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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03088
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 09-06-2011
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03088

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N ASSA U AND B AHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSP APER PMs warningover job growthVolume: 107 No.232 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25) WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 91F LOW 80F By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net NO new job growth is expected for the next year to year and a half, Prime Minster Hubert Ingraham announced yesterday. Mr Ingraham delivered the sober news at the orientation for the first phase of government's job readiness and training programme before a crowd of 400 participants at the Sheraton yesterday. Another 240 attended the programme's launch in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Although the Ingraham administration has invested in numerous infrastructure projects and the $25 million jobs programme to increase employment, thousands of Bahamians are still out of work. About 14,000 unemployed persons applied for the 3,000 jobs available in the programme. Recent unemployment figures released by the Department of Statistic's show unemployment stands at 13.7 per cent. The nation's chief said it is a symptom of the economic crisis that hit many countries in 2008. "The number of applicants seeking to participate in this programme demonstrates that our economy, like economies throughout the world, is severely affected by one of the worst global economic Recovery within 12 to 18 months TRY OUR McFLURRY SNICKERS The TribuneTHEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBESTLATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Dont stress about Back To School Apply for a FidelityBack To School Loan with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go! BACK TO SCHOOLLOANS BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN WOMANSECTIONR R H H Y Y M M I I N N G G D D I I E E T T BBOOOOKKOOUUTTRRAAGGEEBASEBALLBBRRAAVVEESSCCAALLLLUUPPRRIICCHHAARRDDSSOONNSEEWOMANON12BSEESPORTSSECTIONE SEE page eight EARLYLEARNINGAS SCHOOLYEARSTARTS SCOTTY KING is pictured deep in concentration yesterday at the 2 By 2 Academy as Shacasio Lightbourne looks on. Students across the Bahamas are back in the classroom this week as the school year gets underway.Felip Major/Tribune staff By LAMECH JOHNSON A DISCHARGEDpolice officer was arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon on a number of criminal charges, including attempted murder and armed robbery. Former Constable 3340 Angelo Roker, 20, discharged yesterday from the Royal Bahamas Police Force according to police sources, was charged before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in connection with an attempted murder, multiple occurrences of armed robbery and receivDISCHARGED POLICE OFFICER IN COURT ON MULTIPLE CHARGES SEE page eight POLICE in New Providence are inves tigating the disappearance of three Bahamian men, who authorities suspect may have died when their plane crashed during a reported drug mission to Jamaica, last Thursday. These men, who police have yet to officially identify have since been reported missing by their next of kin, police insiders have revealed. Two of the men are believed to be brothers aged 36 and 34, with the third passenger being a 17-year-old. The plane used in this incident was yet to be reported stolen to Civil Aviation DELIVERIES of aid for the battered communities of southern Cat Island were further delayed this weekend as government officials refused to release the goods to waiting volunteers. The first shipment of building materials, tarpaulins, food and water had arrived in Smiths Bay on Friday, yet remained on the dock until yesterday morning as authorities hesitated to release the emergency items to waiting residents and relief volunteers. Staff at the Cat Island Golf and Beach By LAMECH JOHNSON THREE men were arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon in connection with an armed robbery at a popular web cafe in southwestern New Providence. Shakatoure Thompson, 31, Tamico Ban nister, 22, and Orlando Wimms, 27, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez accused of the Island Luck Webcafe armed robbery that occurred Thursday, September 1. The defendants had 11 charges brought against them, eight being armed robbery and three firearm possession with intent SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight THREE MISSING MEN MAY HAVE DIED IN PLANE CRASH THREE CHARGED WITH ARMED ROBBERY OF WEB CAFE SOUTHERNCATISLAND COURTNEWS GOVT OFFICIALS REFUSED TO RELEASE HURRICANE AID TO VOLUNTEERS PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaks yesterday.

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By SANCHESKA BROWN DESPITE fears that road works would add to the usually chaotic back-to-school traffic, Ministry of Works officials said there were no major challenges or traffic jams on New Providence yesterday. Environmental specialist in the Ministry of Works Shenique Albury said despite ongoing road works in the capital, they received no complaints of traffic congestion or long waits. "We had people on the ground working with the traffic police to assist (yesterday). Things ran pretty smoothly. Traffic lines seemed no longer than usual and we did not have any major challenges. We expect everything to continue to run smoothly and will continue to update the public on changes as the work progresses, she said. We were really worried about schools that fall within areas we were working on like St Augustine's College and C I Gibson, but everything seems to have gone pretty well." Ms Albury said parents, teachers and students can access C I Gibson from the Wulff Road roundabout and once Samana Drive is reopened access will be available from Marathon Road/East West Highway Junction. Persons will be able to proceed north on Marathon, turn east (right) onto Jenoa Way, turn north (left) onto Isabella Avenue, then turn left onto Samana Drive and then back onto Marathon Road. St Augustines College is accessible from the west from Fox Hill Road via Springfield Road and from the east from Prince Charles Drive as usual. Doris Johnson Senior High School is acces sible from the west on Prince Charles Drive, whereas local access is only available to the schools eastern gate. Access to the school from the east will be diverted through Beatrice Avenue to Bay Lily, on to Sea Breeze Lane and Fox Hill Road and west on to Prince Charles; only the schools eastern gate will be accessible. Ms Albury said some paving was done to Baillou Hill Road and Marathon Road over the weekend. Some additional paving is expected in the next week or two, however, she admitted that there are some challenges. The rain continues to be a big challenge for us, especially in the Market Street area where the water table is very high. When it rains we have to wait until the water dissipates to begin work. But what we have been seeing lately is when the water dries it begins to rain again. As soon as the weather permits we can get back to paving the roads, she said. Despite the challenges, Ms Albury said road works are still scheduled to be completed by the first quarter of 2012. LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3 OWNERS of the Texaco service station on Robinson Road are claiming their business dropped 70 per cent overnight after road work crews blocked an important entry way to their station. They further claimed that without any consultation or notification, the Ministry of Works last Thursday placed two large concrete columns at the stations entrance from Old Trail Road, leaving only one of three entrances to the station open to the public. The station owner said with the closure of yet another entrance it is becoming impossible to keep business flowing. They might as well shut us down, said one of the stations operