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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03094
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-13-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03094

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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER Pastor guilty of sex with girl, 9 Volume: 107 No.238TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORMS HIGH 90F LOW 78F By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT: After two hours of deliberation, a Supreme Court jury found clergyman Albert Alexander Whyley guilty of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor. After the verdict was a nnounced, it was revealed that Whyley had been convicted of the same offencea lmost 18 years ago. Whyley, 59, will be sentenced on November 11. He was remanded to prison until t hat time, pending a psychiatric evaluation report. The jury of six women and three men returned shortly around 3.15pm yesterday with a guilty verdict of 6-3. Whyley, a local clergyman a nd fruit vendor, was charged with having unlawful sex with a nine-year-old girl on Feb ruary 6, 2011. The case was fast-tracked for trial in the Supreme Court by Voluntary Bill of Indictment. 59-y ear-old had been convicted of same offence 18 years ago TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Apply for a Fidelity Back To School Loan* with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-in Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go!Nassau: t 356.7764 Freeport: t 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: t 367.3135 BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN*Offer applies to government workers only M ISSBAHAMASUNIVERSE C C O O N N T T R R O O V V E E R R S S I I A A L L J J U U M M P P S S U U I I T T COLLEGESCRIMMAGES R R A A T T T T L L E E R R S S C C R R U U S S H H E E D D B B Y Y F F A A L L C C O O N N S S SEEWOMANON12B SEESPORTSSECTIONE ALBERT ALEXANDER WHYLEY was found guilty yesterday. Photo/ Vandyke Hepburn SEE page eight COMPUTERS, MONEYDONATEDTOSCHOOLFORBLINDSTUDENTS STUDENTS at the newly renovated Salvation Army School for the Blind at a ceremony held yesterday, when Scotiabank donated five fully equipped computers to the school, along with $5,000. SEEPAGETHREE Tim Clarke/Tribune staff B y SANCHESKA BROWN T HE mother and daughter who were found dead in Nassau harbour last week both drowned, autopsy results have revealed. T he bodies of Amanda Seymour Burrows, 32, and her f ive-year-old daughter Kaysha were pulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza by defence force officers a week ago today. S uperintendent Paul Rolle, h ead of the Central Detective Unit, said now that police SEE page eight AUTOPSY RESULTS REVEAL MOTHER AND D AUGHTER OTH DROWNED By SANCHESKA BROWN POLICE are looking for a man in connection with a weekend triple shooting that left a man, a woman and their one-year-old daughter in hospital nursing gunshot wounds. They are seeking 29-year-old Earnest Forest of Sea Breeze BISHOP Simeon Hall has urged female lawmakers to push for a change in the country's legislation that would allow for two separate counts of murder to be applied when a pregnant woman is killed. Mr Hall, senior pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church, wrote a pas sionate plea to all female members Parliament and politicians to advocate for a change of the "archaic" law that does not recognise the life of a foetus before birth. His call came in the wake of the recent murders of two pregnant women. "At least two of several women mur dered this year were pregnant and the By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net JUST one week after the start of the new school year a school had to let stu dents out two hours earlier for repairs to be done. The Uriah McPhee Primary School on Kemp Road was closed yesterday at 1pm following the discovery that air-condi tioning units were not functioning at full capacity. Education Minister Desmond Bannister said the issue is being dealt with following the beginning of the semester as MAN SOUGHT IN CONNECTION WITH TRIPLE SHOOTING SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight REPAIRS FORCE THE EARLY CLOSURE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL EARNEST FOREST BISHOPS PLEA TO FEMALE LAWMAKERS CALL FOR TWO COUNTS OF MURDER WHEN PREGN ANT W OMAN KILLED

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A S M A L L l a k e n e a r w he re the Ho bb y H or se H al l R a c e t r a c k o n c e s t o o d bec ame the foc us of an envir o n m e n t a l p r o t e c t i o n p r o gramme thanks to the Baha Mar development. The company said the ini t i a t i v e s h o w s h o w f a r i t i s w i l l i n g t o g o t o l e s s e n t h e im pa c t of c on stru ct io n wo rks a n d p ro t e c t i r re p l a c e a b l e na tural treasures. The contract for cleaning up the verges of t h e l a k e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g wo od la nd s wa s awar d ed t o E n v i r o n m e n t a l R e s p o n s e Concepts, Ltd (ERC). The co mp an y a lso bro ug ht i n h i g h l y re s p e c t e d B a h a m i a n en vi ron me nt al a dv oc a te P eri cl es M ai l li s t o i ns t r u ct t he land clearance team on how to i d e n ti f y a n d p r o te c t i m p o rtant specimens found in the de l i c a t e b i os ph e re o f th e l a k e and its environs. M r M a ill is f o rm er pr es i de nt o f t he B a ha ma s Na ti ona l T ru st f ir st e x p l a i ne d to th e w o rke rs w h a t ma k e s th e a re a special and their vital role in protecting it. "This is much mor e than a job that you all are engaged on Y ou a re d oi ng s om et hin g which is going to be one of t h e m o s t l o o k e d a t a n d fam ous p r o jec ts i n th e wh ole history of the Bahamas. "Everybody is going to go up a n d do w n thi s roa d a ll th e ti m e B a h a m ia n s a nd v is it or s, and this i s goin g to be one of t h e p r e t t i e s t d r i v e s i n o u r who le coun tr y and i s goi ng t o b e f a m o u s b e ca u s e i t s g o i n g t o s h o c k t h e p u b l i c w h e n t h e y c o m e t h r o u g h here," Mr Maillis said. "O n o n e h a nd t h e j o b is cr eat ing i nfr as t ru ctur e, an d o n t h i s s i d e i s g o i n g t o b e q u i t e a l o t o f n a t u r e a n d beauty and wildlife and you have the privilege to be the v er y f i r s t o n e s t o p u t y ou r hands on this. So wh en yo u do t his j ob, b e s i d e s d o i n g t h e j o b f o r y o u r s e l v e s f o r y o u r e m p l o y e r f o r y o u r c o m p a n y y o u re a l so d oin g it for ou r c ou ntry ." M r M a i l l i s g a v e t i p s o n w h i c h t r e e s s h o u l d b e r e m o v e d a n d w h i c h s h o u l d b e l eft to fl ouri sh. H e ex pla ine d t hat fore ign spe c ie s su ch a s th e B ra z ili an p e p p e r t r e e ( s c h i n u s t e r e b i n t h i f o l i u s ) s h o u l d b e rem oved becaus e it is in v asi ve a nd ev en sli gh tly po iso n o u s O n th e ot h er ha n d h e sa i d, i t wa s im port an t to pre se rve n ati ve fl ora suc h as the b la ck ma ngrov e (av ice nnia g ermi n anu s), w h ic h c o ntri bute s to th e qu al ity o f w e tla nd s. B a h a M a r p r o v i d e d t h e w o rk er s w it h la m in a te d pa m p h l e t s c o n t a i n i n g p i c t u r e s a n d i nform at ion ab out p rote c ted spe c ie s, to he lp th em re c og n ise w ha t ne ed ed to b e pro t e c t e d T h e E R C r e m o v a l t e a m w a s a l s o g i v e n e x t e n s i v e p o i n t e r s o n h o w t o p r u n e b r a nc h es fro m a tre e w ith ou t d a m a g i n g t h e h e a l t h y p o r t i o n J a m e s Mc P h e e s e n i o r t e c h n i ci a n / p r o j e ct m an a g er f o r ERC, expl ained why i t was n e c e s s a r y t o c a r r y o u t t h e l a k e j ob by h an d. "We a re do ing al l o f th is wor k h ere man ually. T her e w il l b e n o me c ha ni ca l e qu ip m e nt su c h a s b ul l d oz e r s, tr ac to rs a nd th at ty pe o f stu ff. T h i s i s a n ec o s e n s i t i v e a re a a n d t hi s i s a l so a n h i st or i ca l la ke to t he B ah am as. R i g h t a c r o ss t h e s t r e e t w a s th e H ob by Ho rs e R ac e tra ck a nd there a re a lot of senti m en t a l m o m e n t s t ha t t o o k p lac e i n thi s v ic in ity W e w e r e a s k e d b y o u r c l ie nt to d o i t a s ec o -se nsi ti ve a s p o s s i b l e M r Mc P h e e s a i d R ob ert Sa nds, Ba ha Ma r's se ni or v ic e pre sid en t o f g ov e rnm en t a nd e x tern al a ffa irs, s a i d : T h e k i n d o f c a r e w e a re ta ki ng to e nsure th e prote c t io n o f t he e c o sy st e m th a t t he l ake re pre sent s is an i ndic a tio n o f the l eng ths to w hic h w e me an t o g o to p rote c t th is be aut i fu l acr ea ge on wh ich B a h a Ma r re so rt i s b e i n g f a s h i o n e d W e at B a h a Ma r se e o u rse l v es as s te w a rds of a g re a t t re a s u re H a rn e s si n g t he ri g h t e x p e r ti s e w e h a v e p u t to g e t h e r a n e x t e n s i v e a n d w e l l ref lected pres er vation conse r va t io n a nd p ro te c ti o n p l a n to ensur e t hat s uch p ris tin e t re a su re s a s t h e H o bb y H or se l a k e t h a t h a v e b e e n p u t i n o u r c a re w il l r em a in so f or f ut ure g e ne ra t io ns t o e nj oy W h en B ah a Ma r w a s fi rst c o nc e i v ed lo c a l en v ir on me n t a l i s t s e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n a b ou t t ha t f ac t th a t th e re so rt w o u l d c o v e r t h o u s a n d s o f acr es enco mpa ss in g s eve ral d isti nc t bio sph ere s: sen siti ve sea c oa s t, w etla nds a nd fore s t A l l p r o v i d e a h o m e t o u n i q u e v a r i e t i e s o f a n i m a l a n d p la n t li fe th e l a tte r fe a tu ri ng su c h p rot e c te d tr ee s pe c i e s a s b r as il e t t o Ca r i bb e an pi n e h o r s e f l e s h l i g n u m v i t a e ma ho gan y, s il k cot t on and b la c k e b on y B a ha Ma r L t d inv ite d the c o ns ul ta ti o n o f th e B a h a ma s N a t i o n a l T r u s t a n d o t h e r l o c a l n a t u r e a d v o c a t e s h i r e d a t e a m o f co n s e r v a t i o n e x p e r t s t o i nf or m t he d ev e l op me n t o f a c om pre hen siv e e nvi ronm en tal pr otec tio n and enhanc em e nt pl a n an d g ui de i ts re a li s a t i o n a n d t a c k l e i s s u e s b e f o r e t he y be c om e un ma n ag e a bl e P O L I C E i n N e w P r o v i d ence last w eek cit ed 309 dri v e rs w h o fa il ed to a d h e re t o t ra ff ic ru le s Th e cita tio ns we re fo r v ari o u s t r a f f i c i n f r a c t i o n s a n d p o l i c e p l a c e d 3 0 0 m a t t e r s b e fo r e th e Tr af fic Co u r t. S o m e o f t h e o f f e n c e s f o r w h i c h p e r s o n s w e r e c i t e d in clud ed : failing to l ic enc e or r e g i s t e r a v e h i c l e ; d r i v i n g w i t h a n i n v a l i d i n s p e c t i o n c e r ti fi c at e ; c a u s in g o b s t ru ction to t he flow of t raffi c; dri v i n g w i t h o n e o r n o f i t t e d h e a d l a m p ; f a i l u r e t o h a v e windo w s of t ran sparent view ; fai li ng t o keep lef t; par king in a n o p a r k i n g a r e a ; d r i v i n g w ith a lic e n ce d isc n o t p ro p e r ly a ff ix e d; d r iv in g w ith n o id e ntific atio n p la tes; p ar kin g o n a b u s s to p ; d r i v in g o n a c lo s ed str e et a n d d ri vi n g in the w rong dir ecti on on a onew ay s tr ee t LOCAL NEWS P AGE 2, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE C R I MI N A L S a r e a l w a y s looking for a quick opportu ni ty to st eal a v eh i cle. By tak ing the fol lowi ng preca u tio ns you can prevent your vehicle from being stolen. N e v e r le a v e y o ur ke y s i n yo u r c ar a l wa ys l o c k y o u r ca r never leav e you r car run n in g. N e v e r l e a v e p e r s o n a l belongings visible (for exam p l e l a p t o p s i P o d s p h o n es an d other such items). Park in well-lit areas; park i n a t t e n d e d l o t s a n d l e a v e o n l y t h e i g n i t i o n / d o o r k e y with the attendant. Co mp l etel y cl o se yo u r wi n d o w s w h e n p a r k i n g ; t u r n w he e ls t o the si de i n dr iv e ways an d p ark i n g l o ts ; d i sa b le your vehicle when leaving it. Etch y o ur Veh icle Iden tifi cation Number (VIN) on all windows and engrave expen s i v e a c c e s s o r i e s t o p r e v e n t t h i e v e s f r o m d i s p o s i n g o f them. Install alarms, install a kill switch, and always be on the alert. P OLICE CONTINUE T O TICKET FOR TRAFFIC VIOL A TION S T O DA Y' S TIP : VEHI CLE THEF T P REV ENTI ON POLI CE TIPS F R OM LE FT : C o ns ervationist P ericles Maill is, c ons ervation i st and ER C p r oj ec t ma na g er R o be r t M c P h ee t al k w i t h w or k er s ab ou t t he d ay s clearing procedures. CHOPPING IT DOWN: Workers work hard at clearing the site.

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By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net SCOTIABANK is making a difference in the lives of blind children through its Bright Future programme. At a ceremony held yesterday at the newly renovated Salvation Army School for the Blind, Scotiabank donated five ful ly equipped computers to the school, along with $5,000. Scotiabank spokesperson Leah Davis said the Bright Future programme is a community outreach initiative that seeks opportunities to assist children with their future. Newly appointed managing director of Scotiabank Kevin Teslyk said since the launch of the Bright Future programme 2008, the initiative has sought to help chil dren realise their unlimited potential. Everyone of us can have and is entitled to a bright future, said Mr Teslyk. He added that the programme is a way for the company to fulfil its social responsibility to the community and show its commitment to making a difference. Social responsibility is not an option, it is who we are, he said. According to Scotiabanks website, the programmes objective is: To provide hope t o the countrys youth through supporting education, the arts and culture, the envi ronment and the underprivileged and abused. The Salvation Army is working to raise $1.5 million to complete work on the school, construct a school playground, and expand its other charitable programmes, chairman of the advisory board Judy Munroe said. Mrs Munroe said she was delighted by the generosity of Scotiabank, but reminded the public that they are far from reaching their goal. P ermanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education Elma Garraway noted that the ministrys theme this year is fostering competence, character, citizenship and excellence in education. She said Scotiabanks gift will help the schools students achieve these ends. CORPORATE stakeholders are continuing their fundraising efforts to support child victims of cancer in the Bahamas. Since its inception in 2008, the RBC Childrens Cancer Fund has seen more applicants from the Bahamas than any other country in the region, according to Nathaniel Beneby Jr, president and country head of RBC Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands. Last year, the companys annual fun run/walk raised $25,000 all of which, Mr Beneby Jr said, has already been exhausted. Paediatric cancer is a terrible disease and as we all know, this and other cancers do not discriminate, we are all impacted. Mr Beneby added: The goal is to collectively raise funds by holding fun run/walks and other fund raising events in every country in the region where RBC has a presence. As many as 11 Bahamian children are diagnosed with the disease each year, said Corrine Sinquee-Brown, a paediatric oncologist, who spoke at a press conference about the event. Most children are treated in the public sector, Dr SinqueeBrown said, because their fam ilies have no health insurance. Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said: Our children are the future of the country. They are the ones were preparing the country for and they should be given all opportu nities to have a long life, qual ity life, so that they can make their contribution. In the past year, five chil dren have been treated with radiation therapy through the public sector. Through an arrangement with the government, Dr Sin quee-Brown said families pay a lower rate of $15,000 for the therapy. For most families, the psy cho-social impact of the disease is even greater than the financial strain, Dr SinqueeBrown said. The financial devastation is great, she said. Were not talking about hard costs because for the most part the government has supplied edu cation free. Were talking about time off from work, the possibility of losing jobs because of the extended times to have to come to the hospi tal. Were talking about the psycho-social impact on the family. I have seen cancer tear apart families; fewer bring them together. I think the psycho-social impact of cancer is tremendous. The walk is slated to start at 6am at Royal Bank House, 101 East Hill Street, on Sep tember 24. Registration cost is $15 for adults, and $10 for children under 13. Persons can visit any RBC FINCO or Royal Bank branch to register for the event and donate to the fund. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3 By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLITICIAN Paul Moss claimed he rejected an offer to become deputy leader of the Democratic National Alliance because he was dissatisfied with the integrity of the party's internal process. In an April 12 letter addressed to Mr McCartney, of which The Tribune received a copy, Mr Moss detailed the many reasons why he did not join up with the new third party. Yesterday DNA leader Branville McCartney denied Mr Moss was ever offered the post and dismissed the contents of the letter as "foolishness." However, Mr Moss claimed he was given an "ultimatum" to accept the post as deputy leader of the DNA "on the spot." He also said a meeting called at Mr McCartney's house and another one at his law office at Halsbury Chambers before the party's national launch in May seemed "inappropriate" and should have been arranged at a "neutral" location. "I must reject your offer and the idea of my becoming 'deputy leader' (of the DNA "I told you that any association between us was not going to be merely me joining Bran's wagon. I think you are a decent person but I think your idea of political leadership has been poisoned by (Hubert wrote Mr Moss. He also criticised the movement behind the DNA as a surge of popularity based on personality, not substance. Mr Moss also said he was struck by the DNA's inexperience, comparing its members to teenagers organising a high school "student government popularity contest." Said Mr Moss: "How can I join something that has no principles or process as deputy leader, when I have no idea what I am leading?" Yesterday Mr McCartney dismissed Mr Moss, current leader of a new group the Peoples Democratic Party. He was adamant that Mr Moss' claims were not true. He said he received a copy of the letter several months ago and has not spoken to Mr Moss since contacting him about the correspondence. He said the DNA will elect a deputy leader like it elected a leader when the group convenes in November, once all of its election candidates are ratified. He added that the new party will name another 10 to 15 candidates next month. "He's talking foolishness. I don't know what he's talking about. The deputy leadership is something that has to be voted on and I could not by myself offer it. (The post leadership will be voted on in a couple of months. "I really don't know what he is getting at. No such (thing anybody. Paul was not even a part of the DNA. "The last time I spoke to him was to ask what was the meaning of this letter," said the Bamboo Town MP. By LAMECH JOHNSON A BRIEF mix-up in court yesterday saw the wrong man appear in connection with an attempted murder charge. John Augustine, 26, of Andros Avenue, was supposed to be charged before Magistrate Guillimina Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street in connection with the shooting of Mario Bowe. However, before he could be brought down by the police, another John Augustine a 30year-old resident of Carmichael Road appeared before the court to plead his innocence. After the Carmichael Road Mr Augustine answered the judges questions and insisted he was not involved in the matter, the prosecution revealed that it has statements on file from both men, and admitted that there was a mix-up. The prosecution confirmed the Carmichael Road resident was not to be arraigned in connection with the attempted murder, but he was remanded to prison until October 19, when he is due to appear on another matter. The second John Augustine to appear was charged with shooting Bowe, which occurred on Wednesday, August 17. Due to the nature of the offence, Magistrate Archer informed the accused that he was not required to enter a plea. After the accused acknowledged that he understood the charge, the judge explained that the matter could proceed with a preliminary inquiry to determine if there is sufficient evidence for the case to be heard in the Supreme Court. The alternative, a Voluntary Bill of Indictment, would imme diately forward the case to the Supreme Court. The prosecution objected to bail, arguing that Augustine has no status in the Bahamas and claiming he may interfere with the virtual complainant who is already in fear for his life. The accused, who did not have legal representation during yesterdays arraignment, told the judge that he did have status and that his passport was in the care of his parents. He also noted that he was already on bail in connection with other matters, namely firearm and drug possession charges. How can I be on bail if I dont have a passport? he asked. I was born in Nassau, Bahamas. Magistrate Archer denied the accused bail after taking into consideration both arguments. He was remanded to Her Majestys Prison and the matter was adjourned to January 23, 2012. PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: Tanya McCartney, Managing Director, RBC FINCO; Hubert Minnis, Min ister of Health; Nathaniel Beneby Jr., President and Country Head, RBC Bahamas & Turks and Caicos; and Dr. Corrine SinQuee, Consultant, Princess Margaret Hospital RBC CHILDRENS CANCER FUND ON MARKS FOR FUN RUN/WALK PAUL MOSS CLAIMS HE REJECTED DNA DEPUTY LEADERSHIP OFFER BRANVILLE MCCARTNEY DENIES POST WAS OFFERED OFFERREJECTEDCLAIM: Paul Moss WRONG MAN APPEARS IN ATTEMPTED MURDER CASE JOHN AUGUSTINE 26, accused of attempted murder, tries to hide his face from the camera. C OMPUTERSAND$5,000 DONATED A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR BLIND CHILDREN THROUGH SCOTIABANK PROGRAMME STUDENTS from the Salvation Army School for the Blind at yesterdays ceremony.

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E DITOR, The Tribune. THEDental Clinic at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre offers some of the best services in the Com-m onwealth of the Bahamas. I have been attending the D ental Clinic at Sandilands f or the past four years, and find the service there second to none. Too often we are plagued with the lackluster, dont care attitude of civil servants. However, I wish to e xpress my sincere gratitude a nd to commend Dr McWeeney, Dr Dewards a nd Nurse Neely of the Sandilands Dental Clinic. A lso, Dr Pearce, who is no longer there. On one of my visits to the C linic I arrived at 7.25am for a scheduled appointm ent. I met a R M Bailey s tudent and his mother waiti ng for service. At exactly 7.30am the student wasc alled in by Dr McWeeney f or his service, and at 7.45am the mother was called in for her service. Dr McWeeney arrives at the clinic first, earlier than the patients, and starts seeing patients even before the nurse/receptionist a rrives. Dr McWeeney is a lways patient, professional a nd compassionate even t hough he serves as recept ionist/clerk and dentist. O n this particular visit I was told that Dr Pearce, my dentist, would arrive at 8 .30am. At exactly 8.15am. Dr Pearce arrived and I was seated in her chair by 8.25am. Dr Pearce was extremely professional, but warm and comforting as shed id her job and informed me o f further services I would n eed. I wish to inform here that by 8am the students service was completed, and by 8.15am the mothers service was completed. My service was completed at 9am. T hese dentists are indeed f ine examples of how civil servants ought to perform t heir duties. A SATISFIED PATIENT N assau, August 31, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 F reeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 Freeport fax: (242 W EBSITE w ww.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm MIAMI The United States is losing its advantage in the global talent pool as the number of adults gaining college degrees in countries such as China and South Korea increases rapidly, according to a new study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation a nd Development. One in four adults with a higher education d egree is in the U.S., but industrialized and emerging economies are catching up. China has 12 per cent of all college graduates, but among young adults, its share is much higher. Of those ages 25 to 34, 18.3 per cent of college graduates are in China compared to 20.5 per cent in the U.S., the study found. Participation hasn't increased at the speed it has at other countries," said Andreas S chleicher, head of indicators and analysis at the OECD education directorate. "When you look at the young population, the picture looks quite different already." The report being published Tuesday examined data from the 34 emerging and developed nations that make up the OECD. It comes nearly a year after results from the Programme for International Student Assess ment were released, showing U.S. students trailing behind countries such as South Korea, Finland, and Hong Kong and Shanghai in China. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. ranked 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in mathematics. The results of that test brought about renewed calls for education reform in the United States. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said it was a "wake-up call" for the country, which has reviewed the practices of top-per forming nations at a conference last spring. The new findings are likely to be seen as another piece of evidence indicating U.S. students are falling behind other countries. "It shows the U.S. is asleep at the switch and not really paying attention to what is happening around the rest of the world," said Gary Phillips, vice president and chief scientist at the American Institutes for Research. President Barack Obama has called on the United States to take steps to lead the world in the proportion of college graduates b y 2020. The new report notes the U.S. still ranks a mong the top five in terms of the per cent of the adult population with a higher educa tion degree. However, it ranks 15th among 34 OECD countries in college attainment among 25 to 34-year-olds. The rate of graduation from a two-year college, or higher, has increased from 42 to 49 per cent between 2000 and 2009. "But here too the pace of the expansion has been more rapid in many other count ries," the report states, noting the graduation rate has increased from 37 per cent to 47 per c ent on average across the 34 emerging and developed OECD countries. In the United States, college graduates can expect to earn 79 per cent more than someone with a high school degree higher than in most countries examined. Likewise, those who have the least education face h igher prospects of unemployment, particularly in tough economic times. The recession has amplified the impact of education on outcomes," Schleicher said in a conference call with journalists Monday. While the benefits of education are evi dent, the path to getting there is expensive. The U.S. had the highest tuition fees among OECD countries, with students expected to spend $70,000 in direct costs and $39,000 in lost earning while studying an overall investment of more than $100,000, compared to an average of $50,000 across OECD coun tries. Meanwhile, the percentage of public spending on higher education in the U.S. that goes toward subsidies such as scholarships, grants and loans is about the same as the other countries examined, even while the tuition costs are considerably higher. The report also notes that many U.S. students are academically unprepared for the challenges of higher education, with 42 per cent of 15-year-olds scoring less than a proficiency level three in the PISA reading exam, compared to 17.3 per cent of students in Shanghai. "We are not giving a good college preparatory programme to most of our stu dents," said Tony Wagner, co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He also not ed the high number of students in the U.S. who start but never finish a college degree. He said three key elements to boosting the number of college graduates is to better prep are students for college or a career, make a higher education degree affordable and have c olleges pay closer attention to their attri tion rates. (By Christine Armario of the Associated Press). Best kept secret at Sandilands LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net US losing edge in higher education worldwide EDITOR, The Tribune A lot of shingles are down, meaning carpenters and those with skills sets are earning money. Landscap i ng has been impacted, so t he landscapers are earning money. Truckers collecting debris are earning money" remarks businessmen Franklyn Wilson in The Tri bune "In the short run, my view is that (HurricaneI rene is going to inject an economic stimulus." Rubbish. Irene destroyed wealth a nd property. Resources that would be used to cre ate new wealth and new p roperty, must now be d iverted to repair and recre ate old property destroyed by Irene. Where we couldh ave had two buildings, we n ow have only one broken one that is being repaired. (1 Destruction whether from war, hoodlums, or hurricanes does not "stimulate." Destruction diverts precious capital and labour from activities that would have created new wealth tor eplacing and repairing wealth that was destroyed by Irene. The net effect of Irene on the Bahamiane conomy in the short and l ong run is, was, and only can be: a net economic LOSS for the Bahamas. If destruction were an "economic stimulus" then a country could become rich by having a monthly hurri c ane every month and labour riots thrown in for good measure. The obtuse ness of such a modern Keyn esian style proposal should be obvious. Sadly being an expert in one's particularf ield of business, an econom ist does not one make. The only real economic stimulus is freedom from thed estructive effects of nature, private criminals, and public bureaucrats (who imitate the criminal's methods). Thef irst is not entirely in our c ontrol, the last two are. [1] Mr. Wilson is com mitting the very basic economic fallacy of the "bro ken window" as elaborated in Henry Hazlitt's "Economics In One Lesson" andi n this video: http://www.youtube.com/wat ch?v=UPmo2e-bAMQ MARK DA CUNHA Freeport, B ahamas, S eptember, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME will it speed up traffic or just remove the flooding of the roads? After any pain one hopes that one is given a period where one can sit back and relax and enjoy the positive side for having gone through pain. Those residents of the heart of New Providence out to the east God they have endured and continue to. The NPRP was designed between 1993-94 some 17 years ago during which time I roughly estimate we probably have increased the number of vehicles on the roads by 40-50 per cent as today in total there is approximately 220,000 vehicles. I like many are asking now the obvious after all this pain will we really see an improvement in traffic flow or just have the benefit of a lesser amount of flooding during the rainy season? If the latter then I have to suggest this expenditure except for the laying of the new 30 inch water main has been a total folly of misdirected governance. Surely it is obvious what we really need? We need a dual-carriageway route north-south. We need a dual carriageway route east-west right under the hill of Government House connecting to Chippingham. This cross of arterial highways will cause an immediate improvement to what is only going to get worse. The Airport Gateway road is a total waste of money and will only cause more and more serious deadly road accidents. Why do the Argentinean contractors continue to rip established roads up then leave? There is no Project Management, nil-zero-none, but why? ABRAHAM MOSS Nassau, September 8, 2011. W ill we see traffic f lo w improvement? Share your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. Hurricane Irene is no economic stimulant

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A S with the assassination o f President John Kennedy or the shooting of John Lennon, most of us can remember exactly what we were doing when we first heard about the fast-developing drama of 9/11. JOHN M ARQUIS recalls the day that The Tribune produced a 3,000-copy special afternoon edition to record one of them ost momentous news stories of the modern era. W HEN JFK died in Dallas in 1963, his head smashed apart by ab ullet from a snipers rifle, I was living in a garret flat at the top of a four-storey Victorian house in Northampton, the boot and shoe town in the English Midlands w here I set out in life as a c ub-reporter half a century a go. My neighbour, a rotund a mateur thespian who could inject a touch of drama into the humblest everyday occur-r ence, rapped on my door a nd yelled: Have you heard? Have you heard? The Presidents been shot. There was no play-acting that day. Inevitably, the first reaction was disbelief, followedb y a grudging acceptance of the truth, and then a growing sense that things would n ever be quite the same again. Kennedy for my gen eration represented youth, v itality, a triumph of hope over resigned acceptance of the status quo. He embodied what America seemed tos tand for a buoyant surge towards a golden future which stood in marked con t rast to old Europes continuing gloomy obsession with its past. L ennons murder in 1980 h ad a different kind of impact. It had no political sig nificance at all, but it blew a way part of our youth. Culturally, it was a sickening blow for those of us who grew to adulthood during the 1960s, when The Beatles caught the spirit of the age. Music Lennon, for all his ludicrous posturing, was a remarkable talent whose music defined an entire generation. Every Baby Boomer died a little that day because he was so much part of what we were. I was staying with a friend in London at the time and we gazed for several seconds at each other in disbe lief. When the news of 9/11 broke, I was driving along Shirley Street to begin my shift at The Tribune. I was listening to 100 JAMZ on the car radio when Ed Fields began discussing what seemed highly improbable at the time: the fact that not one, but two, airliners had crashed into the World Trade Centre in New York, and that office workers were leaping to their deaths from the upper floors. At the Tribune office, the newsroom television was already on, and staff were watching, transfixed, as CNN focused on those two stricken buildings, belching smoke and flames like a pair of giant spluttering candles as the citys firefighters contemplated the impossibility of the task facing them. When news came through of a third airliner ploughing into the Pentagon, we knew that America was under sus tained assault. When a fourth plane crashed in Pennsylvania en route to the White House, there was good reason to feel that every major institution of the Union might be a target, and that an orchestrated onslaught was underway designed to cripple every area of govern ment, and thus undermine the stability and security of the entire western world. S tanding there, appalled at t he enormity of the events u nfolding, we all wondered what it meant: whether we w ere witnessing a crazed, one-off act of terrorism ort he opening salvos in a wider w ar. Now we know. The death toll that bright September morning, approaching 3,000, w as but a fraction of the roll call of victims recorded in the decade-long aftermath inI raq and Afghanistan, a figu re that continues to mount by the day. What it symbolised was e qually appalling. Once the p erpetrators had been iden tified, western man had to accept that he was at odds with an alien belief system whose adherents had no fear of death and no regard for A merica and its allies. Every thing we stood for was being called to account. At The Tribune, none of t hese things had yet become evident as we set about pro ducing a special afternoon edition of just 3,000 copies. This was not a commercial undertaking, an attempt toc ash in on tragedy, but recognition of our journalistic responsibilities. We felt it was important to publish a realtime paper for people to read as they headed home after work. Though the reporting of 9/11 was a triumph for the electronic media, which captured every development as it happened, the story was so big that it deserved and required the permanence and nobility of newsprint. While the international agencies reported new angles as they developed direct from New York, we deployed Tribune staff to report the impact of the attacks on the Bahamas. It was this mix of interna tional and local news and commentary, collated and printed in a couple of frantic hours, that made our little Disaster edition so differ ent. No-one else in the Bahamas attempted the same feat. At the airport, homebound tourists were left stranded as flights were grounded. Hotels offered free accommodation to those who had spent all their holiday cash and were now left in limbo. The Tri bune reported their predica ment and recorded their fears. For days afterwards, tourism business in Nassau slumped. The streets were quiet, shops were empty, while the few tourists left in town wandered round in bemused silence. Sub-consciously, everyone was brac ing themselves for further atrocities and an even bigger blow to the local economy. Had the events of 9/11 been sustained, its no exaggeration to say that the Bahamas would have closed for business. With no planes in the air, Nassau and the Family Islands were dead ducks. With the entire foun dation of Bahamian prosperity under threat, it was no surprise that tourism officials f eared the worst. T hankfully, there was no follow-up attack. The World Trade Centre was AlQuaedas biggest and most destructive gesture to date. The towers were the ultimate symbols of western capitali sm, and the jihadist attackers gave Allah his due for helping to bring them down. For Nassau, 9/11 was its s econd major economic blow within a week. Exactly seve n days before the Twin Towers attack, a fire-raiser torched the Straw Market in Bay Street, putting scores of vendors out of work. I was stuck in a traffic jam right outside the market when the first flames took hold. With one of the towns major tourist attractions laidw aste, and the airport at a s tandstill, it was inevitable t hat deep despondency would descend on the nation. F ortunately, it was shortlived. When temporary quarters w ere established for the vend ors, and flights from the USA were restored, a degree of optimism returned. But no-one was able to forget the appalling events of that disastrous week. I t was somehow fitting that the official opening of the new straw market coincided m ore or less with the unveil ing of the 9/11 memorial at Ground Zero in New York.I t took 10 full years to put things right, but it happened in the end. As Tribune reporters p ulled together the facts on that memorable day all those years ago, the sub-editors a ssembled pages at a rapid rate and wrote the headline Act of War over a fuzzyp hotograph the only one a vailable at the time of the second plane angling itself on the surviving tower. It waso ne of those occasions when journalists remind themselves why theyre in the news busi ness, and relish their role in recording history in the making. The whole exercise was r eminiscent of the exciting days of multi-edition evening papers, when accuracy andi mmediacy made uneasy bedfellows in producing printed news at breakneck speed. V endor An emergency crew was called in to man the presses and by mid-afternoon our one-section 9/11 special was on the streets. When I saw a Tribune vendor scuttling down Shirley Street with a pile of the hastily produced papers on his head, I felt a surge of pride and satisfaction. The Tribune had done its bit in reporting the first act of war on American soil since the Union and Confederacy traded gunfire 140 years before. It was even more gratify ing when we heard that every copy had been sold almost as quickly as they had been pro duced. Readers knew they were buying a piece of history something to show their grandchildren 50 years on, when newspapers are likely to be quaint artefacts of a bygone age and responded with enthusiasm. It would be interesting to know how many of those 3,000 Tribunes survive today. The next morning, we consolidated that solid performance with excellent pictures by New York-based Bahami an photographer Helene Seligman, whose vivid image of the second tower explod ing appeared under the headline Moment of Impact. By using her photographs in preference to agency images, we achieved a Bahamas angle on a New York story, and exclusive eye-witness quotes into the bargain. By common consent, our coverage was as good as any, and better than most. On the really big stories, it was nicet o know that we could compete with the best, and that our young, home-grownr eporters could gather and present facts as quickly and l ucidly as anyone in the business. Those of you who still have a copy of that 9/11 special should hold on to it. B y the year 2060, I reckon it will be worth several hundred times more than you paid for it. More importantly, it will be a tangible record of a tragi c day, the repercussions of w hich will be felt many years from now. Osama bin Laden, the b rains behind the 9/11 raid, is dead and gone, but its hard to believe well never hear f rom his kind again. T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 5 M ARQUIS AT L ARGE HOW THE TRIBUNE RECORDED THE HORROR OF 9/11 SPECIAL EDITION PRODUCED ON INFAMOUS DAY S MOKEbillows f rom the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York on September 11, 2001. (AP

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 6, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE T H E B a h a m a s C o n s t i t u t i o n P a r t y w i l l b e g i n i t s e l e c t i o n c a m p a i g n w i t h t w o d a y c o n v e n t i o n s i n G r a n d B a h a m a a n d A b a c o n e x t m o n t h T h e l e a d e r s h i p o f t h e f r i n g e p a r t y s a i d i t w i l l b e r e l e n t l e s s i n i t s e f f o r t s t o c o n v i n c e B a h a m i a n s t o s u p p o r t i t s m e s s a g e o f h o p e T h e B C P w a n t s to s h a r e i t s a g e n d a a n d p l a t f o r m a n d e x p l a i n w h a t i t p r o p o s e s t o d o w h e n i t t a k e s o f f i c e a f t e r t h e 2 0 1 2 g e n e r a l e l e c t i o n s i f g i v e n t h e o p p o r t u n i t y b y t h e e l e c to r a t e s a i d t h e p a r t y i n a s t a t e m e n t T h e B C P n o t e d t h a t w h i l e i t s n e w l y r e l e a s e d p l a t f o r m M a n d a t e 2 0 1 2 h a s o n ly 20 p a g es e x p l a in i n g p o l i c y p l a n s t h e l e a d e r s h i p h a s w r i t t e n a n d c o m p i l e d h u n d r e d o f p a g e s a b o u t h o w i t w i l l p r o v id e g o o d g o v e r n a n c e f i s c a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y a n d c o n s e r v a ti v e le a d e r s h i p t o t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e I t i s w i t h t h i s b a c k d r o p t h a t t h e B C P p r e s s e s f o r w a r d t o g i v e a l l B a h a m i a n s o n t h e i r r e s p e c t i v e i s l a n d s t h e p e r s o n a l o p p o r t u n i t y t o h e a r a n d d e c i d e f o r t h e m s e l v e s w h a t t h e B C P h a s t o o f f e r P r e p a r e d t o g o v e r n o n d a y o n e t h e B C P l e a d e r s h ip is c o n f id e n t t h a t o n c e t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e h a v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o b e e x p o s e d t o i t s p l a n s i t w i l l c h o o s e t h e B C P s N e w V i s i o n a n d F r e s h A g e n d a t h e s t a t e m e n t s a i d T h e G r a n d B a h a m a c o n v e n t i o n t o b e h e l d u n d e r t h e t h e m e G r a n d B a h a m a G e t R e a d y T o L i v e A g a i n w i l l t a k e p l a c e o n M o n d a y a n d T u e s d a y O c t o b e r 1 0 a n d 1 1 T h e Ab a c o C o n ve n t io n t o b e h e l d u n d e r t h e t h e m e A b a c o K e e p e r s o f T h e N o r t h G a t e w i l l t a k e p l a c e o n M o n d a y a n d T u e s d a y O c t o b e r 3 1 a n d N o v e m b e r 1 A l l m e e t i n g s w i l l b e g i n a t 7 3 0 p m T h e p a r t y h a s y e t t o c o n f i r m t h e l o c a t i o n s D u r i n g e a c h m e e t i n g C h i e f S e r v a n t L e a d e r S A l i M c I n t o s h t h e f i r s t w o m a n t o l e a d a p o l i t i c a l p a r t y i n t h e B a h a m a s a n d D e p u t y S e r v a n t L e a d e r C o l i n M i l l e r w i l l s p e a k O t h e r m e m b e r s o f t h e l e a d e r s h i p w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e t o m e e t w i t h t h o s e a t t e n d i n g T H E L y f o r d C a y I n t e r n a t i o n a l Sc hoo l c lass of 2011 d onated a tree to th e s c h o o l t o s a y t ha n k y o u f o r th e man y way s LC I S h elpe d th em g ro w and to leave a c l as s l egac y for futu re s t u d e n t s Th e clas s o f 2 011, w ho find th ems e l v e s i n u n i v e r s i t i e s s u c h a s Y a l e G eo rgeto wn, Ohio S tate, an d Sav annah College o f Art and Design, w ere repr esen ted at t he tr ee plantin g cer em o n y b y g r a d u a t e C e li n e F r ey a n d pare nt of grad uate F e l ici a Ta yl or, Mrs R os e-Mar i e Taylor LC I S p r i n c ip a l S t a c e y B o b o s a id : "T hi s cl ass o f e ig ht in di vi dua l s, LC IS' s s ix th g r ad u at in g c las s w as a wa r d ed m ore t ha n $ 82 4,0 00 i n aca de mi c scho lar shi p supp ort wh i ch not on ly de m onst r at e s ho w h ar d t h ey w or ke d bu t ho w r i go ro us an d res pec ted ou r ac ademic p r og ra mme is at f irs t c la ss u niv er si ties aro und th e w orld I a m d e l i g h t e d t h a t t h e y h a v e d ec id e d t o g i ve b a c k in t h is s p e c i al w a y T h e c l a s s c h o s e t o p la n t a n a t iv e j a c a r a n d a t r e e a l o n g w i t h a p e n n y m i nted i n t he y ear of the ir g radu ati on. Th e tr ee symb olises the gro wth of t he seni ors wit hin the sc hool and the ir co ntinu ed grow th, c ont ribut i o ns an d ac hievements after t hey l eav e. P I CT U RE D fr o m L -R : G ra d u a te C e l in e F re y p ri n c i pa l St a c e y B ob o p a r e nt a n d a d m i s s io n s d ir e c t or R o s e -M a r ie T a y l o r a n d h e a d o f t h e s e c on d a r y school Frederic Bournas. L YF ORD C A Y INTE R N A TIO N AL SCHOO L C L AS S OF 20 1 1: TR UL Y G IFTE D B A H A M A S C O N S T I T U T I O N P A RT Y S E T S D A T E S F O R A B A C O AND G RAND B AH AMA C ONVE N TIO N S Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Colin G Miller S A l i M c I n t o s h

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1, P AGE 7 TH E Sa n da ls F ou nd a tio n i s f u n di n g m a th e m a t ics se m i na r s for 140 Bahamian teachers at the primary and high s cho ol levels throughout the coming year. T he semin ars wh ic h wer e s t ar t ed on Au gu s t 30 20 11 ar e b ei ng h os t ed a t S an da ls Royal Bahamian in an effort t o a s s i s t t h e t e a c h e r s i n i m p r o v i n g Ba h a m i a n st u d e n t s' p r o f i c i e n c y i n t h e s u b j e c t resort representatives said. Ac c ordi ng t o the Minis tr y o f E d u c at i o n r e p o r t o n t h e 20 11 B J C / B G C S E r es u l t s released in August this year, 64 per cent of junior high stu d e n t s ( g r a d e s 7 9 ) p e rf o rm a t a gr ad e D l e v el o r b e l o w Of s e n i o r h i g h s c h o o l s t u d e n t s ( g r a d e s 1 0 1 2 ), 7 5 p e r ce n t a l so perform at a D level or below in mathematics. Cla ud e tte Ro lle d ire ctor o f the Catholic Board of Educa tion, said that the presence of t h e t e a c h e r s a t t h e s e m a t h s e m in a rs sh o ws t h at e du ca t o rs a re co mm i tte d to d o wh a te v e r is n ec e ss a r y to improve the m athema tic s performance o f our Bahamian children." M r s R o l l e a l s o e xp r es s e d appreciation on behalf of the t e a ch e r s fo r t h e S a nd a l s F o u n dation's assistance. T he S an d al s Fo u nd at i o n h a s gr aci o usl y a g re e d to spo n s or t hi s in it ia t iv e be ca u se S a n dal s t oo h as a s t ak e in th e Bah amia n comm unity and is committed to national devel o p m en t T h e r e i s n o b e t t e r wa y to h e lp a cou n try d e v el op than by investing in the edu c a t i o n o f i t s p e o p l e M r s Rolle said. In further pursuit of better m a t h e m a t i c s g r a d e s t h e e x p e r t i s e o f D r M a r c e l l a E ll iot t As s i st an t M ath Pr of es s o r at t he C ol l eg e o f t h e B a h a m a s ( C O B ) h a s a l s o been engaged. A s h e a d o f t h e M a t h e m a t i cs D e p a r t m e n t a t C O B D r El li ott l e d in t he de v el op me n t a n d re v isi o n o f th e cu rricu l um o f m a t h e m a t i cs co u r se s a s we ll a s t h e d e v e l op m e n t o f a B a ch el or o f M a th em at i c s d egr e e a n d as sis ted w ith the review of t he nat ion al mat hemat ic s curriculum. D u r i n g t h e i n i t i a l a s s e s s m e n t a t t h e o p e n i n g o f t h e Sa n da ls F ou n da ti on le a d se m i n a r t e a c h e r s f r o m t h e Catholic Board of Education a l o n g w i t h S a n d a l s R o y a l B ah amian 's adop ted s c ho ol, G o v e r n m e n t H i g h w e r e as sess e d in the ar e as of perc ep tion, conten t c o mpete nc y a n d c o nt e n t co n ce p t u a l u n d e r standing. F o l l o w i n g o n t h e r e s u l t s fr o m t h i s a s se ss m e n t D r E l l i o t w i l l p r o d u c e a p r o f e s s i o n a l d e v e l o p m e n t p l a n t h a t w i l l spe ci fi ca ll y t a rg e t th e n e e ds o f t he teac h er s. Additionally, a s e r i e s o f c u s t o m i s e d w o r k s ho ps w i l l b e f o r mu la t ed to address the need s identified the Sandals Foundation said. A s t h e B a h a m a s l i k e m a n y countries in the region, strug gles with the global economic dow ntur n, a lot of the funding for programm es dedicate d t o t e a c he r d e v e l o pm e n t a re e li m i n a t e d o r c u t fr o m th e sy s tem." P r e s e n t l y t h e C a t h o l i c B oard of Educ ation gove r ns t e n s chools on three islands, N e w P r o v i d e n c e G r a n d B a h a m a a n d A b a c o a n d e m p l oy s 2 62 ad m i n is t r a t o r s and teachers. H e i d i C l a r k e a S a n d a l s F o u n d a t i o n s p o k e s p e rs o n s a i d that the foundation's support f or pro g r amme s suc h as t his i s in kee p ing w ith the c harity's mandate. W e s e e te ache r trai ning as on e o f t he m o st im p o rt a n t e l e ments to make advances with o ur educ ational s yst e m her e in the Caribbean. Mathemat i c ss is one of the c or e ar eas tha t ch ild re n n ee d t o be pr ofi c i e n t i n a n d t h e r e a r e c o n stantly new and exciting ways t o e x p o s e s t u d e n t s t o t h e m ath emat ic s c o nc ept s Wi th ong oin g tra ini ng, tea c h ers are abl e to ke e p up to da te a nd i n turn pro vi de ou r reg io n' s c h il d r en gr ea t er op po r t un i t y to learn. Th e S an d al s Fo un da ti on is our way of better enabling us to ta k e o n m o re o f wh a t n e e d s t o b e d o n e i n t h e i s l a n d s where we operate by making t h e C ar i bb ea n t he b es t th at we can be," she said. S A N D A L S F O U N D A T I O N H O S T S M A T H S E M I N A R S F O R 1 4 0 T E A C H E R S T H E Sa nd a ls Fo u n d at i o n i s f u n d in g mat h emat i cs semi n ars f o r 1 4 0 Ba ha mia n t each er s at t h e p ri mar y an d h i g h sch o o l l eve ls t h ro u g h o u t t h e co ming year.

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Lane/Mollie Street. He is described as being 5 tall, of medium build w ith a dark complexion. According to police reports, the victims were s hot while inside their h ome at Johnson Terrace, o ff Johnson Road, at 4am Saturday. Police have identified the male victim as Israel Lubin. T he Tribune h as opted n ot to print the name of t he woman to protect the identify of the young child. It was revealed that Lubin was charged with the murder of Tekoyo McKinney. Father-of-two McKinn ey, 26, was shot and killed by two armed gunmen on Cordeaux Avenue and Minnie Street. Lubin was accused of intentionally causing McKi nneys death while being c oncerned with another. H e was granted $30,000 bail last month and also required to wear an ankleb racelet to monitor his w hereabouts. W hen asked if police t hought the shooting was an act of retaliation, head of the Central DetectiveU nit Superintendent Paul Rolle would not speculate on a motive. I do not wish to specul ate as the possible cause of the shooting maybe. We are still investigating. We k now that someone fired s hots into the home from t he outside. "We do know that the m an was involved in some c onflict, but at this point we cannot say if it was retaliatory. We have not interviewed Lubin yet so we really dont know, said Mr Rolle. T he woman, who was s hot in the leg and had a bullet graze her head, was r eleased from hospital yest erday. T he infant, who was also shot in the leg, remains in hospital in stable condition. Lubin, who was shot in the head, was in critical condition last night. A nyone with information a bout the incident is asked to contact CDU at 5029991 or emergency services at 919. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE T he victim, who was a fourth grade student at the time of the incident, was d ropped off by her mother at the residence of a family member where the incidento ccurred. Senior Justice Hartman Longley presided over the case, which opened onW ednesday. After several days of testimony, the prosecution team of Erica Kemp and Olivia Blatch, and defence attorney Carlson Shurlandp resented their final address t o the jury yesterday morning. No DNA evidence was p resented in the case, and the prosecution relied on the victims evidence, a note written by the victim telling her mother what had happened, and a doctors report indicating there was some penetration. The defence argued the prosecutions case was lacking the important aspect of DNA evidence linking the accused to the offence. It also noted the defendant was very cooperative with investigators and voluntarily took the stand to give evidence. After the judge delivered his summation in the case, the jury retired around 1.15pm to deliberate. Justice Longley told the jury the case was one of credibility. It is about who you believe. If you believe the evidence of the victim you must convict, and if you b elieve the evidence of the defendant you must acquit, he said. You must base your d ecision only on the evi dence presented in court, not on speculation. You must not allow sympathy or prejudice to influence your decision, he said. H e told the jury that it can bring a verdict of 9-0 guilty or not guilty; 8-1 guilty or not guilty, 7-2 guilty or not guilty, and 6-3 guilty or not guilty, anything else would not be a proper verdict.A fter the guilty verdict of 6-3 was read by the foreman, Mr Shurland requestedt hat a social report be made on his client before Justice Longley passed sentence. The Crown objected to a social report. We see no reason for this as Whyley is 59 years old and has a previous conviction, Mrs Kemp said. Mr Shurland, however, insisted the court delay sentence for a report. I dont see any danger in delaying sentence, he said. However, Mrs Kemp disagreed, adding that Whyley is a repeat offender. We dont see how a social report will help him maybe a psychiatric report, she explained. It was revealed that Whyley was convicted in 1993 of unlawful sexual intercourse and sentenced to 14 years, however a Court of Appeal overturned the sentence r educing it by some nine years. Justice Longley said sen t encing was not mandatory a nd there is room for the court to exercise discretion. He set sentence for Novem ber 11, 2011, at 9.30am. The victims mother did not wish to comment on theo utcome of the case. When asked to comment, prosecutor Kemp said the prosecution has no feeling about the outcome, but said the role of the prosecution is to present the evidence inc ourt. It is up to the jury to bring a verdict of guilty orn ot guilty based on evidence in the trial. Obviously, this trial was based on credibility. We had no DNA evi dence, but the evidence of the virtual complainant was strong enough and we believe based on that the jury rendered a guilty verdict. Mr Shurland said it was a tough case and that he did the best he could. What is disappointing in the case is the lack of direct forensic evidence, trace evidence, and even circum stantial evidence. And the police had the opportunity to have all of that in place, and so it boiled down to credibility, whether you believe a nine year old or a 59 year old, he said. law, in its present form, does not follow the Judeo-Christian position that human life begins at conception. "As I understand it, our law states that a human life begins at the time of birth and that the foetus is a part of the womans body, thus, when a pregnant woman is murdered, the assailant is only culpable for the mothers death. "I appeal to you. .to take up this cause and agitate for change to this archaic and unchristian interpretation of the value of human life," Mr Hall wrote. Under current law, a person cannot be charged with the murder of a foetus, because the unborn child is not yet considered a life, said a source in the Attorney General's Office. "There is not anything in the law which allows it. Unlike America, we do not have a definition of when life begins. In the absence of having a definition as to when life begins in the laws of the Bahamas and also in the absence ofa physician saying: 'This foetus was alive and this foetus was a person,' then the offence of murder would not be (brought cumstances," said the source last month. Despite this, abortions are illegal in the Bahamas. Thirty-year-old Bareshalee Lewis, a preg nant mother of three, who was shot in front of her young son while visiting her security guard husband at a construction site on Beatrice Avenue back in August. The victim's family told The Tribune that she was six months pregnant. She is the second pregnant woman to have been murdered this year. the ministry only recently became aware that the air conditioning units were not working properly as they were not in use d uring the summer break. I am advised that this determination could only have been made when the units were operating at full capacity, as they do when school is open, he said. The indicators were not present when school closed, said Mr Bannister. Mr Bannister said Uriah McPhee Primary will continue to close early until repairs have been completed. While Mr Bannister could not give an exact date as to when r epairs are expected to be finished, he said the replacement units have already been ordered from the United States and they anticipate they will be installed soon. He added that subject to shipping time they hope the school will be functioning normally by the end of next week. know the cause of death, they can determine h ow the mother and daughter died. "We have the autopsy results so now we are preparing the file to go to the coroner, he said. There was water found in their lungs which lets us know they were alive when theyw ent in the water and werent killed and then placed in the harbour. So now we are preparing the coroners inquest." Supt Rolle says the inquest will officially let police know if they are dealing with a murder or a murder suicide. H e said: "It helps us determine the cause of d eath. The coroner will look at all the evidence, all the information and make a deter mination as to the cause of their death. The r eport will determine whether they caused their own death or it was a murder. At the end of the day, the police and the family will h ave an explanation." S upt Rolle said the coroner should have the f ile prepared by the police tomorrow. He said they did all they were required to do and now i t was up to the coroner. He admitted, however, that he does not k now how long the inquest will take. A ccording to sources close to the investigation, new evidence suggests Ms Burrows w as depressed at the time of her death. Based o n this, officers think it is possible she murdered her daughter and killed herself. Among this evidence is said to be a letter Ms Burrows wrote to herself detailing her troubles. T here are also unanswered questions about the discovery of Ms Burrows' Nissan Sentra, w hich was spotted on Wednesday by a passing j ogger who read in the news about the search for this "missing piece" of evidence. According to Supt Rolle, suggestions that t he car was driven by someone after the mothe r and daughter died does not necessarily m ean they were murdered. He pointed out that someone might have s tolen the car from another location where the victims had left it and taken it to the Cricket Club on Wednesday. The car was foundi ntact. Police have also pointed out that they h ave yet to discover any evidence of wrongd oing. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact CDU at 502-9991 or emergency services at 919. FROM page one CALL FOR TWO COUNTS OF MURDER WHEN PREGNANT WOMAN KILLED P ASTOR GUILTY OF SEX WITH GIRL, 9 FROM page one FROM page one AUTOPSY RESULTS REVEAL MOTHER AND DAUGHTER BOTH DROWNED THE BODIES of Amanda Seymour Burrows, 32, and her five-year-old d aughter Kaysha were p ulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza. F ROM page one REPAIRS FORCE THE EARLY CLOSURE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL FROM page one MAN SOUGHT IN CONNECTION WITH TRIPLE SHOOTING

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1, P AGE 1 1 H E A D S T A R T P R E S C H O O L K 2 s t ud en t s a t H ea d St a r t P r eS ch o o l o n M a rk e t St re et a r e a l l s m i l es i n th e cl a s s r o o m a s t h e n ew s ch o o l y e a r go t u n d e r w a y Perez Watson Kenae Brown Ethan Lindsay Alisha Joseph Garth Johnson Malia Hall

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMA CHAMBERofC ommerces president yesterday added his voice to t hose urging the Govern ment to renew Freeports Business Licence and real property tax exemptionsu ntil 2054, arguing that to do otherwise would shack le the citys economy and deter potential investors. K P Turnquest told Tri bune Business it was unfair to leave the issue of whether to extend both exemptions, which are currently set to expire in 2015, hanging until after the forthcoming general election given that the difficult global economic environment already made attracting investment difficult. Warning that no businessmen or financiers would invest in Freeport until they could plan their business models with certainty, Mr Turnquest urged: Its critical that those [exemptions] are renewed and extended, and they should be extended t hrough to 2054 and the end of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, so we dont have to go through thisp rocess again. If we dont make a deci $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.18 $5.38 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor B AHAMASFerries yesterday said the Governments blanket ban on the scrap metal trade had slashed freight revenues on its back haul routes from the Family Islands by 50 per cent, a senior executive urgi ng that a more surgical approach to regulation should have been taken. R eadily acknowledging t hat copper exports had to be banned, Khaalis Rolle, B ahamas Ferries chief mark eting officer, said legitim ate scrap metal firms and a ssociated businesses such as his could ill-afford the loss of critical revenues during harsh economic times. H e questioned why the Bahamas needed to shut down per cent of thes crap metal industry that was not responsible for the epidemic of copper thefts impacting utilities and busin esses, given that copper was estimated to only account for 5 per cent of t otal activity. W arning that the shutd own was likely to increase unemployment, and poten-t ial criminal activity, Mr R olle urged the Governm ent to publicly state where it was in its review of the scrap metal industry andd evelopment of potential regulations. We would like to know ourselves, and other shipp ing companies would like to know, where the Government is in its review of t his industry, Mr Rolle told T ribune Business. Were experiencing a large impact from the shut-d own of that industry. We t ransport a large quantity of scrap metal from the Family I sland destinations we serve. O n our back haul from the Family Islands, that repreB y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LEADINGwholesaler y esterday said most Bahamasbased suppliers had cut City Markets off six to seven weeks ago for failing to pay i ts regular monthly account, conceding that everyone in the industry was worried about recovering the collec t ive multi-million dollar debt it owed to them. B ruce Thompson, managing director of Thompson Trading, the Nassau-based agent for brands such as Pep-s i-Cola, Nestle, Colgate and Quaker, confirmed to Tribune Business that some wholesalers had begun the process of taking City Mar kets to court to recover sums allegedly due to them. R esponding to comments by City Markets principal Mark Finlayson, who in ani nterview with Tribune Busin ess warned Bahamian wholesalers to work with the s upermarket chain or else face the prospect of writingoff 100 per cent of what wasd ue to them, Mr Thompson accused him of seeking to blame the industry for the c ompanys woes. He added that Mr Finlayson got a hell of a deal from the Bahamas Whole s alers Association in late 2010 over the debts incurred by the former BSL Holdings owner s hip, an agreement Mr Thompson said he personally did not support as it involvedn o interest payments. As for Mr Finlaysons assertion that the Association imposed credit limits uponC ity Markets after the two sides signed their 2010 agreem ent, Mr Thompson said this was a normal practice that Thompson Trading applied toa ll its retail clients, including the supermarket chain under BSL Holdings ownership. The problem here is with the balance that is owed, Mr Thompson told Tribune Business. It was split in half, and C ity Markets was given 18 months to pay the balance off with no interest. Thats a hell of a deal. I didnt agree with that. Thats what everyone agreed to do.W e cut them off because they stopped paying their normal monthly accounts. Most of us had them cut off six-seven Pension plan number one concern, while staff health insurance also dropped CONFUSION OVER CITY MARKETS STORE CLOSURES CITY MARKETS CUT OFF 6-7 WEEKS AGO Suppliers worried on debt recovery Leading wholesaler says retailer got hell of a deal he disagreed with on old debts Concern on speculated moves by Bahamas F ood Services chief SEE page 2B B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HE BAHAMAS-BASED Islands of the World Fashion Week is working with two other local operations that will act as step p ing stones for Bahamian designers to progress to the main event, its head telling T ribune Business that many are truly not ready yet for international exposure. Owen Bethel, head of the Nassau-based M ontaque Group and president of Modes Iles, the Islands of the World Fashion Week organiser, said he was looking to make the latCHAMBER CHIEF BACKS TAX BENEFIT EXTENSION TO 2054 F ailure to do so will shackle Freeport economy Sa ys unf air to lea ve Business Licence/property tax issue unresolved But urges: Dont sing final song for Freepor SEE page 2B FERRIES FREIGHT REVENUE OFF 50% OVER METAL BAN Company calls for more surgical approach to issue, rather than b lanket ban Says cutting off 95% of sector to shut down 5% represented by copper S EE page 3B KHAALIS ROLLE Bahamas F erries chief marketing officer BAHAMAS FASHION STEPPING STONES Bahamian show organiser moves to improve local designers readiness Making Islands of the World more exclusive, with goal of five of 10 e x hibitors being Bahamian SEE page 3B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CONFUSION reigned last night over the immediate fate of two New Providence-based City Market stores after theu nion representing the companys line staff said it had received a fax notifying it of their closure. However, when a Tribune Business team visited the Seagrapes Shopping centre store last night it was trading normally. T he same situation occcurred with two City Market F reeport stores where staff were initially told to go home only to be called back and the outlets recommenced normal o perations. City Markets principal Mark Finlayson told Tribune Business on Monday that the supermarket chain was planning to close both the Seagrapes and South Beach stores to carry out $2.5m refrigeration repairs, but said the company had not put t his into effect. It was looking to do so, he added, at the end of September. B ut when interviewed by Tribune Business yesterday, Rosalie McKenzie, administrator for the Bahamas Commercial Stores, Supermarket and Warehouse Workers Union, confirmed that the union had received a fax from Mark Finlayson, head of Trans-Island Traders, City Markets S EE page 2B

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE sion on that, all were doing is putting shackles on the economy, and no one will invest until they are sure their investment model is secured for a definite period. Emphasising that Freeports whole economic model rested entirely on the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, Mr Turnquest said the citys development as a seco nd economic centre, when compared to t he Family Islands, proved it worked. So I hope they can see fit, whether its t his government or the next government, t o make that extension permanent to the e nd of the Agreement, and make that clear as they go about campaigning so everyone knows where they are, hea dded. Its unfair to leave that on the table as unfinished in a period where we in know were in the most difficult of times to solicit investment. Mr Turnquest thus backed a similar call by Fred Smith QC, the Callenders & Co a ttorney and partner, who earlier this m onth also called on the Ingraham admini stration to extend Freeports Business Licence and real property tax exemptionsu ntil 2054, pointing out that Freeports e conomy still generated hundreds of millions of dollars in tax revenues for the Treasury per annum. The Prime Minister himself recently raised the question over whether the exemptions should be extended, given that Bahamian residents and businesses t hroughout the remainder of this nation paid the same taxes while Freeport did not. And, prior to that, he said negotiations o ver the exemption renewal with the G rand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA and its licencees would not start until after the upcoming general election. B ut many in Freeport have privately told Tribune Business that the uncertain ty over whether the tax exemptions will be renewed is potentially turning offi nvestors, BORCO's new owner, Buck eye Partners, having included concerns over this in material sent to investors. And, with businesses already paying annu a l licence fees to the GBPA, having to pay Business Licence fees to Nassau would result in them being 'double taxed'. Several Freeport-based sources have suggested the Prime Minister believes that Freeport, its businesses and residents are getting an 'easy ride' and not paying their due share of taxes, something he wants to c orrect especially given the weak state of t he Government's finances. A nd there is also a body of opinion which believes the Government will seeka 'trade-off' for extending the tax exemptions, namely getting something in return. T his could be, they say, an agreement by the GBPA to hand over all regulatory responsibility for utilities in the Freeport a rea to the Utilities Regulation & Comp etition Authority (URCA t he Government has always wanted. S uch a course of action, though, could c ontravene the Hawksbill Creek Agreem ent. Meanwhile, Mr Turnquest described Freeport/Grand Bahamas three most pressing economic needs as promotion, job creation, and creating airlift/transportation lift. Thats kind of what we need, he told T ribune Business. Unfortunately, we d ont see anything on the horizon. How ever, we do hope that it doesnt get worse.T hings are pretty much stable at this p oint, and were working hard to generate s ome activity and secure some business. We dont want to sing the final song for us. We believe Grand Bahama is ripef or investment, and believe we will find the right partners. Were continuing to work with our partners to do some promotion internationally. Mr Turnquest said the Chamber and other stakeholders were in the third phase of their economic development plan forG rand Bahama, creating the strategic p lan that we will follow to hopefully attract investment into the island, and build competitiveness locally and inter-n ationally. The Grand Bahama Chamber was also working with the Government, Port Authority and other stakeholders on thec reation of the Ingraham administrations Grand Bahama Development Board. It is coming together, Mr Turnquest said of the Board. Were still defining the terms of reference, the kind of activities it will engage in, and what the focus will be. weeks ago. They just keep buying from the States; theyre not buying from the local wholesalers. No one is going to extend them credit if theyre not paying their bills, and they stopped paying their bills. It is not clear just how much City Markets owes collectively to Bahamian wholesalers. Its latest balance sheet, for the nine months to March 9, 2011, show accounts payable and accrued expenses of $9.05 million, and it is likely that a significant chunk of this is due to local suppliers. Mr Thompson said Thompson Trading was at the lower end of what was due to Bahami an wholesalers, adding: I kept their credit limit as tight as I could keep it. Asked about Mr Finlaysons thinly-veiled threat that, if he were to liquidate City Mar kets, the Bahamian wholesale industry would receive nothing because his familys debt ranked ahead of theirs, Mr Thompson expressed scepticism that it would work out this way. He alleged that Mr Finlayson had signed personal guarantees for the sums owed to Bahamian wholesalers, as per the 2010 pay ment agreement, implying that the industry would hold him and his familys 78 per cent majority shareholding vehicle, Trans-Island Traders, to that. The boys [Mr Finlayson] desperate and hes just trying to throw blame on someone else, Mr Thompson told Tribune Business. I said to someone a few weeks ago that theyd try to blame it on the wholesalers and say its their fault. It isnt. He expressed confidence that the Bahamian people would see through this, but conceded that all wholesale players were concerned about the prospects of recovering 100 per cent of what was owed. Im sure everyone is worried about taking them to court, Mr Thompson said. I know some of them [wholesalers] are in the process; they have started the process of collection. The Thompson Trading managing director also expressed concern about speculation once again linking Bahamas Food Services princi pal, Ben Frisch, with a potential purchase of City Markets. Were worried about what Bens up to, Mr Thompson said. Hes been in negotiations, and been seen walking through their warehouse. For Ben to have wholesale and retail would be utterly disastrous for all the other wholesalers. Mr Frisch, who heads Bahamas Food Services and Tropic Seafood, plus their Jack sonville-based parent, Beaver Street Fisheries, initially beat Mr Finlayson to the City Markets purchase when BSL Holdings placed the company up for sale late last year,. However, he ultimately withdrew, but that was a likely taste of his interest in setting up an integrated Bahamian wholesale/retail food model. Tribune Business also understands that an offer has been made to purchase City Markets three Grand Bahama-based stores, although it is unclear whether Mr Frisch is behind this. Likely contenders are existing food retail businesses on the island, including Sawyers Fresh Market and Save More. If City Markets is liquidated, or is split up or sold, the prospects for the Bahamian wholesale industry remain unclear. They could, though, lose what was once a highly important customer, ranking alongside the likes of AML Foods and SuperValue in terms of importance. In Mondays interview with Tribune Business, Mr Finlayson had warned: We bought the shares in this company for $1, and every penny that my family has put in has been in debt. That debt is as solid as any bank debt, and if they decide theyre going to court, I dont blame them but, in the final analysis, my familys debt will have to be paid off before any of theirs. They have a choice to work with us, or write that money off. If I was to liquidate, to date this company does not have enough money to pay the Finlaysons off. I was willing to work with them to save their businesses, along with this, but if they dont understand and are not willing to work with us, they are back in the same posi tion they were prior to us buying the company. 78 per cent majority shareholder, informing them of the closure of the South Beach and Seagrapes Shopping Centre stores with effect from yes-t erday. A dding that the union doesnt know what to say about City Markets actions and the impact on its 300 members employed by the company, Ms McKenzie said its newly-elected president and officer slate had beens eeking a meeting with Mr Finlayson from their August 15 installation date, but to no avail. She said yesterdays fax was the first communication r eceived from City Markets p rincipal, and added: We just c ame from South Beach and the Seagrapes store. The staff w ere told to report to work, and then told to go back home. There has been no communication with the union and involvement with the stakeholders. We dont know what to say about what the company is doing with our members. We understand thes ituation with the company and the issues they are having, but communicate with us so w e can let the members know w hat is going on. Ms McKenzie said Mr Fin l aysons fax said that effective immediately City Markets was closing two New Providence locations, leavingj ust its Cable Beach and Har bour Bay stores open on this island. It also has three Grand Bahama stores, although there are suggestions an offer has been made to buy these. W ell-informed Tribune B usiness source said a City Markets Board of Directors meeting was yesterday due tod ecide whether the company w ould go through with the $2.5 million investment in r efrigeration repairs necessary to rescue the Seagrapes a nd South Beach stores. Some suggested it did not make sense, given that CityM arkets was only likely to repeat the cycle that pushed it to an estimated $14 million operating loss for the financial year to end-June 2011. Ms McKenzie told this newspaper that around 150e mployees had been impacted by the store closures, and their immediate future was u ncertain. We dont know if theyre going to keep them at home, she said, adding thatM r Finlayson was yet to conf irm whether they would be placed in the remaining two New Providence stores. Were looking at it very s eriously, Ms McKenzie said. Peoples lives are being affected by this, and adjust ments made to peoples lives. Prior to the stores closing, the most people were working w as 24 hours a week. People have been employed there for 30 years, a nd they do not even communicate with the staff. The union thinks they should at least have some respect and communicate with the staff. Ms McKenzie added that t he status of City Markets e mployee pension fund was our number one concern, given that the supermarket chain had made no contributions to it since 2007. S he suggested that if City Markets was making no payments into the fund, and given t hat it was a 100 per cent e mployer contribution, the plan should be wound up and staff receive what was due tot hem. Ms McKenzie also confirmed to Tribune Business t hat City Markets had d ropped group health insurance coverage for its employees. Staff found that out when, because of Back to School, a lot of members had to take t heir kids for physicals, she a dded. They found the insurance was no longer in effect, and thats another thing they d id not communicate. Asked about the unions view on City Markets sur-v ival prospects, Ms McKenz ie said: Its not in our view looking good, so thats why we wanted to sit with Mr Finl ayson to see exactly where City Markets future lies. We have no idea at all. S taff morale is very, very low because nobody knows whether, if they come in today, they will be shippedo ut tomorrow and asked to leave the property with no compensation. The staff is in a very depressed state right now. They have no working spirit.T heir minds are not there. T his, Ms McKenzie said, was costing City Markets business, as relatives did notw ant to shop where their kin were unhappy. Customer ser vice was also being impacted. Chamber chief backs tax benefit extension to 2054 FROM page one CONFUSION OVER CITY MARKETS STORE CLOSURES FROM page one MARKFINLAYSON City Markets cut off 6-7 weeks ag FROM page one

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ter now a biennial event tak ing place in May and November, starting in 2012 a more e xclusive event. Of the 10 designers who would exhibit at each Islandso f the World event, Mr Bethel said he ultimately wanted five to be Bahamian, explaining toT ribune Business that he was seeking the best of the best. Theres been a lot of inter est from young designers, but a lot of Bahamian designers are truly not ready for inter national exposure, and a lot o f work needs to be done in terms of the workmanship, the fabric selection and presenta t ion of their designs, he said. Were working with two other operations in the Bahamas, who will also be working other events to encourage designers to participate and make it a step-p ing stone for Islands of the World. They can get their feet wet, learn very quickly and, hopefully, will then be considered for participation in Islands of the World. M r Bethel declined to name the other Bahamian organisations, but added that therew ere two-three Bahamian d esigners who currently had the ability to feature in Islands of the World. Ideally, what were look ing to see is, out of the 10 designs, at least five are B ahamians, Mr Bethel said. What we have to do in terms of taking Islands of the World to the next level is to be m ore selective in who we allow into each show. That is a way of making it more exclu-s ive, making sure we get the best of the best, not only from the Bahamas but the region. A dding that Islands of the World had certainly started the process of creating a Bahamian fashion industry, Mr Bethel said the number of local designers wanting to establish a career in the indus t ry had increased every year since the show started. At least 15 I have s in t ouch with personally are pursuing further their interest in, and careers, in the fashion industry, he added. Therea re five I know of who are studying and gone on to actu al further education in the fashion industry abroad. sents about 50 per cent of our revenue... Because of the shut down of this industry, were seeing the impact, and given this type of timing we can ill-afford to lose activity that is there and readilya vailable economic activity. Were at the point where were seeing impact to ourb usiness and the Family Island economies. Mr Rolle urged the Government to work quickly to support the scrap metal industry, adding that it had provided al iving for Family Island residents who would otherwise be unemployed. He added that he had seen whole families scouring the bush for scrap metal. It was the same in New Providence, where Mr Rolle said that in St Ceciliahe met a whole family husband, wife a nd two children scouring the area for scrap metal to fill up their white pickup truck. I understand the need to protect copp er, Mr Rolle said. One of the things y ou can do to protect the immediately is t o put a ban on copper, but not other metals. We should not shut down an entire i ndustry because of one theft-prone segment that represents 5 per cent of the t ransactions that take place in the indus t ry. We shut down 95 per cent to deal w ith 5 per cent. T he Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer added: We need to find a way to address the problem directly, rather than take the blanket approach...... A much more surgical approach should have been t aken. Youre compromising opportunities for businesses to survive. We have to be more surgical and go to the root of the p roblem to get better results. Our business benefited from it. With high petroleum prices, up 30 per cent o ver last year, we were very pleased with that business. Weve created a situation where were no better off now than we were prior to the ban. I think, in fact, were worse off. I would call for an immediate lifting of the ban, apart from copper, and am ore surgical approach to managing and regulating the trade and industry. Mr Rolle said the Governments approach was in danger of solving one problem but creating another, warningt hat the industry shut-down was likely t o push some metal gatherers to look for o ther ways to feed themselves and their families, including crime. He urged the Government to adopt a consultative approach, meeting with all the industrys stakeholders to collectively monitor and regulate the sector in am anner acceptable to all. B ahamas Ferries, Mr Rolle said, saw real scrap metal carried on its vessels in the form of old cars and tractors, and was also able to identify shiny new copper whose origins seemed suspicious. We miss the revenue, and when you g o through difficult periods our philosop hy is that the last place we look to cut e xpenses is the employees, Mr Rolle s aid of the company. We feel an obligation to keep people e mployed, but that has to be at a reas onable place. We have the obligation to maintain the boats to A1 standard and d eliver great service to the customers, b ut we cant do these things if we do not g et revenue. Thats [scrap metal] a sign ificant part of revenue during this difficult period. Ive just had a meeting with our freight manager, and we are concerned because we do not have a lot of readily available options. N oting the 12,000 applicants for the Governments National Jobs Readiness a nd Training initiative exceeded the 3,000 a vailable places more than four-fold, Mr Rolle added: Unless there is a silver bullet solution to the job problem, then I would suggest the Government work with businesses to help keep them solvent. Areas naturally creating employment, you cant stifle them; you have to encourage it. Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, could not be contacted for com-m ent yesterday. However, he last week said that draft regulations to regulate the scrap metal industry should be ready to be tabled when Parliament reopens this fall. M r Deveaux told Tribune Business: We provided a summary of the meeting w e had with the dealers and made some recommendations to the Government, the offshoot of which is that the regulations to regulate the industry will be prepared and, hopefully, be ready for the next sitting of Parliament so that theyc an be tabled and discussed. With respect to the existing condition and the dealers, the dealers were asked to give evidence of what they had for export and how they would have acquired it, so that representations could be made to the Ministry of Finance,u nder which the Customs Department f alls, to accommodate any scrap metal t hat may have been obtained under cont ractual obligsations or derelict vehicles." O n July 27, the Government enforced a temporary ban on the scrap metal t rade, while imposing a permanent ban on all copper exports. I t said "no person shall, for a period of 9 0 days from the coming into force of t he regulations, export any scrap metal f rom the Bahamas to any place outside the Bahamas". The Export Control (Prohibition of Scrap Metal and Copper) Regulations 2011 add: "No person shall export any c opper from the Bahamas to any place outside the Bahamas." T he move is similar to that of Jamaica, w hich has banned the trade of scrap metal in order to curb the wanton theft and mangling of valuable property. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3B FERRIES FREIGHT REVENUE OFF 50% OVER METAL BAN FROM page one BAHAMAS FASHION STEPPING STONES F ROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbour hoods. Per haps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. O WEN BETHEL, h ead of the Nassau-based Montaque Group

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NEW YORK Associated Press A LATE AFTERNOON rally pushed the stock market higher for only the second day this month. Major indexes spent most of Mon-d ay lower as investors worried that Greece could be edging closer to default. T he yield on the 10-year Treasury note reached another record low as investors piled into U.S. g overnment debt on fears that Europe's debt crisis could spread. The euro fell t o a seven-month low a gainst the dollar. T he Dow Jones industrial average rose 68.99 points, or 0.6 percent, to close at 1 1,061.12. All of the gains came in the last 10 minutes o f trading. The Dow had been down as many as 167 points shortly after 2 p.m. Traders said a combinationof technical factors and r eports that China was buyi ng Italian government bonds triggered the late s purt of buying. Over the last several d ays, stocks have been pushed down so hard it was a s if somebody was trying to push a balloon underwater," said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor's Equity Research. "It's bound to pop up even if only for a short period of time." The S&P 500 index rose 8.04, or 0.7 percent, to 1 ,162.27. It had dropped as many as 18 points. Technology stocks fared better than t he overall market followi ng news of a semiconductor d eal. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index rose2 7.10 points, or 1.1 percent, t o 2,495.09. J.J. Kirnahan, chief options strategist at T.D. Ameritrade, said reports that China planned to buy a significant amount of Ital-i an bonds contributed to the s udden reversal. "The last 1 6 minutes was insane," he s aid. K irnahan said investors s hould not take the day's gains as a sign of a longerlasting trend. "If tomorrow we get any indications that China really isn't going to get involved, then we should expect a quick sell-off." W orries over Europe's debt crisis drove traders into Treasurys, pushing the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to 1.87 percent, the lowest since the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis began keeping daily records in 1962. During the financial crisis in late 2008, the 1 0-year yield hit a low of 2.05 percent. Investors fear that Greece c ould default on its debt, l eading to more disruptions i n global financial markets. They're also concerned thatr ating agencies may cut the c redit ratings of French banks because of their holdings of Greek bonds. That would mark the spread of Europe's debt troubles from peripheral countries likeG reece and Ireland to the h eart of Europe's financial s ystem. All these things together a re getting me concerned," s aid Douglas Cote, chief market strategist for ING Investment Management. "With Europe's banks under so much duress and Greece near an imminent d efault, you can't tell me the U.S. is insulated from their problems. I don't buy it." The resignation of a key European Central Bank official combined with worries over a new recession in t he United States led to a s tock market sell-off Friday. T he Dow Jones industrial a verage and Standard & P oor's 500 index have fallen f or six of the past seven weeks. Before Monday, the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq had posted gains only one day this month, last Wednesday. Tenet Healthcare Corp. s ank 10 percent to $4.52, the b iggest drop among companies in the S&P 500. The hospital operator said it expects earnings to take a hit from a rise in patients using Medicaid, which pays hospitals less for treatment t han private insurance. M cGraw-Hill Cos. rose 4 p ercent to $40.26. The comp any said it will split into t wo public companies, one u nit focused on education services and the other centered on markets, including the rating agency Standard & Poor's and J.D. Power and Associates. NetLogic Microsystems I nc. jumped 51 percent to $ 48.12 after Broadcom Corp. said it has agreed to acquire the maker of semi conductors for $3.7 billion. Bank of America Corp. rose 1 percent to $7.05 after the bank said it would slash 3 0,000 jobs as part of a costc utting drive. W ynn Resorts rose 2 perc ent to $151.72 after a unit o f the casino operator said it h ad a signed a deal to build a resort in Macau. Casinos have been expanding their operations in the former Portuguese colony, considered the world's most lucrative gamb ling market. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 5B LATE RALLY PUSHES STOCKS HIGHER; 2ND GAIN IN SEPTEMBER CHRISTOPHER CULHAM left, of Barclays Capital directs trading from his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday in New York. (AP WILLIAM BOTT left, Michael Volpe, center, and James Malone, all of Barclays Capital, work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday in New York. (AP

PAGE 14

OMAHA, Neb. A ssociated Press B ERKSHIRE HATHAWAY has hired a second hedge fund manager to help r un the company's investment portfolio and prepare for what it described as the eventual retirement of 81-year-old bil l ionaire Warren Buffett. Berkshire said Monday that Ted Weschler will join the O maha-based company early next year. The 50-year-old has a nnounced to the partners of h is hedge fund, Peninsula C apital Advisors, that he will begin winding up the fund so h e can join Berkshire. The announcement helps clarify the investment part ofB erkshire's succession plan, but because the company plans to split Buffett's job intos eparate CEO, chairman and investment manager jobs, it's still not clear who will lead Berkshire after Buffett isg one. Weschler founded Peninsula Capital in 1999, and is a m anaging partner of the firm, based in Charlottesville, Va. The hedge fund makes invest m ents in publicly traded comp anies. Peninsula Capital held a concentrated portfolio of nine stocks as of June 30 thatw as worth nearly $2 billion, according to documents filed with the Securities andE xchange Commission. Berkshire has said that the board has a list of four internal candidates to replace Buffett a s chief executive, but Buffett has always refused to name t hem. B erkshire said Buffett will c ontinue to manage most of the company's investments until his retirement." Stifel Nicolaus analyst Meyer Shields said he believes theu se of the word retirement may be significant because previously Buffett had sug-g ested he would continue working until he either became incapacitated or died. "The word retirement s eems sort of jarring to us," Shields said. Andy Kilpatrick, the stock b roker-author of "Of Permanent Value, the Story of War ren Buffett," said it is unusual f or Berkshire or Buffett to use t he word retirement, but he doesn't expect imminent change at the company. AndW eschler's hiring helps clarify the succession plan a bit. "I think that should give s ome relief to people who are wondering what's going to happen," Kilpatrick said. Buffett did not immediately r espond to a request for an interview Monday. W eschler's hiring comes a fter Berkshire last fall named T odd Combs to help run a portfolio of roughly $1 billion t o $3 billion of investments. Weschler also will run a segment, but Monday's released idn't specify the size of the portfolio he will run. Monday's announcement s aid that Combs and Weschler will eventually share responsibility for Berkshire's entire equity and debt portfolio,a fter Buffett no longer serves as CEO. The announcement said that they could be aided b y one additional manager, and their management of the entire portfolio would be sub j ect to the direction of the C EO at that time, as well as the company's board. "With Todd and Ted on b oard, Berkshire is well-positioned for successor invest ment management at the time M r. Buffett is no longer CEO," the company said. Weschler did not immedi ately respond to a message left a t his office Monday morning. Shields said he doesn't know much about Weschler,b ut he appears to have a solid investment record. Kilpatrick said Weschler's hiring is similar to Combs' int hat neither man was wellknown before Buffett chose them. "Another under-the-radar pick," Kilpatrick said. Weschler may have bought his job interview with Buffett through an annual auction that benefits the Glide Foun dation, which provides social services to the poor and homeless in San Francisco. Glide spokeswoman Denise Lamott confirmed Monday that Weschler paid nearly $5.3 million to win the last two auctions for private lunches with Buffett. Unlike other winners of the auction who enjoyed publicity while dining with Buffett in New York, Weschler asked to remain anonymous and met Buffett at one of his favorite Omaha restaurants after the 2010 and 2011 auctions. In addition to helping run Peninsula Capital, Weschler is a director of WSFS Financial Corp. Peninsula held 1.5 million shares of WSFS as of June 30. In 1989, Weschler was a founding partner of Quad-C, a private equity firm. Before that, he spent six years with W.R. Grace & Co. in several positions. Peninsula held near ly 10.8 million shares of W.R. Grace. He received his bachelor's degree in economics from The Wharton School of the Uni versity of Pennsylvania. Before joining Berkshire, Combs managed the Castle Point Capital hedge fund for five years. Class B shares of Berkshire stock rose $1.47 Monday to close at $69.24. It's Class A shares gained $1,528 to close at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ssociated Press CAROL BARTZhas resigned from the Yahoo board of directors that she blasted for firing hera s the company's CEO last week. T he resignation reversed a defiant stance that Bartz took in a fiery interview published on Fortune magazine's website on Sept. 8. Bartz said, at the time, that she i ntended to retain her seat on Yahoo's board even though she considered her fellow directorst o be "doofuses." Bartz, who is 63, resigned from the board Sept. 9, according to a n email from board spokesman Charles Sipkins. Yahoo Inc. had previously said that Bartz waso bligated to resign after her o uster as CEO. Y ahoo, which is based in Sunnyvale, Calif., has nine members left on its board. An investment hedge fund that owns a 5.2 percent stake in Yahoo is asking Chairman RoyB ostock and three other direct ors to resign too. The fund, called Third Point, contends the b oard needs to be held accountable for hiring Bartz in January 2 009 and other decisions that h ave contributed to a steep drop in Yahoo's stock price in the last f ive years. Bartz's resignation from the board could clear the way for hera nd the company to agree on the t erms of her severance package. I n a Securities and Exchange Commission filing last week, Yahoo acknowledged Bartz qualifies for severance without providing further details. At the end of last year, Bartz w as eligible for a severance packa ge worth about $10.4 million in cash and stock incentives, accordi ng to calculations that Yahoo listed in a shareholder proxy s tatement issued in April. Stock a wards that Bartz received this year could drive up the value of h er severance package. FIRED YAHOO CEO BARTZ BACKS DOWN, RESIGNS FROM BOARD C AROL BARTZ former Yahoo CEO. (AP BUFFETT ADDS INVESTMENT EXEC AS PART OF SUCCESSION

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HELENA, Mont. Associated Press U.S. Sen. Max Baucus says Congress is moving closer to allowing U.S. horses to be slaughtered primarily for their meat with a move that allows inspections of the facilities. The Democratic senator has been backing an idea to allow the U.S. Department of Agriculture to again start inspecting horse slaughter plants. The ban on inspections dates back to 2006 and effectively resulted in a ban on domestic horse slaughter and the processing of horse meat, which is considered a delicacy in some overseas markets. The Senate Appropriations Committee on Wednesday passed an agri cultural spending bill that would allow inspection of slaughtered horses, which is needed to ship meat and ani mal byproducts across state borders. Baucus said he is making sure that language stays intact as the appropriation process continues. A Government Account ability Office study found that the horse slaughter ban has resulted in a shift of the market to Canada and Mex ico, Baucus noted. It also has resulted in lower horse prices and strained local ani-mal welfare agencies that are now dealing with more cases of horse abandonment. "We've seen some pretty shocking cases across Montana of horse abandonment and neglect as owners face tough economic times," Bau cus said in a statement. "This ban is a part of the problem and has resulted in t he inhumane treatment of injured and sick horses along with hurting the economy. We have an opportunity here to do the right thing for our farmers and ranchers while improving the welfare of horses." The Montana Legislature in 2009 passed a new law that aimed to court the cons truction of a horse slaughter plant in Montana, a law prompted by complaints from ranchers and agricul ture interests. But no slaughter plant has ever been built, in part because the USDA inspection ban would prevent horse meat from being exported outside Montana. WASHINGTON Associated Press IN Asharp challenge to the G OP, President Barack Obama proposed paying for his costly new jobs plan Monday with tax hikes that Republicans have already emphatically rejected. The reception to his new proposal was no m ore welcoming, setting the stage for a likely new fight w ith Congress. Flanked at the White H ouse by workers he said the l egislation would help, Obam a declared, "This is the bill t hat Congress needs to pass. No games. No politics. No d elays." He sent it to Capitol Hill saying, "The only thing that's stopping it is politics." T he president's proposal d rew criticism from House S peaker John Boehner, who'd previously responded in caut ious but somewhat receptive tones to the $447 billion jobs plan made up of tax cuts andn ew spending that Obama f irst proposed in an address to Congress last Thursday. "It would be fair to say this tax increase on job creators is the kind of proposal both parties have opposed in the past.W e remain eager to work together on ways to support job growth, but this proposal doesn't appear to have been o ffered in that bipartisan spirit," Boehner spokesman Brend an Buck said. The biggest piece of the payment plan would raisea bout $400 billion by elimin ating certain deductions, including on charitable con tributions, that can be claimed by wealthy taxpayers. Obama has proposed that in the past to help pay for his health c are overhaul, for example and it's been shot down by Republican lawmakers along with some Democrats. Yet by daring Republicans anew to reject tax hikes on the r ich Obama could gain a talking point as the 2012 presi dential campaign moves for w ard, if not a legislative victory. A t a Rose Garden event Monday, Obama brandished his jobs bill in the air and surrounded himself with police officers, firefighters, teachers, construction workers and oth-e rs he said would be helped by it. Adopting a newly combative tone that's been welcomed by dispirited Democrats, Obama demanded immediate action on the legislation, which the White House sent to Capitol Hill Monday after-n oon. Instead of just talking about America's job creators, l et's actually do something for America's job creators." Obama told of reading a quotation in a newspaper article from a Republican con g ressional aide who questioned why Republicans should work with Obama since the result might just be to help the president politically. "That was very explicit," Obama said. B uck, the Boehner spokesman, said the anonymous quote cited by the president didn't reflect the view of Republican leadership. And even as Obama was a ccusing Republicans of playi ng politics, he and his Democratic allies were marshaling an aggressive politicalr esponse of their own. Obama was traveling to Boehner's home state of Ohio T uesday to promote his jobs plan, and following that with a trip Wednesday to North Carolina, a traditionally Republ ican state he won in 2008. He was getting backup from the Democratic National Committee, which announced a television ad campaign start ing Monday to promote Oba m a's jobs plans in key swing and early-voting states and to call on voters to pressure their lawmakers for support. Thea ds urge viewers to "Read it. Fight for it. ... Pass the President's Jobs Plan." The back-and-forth was tak ing on elements of a political campaign, with high stakes for both sides as Obama heads i nto his re-election fight with the economy stalled, unemployment stuck at 9.1 percent a nd polls showing deep public unhappiness with his leadership on the economy. In an appearance later Monday with his aides on five African-American news Webs ites, Obama suggested that even a legislative loss for his plan could translate into a political win for him. "I need people to be out there promoting this and pushing this and making sure that everybody understandst he details of what this would m ean, so that one of two things happen: Either Cong ress gets it done, or if Congress doesn't get it done people know exactly what's holding it up," the president said. The jobs package would c ombine tax cuts for workers and employers by reducing the Social Security payroll tax, with spending elements including more money to hire teachers, rebuild schools and pay unemployment benefits.T here are also tax credits to encourage businesses to hire veterans and the long-term unemployed. The payment method the White House announced M onday would consist of: $405 billion from limiting the itemized deductions for charitable contributionsa nd other deductions that can be taken by individuals making over $200,000 a year and f amilies making over $250,000; $41 billion from closing l oopholes for oil and gas com panies; $18 billion from requir i ng fund managers to pay higher taxes on certain i ncome; $3 billion from changing the tax treatment of corpo r ate jets. White House Budget Director Jacob Lew said that Obama will also include those tax proposals in a broader debt-cutting package he plans to submit next week to a con g ressional "supercommittee" charged with finding $1.2 trillion in savings later this year. H e said that the supercommittee would have the option o f accepting the payment mechanisms for the jobs bill p roposed by Obama, or proposing new ones. Republicans have indicated they're receptive to support i ng Obama's proposed pay roll tax cut and finding a way to extend unemployment benefits, though many have r ejected Obama's planned n ew spending. Obama's new proposal Monday to pay for it a ll by raising taxes without any proposals to cut spendi ng is unlikely to win him any new GOP support for any element of his plan. "I sure hope that the pres i dent is not suggesting that we pay for his proposals with a massive tax increase at the end of 2012 on job creators t hat we're actually counting o n to reduce unemployment," said House Majority Leader E ric Cantor, R-Va. The new DNC ads are airi ng in: Denver; Tampa and Orlando, Fla.; Des Moines, Iowa; Las Vegas; Manches ter, N.H.; Raleigh and Char l otte, N.C.; Columbus and Cleveland, Ohio and Norfolk, Richmond and Roanoke, Va.; as well as Washington, D .C. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 7B OBAMA WOULD HIKE TAXES TO PAY FOR HIS JOBS BILL PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA speaks in the Rose Garden of t he White House in Washingt on. Obama cited the payroll tax in his weekend radio and Internet address Saturday, Aug. 20, 2011, when he urged Congress to work together on measures that help the econo my and create jobs. "There a re things we can do right now that will mean more customers for businesses and more jobs across the country. We can cut payroll taxesa gain, so families have an extra $1,000 to spend," hes aid. (AP BAUCUS PRAISES BILL TO END TO HORSE SLAUGHTER BAN

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NEW YORK Associated Press B ANK OF AMERICAis s lashing 30,000 jobs as part o f an effort to reverse a cris is of confidence among i nvestors. It's the largest sing le job reduction by a U.S. company this year. What CEO Brian Moynihan is trying to do is nothing less than save the nation's largest bank. Investors have cut the bank's market value b y half this year. The bank is facing huge liabilities over soured mortgage invest-m ents and concerns over whether it has enough capit al to withstand more financial shocks. The cuts, which affect B ank of America's consumer businesses, represent 10 percent of the Charlotte, North Carolina, bank's work force. The bank said it hopes the cuts and other measures will result in $5 b illion in annual savings by 2014. The bank has already cut 6,000 jobs this year. The b ank also said it would look f or cost savings at its other b usinesses in a six-month review that will begin next month. "It's as if someone has hit the panic button," said Bert Ely, president of banking consultant Ely & Co. Management M oynihan has been taking other steps to shore upt he bank's standing. Last w eek he shook up the bank's top management ranks and has been selling parts of the company to raise cash. Last month Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. invested $5 b illion in the company. M oynihan has struggled to calm investors ever since h e took the top job in Janua ry 2010. He is reversing the e mpire-building strategy of his predecessor, Ken Lewis, who stepped down amid c ontroversy over the purc hase of Merrill Lynch duri ng the financial crisis. Lewis also engineered the ill-fated acquisition of Countrywide Financial Corp., then the country's largest mortgage lender, which has led to heavy financial losses, l awsuits and regulatory p robes. Moynihan is now taking a knife to the company, h oping to shrink it down to a more manageable size e ven if it means losing the b ragging rights of being the nation's largest bank. "We don't have to be the biggest company out there," said M oynihan. Bank of America's stock has lost 48 percent this year, l argely because of problems r elated to poorly-written m ortgages at Countrywide. Just in the first half of they ear the bank paid out $12.7 b illion to settle claims from investors that it sold them securities backed by faulty mortgages. In vestors Some investors and analysts worry that the job cutsw ill lead to poor customer s ervice and the bank will lose market share to rivals at a time when there ares igns that the economy is slowing down. They also wonder if the job cuts are enough to produce the prof i ts the bank needs to overc ome the spiraling costs from its mortgage business. "There is a fair amount of skepticism on Wall Street, and Brian is doing as much as he can do in the face of a worsening econo m y," said Nancy Bush, an analyst and contributing editor at SNL Financial, a research firm. The bank's stock was down for most of the afternoon but rose along with the overall market to close up 7 cents, or 1 percent, at $7.05. The job cuts follow a revamp of the bank's top management team last week. Two senior executives, wealth management head Sallie Krawcheck and head of consumer banking Joe Price, left the bank. The bank also elevated com m ercial banking chief David Darnell and investment banking head Tom Montag to co-chief operating offi c ers, reporting to Moynihan. B ank of America is seen as one of the most bloatedb anks in the industry. The p ayroll cuts will bring its work force in line with some of its key rivals. JPMorgan Chase & Co. had 250,000w orkers at the end of the second quarter. "Financial companies have already been cutting for a few months now. He'sa little late to the game already," said Walter Todd,a portfolio manager at G reenwood Capital, which owns Bank of America pre ferred shares. T he cuts are the largest by a U.S. employer this year, according to the outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christ mas Inc. Merck & Co. said this year it would cut 13,000 jobs. Bank of America's cuts are the largest since the Postal Service announced 30,000 job cuts last year. General Motors Co. cut 47,000 jobs in 2009. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.0081,9630.1550.0807.76.72% 1 0.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .504.40Bank of Bahamas6.936.92-0.011,2750.2300.10030.11.45% 0.530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1.961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.488.47-0.015,2490.2450.31034.63.66% 2.802.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.4380.0405.81.57% 8.508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.000.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.886.880.000.4960.26013.93.78% 2 .001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.601.650.050.1110.04514.92.73% 1 .771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.000.0740.11018.58.03% 5 .504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8 .505.35Finco5.395.390.000.7570.0007.10.00% 9.747.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.298.21-0.083,8500.4940.35016.64.26% 6 .005.00Focol (S 5.755.750.002000.4350.22013.23.83% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.00-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.00250.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%F RIDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 2011B ISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,393.56| CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -101.95 | YTD % -7.07BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5730Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 BANK OF AMERICA WILL ELIMINATE 30,000 JOBS LARGESTSINGLEJOBREDUCTIONBYUSFIRMTHISYEAR NEWARK, N.J. Associated Press THE MINORITY OWNERS of the New Jersey Devils are finalizing a deal to sell their interest in the NHL team and give managing partner Jeff Vander-b eek some new partners. The Devils disclosed the potential sale by Brick City LLC in a statement on Monday in which they said a report in the New York Post that the team was facing bankruptcy was inaccurate. Brick City LLC is the legal name for the Devils share owned by Ray Chambers and Mike Gilfillan, his son-in-law. Quoting a source, The Post said team missed its Sept. 1 loan payment, giving its lenders a breakaway chance to push the team into bankruptcy. The newspaper also said the team had a bad relationships with its banks. "The notions that the Devils are facing bankruptcy or that 'the Devils have told their banks to get lost' are patently untrue," the team said in its statement. "The Devils value their relationship with their banks and are confident a refinancing will be completed shortly. "As stated previously, ownership is close to finaliz ing an agreement that would lead to a buyout of Brick City's share of the company." The Devils also disclosed that new season ticket sales are up 130 percent over last year and last week's sale of single-game tickets were up 260 percent compared with a year ago. Team president and general manager Lou Lamoriello refused to discuss the organization's financial situation. Devils veterans will report for training camp on Sat urday. Vanderbeek and his partners have been at odds since earlier this year, with Vanderbeek noting they have different visions for the franchise. Brick City exercised its contractual rights under its partnership agreement with Vanderbeek to cause a sale of the entire team and arena rights to the Prudential Center, subject to certain terms and conditions. It hired Moag & Co., a Baltimore-based investment bank, to assist in its attempt to sell its share of the team. Vanderbeek, however, was adamant that he would keep his part of the team. DEVIL S DENY REPORT THAT THEY F ACE BANKRUPTCY Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story.

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Seattle-Pacific University Falcons didn't have any mercy on the CI Gibson Rattlers. The Falcons, in town for a threeday game series in the return of the B ahamas Basketball Federation's C ollege Scrimmages, delighted their fans and the few Bahamians who showed up at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium last night with a 96-63r out over the Rattlers. "I felt like we played okay in stretches, but we need to do a little better job of defending without fouling," said Seattle Pacific's coach R yan Tooney. "We put them on the f ree throw a little too much." CI Gibson, using seven of their returning players while adding an additional five, including Mark Hanna and Ernest Saunders, went to thef oul line 29 times and completed 22 o f their charity shots. B ut while they took advantage of their inside game with their smaller line-up, the Falcons, with 11 returning players from last year's roster,s hot the lights out from the outside. They were 39 of 83 from the field, including 35 of 72 from two-point percentage and 4-of-11 from the t hree-point arch. But the way they p layed, it looked as if the percentage should have been much higher. "For us, it's early. We only practiced for seven days together before we came on the trip," Looney said." We definitely need to get better. T hat's why we came down here." A ndy Polina was a tower of strength, leading three other players in double figures for Seattle Pacific with 19 points in 25 minutes.H e was 8-of-18 from the field, all of which came in the paint where he was also responsible for pulling down a game high 13 rebounds with t hree blocks, three assists and two s teals. Jobi Well contributed 18 points, 10 rebounds, three assists and three steals in 26 minutes, while Cory Hutsen had 14 points, four rebounds andt wo assists. Scott Morse finished with 1 4 points, four rebounds and two a ssists. David Downs and Jeff Dorman both chipped in with five points. The Falcons opened a 17-4 lead after the first five minutes ande xtended their margin to 48-25 at the half. By the end of the third quarter, they were up 73-40 and it was just a matter of how many points t hey would score in the fourth as R attlers' coach Kevin 'KJ' Johnson tried to switch from a bigger lineup to a smaller one in a bid to defuse Seattle Pacific, but that didn't even make a difference. T he only thing the Falcons didn't a chieve was the 100-point digit. Hann a exploded for a game high 25 points in 32 minutes to lead CI Gibson. THETRIBUNE SECTIONETUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 INSIDE TRAK T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 5 5 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 7 7 E E . . . ROADMASTERS CHARITY RUN THIS WEEKEND SMALL NATIONS STEAL HEARTS OF FANS, BRING RUGBY WORLD CUP TO LIFE DESPITE WIN, NEW LOOK EAGLES HAVE WAYS TO GO DJOKOVIC DEFEATS NADAL TO WIN HIS FIRST US OPEN TITLE T T U U R R N N T T O O 8 8 E E . COLLEGE SCRIMMAGES: FALCONS ROUT RATTLERS, 96-63 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E TOUCHDOWN: New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez (8125 first half of last nights game in Miami. SEE FULL STORY ON PAGE 2E (AP Brady throws for 517 yards

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS Ernest Saunders was the only other player in double f igures with 16. Their next b est scorer was Travonne G rant with eight. Alcot Fox had six. "I think we played pretty well. We played a number fifth ranked team in the coun-t ry division two," said Johns on, as he starts to look at his p layers for the upcoming Government Secondary Schools Sports Association's basketball season. "Their team shot the ball e xtremely well. They execute d the game extremely well. My guys didn't make shots. If you want to compete, you have to make shots. We didn't do that. Thank God for Mark and Ernest and a couple of g uys who came out and who played hard." J ohnson said it was definitely a learning experience for his squad, who played ag ood defensive game, but didn't make sufficient shots or shoot the ball that well fromt he outside to put a dent in the Falcons' lead. It was good for this young team with players who are aspiring to play college basketball," said Johnson, who year after year is trying toe xpose as many of his players to either high school or college in the United States. Level "It's very hard at this level a nd we had to play extremely hard to compete. Hopefully, they will learn as we go and get better as a result of playing in this game." Seattle Pacific compiled a 20-10 record and placed third i n the Great Northwest Athletic Conference with a 12-6 m ark in 2011. The Falcons made their s eventh straight NCAA Tourn ament appearance and will b e back in action 7pm tonight when they take on the Real Deal Shockers. T heir exhibition series will come to a close on Wednes-d ay night against the MailBoat Cybots. "You can expect a little bit of the same thing from us," said Looney as he preparesh is Falcons for game two of their scrimmage. "We hope to turn it up a notch and playa little bit harder." Looney said the trip is designed to blend the old with the new players and at thes ame time provide them with an opportunity to mix and mingle with the locals by rendering their assistance with one of the orphanages on the island. But more importantly, he s aid they intend to get a splash in the beautiful waters o f the Bahamas and make sure that they get some sun a nd fun before they return to t he US for the start of their c ollegiate season. FALCONS ROUT RATTLERS T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E FOOTWORK: CI Gibson Rattlers Mark Hanna (far right in action yesterday. By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI (AP threw his first interception since October, so he wasn't perfect in the New England Patriots' opener. He was close, though. Brady threw for a team-record 517 yards and four touchdowns, includ ing a 99-yarder to Wes Welker, and the reigning AFC East champions started with a victory for the eighth consecutive season Monday night by beating the Miami Dolphins 3824. Defensive end Jared Odrick picked off a deflected pass to set up a Miami touchdown and end Brady's NFL-record streak of 358 passes without an interception. Otherwise Brady and the Patriots picked up where they left off last season, when he threw for 36 TDs and his team led the league in scoring. New England totalled 622 yards, the most in franchise history and the most allowed by Miami. Brady's performance overshadowed Miami's Chad Henne, who threw for a career-high 416 yards. The 906 net yards passing by both teams was an NFL record. Brady, who went 32 for 48, became the 11th quarterback to throw for at least 500 yards. Norm Van Brocklin set the record of 554 yards in 1951. "We're pleased to have him on our side," teammate Danny Wood head said with a smile. The capper came with 5:44 left and the Patriots leading 31-17. After they stopped Miami on downs at the 1-foot line, Brady lined up in the shotgun on first down and threw from his end zone to Welker, who had slipped behind Benny Sapp near the 30-yard line. Welker caught the pass in stride and sprinted untouched for the score to complete the longest play in Patriots history. "Some of their scores ended up looking like it was kind of easy," Miami coach Tony Sparano said. "Not the defensive performance we were hoping for. That's an under statement." T ouchdown Brady also threw touchdown passes on consecutive plays. He hit Aaron Hernandez for a 31-yard score, and when a replay review determined the receiver was down at the 1, Brady threw to him again for a TD on the next play. His other scoring passes covered 10 yards to Rob Gronkowski and 2 yards to Welker. Brady was sacked only once, and good protection gave his receivers plenty of time to work their way open. Newcomer Chad Ochocino had only one catch for 14 yards. But Welker made eight receptions for 160 yards, and tight ends Hernandez and Gronkowski combined for 189 yards on 13 catches. "It wasn't a one-man band out there," coach Bill Belichick said. "We had a lot of contributions." The Dolphins' defense returned virtually intact from last season and was expected to be the team's strength, but Brady riddled them from the start. He completed his first eight passes for 127 yards on the Patriots' first two possessions, and both ended with TDs. Brady's first interception since October 17 came early in the third quarter, when he tried to hit Julian Edelman in the flat. Sapp deflected the ball to the 304-pound Odrick, who rumbled 40 yards to the 9. Two plays later, Henne hit Brian Hart line with a 10-yard touchdown pass to make the score 14-all. Brady was so rattled it took him 10 plays to put the Pats ahead to stay. They drove 73 yards and scored on his 2-yard pass to Welker. Miami's problems with Brady were nothing new. He and the Pats beat the Dolphins twice last year while outscoring them 79-21. Losing at home was nothing different for the Dolphins, either, who have dropped 10 of their past 11 home games. There was one change for the Dol phins. They promised a more aggressive, exciting offense under new offensive coordinator Brian Daboll and showed it from the start, scoring on a season-opening drive for the first time since 2000. They lined up 355-pound nose tackle Paul Soliai in their goal-line offense, did damage with quarterback keepers by Henne and gave newcomer Reggie Bush 20 touches. Brandon Marshall gained 139 yards on seven catches, but he and Miami couldn't keep up with Brady. Patriots beat Dolphins 38-24 TEAM RECORD: New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady throws during the first half of Monday nights game against the Miami Dolphins in Miami. (AP

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FOR the average runner, one goal is to complete a halfm arathon and then eventuall y a full marathon, whether i ts for their own personal gratification or just for a worthy cause. For the past three years, the Bahamas Roadmasters Clubh as provided both opportunities. Now into its fourth year, the annual Charity Run is set for Saturday, September 17, and the interest is brewing from a cross-section of the society. L ast year, the proceeds w ent to the Pilot Club of Nass au in their quest to build a p ool for the physically disabled. Previously, the Aids Foundation and the Aids C amp were among the beneficiaries. This year, Bahamas Roadm asters goal is to raise at l east $10,000 to assist the Ranfurly Home for Children. The club was founded by president George Smith and others to provide an avenue f or Bahamians to develop t heir dream of being a marathoner. It also catered to those members who were pri-m arily interested in losing weight or just improving their physical conditioning. K imley Saunders, chairman o f the organising committee for the run, said they are opening doors for so many o ther Bahamians to partici pate because of the charity aspects attached to the event. A lthough its not a full or e ven a half marathon, the run features a number of aspects that will cater to just aboute very casual or competitive runner, from a five-mile run or walk from Montagu Beach t o Charlotte Street and back. Theres also a 10-mile run/walk that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way t o Goodmans Bay and back. Or if you dare to be more adventurous, theres the 20-m ile run that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way to Blake Road and back toM ontagu. Additionally, theres also the 20-mile uniformed offi cers relay that already has a t eam from the Royal Bahamas Police Force, two from Her Majestys Prisons a nd three from the Royal B ahamas Defence Force signed up to compete. There is also an open relay. P ick your choice. For those doing the 20-mile run, the start time is 4:30am. The fivea nd 10-mile races will begin an hour later at 5:30am. We hope to have at least 150 to 200 participants orm ore and that everyone will have fun and enjoy themselves and at the same time s upport the Ranfurly Home. We hope that we can raise the $10,000 or more that we area nticipating to raise for the R anfurly Home, Saunders said. I I N N S S P P I I R R A A T T I I O O N N T T O O F F O O L L L L O O W W In July 2009, Angela Grandmother Rahming decided to increase her mobil ity by moving up from walki ng to running. She did her first charity run two years ago and returned for her second appearance last year. T his year, however, Rah ming has decided to work closely with the organising c ommittee. She serves as the assistant secretary, but she said she was so inspired byh er ability to complete the r un without any problems that she has made it her goal to encourage others to get involved. It can be for anybody, she said. You dont have to w orry about keeping up with anybody. As long as you are consistent, you can finish. Every day you go out, you cana dd your mileage. Being consistent is the key. Through her new found l ove, the actual grandmother of one said a lot of the members were taken aback when s he started, but she never a llowed anyone to discourage h er. In fact, they are all in awe o f her achievement in just three years. Last year, Rahming partici pated in her first half m arathon on January 31 at the ING in Miami. Her nephew, who lives in Florida, w as so thrilled about her commitment and dedication that he decided to join her. W ith the support of her daughter, grandson, sister and niece on the sideline cheering her on, Rahming completed the course in three hours and 10 minutes. For me, that was good, r eally good. Obviously, its not elite running time, but for me it was super, she said. T hat has led to Rahming m aking strides in a series of other events. In October, she d id a half marathon on the Saturday in Washington and on Sunday, the following week she did her first fullm arathon. In April, Rahming duplicated the feat when she ran the Kentucky Derby, then drove back to Ohio and did a half marathon on Sunday. I didnt tell anybody in the club t hat I was going. I just went with another friend, she stat ed. They were all surprised t hat I did it. R R E E L L A A Y Y C C H H A A L L L L E E N N G G E E A lthough it was a new event last year, the RBDF has d ominated the relay competition and this year, sports officer Ramon Storr said the Defence Force will be backt o make it two straight. I guarantee a repeat in the relays, said Storr of theird ominance of the first, second, third and fifth place finishes. We have a couple solid y oung fellows in training and o n the squad now, so I guarantee we will repeat with the r elays. Known for their athletic prowess, Storr said theD efence Force is always capab le and ready to assist because they are still fit. This road race will just s howcase our talent, he said. We really are in it because we want to do our part toa ssist with charity. I I N N C C E E N N T T I I V V E E S S Each participant (there is a registration fee) will receive a T-shirt, eco-friendly bag, a water bottle and free food s tew conch, chicken souse, Johnny cake, fruits, Gatorade, juice and water. A number of prizes will be o ffered, including tickets on the Fast Ferries, dinner for t wo (2 nial Hilton and gift certificates from the Sports Centre, Mys tical Gym, Lickety Split, D ominos Pizza and full body massage by International Orthopedics. Registration sites are the Palmdale Vision, the Reef Restaurant and the Ranfurly Home for Children. L arge groups can contact Kimley Saunders at 364-3282 or 454-5356 or Angela Rah m ing at 394-0449 or 477-7213. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L / / T T R R A A C C K K B B S S C C A A C C T T I I V V I I T T I I E E S S THE Baptist Sports Council has announced the dates for the final two events on its sporting calendar. The 2011 BishopN eil C. Ellis Softball Classic is scheduled to start on Saturday, October 1 at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. It will featurec ompetition in the men, c o-ed and 19-and-under d ivisions. And the Rev Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic will follow on Saturday, October 22, at the Thomas A RobinsonT rack and Field Stadium. Persons interested in more details are asked to c ontact league president Brent Stubbs at stubb obs@gmail.com or secret ary Jonique Webb at joniquewebb@hotmail.co m C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N R R E E G G I I S S T T R R A A T T I I O O N N U U N N D D E E R R W W A A Y Y THE 25th annual Conchman Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, N ovember 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will c omprise of a one-kilometre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can register by logging onto t he Facebook Event Page, e -mail organiser Bert Bell a t b ertbell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 o r 727-5381. N N P P S S A A S S T T A A N N D D I I N N G G S S T T u u e e s s d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Wildcats vs Bom mer George Operators (L 8 :30pm Island Luck Truckers vs Mighty Mitts (M T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7 pm Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks vs Wildcats (L 8 :30pm New Breed vs J ohns Buccaneers (M F F r r i i d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Pheonix vs Sigma Brackettes (L 8:30pm Dorsey Park Boyz vs Miller Rams (M S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Sigma Brackettes vs Wildcats (L 8:30pm Truckers vs Dorin United Hitmen (M SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3E ROADMASTERS ANNUAL CHARITY RUN ALL SET FOR SATURDAY SPORTS IN BRIEF Goal to raise at least $10,000 to assist the Ranfurly Home for Children FOR CHARITY: Now into its fourth year, Bahamas Roadmasters C lubs annual Charity Run is set for Saturday, September 17. By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK (AP pivotal stretch in the NBA lockout begins Tuesday, when full bargaining com mittees return to the table. That could move players and owners closer to a new labour deal, but it also could send things in the wrong direction with time running down if more voices in the room leads to discord. Any setback now would diminish hopes of the pre season opening without delay. "The reality is our training camp would be scheduled to start on October 3 I believe, and so if there's any intention of trying to get that start ed on time, then we both have to figure some things out very quickly," players' association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers said last week. "That's just the reality of the situation." The process toward getting a new collective bargaining agreement seems to have gotten back on track after three meetings in the past two weeks between top negotiators from each side. They decided their full committees have to return before they can go any further, so the owners' labour relations committee and the union's executive committee were told to come to New York for a session Tuesday, and perhaps even Wednes day. That should more than double the number of people in the room from last week, when there were nine. On Thursday, both sides will report back to their mem berships, with owners meeting in Dallas and players headed to Las Vegas, where more than 40 are taking part this week in a series of games at the Impact Basketball academy. If things go poorly in New York, the message may include warnings that camps might have to be postponed, even though Commissioner David Stern said last week he didn't expect any vote to be taken among owners Thurs day. Nor would he say what he needs to hear before then to know if the schedule is in jeopardy. "We have no conditions of any kind," he said. Stern hasn't revealed much else, as both sides vowed to keep details of the process quiet until a deal is done. Clearly intent on sticking to his word, he gave more than a half dozen one-word answers during two brief meetings with reporters last week. That has created a guess ing game about how far along things really are, not only among fans and the media, but even with players themselves. "I wish that I was in a posi tion to say we knew when NBA players would be back on the court and we're getting close, but we're just not at the point where we can make those type of statements," Fisher said. "It wouldn't be fair to the players, it wouldn't be fair to the fans to get any false senti ments or hopes up at this point." PIVOTAL STRETCH OF NBA LOCKOUT TO BEGIN TODAY PLAYERS association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers.



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N ASSA U AND B AHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSP APER Pastor guilty of sex with girl, 9Volume: 107 No.238 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER SUNNY, T-STORMS HIGH 90F LOW 78F By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT: After two hours of deliberation, a Supreme Court jury found clergyman Albert Alexander Whyley guilty of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor. After the verdict was announced, it was revealed that Whyley had been convicted of the same offence almost 18 years ago. Whyley, 59, will be sentenced on November 11. He was remanded to prison until that time, pending a psychiatric evaluation report. The jury of six women and three men returned shortly around 3.15pm yesterday with a guilty verdict of 6-3. Whyley, a local clergyman and fruit vendor, was charged with having unlawful sex with a nine-year-old girl on Feb ruary 6, 2011. The case was fast-tracked for trial in the Supreme Court by Voluntary Bill of Indictment. 59-year-old had been convicted of same offence 18 years ago TRY OUR PINA COLADA McFLURRY The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Apply for a Fidelity Back To School Loan* with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-in Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go!Nassau: t 356.7764 Freeport: t 352.6676/7 Marsh Harbour: t 367.3135 BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN*Offer applies to government workers only MISSBAHAMASUNIVERSECCOONNTTRROOVVEERRSSIIAALLJJUUMMPPSSUUIITTCOLLEGESCRIMMAGESRRAATTTTLLEERRSSCCRRUUSSHHEEDDBBYYFFAALLCCOONNSSSEEWOMANON12BSEESPORTSSECTIONE ALBERT ALEXANDER WHYLEY was found guilty yesterday. Photo/Vandyke Hepburn SEE page eight COMPUTERS, MONEYDONATEDTOSCHOOLFORBLINDSTUDENTS STUDENTS at the newly renovated Salvation Army School for the Blind at a ceremony held yesterday, when Scotiabank donated five fully equipped computers to the school, along with $5,000. SEE PAGETHREE Tim Clarke/Tribune staff By SANCHESKA BROWN THE mother and daughter who were found dead in Nassau harbour last week both drowned, autopsy results have revealed. The bodies of Amanda Seymour Burrows, 32, and her five-year-old daughter Kaysha were pulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza by defence force officers a week ago today. Superintendent Paul Rolle, head of the Central Detective Unit, said now that police SEE page eight AUTOPSY RESULTS REVEAL MOTHER AND DAUGHTER BOTH DROWNED By SANCHESKA BROWN POLICE are looking for a man in connection with a weekend triple shooting that left a man, a woman and their one-year-old daughter in hospital nursing gunshot wounds. They are seeking 29-year-old Earnest Forest of Sea Breeze BISHOP Simeon Hall has urged female lawmakers to push for a change in the country's legislation that would allow for two separate counts of murder to be applied when a pregnant woman is killed. Mr Hall, senior pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church, wrote a passionate plea to all female members Parliament and politicians to advocate for a change of the "archaic" law that does not recognise the life of a foetus before birth. His call came in the wake of the recent murders of two pregnant women. "At least two of several women murdered this year were pregnant and the By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net JUST one week after the start of the new school year a school had to let students out two hours earlier for repairs to be done. The Uriah McPhee Primary School on Kemp Road was closed yesterday at 1pm following the discovery that air-condi tioning units were not functioning at full capacity. Education Minister Desmond Bannister said the issue is being dealt with following the beginning of the semester as MAN SOUGHT IN CONNECTIONWITH TRIPLE SHOOTING SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight REPAIRS FORCE THE EARLY CLOSURE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL EARNESTFOREST BISHOPSPLEATOFEMALELAWMAKERS CALL FOR TWO COUNTS OF MURDER WHEN PREGNANT WOMAN KILLED

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A S M A L L l a k e n e a r w he re the Ho bb y H or se H al l R a c e t r a c k o n c e s t o o d bec ame the foc us of an envir o n m e n t a l p r o t e c t i o n p r o gramme thanks to the Baha Mar development. The company said the init i a t i v e s h o w s h o w f a r i t i s w i l l i n g t o g o t o l e s s e n t h e im pa c t of c on stru ct io n wo rks a n d p ro t e c t i r re p l a c e a b l e na tural treasures. The contract for cleaning up the verges of t h e l a k e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g wo od la nd s wa s awar d ed t o E n v i r o n m e n t a l R e s p o n s e Concepts, Ltd (ERC). The co mp an y a lso bro ug ht i n h i g h l y re s p e c t e d B a h a m i a n en vi ron me nt al a dv oc a te P eri cl es M ai l li s t o i ns t r u ct t he land clearance team on how to i d e n ti f y a n d p r o te c t i m p o rtant specimens found in the de l i c a t e b i os ph e re o f th e l a k e and its environs. M r M a ill is f o rm er pr es i de nt o f t he B a ha ma s Na ti ona l T ru st f ir st e x p l a i ne d to th e w o rke rs w h a t ma k e s th e a re a special and their vital role in protecting it. This is much mor e than a job that you all are engaged on Y ou a re d oi ng s om et hin g which is going to be one of t h e m o s t l o o k e d a t a n d fam ous p r o jec ts i n th e wh ole history of the Bahamas. Everybody is going to go up a n d do w n thi s roa d a ll th e ti m e B a h a m ia n s a nd v is it or s, and this i s goin g to be one of t h e p r e t t i e s t d r i v e s i n o u r who le coun tr y and i s goi ng t o b e f a m o u s b e ca u s e i t s g o i n g t o s h o c k t h e p u b l i c w h e n t h e y c o m e t h r o u g h here, Mr Maillis said. O n o n e h a nd t h e j o b is cr eat ing i nfr as t ru ctur e, an d o n t h i s s i d e i s g o i n g t o b e q u i t e a l o t o f n a t u r e a n d beauty and wildlife and you have the privilege to be the v er y f i r s t o n e s t o p u t y ou r hands on this. So wh en yo u do t his j ob, b e s i d e s d o i n g t h e j o b f o r y o u r s e l v e s f o r y o u r e m p l o y e r f o r y o u r c o m p a n y y o u re a l so d oin g it for ou r c ou ntry . M r M a i l l i s g a v e t i p s o n w h i c h t r e e s s h o u l d b e r e m o v e d a n d w h i c h s h o u l d b e l eft to fl ouri sh. H e ex pla ine d t hat fore ign spe c ie s su ch a s th e B ra z ili an p e p p e r t r e e ( s c h i n u s t e r e b i n t h i f o l i u s ) s h o u l d b e rem oved becaus e it is in v asi ve a nd ev en sli gh tly po iso n o u s O n th e ot h er ha n d h e sa i d, i t wa s im port an t to pre se rve n ati ve fl ora suc h as the b la ck ma ngrov e (av ice nnia g ermi n anu s), w h ic h c o ntri bute s to th e qu al ity o f w e tla nd s. B a h a M a r p r o v i d e d t h e w o rk er s w it h la m in a te d pa m p h l e t s c o n t a i n i n g p i c t u r e s a n d i nform at ion ab out p rote c ted spe c ie s, to he lp th em re c og n ise w ha t ne ed ed to b e pro t e c t e d T h e E R C r e m o v a l t e a m w a s a l s o g i v e n e x t e n s i v e p o i n t e r s o n h o w t o p r u n e b r a nc h es fro m a tre e w ith ou t d a m a g i n g t h e h e a l t h y p o r t i o n J a m e s Mc P h e e s e n i o r t e c h n i ci a n / p r o j e ct m an a g er f o r ERC, expl ained why i t was n e c e s s a r y t o c a r r y o u t t h e l a k e j ob by h an d. We a re do ing al l o f th is wor k h ere man ually. T her e w il l b e n o me c ha ni ca l e qu ip m e nt su c h a s b ul l d oz e r s, tr ac to rs a nd th at ty pe o f stu ff. T h i s i s a n ec o s e n s i t i v e a re a a n d t hi s i s a l so a n h i st or i ca l la ke to t he B ah am as. R i g h t a c r o ss t h e s t r e e t w a s th e H ob by Ho rs e R ac e tra ck a nd there a re a lot of senti m en t a l m o m e n t s t ha t t o o k p lac e i n thi s v ic in ity W e w e r e a s k e d b y o u r c l ie nt to d o i t a s ec o -se nsi ti ve a s p o s s i b l e M r Mc P h e e s a i d R ob ert Sa nds, Ba ha Ma rs se ni or v ic e pre sid en t o f g ov e rnm en t a nd e x tern al a ffa irs, s a i d : T h e k i n d o f c a r e w e a re ta ki ng to e nsure th e prote c t io n o f t he e c o sy st e m th a t t he l ake re pre sent s is an i ndic a tio n o f the l eng ths to w hic h w e me an t o g o to p rote c t th is be aut i fu l acr ea ge on wh ich B a h a Ma r re so rt i s b e i n g f a s h i o n e d W e at B a h a Ma r se e o u rse l v es as s te w a rds of a g re a t t re a s u re H a rn e s si n g t he ri g h t e x p e r ti s e w e h a v e p u t to g e t h e r a n e x t e n s i v e a n d w e l l ref lected pres er vation conse r va t io n a nd p ro te c ti o n p l a n to ensur e t hat s uch p ris tin e t re a su re s a s t h e H o bb y H or se l a k e t h a t h a v e b e e n p u t i n o u r c a re w il l r em a in so f or f ut ure g e ne ra t io ns t o e nj oy W h en B ah a Ma r w a s fi rst c o nc e i v ed lo c a l en v ir on me n t a l i s t s e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n a b ou t t ha t f ac t th a t th e re so rt w o u l d c o v e r t h o u s a n d s o f acr es enco mpa ss in g s eve ral d isti nc t bio sph ere s: sen siti ve sea c oa s t, w etla nds a nd fore s t A l l p r o v i d e a h o m e t o u n i q u e v a r i e t i e s o f a n i m a l a n d p la n t li fe th e l a tte r fe a tu ri ng su c h p rot e c te d tr ee s pe c i e s a s b r as il e t t o Ca r i bb e an pi n e h o r s e f l e s h l i g n u m v i t a e ma ho gan y, s il k cot t on and b la c k e b on y B a ha Ma r L t d inv ite d the c o ns ul ta ti o n o f th e B a h a ma s N a t i o n a l T r u s t a n d o t h e r l o c a l n a t u r e a d v o c a t e s h i r e d a t e a m o f co n s e r v a t i o n e x p e r t s t o i nf or m t he d ev e l op me n t o f a c om pre hen siv e e nvi ronm en tal pr otec tio n and enhanc em e nt pl a n an d g ui de i ts re a li s a t i o n a n d t a c k l e i s s u e s b e f o r e t he y be c om e un ma n ag e a bl e P O L I C E i n N e w P r o v i d ence last w eek cit ed 309 dri v e rs w h o fa il ed to a d h e re t o t ra ff ic ru le s Th e cita tio ns we re fo r v ari o u s t r a f f i c i n f r a c t i o n s a n d p o l i c e p l a c e d 3 0 0 m a t t e r s b e fo r e th e Tr af fic Co u r t. S o m e o f t h e o f f e n c e s f o r w h i c h p e r s o n s w e r e c i t e d in clud ed : failing to l ic enc e or r e g i s t e r a v e h i c l e ; d r i v i n g w i t h a n i n v a l i d i n s p e c t i o n c e r ti fi c at e ; c a u s in g o b s t ru ction to t he flow of t raffi c; dri v i n g w i t h o n e o r n o f i t t e d h e a d l a m p ; f a i l u r e t o h a v e windo w s of tran sparent view ; fai li ng t o keep lef t; par king in a n o p a r k i n g a r e a ; d r i v i n g w ith a lic e n ce d isc n o t p ro p e r ly a ff ix e d; d r iv in g w ith n o id e ntific atio n p la tes; p ar kin g o n a b u s s to p ; d r i v in g o n a c lo s ed str e et a n d d ri vi n g in the w rong dir ecti on on a onew ay s tr ee t LOCAL NEWS P AGE 2, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE C R I MI N A L S a r e a l w a y s looking for a quick opportuni ty to st eal a v eh i cle. By tak ing the fol lowi ng preca u tio ns you can prevent your vehicle from being stolen. N e v e r le a v e y o ur ke y s i n yo u r c ar a l wa ys l o c k y o u r ca r never leav e you r car run n in g. N e v e r l e a v e p e r s o n a l belongings visible (for exam p l e l a p t o p s i P o d s p h o n es an d other such items). Park in well-lit areas; park i n a t t e n d e d l o t s a n d l e a v e o n l y t h e i g n i t i o n / d o o r k e y with the attendant. Co mp l etel y cl o se yo u r wi n d o w s w h e n p a r k i n g ; t u r n w he e ls t o the si de i n dr iv e ways an d p ark i n g l o ts ; d i sa b le your vehicle when leaving it. Etch y o ur Veh icle Iden tifi cation Number (VIN) on all windows and engrave expens i v e a c c e s s o r i e s t o p r e v e n t t h i e v e s f r o m d i s p o s i n g o f them. Install alarms, install a kill switch, and always be on the alert. P OLICE CONTINUE T O TICKET FOR TRAFFIC VIOL A TION S T O DA Y S TIP : VEHI CLE THEF T P REV ENTI ON POLI CE TIPS F R OM LE FT : C o ns ervationist P ericles Maill is, c ons ervation i st and ER C p r oj ec t ma na g er R o be r t M c P h ee t al k w i t h w or k er s ab ou t t he d ay s clearing procedures. CHOPPING IT DOWN: Workers work hard at clearing the site.

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By CELESTE NIXON Tribune Staff Reporter cnixon@tribunemedia.net SCOTIABANK is making a difference in the lives of blind children through its Bright Future programme. At a ceremony held yesterday at the newly renovated Salvation Army School for the Blind, Scotiabank donated five ful ly equipped computers to the school, along with $5,000. Scotiabank spokesperson Leah Davis said the Bright Future programme is a community outreach initiative that seeks opportunities to assist children with their future. Newly appointed managing director of Scotiabank Kevin Teslyk said since the launch of the Bright Future programme 2008, the initiative has sought to help chil dren realise their unlimited potential. Everyone of us can have and is entitled to a bright future, said Mr Teslyk. He added that the programme is a way for the company to fulfil its social responsibility to the community and show its commitment to making a difference. Social responsibility is not an option, it is who we are, he said. According to Scotiabanks website, the programmes objective is: To provide hope to the countrys youth through supporting education, the arts and culture, the envi ronment and the underprivileged and abused. The Salvation Army is working to raise $1.5 million to complete work on the school, construct a school playground, and expand its other charitable programmes, chairman of the advisory board Judy Munroe said. Mrs Munroe said she was delighted by the generosity of Scotiabank, but reminded the public that they are far from reaching their goal. Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Education Elma Garraway noted that the ministrys theme this year is fostering competence, character, citizenship and excellence in education. She said Scotiabanks gift will help the schools students achieve these ends. CORPORATE stakeholders are continuing their fundraising efforts to support child victims of cancer in the Bahamas. Since its inception in 2008, the RBC Childrens Cancer Fund has seen more applicants from the Bahamas than any other country in the region, according to Nathaniel Beneby Jr, president and country head of RBC Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands. Last year, the companys annual fun run/walk raised $25,000 all of which, Mr Beneby Jr said, has already been exhausted. Paediatric cancer is a terrible disease and as we all know, this and other cancers do not discriminate, we are all impacted. Mr Beneby added: The goal is to collectively raise funds by holding fun run/walks and other fund raising events in every country in the region where RBC has a presence. As many as 11 Bahamian children are diagnosed with the disease each year, said Corrine Sinquee-Brown, a paediatric oncologist, who spoke at a press conference about the event. Most children are treated in the public sector, Dr SinqueeBrown said, because their fam ilies have no health insurance. Health Minister Dr Hubert Minnis said: Our children are the future of the country. They are the ones were preparing the country for and they should be given all opportu nities to have a long life, qual ity life, so that they can make their contribution. In the past year, five chil dren have been treated with radiation therapy through the public sector. Through an arrangement with the government, Dr Sin quee-Brown said families pay a lower rate of $15,000 for the therapy. For most families, the psy cho-social impact of the disease is even greater than the financial strain, Dr SinqueeBrown said. The financial devastation is great, she said. Were not talking about hard costs because for the most part the government has supplied edu cation free. Were talking about time off from work, the possibility of losing jobs because of the extended times to have to come to the hospi tal. Were talking about the psycho-social impact on the family. I have seen cancer tear apart families; fewer bring them together. I think the psycho-social impact of cancer is tremendous. The walk is slated to start at 6am at Royal Bank House, 101 East Hill Street, on Sep tember 24. Registration cost is $15 for adults, and $10 for children under 13. Persons can visit any RBC FINCO or Royal Bank branch to register for the event and donate to the fund. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3 By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLITICIAN Paul Moss claimed he rejected an offer to become deputy leader of the Democratic National Alliance because he was dissatisfied with the integrity of the party's internal process. In an April 12 letter addressed to Mr McCartney, of which The Tribune received a copy, Mr Moss detailed the many reasons why he did not join up with the new third party. Yesterday DNA leader Branville McCartney denied Mr Moss was ever offered the post and dismissed the contents of the letter as "foolishness." However, Mr Moss claimed he was given an "ultimatum" to accept the post as deputy leader of the DNA "on the spot." He also said a meeting called at Mr McCartney's house and another one at his law office at Halsbury Chambers before the party's national launch in May seemed "inappropriate" and should have been arranged at a "neutral" location. "I must reject your offer and the idea of my becoming 'deputy leader' (of the DNA). "I told you that any association between us was not going to be merely me joining Bran's wagon. I think you are a decent person but I think your idea of political leadership has been poisoned by (Hubert) Ingraham," wrote Mr Moss. He also criticised the movement behind the DNA as a surge of popularity based on personality, not substance. Mr Moss also said he was struck by the DNA's inexperience, comparing its members to teenagers organising a high school "student government popularity contest." Said Mr Moss: "How can I join something that has no principles or process as deputy leader, when I have no idea what I am leading?" Yesterday Mr McCartney dismissed Mr Moss, current leader of a new group the Peoples Democratic Party. He was adamant that Mr Moss' claims were not true. He said he received a copy of the letter several months ago and has not spoken to Mr Moss since contacting him about the correspondence. He said the DNA will elect a deputy leader like it elected a leader when the group convenes in November, once all of its election candidates are ratified. He added that the new party will name another 10 to 15 candidates next month. "He's talking foolishness. I don't know what he's talking about. The deputy leadership is something that has to be voted on and I could not by myself offer it. (The post) of deputy leadership will be voted on in a couple of months. "I really don't know what he is getting at. No such (thing) was offered to anybody. Paul was not even a part of the DNA. "The last time I spoke to him was to ask what was the meaning of this letter," said the Bamboo Town MP. By LAMECH JOHNSON A BRIEF mix-up in court yesterday saw the wrong man appear in connection with an attempted murder charge. John Augustine, 26, of Andros Avenue, was supposed to be charged before Magistrate Guillimina Archer in Court 10, Nassau Street in connection with the shooting of Mario Bowe. However, before he could be brought down by the police, another John Augustine a 30year-old resident of Carmichael Road appeared before the court to plead his innocence. After the Carmichael Road Mr Augustine answered the judges questions and insisted he was not involved in the matter, the prosecution revealed that it has statements on file from both men, and admitted that there was a mix-up. The prosecution confirmed the Carmichael Road resident was not to be arraigned in connection with the attempted murder, but he was remanded to prison until October 19, when he is due to appear on another matter. The second John Augustine to appear was charged with shooting Bowe, which occurred on Wednesday, August 17. Due to the nature of the offence, Magistrate Archer informed the accused that he was not required to enter a plea. After the accused acknowledged that he understood the charge, the judge explained that the matter could proceed with a preliminary inquiry to determine if there is sufficient evidence for the case to be heard in the Supreme Court. The alternative, a Voluntary Bill of Indictment, would imme diately forward the case to the Supreme Court. The prosecution objected to bail, arguing that Augustine has no status in the Bahamas and claiming he may interfere with the virtual complainant who is already in fear for his life. The accused, who did not have legal representation during yesterdays arraignment, told the judge that he did have status and that his passport was in the care of his parents. He also noted that he was already on bail in connection with other matters, namely firearm and drug possession charges. How can I be on bail if I dont have a passport? he asked. I was born in Nassau, Bahamas. Magistrate Archer denied the accused bail after taking into consideration both arguments. He was remanded to Her Majestys Prison and the matter was adjourned to January 23, 2012. PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT ARE: Tanya McCartney, Managing Director, RBC FINCO; Hubert Minnis, Min ister of Health; Nathaniel Beneby Jr., President and Country Head, RBC Bahamas & Turks and Caicos; and Dr. Corrine SinQuee, Consultant, Princess Margaret Hospital RBC CHILDRENS CANCER FUND ON MARKS FOR FUN RUN/WALK PAUL MOSS CLAIMS HE REJECTED DNA DEPUTY LEADERSHIP OFFER BRANVILLE MCCARTNEY DENIES POST WAS OFFERED OFFERREJECTEDCLAIM: Paul Moss WRONG MAN APPEARS IN ATTEMPTED MURDER CASE JOHN AUGUSTINE 26, accused of attempted murder, tries to hide his face from the camera. COMPUTERSAND$5,000 DONATED ABRIGHT FUTURE FOR BLIND CHILDREN THROUGH SCOTIABANK PROGRAMME STUDENTS from the Salvation Army School for the Blind at yesterdays ceremony.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. THEDental Clinic at Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre offers some of the best services in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. I have been attending the Dental Clinic at Sandilands for the past four years, and find the service there second to none. Too often we are plagued with the lackluster, dont care attitude of civil servants. However, I wish to express my sincere gratitude and to commend Dr McWeeney, Dr Dewards and Nurse Neely of the Sandilands Dental Clinic. Also, Dr Pearce, who is no longer there. On one of my visits to the Clinic I arrived at 7.25am for a scheduled appointment. I met a R M Bailey student and his mother waiting for service. At exactly 7.30am the student was called in by Dr McWeeney for his service, and at 7.45am the mother was called in for her service. Dr McWeeney arrives at the clinic first, earlier than the patients, and starts seeing patients even before the nurse/receptionist arrives. Dr McWeeney is always patient, professional and compassionate even though he serves as receptionist/clerk and dentist. On this particular visit I was told that Dr Pearce, my dentist, would arrive at 8.30am. At exactly 8.15am. Dr Pearce arrived and I was seated in her chair by 8.25am. Dr Pearce was extremely professional, but warm and comforting as she did her job and informed me of further services I would need. I wish to inform here that by 8am the students service was completed, and by 8.15am the mothers service was completed. My service was completed at 9am. These dentists are indeed fine examples of how civil servants ought to perform their duties. A SATISFIED PATIENT Nassau, August 31, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 Circulation Department (242) 502-2386 Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608 Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 WEBSITE www.tribune242.com updated daily at 2pm MIAMI The United States is losing its advantage in the global talent pool as the number of adults gaining college degrees in countries such as China and South Korea increases rapidly, according to a new study by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. One in four adults with a higher education degree is in the U.S., but industrialized and emerging economies are catching up. China has 12 per cent of all college graduates, but among young adults, its share is much higher. Of those ages 25 to 34, 18.3 per cent of college graduates are in China compared to 20.5 per cent in the U.S., the study found. "Participation hasn't increased at the speed it has at other countries," said Andreas Schleicher, head of indicators and analysis at the OECD education directorate. "When you look at the young population, the picture looks quite different already." The report being published Tuesday examined data from the 34 emerging and developed nations that make up the OECD. It comes nearly a year after results from the Programme for International Student Assess ment were released, showing U.S. students trailing behind countries such as South Korea, Finland, and Hong Kong and Shanghai in China. Out of 34 countries, the U.S. ranked 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in mathematics. The results of that test brought about renewed calls for education reform in the United States. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said it was a "wake-up call" for the country, which has reviewed the practices of top-per forming nations at a conference last spring. The new findings are likely to be seen as another piece of evidence indicating U.S. students are falling behind other countries. "It shows the U.S. is asleep at the switch and not really paying attention to what is happening around the rest of the world," said Gary Phillips, vice president and chief scientist at the American Institutes for Research. President Barack Obama has called on the United States to take steps to lead the world in the proportion of college graduates by 2020. The new report notes the U.S. still ranks among the top five in terms of the per cent of the adult population with a higher educa tion degree. However, it ranks 15th among 34 OECD countries in college attainment among 25 to 34-year-olds. The rate of graduation from a two-year college, or higher, has increased from 42 to 49 per cent between 2000 and 2009. "But here too the pace of the expansion has been more rapid in many other countries," the report states, noting the graduation rate has increased from 37 per cent to 47 per cent on average across the 34 emerging and developed OECD countries. In the United States, college graduates can expect to earn 79 per cent more than someone with a high school degree higher than in most countries examined. Likewise, those who have the least education face higher prospects of unemployment, particularly in tough economic times. "The recession has amplified the impact of education on outcomes," Schleicher said in a conference call with journalists Monday. While the benefits of education are evi dent, the path to getting there is expensive. The U.S. had the highest tuition fees among OECD countries, with students expected to spend $70,000 in direct costs and $39,000 in lost earning while studying an overall investment of more than $100,000, compared to an average of $50,000 across OECD coun tries. Meanwhile, the percentage of public spending on higher education in the U.S. that goes toward subsidies such as scholarships, grants and loans is about the same as the other countries examined, even while the tuition costs are considerably higher. The report also notes that many U.S. students are academically unprepared for the challenges of higher education, with 42 per cent of 15-year-olds scoring less than a proficiency level three in the PISA reading exam, compared to 17.3 per cent of students in Shanghai. "We are not giving a good college preparatory programme to most of our students," said Tony Wagner, co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He also not ed the high number of students in the U.S. who start but never finish a college degree. He said three key elements to boosting the number of college graduates is to better prepare students for college or a career, make a higher education degree affordable and have colleges pay closer attention to their attri tion rates. (By Christine Armario of the Associated Press). Best kept secret at Sandilands LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net US losing edge in higher education worldwide EDITOR, The Tribune "A lot of shingles are down, meaning carpenters and those with skills sets are earning money. Landscap ing has been impacted, so the landscapers are earning money. Truckers collecting debris are earning money" remarks businessmen Franklyn Wilson in The Tri bune. "In the short run, my view is that (Hurricane) Irene is going to inject an economic stimulus." Rubbish. Irene destroyed wealth and property. Resources that would be used to cre ate new wealth and new property, must now be diverted to repair and recre ate old property destroyed by Irene. Where we could have had two buildings, we now have only one broken one that is being repaired. (1) Destruction whether from war, hoodlums, or hurricanes does not "stimulate." Destruction diverts precious capital and labour from activities that would have created new wealth to replacing and repairing wealth that was destroyed by Irene. The net effect of Irene on the Bahamian economy in the short and long run is, was, and only can be: a net economic LOSS for the Bahamas. If destruction were an "economic stimulus" then a country could become rich by having a monthly hurricane every month and labour riots thrown in for good measure. The obtuseness of such a modern Keynesian style proposal should be obvious. Sadly being an expert in one's particular field of business, an economist does not one make. The only real economic stimulus is freedom from the destructive effects of nature, private criminals, and public bureaucrats (who imitate the criminal's methods). The first is not entirely in our control, the last two are. [1] Mr. Wilson is com mitting the very basic economic fallacy of the "bro ken window" as elaborated in Henry Hazlitt's "Economics In One Lesson" and in this video: http://www.youtube.com/wat ch?v=UPmo2e-bAMQ MARK DA CUNHA Freeport, Bahamas, September, 2011. EDITOR, The Tribune. NEW PROVIDENCE ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMME will it speed up traffic or just remove the flooding of the roads? After any pain one hopes that one is given a period where one can sit back and relax and enjoy the positive side for having gone through pain. Those residents of the heart of New Providence out to the east God they have endured and continue to. The NPRP was designed between 1993-94 some 17 years ago during which time I roughly estimate we probably have increased the number of vehicles on the roads by 40-50 per cent as today in total there is approximately 220,000 vehicles. I like many are asking now the obvious after all this pain will we really see an improvement in traffic flow or just have the benefit of a lesser amount of flooding during the rainy season? If the latter then I have to suggest this expenditure except for the laying of the new 30 inch water main has been a total folly of misdirected governance. Surely it is obvious what we really need? We need a dual-carriageway route north-south. We need a dual carriageway route east-west right under the hill of Government House connecting to Chippingham. This cross of arterial highways will cause an immediate improvement to what is only going to get worse. The Airport Gateway road is a total waste of money and will only cause more and more serious deadly road accidents. Why do the Argentinean contractors continue to rip established roads up then leave? There is no Project Management, nil-zero-none, but why? ABRAHAM MOSS Nassau, September 8, 2011. Will we see traffic flow improvement? Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Hurricane Irene is no economic stimulant

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AS with the assassination of President John Kennedy or the shooting of John Lennon, most of us can remember exactly what we were doing when we first heard about the fast-developing drama of 9/11. JOHN MARQUIS recalls the day that The Tribune produced a 3,000-copy special afternoon edition to record one of the most momentous news stories ofthe modern era.WHEN JFK died in Dallas in 1963, his head smashed apart by a bullet from a snipers rifle, I was living in a garret flat at the top of a four-storey Victorian house in Northampton, the boot and shoe town in the English Midlands where I set out in life as a cub-reporter half a century ago. My neighbour, a rotund amateur thespian who could inject a touch of drama into the humblest everyday occurrence, rapped on my door and yelled: Have you heard? Have you heard? The Presidents been shot. There was no play-acting that day. Inevitably, the first reaction was disbelief, followed bya grudging acceptance of the truth, and then a growing sense that things would never be quite the same again. Kennedy for my gen eration represented youth, vitality, a triumph of hope over resigned acceptance of the status quo. He embodied what America seemed to stand for a buoyant surge towards a golden future which stood in marked con trast to old Europes continuing gloomy obsession with its past. Lennons murder in 1980 had a different kind of impact. It had no political sig nificance at all, but it blew away part of our youth. Culturally, it was a sickening blow for those of us who grew to adulthood during the 1960s, when The Beatles caught the spirit of the age.MusicLennon, for all his ludicrous posturing, was a remarkable talent whose music defined an entire generation. Every Baby Boomer died a little that day because he was so much part of what we were. I was staying with a friend in London at the time and we gazed for several secondsat each other in disbe lief. When the news of 9/11 broke, I was driving along Shirley Street to begin my shift at The Tribune. I was listening to 100 JAMZ on the car radio when Ed Fields began discussing what seemed highly improbable at the time: the fact that not one, but two, airliners had crashed into the World Trade Centre in New York, and that office workers were leaping to their deaths from the upper floors. At the Tribune office, the newsroom television was already on, and staff were watching, transfixed, as CNN focused on those two stricken buildings, belching smoke and flames like a pair of giant spluttering candles as the citys firefighters contemplated the impossibility of the task facing them. When news came through ofa third airliner ploughing intothe Pentagon, we knew that America was under sus tained assault. When a fourth plane crashed in Pennsylvania en route to the White House, there was good reason to feel that every major institution of the Union might be a target, and that an orchestrated onslaught was underway designed to cripple every area of govern ment, and thus undermine the stability and security of the entire western world. Standing there, appalled at the enormity of the events unfolding, we all wondered what it meant: whether we were witnessing a crazed, one-off act of terrorism or the opening salvos in a wider war. Now we know. The death toll that bright September morning, approaching 3,000, was but a fraction of the roll call of victims recorded in the decade-long aftermath in Iraq and Afghanistan, a figure that continues to mount by the day. What it symbolised was equally appalling. Once the perpetrators had been iden tified, western man had to accept that he was at odds with an alien belief system whose adherents had no fear of death and no regard for America and its allies. Every thing we stood for was being called to account. At The Tribune, none of these things had yet become evident as we set about producing a special afternoon edition of just 3,000 copies. This was not a commercial undertaking, an attempt to cash in on tragedy, but recognition of our journalistic responsibilities. We felt it was important to publish a realtime paper for people to read as they headed home after work. Though the reporting of 9/11 was a triumph for the electronic media, which captured every development as it happened, the story was so big that it deserved and required the permanence and nobility of newsprint. While the international agencies reported new angles as they developed direct from New York, we deployed Tribune staff to report the impact of the attacks on the Bahamas. It was this mix of international and local news and commentary, collated and printed in a couple of frantic hours, that made our little Disaster edition so differ ent. No-one else in the Bahamas attempted the same feat. At the airport, homebound tourists were left stranded as flights were grounded. Hotels offered free accommodation to those who had spent all their holiday cash and were now left in limbo. The Tri bune reported their predica ment and recorded their fears. For days afterwards, tourism business in Nassau slumped. The streets were quiet, shops were empty, while the few tourists left in town wandered round in bemused silence. Sub-consciously, everyone was brac ing themselves for further atrocities and an even bigger blow to the local economy. Had the events of 9/11 been sustained, its no exaggeration to say that the Bahamas would have closed for business. With no planes in the air, Nassau and the Family Islands were dead ducks. With the entire foun dation of Bahamian prosperity under threat, it was no surprise that tourism officials feared the worst. Thankfully, there was no follow-up attack. The World Trade Centre was AlQuaedas biggest and most destructive gesture to date. The towers were the ultimate symbols of western capitalism, and the jihadist attackers gave Allah his due for helping to bring them down. For Nassau, 9/11 was its second major economic blow within a week. Exactly seven days before the Twin Towers attack, a fire-raiser torched the Straw Market in Bay Street, putting scores of vendors out of work. I was stuck in a traffic jam right outside the market when the first flames took hold. With one of the towns major tourist attractions laid waste, and the airport at a standstill, it was inevitable that deep despondency would descend on the nation. Fortunately, it was shortlived. When temporary quarters were established for the vendors, and flights from the USA were restored, a degree of optimism returned. But no-one was able to forget the appalling events of that disastrous week. It was somehow fitting that the official opening of the new straw market coincided more or less with the unveil ing of the 9/11 memorial at Ground Zero in New York. It took 10 full years to put things right, but it happened in the end. As Tribune reporters pulled together the facts on that memorable day all those years ago, the sub-editors assembled pages at a rapid rate and wrote the headline Act of War over a fuzzy photograph the only one available at the time of the second plane angling itself on the surviving tower. It was one of those occasions when journalists remind themselves why theyre in the news busi ness, and relish their role in recording history in the making. The whole exercise was reminiscent of the exciting days of multi-edition evening papers, when accuracy and immediacy made uneasy bedfellows in producing printed news at breakneck speed.V endorAn emergency crew was called in to man the presses and by mid-afternoon our one-section 9/11 special was on the streets. When I saw a Tribune vendor scuttling down Shirley Street with a pile of the hastily produced papers on his head, I felt a surge of pride and satisfaction. The Tribune had done its bit in reporting the first act of war on American soil since the Union and Confederacy traded gunfire 140 years before. It was even more gratify ing when we heard that every copy had been sold almost as quickly as they had been pro duced. Readers knew they were buying a piece of history something to show their grandchildren 50 years on, when newspapers are likely to be quaint artefacts of a bygone age and responded with enthusiasm. It would be interesting to know how many of those 3,000 Tribunes survive today. The next morning, we consolidated that solid performance with excellent pictures by New York-based Bahami an photographer Helene Seligman, whose vivid image of the second tower explod ing appeared under the headline Moment of Impact. By using her photographs in preference to agency images, we achieved a Bahamas angle on a New York story, and exclusive eye-witness quotes into the bargain. By common consent, our coverage was as good as any, and better than most. On the really big stories, it was nice to know that we could compete with the best, and that our young, home-grown reporters could gather and present facts as quickly and lucidly as anyone in the business. Those of you who still have a copy of that 9/11 special should hold on to it. By the year 2060, I reckon it will be worth several hundred times more than you paid for it. More importantly, it will be a tangible record of a tragic day, the repercussions of which will be felt many years from now. Osama bin Laden, the brains behind the 9/11 raid, is dead and gone, but its hard to believe well never hear from his kind again. THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 5 /XNH MARQUIS ATLARGE HOW THE TRIBUNE RECORDED THE HORROR OF 9/11 SPECIAL EDITION PRODUCED ON INFAMOUS DAY SMOKEbillows from the twin towers of the World Trade Centre in New York on September 11, 2001. (AP)

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LOCAL NEWS P AGE 6, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE T H E B a h a m a s C o n s t i t u t i o n P a r t y w i l l b e g i n i t s e l e c t i o n c a m p a i g n w i t h t w o d a y c o n v e n t i o n s i n G r a n d B a h a m a a n d A b a c o n e x t m o n t h T h e l e a d e r s h i p o f t h e f r i n g e p a r t y s a i d i t w i l l b e r e l e n t l e s s i n i t s e f f o r t s t o c o n v i n c e B a h a m i a n s t o s u p p o r t i t s m e s s a g e o f h o p e T h e B C P w a n t s to s h a r e i t s a g e n d a a n d p l a t f o r m a n d e x p l a i n w h a t i t p r o p o s e s t o d o w h e n i t t a k e s o f f i c e a f t e r t h e 2 0 1 2 g e n e r a l e l e c t i o n s i f g i v e n t h e o p p o r t u n i t y b y t h e e l e c to r a t e s a i d t h e p a r t y i n a s t a t e m e n t T h e B C P n o t e d t h a t w h i l e i t s n e w l y r e l e a s e d p l a t f o r m M a n d a t e 2 0 1 2 h a s o n ly 20 p a g es e x p l a in i n g p o l i c y p l a n s t h e l e a d e r s h i p h a s w r i t t e n a n d c o m p i l e d h u n d r e d o f p a g e s a b o u t h o w i t w i l l p r o v id e g o o d g o v e r n a n c e f i s c a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y a n d c o n s e r v a ti v e le a d e r s h i p t o t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e I t i s w i t h t h i s b a c k d r o p t h a t t h e B C P p r e s s e s f o r w a r d t o g i v e a l l B a h a m i a n s o n t h e i r r e s p e c t i v e i s l a n d s t h e p e r s o n a l o p p o r t u n i t y t o h e a r a n d d e c i d e f o r t h e m s e l v e s w h a t t h e B C P h a s t o o f f e r P r e p a r e d t o g o v e r n o n d a y o n e t h e B C P l e a d e r s h ip is c o n f id e n t t h a t o n c e t h e B a h a m i a n p e o p l e h a v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o b e e x p o s e d t o i t s p l a n s i t w i l l c h o o s e t h e B C P s N e w V i s i o n a n d F r e s h A g e n d a t h e s t a t e m e n t s a i d T h e G r a n d B a h a m a c o n v e n t i o n t o b e h e l d u n d e r t h e t h e m e G r a n d B a h a m a G e t R e a d y T o L i v e A g a i n w i l l t a k e p l a c e o n M o n d a y a n d T u e s d a y O c t o b e r 1 0 a n d 1 1 T h e Ab a c o C o n ve n t io n t o b e h e l d u n d e r t h e t h e m e A b a c o K e e p e r s o f T h e N o r t h G a t e w i l l t a k e p l a c e o n M o n d a y a n d T u e s d a y O c t o b e r 3 1 a n d N o v e m b e r 1 A l l m e e t i n g s w i l l b e g i n a t 7 3 0 p m T h e p a r t y h a s y e t t o c o n f i r m t h e l o c a t i o n s D u r i n g e a c h m e e t i n g C h i e f S e r v a n t L e a d e r S A l i M c I n t o s h t h e f i r s t w o m a n t o l e a d a p o l i t i c a l p a r t y i n t h e B a h a m a s a n d D e p u t y S e r v a n t L e a d e r C o l i n M i l l e r w i l l s p e a k O t h e r m e m b e r s o f t h e l e a d e r s h i p w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e t o m e e t w i t h t h o s e a t t e n d i n g T H E L y f o r d C a y I n t e r n a t i o n a l Sc hoo l c lass of 2011 d onated a tree to th e s c h o o l t o s a y t ha n k y o u f o r th e man y way s LC I S h elpe d th em g ro w and to leave a c l as s l egac y for futu re s t u d e n t s Th e clas s o f 2 011, w ho find th ems e l v e s i n u n i v e r s i t i e s s u c h a s Y a l e G eo rgeto wn, Ohio S tate, an d Sav annah College o f Art and Design, w ere repr esen ted at t he tr ee plantin g cer em o n y b y g r a d u a t e C e li n e F r ey a n d pare nt of grad uate F e l ici a Ta yl or, Mrs R os e-Mar i e Taylor LC I S p r i n c ip a l S t a c e y B o b o s a id : "T hi s cl ass o f e ig ht in di vi dua l s, LC IS s s ix th g r ad u at in g c las s w as a wa r d ed m ore t ha n $ 82 4,0 00 i n aca de mi c scho lar shi p supp ort wh i ch not on ly de m onst r at e s ho w h ar d t h ey w or ke d bu t ho w r i go ro us an d res pec ted ou r ac ademic p r og ra mme is at f irs t c la ss u niv er si ties aro und th e w orld I a m d e l i g h t e d t h a t t h e y h a v e d ec id e d t o g i ve b a c k in t h is s p e c i al w a y T h e c l a s s c h o s e t o p la n t a n a t iv e j a c a r a n d a t r e e a l o n g w i t h a p e n n y m i nted i n t he y ear of the ir g radu ati on. Th e tr ee symb olises the gro wth of t he seni ors wit hin the sc hool and the ir co ntinu ed grow th, c ont ribut i o ns an d ac hievements after t hey l eav e. P I CT U RE D fr o m L -R : G ra d u a te C e l in e F re y p ri n c i pa l St a c e y B ob o p a r e nt a n d a d m i s s io n s d ir e c t or R o s e -M a r ie T a y l o r a n d h e a d o f t h e s e c on d a r y school Frederic Bournas. L YF ORD C A Y INTE R N A TIO N AL SCHOO L C L AS S OF 20 1 1: TR UL Y G IFTE DB A H A M A S C O N S T I T U T I O N P A RT Y S E T S D A T E S F O R A B A C O AND G RAND B AH AMA C ONVE N TIO N S Share your newsThe Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Colin G Miller S A l i M c I n t o s h

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1, P AGE 7 TH E Sa n da ls F ou nd a tio n i s f u n di n g m a th e m a t ics se m i na r s for 140 Bahamian teachers at the primary and high s cho ol levels throughout the coming year. T he semin ars wh ic h wer e s t ar t ed on Au gu s t 30 20 11 ar e b ei ng h os t ed a t S an da ls Royal Bahamian in an effort t o a s s i s t t h e t e a c h e r s i n i m p r o v i n g Ba h a m i a n st u d e n t s p r o f i c i e n c y i n t h e s u b j e c t resort representatives said. Ac c ordi ng t o the Minis tr y o f E d u c at i o n r e p o r t o n t h e 20 11 B J C / B G C S E r es u l t s released in August this year, 64 per cent of junior high stu d e n t s ( g r a d e s 7 9 ) p e rf o rm a t a gr ad e D l e v el o r b e l o w Of s e n i o r h i g h s c h o o l s t u d e n t s ( g r a d e s 1 0 1 2 ), 7 5 p e r ce n t a l so perform at a D level or below in mathematics. Cla ud e tte Ro lle d ire ctor o f the Catholic Board of Educa tion, said that the presence of t h e t e a c h e r s a t t h e s e m a t h s e m in a rs sh o ws t h at e du ca t o rs a re co mm i tte d to d o wh a te v e r is n ec e ss a r y to improve the m athema tic s performance o f our Bahamian children. M r s R o l l e a l s o e xp r es s e d appreciation on behalf of the t e a ch e r s fo r t h e S a nd a l s F o u n dations assistance. T he S an d al s Fo u nd at i o n h a s gr aci o usl y a g re e d to spo n s or t hi s in it ia t iv e be ca u se S a n dal s t oo h as a s t ak e in th e Bah amia n comm unity and is committed to national devel o p m en t T h e r e i s n o b e t t e r wa y to h e lp a cou n try d e v el op than by investing in the edu c a t i o n o f i t s p e o p l e M r s Rolle said. In further pursuit of better m a t h e m a t i c s g r a d e s t h e e x p e r t i s e o f D r M a r c e l l a E ll iot t As s i st an t M ath Pr of es s o r at t he C ol l eg e o f t h e B a h a m a s ( C O B ) h a s a l s o been engaged. A s h e a d o f t h e M a t h e m a t i cs D e p a r t m e n t a t C O B D r El li ott l e d in t he de v el op me n t a n d re v isi o n o f th e cu rricu l um o f m a t h e m a t i cs co u r se s a s we ll a s t h e d e v e l op m e n t o f a B a ch el or o f M a th em at i c s d egr e e a n d as sis ted w ith the review of t he nat ion al mat hemat ic s curriculum. D u r i n g t h e i n i t i a l a s s e s s m e n t a t t h e o p e n i n g o f t h e Sa n da ls F ou n da ti on le a d se m i n a r t e a c h e r s f r o m t h e Catholic Board of Education a l o n g w i t h S a n d a l s R o y a l B ah amian s adop ted s c ho ol, G o v e r n m e n t H i g h w e r e as sess e d in the ar e as of perc ep tion, conten t c o mpete nc y a n d c o nt e n t co n ce p t u a l u n d e r standing. F o l l o w i n g o n t h e r e s u l t s fr o m t h i s a s se ss m e n t D r E l l i o t w i l l p r o d u c e a p r o f e s s i o n a l d e v e l o p m e n t p l a n t h a t w i l l spe ci fi ca ll y t a rg e t th e n e e ds o f t he teac h er s. Additionally, a s e r i e s o f c u s t o m i s e d w o r k s ho ps w i l l b e f o r mu la t ed to address the need s identified the Sandals Foundation said. A s t h e B a h a m a s l i k e m a n y countries in the region, struggles with the global economic dow ntur n, a lot of the funding for programm es dedicate d t o t e a c he r d e v e l o pm e n t a re e li m i n a t e d o r c u t fr o m th e sy s tem. P r e s e n t l y t h e C a t h o l i c B oard of Educ ation gove r ns t e n s chools on three islands, N e w P r o v i d e n c e G r a n d B a h a m a a n d A b a c o a n d e m p l oy s 2 62 ad m i n is t r a t o r s and teachers. H e i d i C l a r k e a S a n d a l s F o u n d a t i o n s p o k e s p e rs o n s a i d that the foundations support f or pro g r amme s suc h as t his i s in kee p ing w ith the c haritys mandate. W e s e e te ache r trai ning as on e o f t he m o st im p o rt a n t e l e ments to make advances with o ur educ ational s yst e m her e in the Caribbean. Mathemati c ss is one of the c or e ar eas tha t ch ild re n n ee d t o be pr ofi c i e n t i n a n d t h e r e a r e c o n stantly new and exciting ways t o e x p o s e s t u d e n t s t o t h e m ath emat ic s c o nc ept s Wi th ong oin g tra ini ng, tea c h ers are abl e to ke e p up to da te a nd i n turn pro vi de ou r reg io n s c h il d r en gr ea t er op po r t un i t y to learn. Th e S an d al s Fo un da ti on is our way of better enabling us to ta k e o n m o re o f wh a t n e e d s t o b e d o n e i n t h e i s l a n d s where we operate by making t h e C ar i bb ea n t he b es t th at we can be, she said.S A N D A L S F O U N D A T I O N H O S T S M A T H S E M I N A R S F O R 1 4 0 T E A C H E R S T H E Sa nd a ls Fo u n d at i o n i s f u n d in g mat h emat i cs semi n ars f o r 1 4 0 Ba ha mia n t each er s at t h e p ri mar y an d h i g h sch o o l l eve ls t h ro u g h o u t t h e co ming year.

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Lane/Mollie Street. He is described as being 5 tall, of medium build witha dark complexion. According to police reports, the victims were shot while inside their home at Johnson Terrace, off Johnson Road, at 4am Saturday. Police have identified the male victim as Israel Lubin. The Tribune has opted not to print the name of the woman to protect the identify of the young child. It was revealed that Lubin was charged with the murder of Tekoyo McKinney. Father-of-two McKinney, 26, was shot and killed by two armed gunmen on Cordeaux Avenue and Minnie Street. Lubin was accused of intentionally causing McKinneys death while being concerned with another. He was granted $30,000 bail last month and also required to wear an ankle bracelet to monitor his whereabouts. When asked if police thought the shooting was an act of retaliation, head of the Central Detective Unit Superintendent Paul Rolle would not speculate on a motive. I do not wish to speculate as the possible cause of the shooting maybe. We are still investigating. We know that someone fired shots into the home from the outside. "We do know that the man was involved in some conflict, but at this point we cannot say if it was retaliatory. We have not interviewed Lubin yet so we really dont know, said Mr Rolle. The woman, who was shot in the leg and had a bullet graze her head, was released from hospital yesterday. The infant, who was also shot in the leg, remains in hospital in stable condition. Lubin, who was shot in the head, was in critical condition last night. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact CDU at 5029991 or emergency services at 919. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The victim, who was a fourth grade student at the time of the incident, was dropped off by her mother at the residence of a family member where the incident occurred. Senior Justice Hartman Longley presided over the case, which opened on Wednesday. After several days of testimony, the prosecution team of Erica Kemp and Olivia Blatch, and defence attorney Carlson Shurland presented their final address to the jury yesterday morning. No DNA evidence was presented in the case, and the prosecution relied on the victims evidence, a note written by the victim telling her mother what had happened, and a doctors report indicating there was some penetration. The defence argued the prosecutions case was lacking the important aspect of DNA evidence linking the accused to the offence. It also noted the defendant was very cooperative with investigators and voluntarily took the stand to give evidence. After the judge delivered his summation in the case, the jury retired around 1.15pm to deliberate. Justice Longley told the jury the case was one of credibility. It is about who you believe. If you believe the evidence of the victim you must convict, and if you believe the evidence of the defendant you must acquit, he said. You must base your decision only on the evi dence presented in court, not on speculation. You must not allow sympathy or prejudice to influence your decision, he said. He told the jury that it can bring a verdict of 9-0 guilty or not guilty; 8-1 guilty or not guilty, 7-2 guilty or not guilty, and 6-3 guilty or not guilty, anything else would not be a proper verdict. After the guilty verdict of 6-3 was read by the foreman, Mr Shurland requested that a social report be made on his client before Justice Longley passed sentence. The Crown objected to a social report. We see no reason for this as Whyley is 59 years old and has a previous conviction, Mrs Kemp said. Mr Shurland, however, insisted the court delay sentence for a report. I dont see any danger in delaying sentence, he said. However, Mrs Kemp disagreed, adding that Whyley is a repeat offender. We dont see how a social report will help him maybe a psychiatric report, she explained. It was revealed that Whyley was convicted in 1993 of unlawful sexual intercourse and sentenced to 14 years, however a Court of Appeal overturned the sentence reducing it by some nine years. Justice Longley said sen tencing was not mandatory and there is room for the court to exercise discretion. He set sentence for Novem ber 11, 2011, at 9.30am. The victims mother did not wish to comment on the outcome of the case. When asked to comment, prosecutor Kemp said the prosecution has no feeling about the outcome, but said the role of the prosecution is to present the evidence in court. It is up to the jury to bring a verdict of guilty or not guilty based on evidence in the trial. Obviously, this trial was based on credibility. We had no DNA evi dence, but the evidence of the virtual complainant was strong enough and we believe based on that the jury rendered a guilty verdict. Mr Shurland said it was a tough case and that he did the best he could. What is disappointing in the case is the lack of direct forensic evidence, trace evidence, and even circum stantial evidence. And the police had the opportunity to have all of that in place, and so it boiled down to credibility, whether you believe a nine year old or a 59 year old, he said. law, in its present form, does not follow the Judeo-Christian position that human life begins at conception. "As I understand it, our law states that a human life begins at the time of birth and that the foetus is a part of the womans body, thus, when a pregnant woman is murdered, the assailant is only culpable for the mothers death. "I appeal to you. .to take up this cause and agitate for change to this archaic and unchristian interpretation of the value of human life," Mr Hall wrote. Under current law, a person cannot be charged with the murder of a foetus, because the unborn child is not yet considered a life, said a source in the Attorney General's Office. "There is not anything in the law which allows it. Unlike America, we do not have a definition of when life begins. In the absence of having a definition as to when life begins in the laws of the Bahamas and also in the absence of a physician saying: 'This foetus was alive and this foetus was a person,' then the offence of murder would not be (brought) in those circumstances," said the source last month. Despite this, abortions are illegal in the Bahamas. Thirty-year-old Bareshalee Lewis, a pregnant mother of three, who was shot in front of her young son while visiting her security guard husband at a construction site on Beatrice Avenue back in August. The victim's family told The Tribune that she was six months pregnant. She is the second pregnant woman to have been murdered this year. the ministry only recently became aware that the air conditioning units were not working properly as they were not in use during the summer break. I am advised that this determination could only have been made when the units were operating at full capacity, as they do when school is open, he said. The indicators were not present when school closed, said Mr Bannister. Mr Bannister said Uriah McPhee Primary will continue to close early until repairs have been completed. While Mr Bannister could not give an exact date as to when repairs are expected to be finished, he said the replacement units have already been ordered from the United States and they anticipate they will be installed soon. He added that subject to shipping time they hope the school will be functioning normally by the end of next week. know the cause of death, they can determine how the mother and daughter died. "We have the autopsy results so now we are preparing the file to go to the coroner, he said. There was water found in their lungs which lets us know they were alive when they went in the water and werent killed and then placed in the harbour. So now we are preparing the coroners inquest." Supt Rolle says the inquest will officially let police know if they are dealing with a murder or a murder suicide. He said: "It helps us determine the cause of death. The coroner will look at all the evidence, all the information and make a determination as to the cause of their death. The report will determine whether they caused their own death or it was a murder. At the end of the day, the police and the family will have an explanation." Supt Rolle said the coroner should have the file prepared by the police tomorrow. He said they did all they were required to do and now it was up to the coroner. He admitted, however, that he does not know how long the inquest will take. According to sources close to the investigation, new evidence suggests Ms Burrows was depressed at the time of her death. Based on this, officers think it is possible she murdered her daughter and killed herself. Among this evidence is said to be a letter Ms Burrows wrote to herself detailing her troubles. There are also unanswered questions about the discovery of Ms Burrows' Nissan Sentra, which was spotted on Wednesday by a passing jogger who read in the news about the search for this "missing piece" of evidence. According to Supt Rolle, suggestions that the car was driven by someone after the mother and daughter died does not necessarily mean they were murdered. He pointed out that someone might have stolen the car from another location where the victims had left it and taken it to the Cricket Club on Wednesday. The car was found intact. Police have also pointed out that they have yet to discover any evidence of wrongdoing. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to contact CDU at 502-9991 or emergency services at 919. FROM page one CALL FOR TWO COUNTS OF MURDER WHEN PREGNANT WOMAN KILLED PASTOR GUILTY OF SEX WITH GIRL, 9 FROM page one FROM page one AUTOPSY RESULTS REVEAL MOTHER AND DAUGHTER BOTH DROWNED THE BODIES of Amanda Seymour Burrows, 32, and her five-year-old daughter Kaysha were pulled from waters behind Elizabeth and Bay Plaza. FROM page one REPAIRS FORCE THE EARLY CLOSURE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL FROM page one MAN SOUGHT IN CONNECTION WITH TRIPLE SHOOTING

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LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 13, 201 1, P AGE 1 1 H E A D S T A R T P R E S C H O O L K 2 s t ud en t s a t H ea d St a r t P r eS ch o o l o n M a rk e t St re et a r e a l l s m i l es i n th e cl a s s r o o m a s t h e n ew s ch o o l y e a r go t u n d e r w a y Perez Watson Kenae Brown Ethan Lindsay Alisha Joseph Garth Johnson Malia Hall

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By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE GRAND BAHAMA CHAMBERof Commerces president yesterday added his voice to those urging the Govern ment to renew Freeports Business Licence and real property tax exemptions until 2054, arguing that to do otherwise would shack le the citys economy and deter potential investors. KP Turnquest told Tri bune Business it was unfair to leave the issue of whether to extend both exemptions, which are currently set to expire in 2015, hanging until after the forthcoming general election given that the difficult global economic environment already made attracting investment difficult. Warning that no businessmen or financiers would invest in Freeport until they could plan their business models with certainty, Mr Turnquest urged: Its critical that those [exemptions] are renewed and extended, and they should be extended through to 2054 and the end of the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, so we dont have to go through this process again. If we dont make a deci$4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.32 $5.18 $5.38 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMASFerries yesterday said the Governments blanket ban on the scrap metal trade had slashed freight revenues on its back haul routes from the Family Islands by 50 per cent, a senior executive urging that a more surgical approach to regulation should have been taken. Readily acknowledging that copper exports had to be banned, Khaalis Rolle, Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer, said legitimate scrap metal firms and associated businesses such as his could ill-afford the loss of critical revenues during harsh economic times. He questioned why the Bahamas needed to shut down per cent of the scrap metal industry that was not responsible for the epidemic of copper thefts impacting utilities and businesses, given that copper was estimated to only account for 5 per cent of total activity. Warning that the shutdown was likely to increase unemployment, and potential criminal activity, Mr Rolle urged the Government to publicly state where it was in its review of the scrap metal industry and development of potential regulations. We would like to know ourselves, and other shipping companies would like to know, where the Government is in its review of this industry, Mr Rolle told Tribune Business. Were experiencing a large impact from the shutdown of that industry. We transport a large quantity of scrap metal from the Family Island destinations we serve. On our back haul from the Family Islands, that repreBy NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A LEADINGwholesaler yesterday said most Bahamasbased suppliers had cut City Markets off six to seven weeks ago for failing to pay its regular monthly account, conceding that everyone in the industry was worried about recovering the collec tive multi-million dollar debt it owed to them. Bruce Thompson, managing director of Thompson Trading, the Nassau-based agent for brands such as Pepsi-Cola, Nestle, Colgate and Quaker, confirmed to Tribune Business that some wholesalers had begun the process of taking City Mar kets to court to recover sums allegedly due to them. Responding to comments by City Markets principal Mark Finlayson, who in an interview with Tribune Business warned Bahamian wholesalers to work with the supermarket chain or else face the prospect of writingoff 100 per cent of what was due to them, Mr Thompson accused him of seeking to blame the industry for the companys woes. He added that Mr Finlayson got a hell of a deal from the Bahamas Whole salers Association in late 2010 over the debts incurred by the former BSL Holdings owner ship, an agreement Mr Thompson said he personally did not support as it involved no interest payments. As for Mr Finlaysons assertion that the Association imposed credit limits upon City Markets after the two sides signed their 2010 agreement, Mr Thompson said this was a normal practice that Thompson Trading applied to all its retail clients, including the supermarket chain under BSL Holdings ownership. The problem here is with the balance that is owed, Mr Thompson told Tribune Business. It was split in half, and City Markets was given 18 months to pay the balance off with no interest. Thats a hell of a deal. I didnt agree with that. Thats what everyone agreed to do. We cut them off because they stopped paying their normal monthly accounts. Most of us had them cut off six-seven Pension plan number one concern, while staff health insurance also dropped CONFUSION OVER CITY MARKETS STORE CLOSURES CITY MARKETS CUT OFF 6-7 WEEKS AGO Suppliers worried on debt recovery Leading wholesaler says retailer got hell of a deal he disagreed with on old debts Concern on speculated moves by Bahamas Food Services chief SEE page 2B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMAS-BASED Islands of the World Fashion Week is working with two other local operations that will act as stepping stones for Bahamian designers to progress to the main event, its head telling Tribune Business that many are truly not ready yet for international exposure. Owen Bethel, head of the Nassau-based Montaque Group and president of Modes Iles, the Islands of the World Fashion Week organiser, said he was looking to make the latCHAMBER CHIEF BACKS TAX BENEFIT EXTENSION TO 2054 Failure to do so will shackle Freeport economy Sa ys unfair to leave Business Licence/property tax issue unresolved But urges: Dont sing final song for Freeport SEE page 2B FERRIES FREIGHT REVENUE OFF50% OVER METAL BAN Company calls for more surgical approach to issue, rather than blanket ban Says cutting off 95% of sector to shut down 5% represented by copper SEE page 3B KHAALIS ROLLE Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer BAHAMAS FASHION STEPPING STONES Bahamian show organiser moves to improve local designers readiness Making Islands of the World more exclusive, with goal of five of 10 e xhibitors being Bahamian SEE page 3B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CONFUSION reigned last night over the immediate fate of two New Providence-based City Market stores after the union representing the companys line staff said it had received a fax notifying it of their closure. However, when a Tribune Business team visited the Seagrapes Shopping centre store last night it was trading normally. The same situation occcurred with two City Market Freeport stores where staff were initially told to go home only to be called back and the outlets recommenced normal operations. City Markets principal Mark Finlayson told Tribune Business on Monday that the supermarket chain was planning to close both the Seagrapes and South Beach stores to carry out $2.5m refrigeration repairs, but said the company had not put this into effect. It was looking to do so, he added, at the end of September. But when interviewed by Tribune Business yesterday, Rosalie McKenzie, administrator for the Bahamas Commercial Stores, Supermarket and Warehouse Workers Union, confirmed that the union had received a fax from Mark Finlayson, head of Trans-Island Traders, City Markets SEE page 2B

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BUSINESS PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE sion on that, all were doing is putting shackles on the economy, and no one will invest until they are sure their investment model is secured for a definite period. Emphasising that Freeports whole economic model rested entirely on the Hawksbill Creek Agreement, Mr Turnquest said the citys development as a second economic centre, when compared to the Family Islands, proved it worked. So I hope they can see fit, whether its this government or the next government, to make that extension permanent to the end of the Agreement, and make that clear as they go about campaigning so everyone knows where they are, he added. Its unfair to leave that on the table as unfinished in a period where we in know were in the most difficult of times to solicit investment. Mr Turnquest thus backed a similar call by Fred Smith QC, the Callenders & Co attorney and partner, who earlier this month also called on the Ingraham administration to extend Freeports Business Licence and real property tax exemptions until 2054, pointing out that Freeports economy still generated hundreds of millions of dollars in tax revenues for the Treasury per annum. The Prime Minister himself recently raised the question over whether the exemptions should be extended, given that Bahamian residents and businesses throughout the remainder of this nation paid the same taxes while Freeport did not. And, prior to that, he said negotiations over the exemption renewal with the Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) and its licencees would not start until after the upcoming general election. But many in Freeport have privately told Tribune Business that the uncertain ty over whether the tax exemptions will be renewed is potentially turning off investors, BORCO's new owner, Buck eye Partners, having included concerns over this in material sent to investors. And, with businesses already paying annu al licence fees to the GBPA, having to pay Business Licence fees to Nassau would result in them being 'double taxed'. Several Freeport-based sources have suggested the Prime Minister believes that Freeport, its businesses and residents are getting an 'easy ride' and not paying their due share of taxes, something he wants to correct especially given the weak state of the Government's finances. And there is also a body of opinion which believes the Government will seek a 'trade-off' for extending the tax exemptions, namely getting something in return. This could be, they say, an agreement by the GBPA to hand over all regulatory responsibility for utilities in the Freeport area to the Utilities Regulation & Competition Authority (URCA), something the Government has always wanted. Such a course of action, though, could contravene the Hawksbill Creek Agreement. Meanwhile, Mr Turnquest described Freeport/Grand Bahamas three most pressing economic needs as promotion, job creation, and creating airlift/transportation lift. Thats kind of what we need, he told Tribune Business. Unfortunately, we dont see anything on the horizon. How ever, we do hope that it doesnt get worse. Things are pretty much stable at this point, and were working hard to generate some activity and secure some business. We dont want to sing the final song for us. We believe Grand Bahama is ripe for investment, and believe we will find the right partners. Were continuing to work with our partners to do some promotion internationally. Mr Turnquest said the Chamber and other stakeholders were in the third phase of their economic development plan for Grand Bahama, creating the strategic plan that we will follow to hopefully attract investment into the island, and build competitiveness locally and internationally. The Grand Bahama Chamber was also working with the Government, Port Authority and other stakeholders on the creation of the Ingraham administrations Grand Bahama Development Board. It is coming together, Mr Turnquest said of the Board. Were still defining the terms of reference, the kind of activities it will engage in, and what the focus will be. weeks ago. They just keep buying from the States; theyre not buying from the local wholesalers. No one is going to extend them credit if theyre not paying their bills, and they stopped paying their bills. It is not clear just how much City Markets owes collectively to Bahamian wholesalers. Its latest balance sheet, for the nine months to March 9, 2011, show accounts payable and accrued expenses of $9.05 million, and it is likely that a significant chunk of this is due to local suppliers. Mr Thompson said Thompson Trading was at the lower end of what was due to Bahami an wholesalers, adding: I kept their credit limit as tight as I could keep it. Asked about Mr Finlaysons thinly-veiled threat that, if he were to liquidate City Markets, the Bahamian wholesale industry would receive nothing because his familys debt ranked ahead of theirs, Mr Thompson expressed scepticism that it would work out this way. He alleged that Mr Finlayson had signed personal guarantees for the sums owed to Bahamian wholesalers, as per the 2010 payment agreement, implying that the industry would hold him and his familys 78 per cent majority shareholding vehicle, Trans-Island Traders, to that. The boys [Mr Finlayson] desperate and hes just trying to throw blame on someone else, Mr Thompson told Tribune Business. I said to someone a few weeks ago that theyd try to blame it on the wholesalers and say its their fault. It isnt. He expressed confidence that the Bahamian people would see through this, but conceded that all wholesale players were concerned about the prospects of recovering 100 per cent of what was owed. Im sure everyone is worried about taking them to court, Mr Thompson said. I know some of them [wholesalers] are in the process; they have started the process of collection. The Thompson Trading managing director also expressed concern about speculation once again linking Bahamas Food Services principal, Ben Frisch, with a potential purchase of City Markets. Were worried about what Bens up to, Mr Thompson said. Hes been in negotiations, and been seen walking through their warehouse. For Ben to have wholesale and retail would be utterly disastrous for all the other wholesalers. Mr Frisch, who heads Bahamas Food Services and Tropic Seafood, plus their Jack sonville-based parent, Beaver Street Fisheries, initially beat Mr Finlayson to the City Markets purchase when BSL Holdings placed the company up for sale late last year,. However, he ultimately withdrew, but that was a likely taste of his interest in setting up an integrated Bahamian wholesale/retail food model. Tribune Business also understands that an offer has been made to purchase City Markets three Grand Bahama-based stores, although it is unclear whether Mr Frisch is behind this. Likely contenders are existing food retail businesses on the island, including Sawyers Fresh Market and Save More. If City Markets is liquidated, or is split up or sold, the prospects for the Bahamian wholesale industry remain unclear. They could, though, lose what was once a highly important customer, ranking alongside the likes of AML Foods and SuperValue in terms of importance. In Mondays interview with Tribune Business, Mr Finlayson had warned: We bought the shares in this company for $1, and every penny that my family has put in has been in debt. That debt is as solid as any bank debt, and if they decide theyre going to court, I dont blame them but, in the final analysis, my familys debt will have to be paid off before any of theirs. They have a choice to work with us, or write that money off. If I was to liquidate, to date this company does not have enough money to pay the Finlaysons off. I was willing to work with them to save their businesses, along with this, but if they dont understand and are not willing to work with us, they are back in the same position they were prior to us buying the company. 78 per cent majority shareholder, informing them of the closure of the South Beach and Seagrapes Shopping Centre stores with effect from yesterday. Adding that the union doesnt know what to say about City Markets actions and the impact on its 300 members employed by the company, Ms McKenzie said its newly-elected president and officer slate had been seeking a meeting with Mr Finlayson from their August 15 installation date, but to no avail. She said yesterdays fax was the first communication received from City Markets principal, and added: We just came from South Beach and the Seagrapes store. The staff were told to report to work, and then told to go back home. There has been no communication with the union and involvement with the stakeholders. We dont know what to say about what the company is doing with our members. We understand the situation with the company and the issues they are having, but communicate with us so we can let the members know what is going on. Ms McKenzie said Mr Finlaysons fax said that effective immediately City Markets was closing two New Providence locations, leaving just its Cable Beach and Har bour Bay stores open on this island. It also has three Grand Bahama stores, although there are suggestions an offer has been made to buy these. Well-informed Tribune Business source said a City Markets Board of Directors meeting was yesterday due to decide whether the company would go through with the $2.5 million investment in refrigeration repairs necessary to rescue the Seagrapes and South Beach stores. Some suggested it did not make sense, given that City Markets was only likely to repeat the cycle that pushed it to an estimated $14 million operating loss for the financial year to end-June 2011. Ms McKenzie told this newspaper that around 150 employees had been impacted by the store closures, and their immediate future was uncertain. We dont know if theyre going to keep them at home, she said, adding that Mr Finlayson was yet to confirm whether they would be placed in the remaining two New Providence stores. Were looking at it very seriously, Ms McKenzie said. Peoples lives are being affected by this, and adjust ments made to peoples lives. Prior to the stores closing, the most people were working was 24 hours a week. People have been employed there for 30 years, and they do not even communicate with the staff. The union thinks they should at least have some respect and communicate with the staff. Ms McKenzie added that the status of City Markets employee pension fund was our number one concern, given that the supermarket chain had made no contributions to it since 2007. She suggested that if City Markets was making no payments into the fund, and given that it was a 100 per cent employer contribution, the plan should be wound up and staff receive what was due to them. Ms McKenzie also confirmed to Tribune Business that City Markets had dropped group health insurance coverage for its employees. Staff found that out when, because of Back to School, a lot of members had to take their kids for physicals, she added. They found the insurance was no longer in effect, and thats another thing they did not communicate. Asked about the unions view on City Markets survival prospects, Ms McKenzie said: Its not in our view looking good, so thats why we wanted to sit with Mr Finlayson to see exactly where City Markets future lies. We have no idea at all. Staff morale is very, very low because nobody knows whether, if they come in today, they will be shipped out tomorrow and asked to leave the property with no compensation. The staff is in a very depressed state right now. They have no working spirit. Their minds are not there. This, Ms McKenzie said, was costing City Markets business, as relatives did not want to shop where their kin were unhappy. Customer ser vice was also being impacted. Chamber chief backs tax benefit extension to 2054 FROM page one CONFUSION OVER CITY MARKETS STORE CLOSURES FROM page one MARKFINLAYSON City Markets cut off 6-7 weeks ago FROM page one

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ter now a biennial event tak ing place in May and November, starting in 2012 a more exclusive event. Of the 10 designers who would exhibit at each Islands of the World event, Mr Bethel said he ultimately wanted five to be Bahamian, explaining to Tribune Business that he was seeking the best of the best. Theres been a lot of inter est from young designers, but a lot of Bahamian designers are truly not ready for inter national exposure, and a lot of work needs to be done in terms of the workmanship, the fabric selection and presenta tion of their designs, he said. Were working with two other operations in the Bahamas, who will also be working other events to encourage designers to participate and make it a stepping stone for Islands of the World. They can get their feet wet, learn very quickly and, hopefully, will then be considered for participation in Islands of the World. Mr Bethel declined to name the other Bahamian organisations, but added that there were two-three Bahamian designers who currently had the ability to feature in Islands of the World. Ideally, what were looking to see is, out of the 10 designs, at least five are Bahamians, Mr Bethel said. What we have to do in terms of taking Islands of the World to the next level is to be more selective in who we allow into each show. That is a way of making it more exclusive, making sure we get the best of the best, not only from the Bahamas but the region. Adding that Islands of the World had certainly started the process of creating a Bahamian fashion industry, Mr Bethel said the number of local designers wanting to establish a career in the indus try had increased every year since the show started. At least 15 I have s in touch with personally are pursuing further their interest in, and careers, in the fashion industry, he added. There are five I know of who are studying and gone on to actu al further education in the fashion industry abroad. sents about 50 per cent of our revenue...Because of the shut down of this industry, were seeing the impact, and given this type of timing we can ill-afford to lose activity that is there and readily available economic activity. Were at the point where were seeing impact to our business and the Family Island economies. Mr Rolle urged the Government to work quickly to support the scrap metal industry, adding that it had provided a living for Family Island residents who would otherwise be unemployed. He added that he had seen whole families scouring the bush for scrap metal. It was the same in New Providence, where Mr Rolle said that in St Cecilia hemeta whole family husband, wife andtwo children scouring the area for scrap metal to fill up their white pickup truck. I understand the need to protect copper, Mr Rolle said. One of the things you can do to protect the immediately is to put a ban on copper, but not other metals. We should not shut down an entire industry because of one theft-prone segment that represents 5 per cent of the transactions that take place in the indus try. We shut down 95 per cent to deal with 5 per cent. The Bahamas Ferries chief marketing officer added: We need to find a way to address the problem directly, rather than take the blanket approach...... A much more surgical approach should have been taken. Youre compromising opportunities for businesses to survive. We have to be more surgical and go to the root of the problem to get better results. Our business benefited from it. With high petroleum prices, up 30 per cent over last year, we were very pleased with that business. Weve created a situation where were no better off now than we were prior to the ban. I think, in fact, were worse off. I would call for an immediate lifting of the ban, apart from copper, and a more surgical approach to managing and regulating the trade and industry. Mr Rolle said the Governments approach was in danger of solving one problem but creating another, warning that the industry shut-down was likely to push some metal gatherers to look for other ways to feed themselves and their families, including crime. He urged the Government to adopt a consultative approach, meeting with all the industrys stakeholders to collectively monitor and regulate the sector in a manner acceptable to all. Bahamas Ferries, Mr Rolle said, saw real scrap metal carried on its vessels in the form of old cars and tractors, and was also able to identify shiny new copper whose origins seemed suspicious. We miss the revenue, and when you go through difficult periods our philosophy is that the last place we look to cut expenses is the employees, Mr Rolle said of the company. We feel an obligation to keep people employed, but that has to be at a reasonable place. We have the obligation to maintain the boats to A1 standard and deliver great service to the customers, but we cant do these things if we do not get revenue. Thats [scrap metal] a significant part of revenue during this difficult period. Ive just had a meeting with our freight manager, and we are concerned because we do not have a lot of readily available options. Noting the 12,000 applicants for the Governments National Jobs Readiness and Training initiative exceeded the 3,000 available places more than four-fold, Mr Rolle added: Unless there is a silver bullet solution to the job problem, then I would suggest the Government work with businesses to help keep them solvent. Areas naturally creating employment, you cant stifle them; you have to encourage it. Earl Deveaux, minister of the environment, could not be contacted for comment yesterday. However, he last week said that draft regulations to regulate the scrap metal industry should be ready to be tabled when Parliament reopens this fall. Mr Deveaux told Tribune Business: "We provided a summary of the meeting we had with the dealers and made some recommendations to the Government, the offshoot of which is that the regulations to regulate the industry will be prepared and, hopefully, be ready for the next sitting of Parliament so that they can be tabled and discussed. "With respect to the existing condition and the dealers, the dealers were asked to give evidence of what they had for export and how they would have acquired it, so that representations could be made to the Ministry of Finance, under which the Customs Department falls, to accommodate any scrap metal that may have been obtained under contractual obligsations or derelict vehicles." On July 27, the Government enforced a temporary ban on the scrap metal trade, while imposing a permanent ban on all copper exports. Itsaid "no person shall, for a period of 90 days from the coming into force of the regulations, export any scrap metal from the Bahamas to any place outside the Bahamas". The Export Control (Prohibition of Scrap Metal and Copper) Regulations 2011 add: "No person shall export any copper from the Bahamas to any place outside the Bahamas." The move is similar to that of Jamaica, which has banned the trade of scrap metal in order to curb the wanton theft and mangling of valuable property. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3B FERRIES FREIGHT REVENUE OFF 50% OVER METAL BAN FROM page one BAHAMAS FASHION STEPPING STONES FROM page one Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. OWEN BETHEL, head of the Nassau-based Montaque Group

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NEW YORK Associated Press A LATE AFTERNOON rally pushed the stock market higher for only the second day this month. Major indexes spent most of Monday lower as investors worried that Greece could be edging closer to default. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note reached another record low as investors piled into U.S. government debt on fears that Europe's debt crisis could spread. The euro fell toa seven-month low against the dollar. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 68.99 points, or 0.6 percent, to close at 11,061.12. All of the gains came in the last 10 minutes of trading. The Dow had been down as many as 167 points shortly after 2 p.m. Traders said a combination of technical factors and reports that China was buying Italian government bonds triggered the late spurtof buying. "Over the last several days, stocks have been pushed down so hard it was as if somebody was trying to push a balloon underwater," said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor's Equity Research. "It's bound to pop up even if only for a short period of time." The S&P 500 index rose 8.04, or 0.7 percent, to 1,162.27. It had dropped as many as 18 points. Technology stocks fared better than the overall market following news of a semiconductor deal. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index rose 27.10 points, or 1.1 percent, to 2,495.09. J.J. Kirnahan, chief options strategist at T.D. Ameritrade, said reports that China planned to buy a significant amount of Italian bonds contributed to the sudden reversal. "The last 16 minutes was insane," he said. Kirnahan said investors should not take the day's gains as a sign of a longerlasting trend. "If tomorrow we get any indications that China really isn't going to get involved, then we should expect a quick sell-off." Worries over Europe's debt crisis drove traders into Treasurys, pushing the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to 1.87 percent, the lowest since the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis began keeping daily records in 1962. During the financial crisis in late 2008, the 10-year yield hit a low of 2.05 percent. Investors fear that Greece could default on its debt, leading to more disruptions in global financial markets. They're also concerned that rating agencies may cut the credit ratings of French banks because of their holdings of Greek bonds. That would mark the spread of Europe's debt troubles from peripheral countries like Greece and Ireland to the heart of Europe's financial system. "All these things together are getting me concerned," said Douglas Cote, chief market strategist for ING Investment Management. "With Europe's banks under so much duress and Greece near an imminent default, you can't tell me the U.S. is insulated from their problems. I don't buy it." The resignation of a key European Central Bank official combined with worries over a new recession in the United States led to a stock market sell-off Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average and Standard & Poor's 500 index have fallen for six of the past seven weeks. Before Monday, the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq had posted gains only one day this month, last Wednesday. Tenet Healthcare Corp. sank 10 percent to $4.52, the biggest drop among companies in the S&P 500. The hospital operator said it expects earnings to take a hit from a rise in patients using Medicaid, which pays hospitals less for treatment than private insurance. McGraw-Hill Cos. rose 4 percent to $40.26. The company said it will split into two public companies, one unit focused on education services and the other centered on markets, including the rating agency Standard & Poor's and J.D. Power and Associates. NetLogic Microsystems Inc. jumped 51 percent to $48.12 after Broadcom Corp. said it has agreed to acquire the maker of semi conductors for $3.7 billion. Bank of America Corp. rose 1 percent to $7.05 after the bank said it would slash 30,000 jobs as part of a costcutting drive. Wynn Resorts rose 2 percent to $151.72 after a unit of the casino operator said it had a signed a deal to build a resort in Macau. Casinos have been expanding their operations in the former Portuguese colony, considered the world's most lucrative gambling market. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 5B LATE RALLY PUSHES STOCKS HIGHER; 2ND GAIN IN SEPTEMBER CHRISTOPHER CULHAM left, of Barclays Capital directs trading from his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday in New York. (AP) WILLIAM BOTT left, Michael Volpe, center, and James Malone, all of Barclays Capital, work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday in New York. (AP)

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OMAHA, Neb. Associated Press BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY has hired a second hedge fund manager to help run the company's investment portfolio and prepare for what it described as the eventual retirement of 81-year-old bil lionaire Warren Buffett. Berkshire said Monday that Ted Weschler will join the Omaha-based company early next year. The 50-year-old has announced to the partners of his hedge fund, Peninsula Capital Advisors, that he will begin winding up the fund so he can join Berkshire. The announcement helps clarify the investment part of Berkshire's succession plan, but because the company plans to split Buffett's job into separate CEO, chairman and investment manager jobs, it's still not clear who will lead Berkshire after Buffett is gone. Weschler founded Peninsula Capital in 1999, and is a managing partner of the firm, based in Charlottesville, Va. The hedge fund makes invest ments in publicly traded companies. Peninsula Capital held a concentrated portfolio of nine stocks as of June 30 that was worth nearly $2 billion, according to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Berkshire has said that the board has a list of four internal candidates to replace Buffett as chief executive, but Buffett has always refused to name them. Berkshire said Buffett will continue to manage most of the company's investments "until his retirement." Stifel Nicolaus analyst Meyer Shields said he believes the use of the word retirement may be significant because previously Buffett had suggested he would continue working until he either became incapacitated or died. "The word retirement seems sort of jarring to us," Shields said. Andy Kilpatrick, the stock broker-author of "Of Permanent Value, the Story of War ren Buffett," said it is unusual for Berkshire or Buffett to use the word retirement, but he doesn't expect imminent change at the company. And Weschler's hiring helps clarify the succession plan a bit. "I think that should give some relief to people who are wondering what's going to happen," Kilpatrick said. Buffett did not immediately respond to a request for an interview Monday. Weschler's hiring comes after Berkshire last fall named Todd Combs to help run a portfolio of roughly $1 billion to $3 billion of investments. Weschler also will run a segment, but Monday's release didn't specify the size of the portfolio he will run. Monday's announcement said that Combs and Weschler will eventually share responsibility for Berkshire's entire equity and debt portfolio, after Buffett no longer serves as CEO. The announcement said that they could be aided by one additional manager, and their management of the entire portfolio would be sub ject to the direction of the CEO at that time, as well as the company's board. "With Todd and Ted on board, Berkshire is well-positioned for successor invest ment management at the time Mr. Buffett is no longer CEO," the company said. Weschler did not immedi ately respond to a message left at his office Monday morning. Shields said he doesn't know much about Weschler, but he appears to have a solid investment record. Kilpatrick said Weschler's hiring is similar to Combs' in that neither man was wellknown before Buffett chose them. "Another under-the-radar pick," Kilpatrick said. Weschler may have bought his job interview with Buffett through an annual auction that benefits the Glide Foun dation, which provides social services to the poor and homeless in San Francisco. Glide spokeswoman Denise Lamott confirmed Monday that Weschler paid nearly $5.3 million to win the last two auctions for private lunches with Buffett. Unlike other winners of the auction who enjoyed publicity while dining with Buffett in New York, Weschler asked to remain anonymous and met Buffett at one of his favorite Omaha restaurants after the 2010 and 2011 auctions. In addition to helping run Peninsula Capital, Weschler is a director of WSFS Financial Corp. Peninsula held 1.5 million shares of WSFS as of June 30. In 1989, Weschler was a founding partner of Quad-C, a private equity firm. Before that, he spent six years with W.R. Grace & Co. in several positions. Peninsula held near ly 10.8 million shares of W.R. Grace. He received his bachelor's degree in economics from The Wharton School of the Uni versity of Pennsylvania. Before joining Berkshire, Combs managed the Castle Point Capital hedge fund for five years. Class B shares of Berkshire stock rose $1.47 Monday to close at $69.24. It's Class A shares gained $1,528 to close at $103,800. BUSINESS P AGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE ,Q$FFRUGDQFHZLWK$UWLFOHf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ssociated Press CAROL BARTZhas resigned from the Yahoo board of directors that she blasted for firing her asthe company's CEO last week. The resignation reversed a defiant stance that Bartz took in a fiery interview published on Fortune magazine's website on Sept. 8. Bartz said, at the time, that she intended to retain her seat on Yahoo's board even though she considered her fellow directors tobe "doofuses." Bartz, who is 63, resigned from the board Sept. 9, according to an email from board spokesman Charles Sipkins. Yahoo Inc. had previously said that Bartz was obligated to resign after her ouster as CEO. Yahoo, which is based in Sunnyvale, Calif., has nine members left on its board. An investment hedge fund that owns a 5.2 percent stake in Yahoo is asking Chairman Roy Bostock and three other directors to resign too. The fund, called Third Point, contends the board needs to be held accountable for hiring Bartz in January 2009 and other decisions that have contributed to a steep drop in Yahoo's stock price in the last five years. Bartz's resignation from the board could clear the way for her and the company to agree on the terms of her severance package. Ina Securities and Exchange Commission filing last week, Yahoo acknowledged Bartz qualifies for severance without providing further details. At the end of last year, Bartz was eligible for a severance package worth about $10.4 million in cash and stock incentives, according to calculations that Yahoo listed in a shareholder proxy statement issued in April. Stock awards that Bartz received this year could drive up the value of her severance package. FIRED YAHOO CEO BARTZ BACKS DOWN, RESIGNS FROM BOARD CAROL BARTZ former Yahoo CEO. (AP) BUFFETT ADDS INVESTMENT EXEC AS PART OF SUCCESSION

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HELENA, Mont. Associated Press U.S. Sen. Max Baucus says Congress is moving closer to allowing U.S. horses to be slaughtered primarily for their meat with a move that allows inspections of the facilities. The Democratic senator has been backing an idea to allow the U.S. Department of Agriculture to again start inspecting horse slaughter plants. The ban on inspections dates back to 2006 and effectively resulted in a ban on domestic horse slaughter and the processing of horse meat, which is considered a delicacy in some overseas markets. The Senate Appropriations Committee on Wednesday passed an agricultural spending bill that would allow inspection of slaughtered horses, which is needed to ship meat and ani mal byproducts across state borders. Baucus said he is making sure that language stays intact as the appropriation process continues. A Government Account ability Office study found that the horse slaughter ban has resulted in a shift of the market to Canada and Mex ico, Baucus noted. It also has resulted in lower horse prices and strained local animal welfare agencies that are now dealing with more cases of horse abandonment. "We've seen some pretty shocking cases across Montana of horse abandonment and neglect as owners face tough economic times," Bau cus said in a statement. "This ban is a part of the problem and has resulted in the inhumane treatment of injured and sick horses along with hurting the economy. We have an opportunity here to do the right thing for our farmers and ranchers while improving the welfare of horses." The Montana Legislature in 2009 passed a new law that aimed to court the construction of a horse slaughter plant in Montana, a law prompted by complaints from ranchers and agricul ture interests. But no slaughter plant has ever been built, in part because the USDA inspection ban would prevent horse meat from being exported outside Montana. WASHINGTON Associated Press IN Asharp challenge to the GOP, President Barack Obama proposed paying for his costly new jobs plan Monday with tax hikes that Republicans have already emphatically rejected. The reception to his new proposal was no more welcoming, setting the stage for a likely new fight with Congress. Flanked at the White House by workers he said the legislation would help, Obama declared, "This is the bill that Congress needs to pass. No games. No politics. No delays." He sent it to Capitol Hill saying, "The only thing that's stopping it is politics." The president's proposal drew criticism from House Speaker John Boehner, who'd previously responded in cautious but somewhat receptive tones to the $447 billion jobs plan made up of tax cuts and new spending that Obama first proposed in an address to Congress last Thursday. "It would be fair to say this tax increase on job creators is thekindof proposal both parties have opposed in the past. We remain eager to work together on ways to support job growth, but this proposal doesn't appear to have been offered in that bipartisan spirit," Boehner spokesman Brendan Buck said. The biggest piece of the payment plan would raise about $400 billion by eliminating certain deductions, including on charitable con tributions, that can be claimed by wealthy taxpayers. Obama has proposed that in the past to help pay for his health care overhaul, for example and it's been shot down by Republican lawmakers along with some Democrats. Yet by daring Republicans anew to reject tax hikes on the rich Obama could gain a talking point as the 2012 presi dential campaign moves for ward, if not a legislative victory. Ata Rose Garden event Monday, Obama brandished his jobs bill in the air and surrounded himself with police officers, firefighters, teachers, construction workers and others he said would be helped by it. Adopting a newly combative tone that's been welcomed by dispirited Democrats, Obama demanded immediate action on the legislation, which the White House sent to Capitol Hill Monday afternoon. "Instead of just talking about America's job creators, let's actually do something for America's job creators." Obama told of reading a quotation in a newspaper article from a Republican con gressional aide who questioned why Republicans should work with Obama since the result might just be to help the president politically. "That was very explicit," Obama said. Buck, the Boehner spokesman, said the anonymous quote cited by the president didn't reflect the view of Republican leadership. And even as Obama was accusing Republicans of playing politics, he and his Democratic allies were marshaling an aggressive political response of their own. Obama was traveling to Boehner's home state of Ohio Tuesday to promote his jobs plan, and following that with a trip Wednesday to North Carolina, a traditionally Republican state he won in 2008. He was getting backup from the Democratic National Committee, which announced a television ad campaign start ing Monday to promote Oba ma's jobs plans in key swing and early-voting states and to call on voters to pressure their lawmakers for support. The ads urge viewers to "Read it. Fight for it. ... Pass the President's Jobs Plan." The back-and-forth was tak ing on elements of a political campaign, with high stakes for both sides as Obama heads into his re-election fight with the economy stalled, unemployment stuck at 9.1 percent and polls showing deep public unhappiness with his leadership on the economy. In an appearance later Monday with his aides on five African-American news Web sites, Obama suggested that even a legislative loss for his plan could translate into a political win for him. "I need people to be out there promoting this and pushing this and making sure that everybody understands the details of what this would mean, so that one of two things happen: Either Congress gets it done, or if Congress doesn't get it done people know exactly what's holding it up," the president said. The jobs package would combine tax cuts for workers and employers by reducing the Social Security payroll tax, with spending elements including more money to hire teachers, rebuild schools and pay unemployment benefits. There are also tax credits to encourage businesses to hire veterans and the long-term unemployed. The payment method the White House announced Monday would consist of: $405 billion from limiting the itemized deductions for charitable contributions and other deductions that can be taken by individuals making over $200,000 a year and families making over $250,000; $41 billion from closing loopholes for oil and gas com panies; $18 billion from requir ing fund managers to pay higher taxes on certain income; $3 billion from changing the tax treatment of corpo rate jets. White House Budget Director Jacob Lew said that Obama will also include those tax proposals in a broader debt-cutting package he plans to submit next week to a con gressional "supercommittee" charged with finding $1.2 trillion in savings later this year. He said that the supercommittee would have the option of accepting the payment mechanisms for the jobs bill proposed by Obama, or proposing new ones. Republicans have indicated they're receptive to support ing Obama's proposed pay roll tax cut and finding a way to extend unemployment benefits, though many have rejected Obama's planned new spending. Obama's new proposal Monday to pay for it all by raising taxes without any proposals to cut spending is unlikely to win him any new GOP support for any element of his plan. "I sure hope that the president is not suggesting that we pay for his proposals with a massive tax increase at the end of 2012 on job creators that we're actually counting on to reduce unemployment," said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va. The new DNC ads are airing in: Denver; Tampa and Orlando, Fla.; Des Moines, Iowa; Las Vegas; Manches ter, N.H.; Raleigh and Char lotte, N.C.; Columbus and Cleveland, Ohio and Norfolk, Richmond and Roanoke, Va.; as well as Washington, D.C. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 7B OBAMA WOULD HIKE TAXES TO PAY FOR HIS JOBS BILL PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Obama cited the payroll tax in his weekend radio and Internet address Saturday, Aug. 20, 2011, when he urged Congress to work together on measures that help the economy and create jobs. "There are things we can do right now that will mean more customers for businesses and more jobs across the country. We can cut payroll taxes again, so families have an extra $1,000 to spend," he said. (AP) BAUCUS PRAISES BILL TO END TO HORSE SLAUGHTER BAN

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NEW YORK Associated Press BANK OF AMERICAis slashing 30,000 jobs as part of an effort to reverse a crisisof confidence among investors. It's the largest single job reduction by a U.S. company this year. What CEO Brian Moynihan is trying to do is nothing less than save the nation's largest bank. Investors have cut the bank's market value by half this year. The bank is facing huge liabilities over soured mortgage investments and concerns over whether it has enough capital to withstand more financial shocks. The cuts, which affect Bank of America's consumer businesses, represent 10 percent of the Charlotte, North Carolina, bank's work force. The bank said it hopes the cuts and other measures will result in $5 billion in annual savings by 2014. The bank has already cut 6,000 jobs this year. The bank also said it would look for cost savings at its other businesses in a six-month review that will begin next month. "It's as if someone has hit the panic button," said Bert Ely, president of banking consultant Ely & Co.ManagementMoynihan has been taking other steps to shore up the bank's standing. Last week he shook up the bank's top management ranks and has been selling parts of the company to raise cash. Last month Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. invested $5 billion in the company. Moynihan has struggled to calm investors ever since he took the top job in January 2010. He is reversing the empire-building strategy of his predecessor, Ken Lewis, who stepped down amid controversy over the purchase of Merrill Lynch during the financial crisis. Lewis also engineered the ill-fated acquisition of Countrywide Financial Corp., then the country's largest mortgage lender, which has led to heavy financial losses, lawsuits and regulatory probes. Moynihan is now taking a knife to the company, hoping to shrink it down to a more manageable size even if it means losing the bragging rights of being the nation's largest bank. "We don't have to be the biggest company out there," said Moynihan. Bank of America's stock has lost 48 percent this year, largely because of problems related to poorly-written mortgages at Countrywide. Just in the first half of the year the bank paid out $12.7 billion to settle claims from investors that it sold them securities backed by faulty mortgages.InvestorsSome investors and analysts worry that the job cuts will lead to poor customer service and the bank will lose market share to rivals at a time when there are signs that the economy is slowing down. They also wonder if the job cuts are enough to produce the prof its the bank needs to overcome the spiraling costs from its mortgage business. "There is a fair amount of skepticism on Wall Street, and Brian is doing as much as he can do in the face of a worsening econo my," said Nancy Bush, an analyst and contributing editor at SNL Financial, a research firm. The bank's stock was down for most of the afternoon but rose along with the overall market to close up 7 cents, or 1 percent, at $7.05. The job cuts follow a revamp of the bank's top management team last week. Two senior executives, wealth management head Sallie Krawcheck and head of consumer banking Joe Price, left the bank. The bank also elevated com mercial banking chief David Darnell and investment banking head Tom Montag to co-chief operating offi cers, reporting to Moynihan. Bank of America is seen as one of the most bloated banks in the industry. The payroll cuts will bring its work force in line with some of its key rivals. JPMorgan Chase & Co. had 250,000 workers at the end of the second quarter. "Financial companies have already been cutting for a few months now. He's a little late to the game already," said Walter Todd, a portfolio manager at Greenwood Capital, which owns Bank of America pre ferred shares. The cuts are the largest by a U.S. employer this year, according to the outplacement consulting firm Challenger, Gray & Christ mas Inc. Merck & Co. said this year it would cut 13,000 jobs. Bank of America's cuts are the largest since the Postal Service announced 30,000 job cuts last year. General Motors Co. cut 47,000 jobs in 2009. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y P revious CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.19 0.95AML Foods Limited 1.19 1.19 0.0081,9630.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.93 6.92 -0.011,2750.2300.10030.11.45% 0.53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2.84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1.96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.48 8.47 -0.015,2490.2450.31034.63.66% 2.80 2.35Colina Holdings 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.4380.0405.81.57% 8.50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.88 6.88 0.00 0.4960.26013.93.78% 2 .00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.60 1.65 0.05 0.1110.04514.92.73% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.00 0.0740.11018.58.03% 5 .50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.50 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.00 0.7570.0007.10.00% 9.74 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.29 8.21 -0.083,8500.4940.35016.64.26% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.75 5.75 0.00 2000.4350.22013.23.83% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.50ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 -0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 250.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%F RIDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,393.56| CHG 0.05 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -101.95 | YTD % -7.07BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320F INDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.06 5.01Bahamas Supermarkets N/A N/A 14.00 -2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.0010.000256.60.00% 41.00 29.00ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.5400.0009.030.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.65 0.75 0.40 0.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Fund Name NAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.02482.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund 1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5730Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.800113.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund 114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund 118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund 1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities)31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 BANK OF AMERICA WILL ELIMINATE 30,000 JOBS LARGESTSINGLEJOBREDUCTIONBYUSFIRMTHISYEAR NEWARK, N.J. Associated Press THE MINORITY OWNERSof the New Jersey Devils are finalizing a deal to sell their interest in the NHL team and give managing partner Jeff Vanderbeek some new partners. The Devils disclosed the potential sale by Brick City LLC in a statement on Monday in which they said a report in the New York Post that the team was facing bankruptcy was inaccurate. Brick City LLC is the legal name for the Devils share owned by Ray Chambers and Mike Gilfillan, his son-in-law. Quoting a source, The Post said team missed its Sept. 1 loan payment, giving its lenders a breakaway chance to push the team into bankruptcy. The newspaper also said the team had a bad relationships with its banks. "The notions that the Devils are facing bankruptcy or that 'the Devils have told their banks to get lost' are patently untrue," the team said in its statement. "The Devils value their relationship with their banks and are confident a refinancing will be completed shortly. "As stated previously, ownership is close to finaliz ing an agreement that would lead to a buyout of Brick City's share of the company." The Devils also disclosed that new season ticket sales are up 130 percent over last year and last week's sale of single-game tickets were up 260 percent compared with a year ago. Team president and general manager Lou Lamoriello refused to discuss the organization's financial situation. Devils veterans will report for training camp on Sat urday. Vanderbeek and his partners have been at odds since earlier this year, with Vanderbeek noting they have different visions for the franchise. Brick City exercised its contractual rights under its partnership agreement with Vanderbeek to cause a sale of the entire team and arena rights to the Prudential Center, subject to certain terms and conditions. It hired Moag & Co., a Baltimore-based investment bank, to assist in its attempt to sell its share of the team. Vanderbeek, however, was adamant that he would keep his part of the team. DEVILS DENY REPORT THAT THEY FACE BANKRUPTCY Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net THE Seattle-Pacific University Falcons didn't have any mercy on the CI Gibson Rattlers. The Falcons, in town for a threeday game series in the return of the Bahamas Basketball Federation's College Scrimmages, delighted their fans and the few Bahamians who showed up at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium last night with a 96-63 rout over the Rattlers. "I felt like we played okay in stretches, but we need to do a little better job of defending without fouling," said Seattle Pacific's coach Ryan Tooney. "We put them on the free throw a little too much." CI Gibson, using seven of their returning players while adding an additional five, including Mark Hanna and Ernest Saunders, went to the foul line 29 times and completed 22 of their charity shots. But while they took advantage of their inside game with their smaller line-up, the Falcons, with 11 returning players from last year's roster, shot the lights out from the outside. They were 39 of 83 from the field, including 35 of 72 from two-point percentage and 4-of-11 from the three-point arch. But the way they played, it looked as if the percentage should have been much higher. "For us, it's early. We only practiced for seven days together before we came on the trip," Looney said. "We definitely need to get better. That's why we came down here." Andy Polina was a tower of strength, leading three other players in double figures for Seattle Pacific with 19 points in 25 minutes. He was 8-of-18 from the field, all of which came in the paint where he was also responsible for pulling down a game high 13 rebounds with three blocks, three assists and two steals. Jobi Well contributed 18 points, 10 rebounds, three assists and three steals in 26 minutes, while Cory Hutsen had 14 points, four rebounds and two assists. Scott Morse finished with 14 points, four rebounds and two assists. David Downs and Jeff Dorman both chipped in with five points. The Falcons opened a 17-4 lead after the first five minutes and extended their margin to 48-25 at the half. By the end of the third quarter, they were up 73-40 and it was just a matter of how many points they would score in the fourth as Rattlers' coach Kevin 'KJ' Johnson tried to switch from a bigger lineup to a smaller one in a bid to defuse Seattle Pacific, but that didn't even make a difference. The only thing the Falcons didn't achieve was the 100-point digit. Hanna exploded for a game high 25 points in 32 minutes to lead CI Gibson. THETRIBUNE SECTIONE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 INSIDE TRAK TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 55EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 77EE...... ROADMASTERS CHARITY RUN THIS WEEKENDSMALL NATIONS STEAL HEARTS OF FANS, BRING RUGBY WORLD CUP TO LIFEDESPITE WIN, NEWLOOK EAGLES HAVE WAYS TO GO DJOKOVIC DEFEA TS NADAL TO WIN HIS FIRST US OPEN TITLE TTUURRNN TTOO 88EE.. COLLEGE SCRIMMAGES: FALCONS ROUT RATTLERS, 96-63 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 2 2 E E TOUCHDOWN: New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez (81) makes a touchdown reception as Miami Dolphins defensive back Will Allen (25) defends during the first half of last nights game in Miami. SEE FULL STORY ON PAGE 2E (AP)Brady throws for 517 yards

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SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS Ernest Saunders was the only other player in double figures with 16. Their next best scorer was Travonne Grant with eight. Alcot Fox had six. "I think we played pretty well. We played a number fifth ranked team in the country division two," said Johnson, as he starts to look at his players for the upcoming Government Secondary Schools Sports Association's basketball season. "Their team shot the ball extremely well. They executed the game extremely well. My guys didn't make shots. If you want to compete, you have to make shots. We didn't dothat. Thank God for Mark and Ernest and a couple of guys who came out and who played hard." Johnson said it was definitely a learning experience for his squad, who played a good defensive game, but didn't make sufficient shots or shoot the ball that well from the outside to put a dent in the Falcons' lead. "It was good for this young team with players who are aspiring to play college basketball," said Johnson, who year after year is trying to expose as many of his players to either high school or college in the United States. Level"It's very hard at this level and we had to play extremely hard to compete. Hopefully, they will learn as we go and get better as a result of playing in this game." Seattle Pacific compiled a 20-10 record and placed third in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference with a 12-6 mark in 2011. The Falcons made their seventh straight NCAA Tournament appearance and will be back in action 7pm tonight when they take on the Real Deal Shockers. Their exhibition series will come to a close on Wednesday night against the MailBoat Cybots. "You can expect a little bit of the same thing from us," said Looney as he prepares his Falcons for game two of their scrimmage. "We hope to turn it up a notch and play a little bit harder." Looney said the trip is designed to blend the old with the new players and at the same time provide them with an opportunity to mix and mingle with the locals by rendering their assistance with one of the orphanages on the island. But more importantly, he said they intend to get a splash in the beautiful waters of the Bahamas and make sure that they get some sun and fun before they return to the US for the start of their collegiate season. FALCONS ROUT RATTLERS TimClarke/Tribunestaff F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E FOOTWORK: CI Gibson Rattlers Mark Hanna (far right) in action yesterday. By STEVEN WINE AP Sports Writer MIAMI (AP) Tom Brady threw his first interception since October, so he wasn't perfect in the New England Patriots' opener. He was close, though. Brady threw for a team-record 517 yards and four touchdowns, including a 99-yarder to Wes Welker, and the reigning AFC East champions started with a victory for the eighth consecutive season Monday night by beating the Miami Dolphins 3824. Defensive end Jared Odrick picked off a deflected pass to set up a Miami touchdown and end Brady's NFL-record streak of 358 passes without an interception. Otherwise Brady and the Patriots picked up where they left off last season, when he threw for 36 TDs and his team led the league in scoring. New England totalled 622 yards, the most in franchise history and the most allowed by Miami. Brady's performance overshadowed Miami's Chad Henne, who threw for a career-high 416 yards. The 906 net yards passing by both teams was an NFL record. Brady, who went 32 for 48, became the 11th quarterback to throw for at least 500 yards. Norm Van Brocklin set the record of 554 yards in 1951. "We're pleased to have him on our side," teammate Danny Woodhead said with a smile. The capper came with 5:44 left and the Patriots leading 31-17. After they stopped Miami on downs at the 1-foot line, Brady lined up in the shotgun on first down and threw from his end zone to Welker, who had slipped behind Benny Sapp near the 30-yard line. Welker caught the pass in stride and sprinted untouched for the score to complete the longest play in Patriots history. "Some of their scores ended up looking like it was kind of easy," Miami coach Tony Sparano said. "Not the defensive performance we were hoping for. That's an understatement."TouchdownBrady also threw touchdown passes on consecutive plays. He hit Aaron Hernandez for a 31-yard score, and when a replay review determined the receiver was down at the 1, Brady threw to him again for a TD on the next play. His other scoring passes covered 10 yards to Rob Gronkowski and 2 yards to Welker. Brady was sacked only once, and good protection gave his receivers plenty of time to work their way open. Newcomer Chad Ochocino had only one catch for 14 yards. But Welker made eight receptions for 160 yards, and tight ends Hernandez and Gronkowski combined for 189 yards on 13 catches. "It wasn't a one-man band out there," coach Bill Belichick said. "We had a lot of contributions." The Dolphins' defense returned virtually intact from last season and was expected to be the team's strength, but Brady riddled them from the start. He completed his first eight passes for 127 yards on the Patriots' first two possessions, and both ended with TDs. Brady's first interception since October 17 came early in the third quarter, when he tried to hit Julian Edelman in the flat. Sapp deflected the ball to the 304-pound Odrick, who rumbled 40 yards to the 9. Two plays later, Henne hit Brian Hart line with a 10-yard touchdown pass to make the score 14-all. Brady was so rattled it took him 10 plays to put the Pats ahead to stay. They drove 73 yards and scored on his 2-yard pass to Welker. Miami's problems with Brady were nothing new. He and the Pats beat the Dolphins twice last year while outscoring them 79-21. Losing at home was nothing different for the Dolphins, either, who have dropped 10 of their past 11 home games. There was one change for the Dol phins. They promised a more aggressive, exciting offense under new offensive coordinator Brian Daboll and showed it from the start, scoring on a season-opening drive for the first time since 2000. They lined up 355-pound nose tackle Paul Soliai in their goal-line offense, did damage with quarterback keepers by Henne and gave newcomer Reggie Bush 20 touches. Brandon Marshall gained 139 yards on seven catches, but he and Miami couldn't keep up with Brady. Patriots beat Dolphins 38-24 TEAM RECORD: New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady throws during the first half of Monday nights game against the Miami Dolphins in Miami. (AP)

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FOR the average runner, one goal is to complete a half marathon and then eventuallya full marathon, whether its for their own personal gratification or just for a worthy cause. For the past three years, the Bahamas Roadmasters Club has provided both opportunities. Now into its fourth year, the annual Charity Run is set for Saturday, September 17, and the interest is brewing from a cross-section of the society. Last year, the proceeds went to the Pilot Club of Nassau in their quest to build a pool for the physically disabled. Previously, the Aids Foundation and the Aids Camp were among the beneficiaries. This year, Bahamas Roadmasters goal is to raise at least $10,000 to assist the Ranfurly Home for Children. The club was founded by president George Smith and others to provide an avenue for Bahamians to develop their dream of being a marathoner. It also catered to those members who were primarily interested in losing weight or just improving their physical conditioning. Kimley Saunders, chairman of the organising committee for the run, said they are opening doors for so many other Bahamians to partici pate because of the charity aspects attached to the event. Although its not a full or even a half marathon, the run features a number of aspects that will cater to just about every casual or competitive runner, from a five-mile run or walk from Montagu Beach to Charlotte Street and back. Theres also a 10-mile run/walk that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way to Goodmans Bay and back. Or if you dare to be more adventurous, theres the 20mile run that leaves Montagu Beach and travels all the way to Blake Road and back to Montagu. Additionally, theres also the 20-mile uniformed offi cers relay that already has a team from the Royal Bahamas Police Force, two from Her Majestys Prisons and three from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force signed up to compete. There is also an open relay. Pick your choice. For those doing the 20-mile run, the start time is 4:30am. The five and 10-mile races will begin an hour later at 5:30am. We hope to have at least 150 to 200 participants or more and that everyone will have fun and enjoy themselves and at the same time support the Ranfurly Home. We hope that we can raise the $10,000 or more that we are anticipating to raise for the Ranfurly Home, Saunders said. I I N N S S P P I I R R A A T T I I O O N N T T O O F F O O L L L L O O W W In July 2009, Angela Grandmother Rahming decided to increase her mobil ity by moving up from walking to running. She did her first charity run two years ago and returned for her second appearance last year. This year, however, Rahming has decided to work closely with the organising committee. She serves as the assistant secretary, but she said she was so inspired by her ability to complete the run without any problems that she has made it her goal to encourage others to get involved. It can be for anybody, she said. You dont have to worry about keeping up with anybody. As long as you are consistent, you can finish. Every day you go out, you can add your mileage. Being consistent is the key. Through her new found love, the actual grandmother of one said a lot of the members were taken aback when she started, but she never allowed anyone to discourage her. In fact, they are all in awe of her achievement in just three years. Last year, Rahming participated in her first half marathon on January 31 at the ING in Miami. Her nephew, who lives in Florida, was so thrilled about her commitment and dedication that he decided to join her. With the support of her daughter, grandson, sister and niece on the sideline cheering her on, Rahming completed the course in three hours and 10 minutes. For me, that was good, really good. Obviously, its not elite running time, but for me it was super, she said. That has led to Rahming making strides in a series of other events. In October, she did a half marathon on the Saturday in Washington and on Sunday, the following week she did her first full marathon. In April, Rahming duplicated the feat when she ran the Kentucky Derby, then drove back to Ohio and did a half marathon on Sunday. I didnt tell anybody in the club that I was going. I just went with another friend, she stat ed. They were all surprised that I did it. R R E E L L A A Y Y C C H H A A L L L L E E N N G G E E Although it was a new event last year, the RBDF has dominated the relay competition and this year, sports officer Ramon Storr said the Defence Force will be back to make it two straight. I guarantee a repeat in the relays, said Storr of their dominance of the first, second, third and fifth place finishes. We have a couple solid young fellows in training and on the squad now, so I guarantee we will repeat with the relays. Known for their athletic prowess, Storr said the Defence Force is always capable and ready to assist because they are still fit. This road race will just showcase our talent, he said. We really are in it because we want to do our part to assist with charity. I I N N C C E E N N T T I I V V E E S S Each participant (there is a registration fee) will receive a T-shirt, eco-friendly bag, a water bottle and free food stew conch, chicken souse, Johnny cake, fruits, Gatorade, juice and water. A number of prizes will be offered, including tickets on the Fast Ferries, dinner for two (2) at the British Colonial Hilton and gift certificates from the Sports Centre, Mys tical Gym, Lickety Split, Dominos Pizza and full body massage by International Orthopedics. Registration sites are the Palmdale Vision, the Reef Restaurant and the Ranfurly Home for Children. Large groups can contact Kimley Saunders at 364-3282 or 454-5356 or Angela Rahming at 394-0449 or 477-7213. S S O O F F T T B B A A L L L L / / T T R R A A C C K K B B S S C C A A C C T T I I V V I I T T I I E E S S THE Baptist Sports Council has announced the dates for the final two events on its sporting calendar. The 2011 Bishop Neil C. Ellis Softball Classic is scheduled to start on Saturday, October 1 at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. It will feature competition in the men, co-ed and 19-and-under divisions. And the Rev Enoch Backford Track and Field Classic will follow on Saturday, October 22, at the Thomas A Robinson Track and Field Stadium. Persons interested in more details are asked to contact league president Brent Stubbs at stubbobs@gmail.com or secretary Jonique Webb at joniquewebb@hotmail.co m C C O O N N C C H H M M A A N N R R E E G G I I S S T T R R A A T T I I O O N N U U N N D D E E R R W W A A Y Y THE 25th annual Conchman Triathlon is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 in Freeport, Grand Bahama. It will comprise of a one-kilometre swim, a 25k bike ride and a 5k run. Interested persons can register by logging onto the Facebook Event Page, e-mail organiser Bert Bell at bertbell@coralwave.com or calling him at 727-5886 or 727-5381. N N P P S S A A S S T T A A N N D D I I N N G G S S T T u u e e s s d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Wildcats vs Bom mer George Operators (L) 8:30pm Island Luck Truckers vs Mighty Mitts (M) T T h h u u r r s s d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Proper Care Pool Lady Sharks vs Wildcats (L) 8:30pm New Breed vs Johns Buccaneers (M) F F r r i i d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Pheonix vs Sigma Brackettes (L) 8:30pm Dorsey Park Boyz vs Miller Rams (M) S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y s s s s c c h h e e d d u u l l e e 7pm Sigma Brackettes vs Wildcats (L). 8:30pm Truckers vs Dorin United Hitmen (M) SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2011, PAGE 3E ROADMASTERS ANNUAL CHARITY RUN ALL SET FOR SATURDAY SPORTS INBRIEF Goal to raise at least $10,000 to assist the Ranfurly Home for Children FOR CHARITY: Now into its fourth year, Bahamas Roadmasters Clubs annual Charity Run is set for Saturday, September 17. By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer NEW YORK (AP) A pivotal stretch in the NBA lockout begins Tuesday, when full bargaining com mittees return to the table. That could move players and owners closer to a new labour deal, but it also could send things in the wrong direction with time running down if more voices in the room leads to discord. Any setback now would diminish hopes of the pre season opening without delay. "The reality is our training camp would be scheduled to start on October 3 I believe, and so if there's any intention of trying to get that start ed on time, then we both have to figure some things out very quickly," players' association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers said last week. "That's just the reality of the situation." The process toward getting a new collective bargaining agreement seems to have gotten back on track after three meetings in the past two weeks between top negotiators from each side. They decided their full committees have to return before they can go any further, so the owners' labour relations committee and the union's executive committee were told to come to New York for a session Tuesday, and perhaps even Wednes day. That should more than double the number of people in the room from last week, when there were nine. On Thursday, both sides will report back to their mem berships, with owners meeting in Dallas and players headed to Las Vegas, where more than 40 are taking part this week in a series of games at the Impact Basketball academy. If things go poorly in New York, the message may include warnings that camps might have to be postponed, even though Commissioner David Stern said last week he didn't expect any vote to be taken among owners Thursday. Nor would he say what he needs to hear before then to know if the schedule is in jeopardy. "We have no conditions of any kind," he said. Stern hasn't revealed much else, as both sides vowed to keep details of the process quiet until a deal is done. Clearly intent on sticking to his word, he gave more than a half dozen one-word answers during two brief meetings with reporters last week. That has created a guess ing game about how far along things really are, not only among fans and the media, but even with players themselves. "I wish that I was in a posi tion to say we knew when NBA players would be back on the court and we're getting close, but we're just not at the point where we can make those type of statements," Fisher said. "It wouldn't be fair to the players, it wouldn't be fair to the fans to get any false senti ments or hopes up at this point." PIVOTAL STRETCH OF NBA LOCKOUT TO BEGIN TODAY PLAYERS association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers.


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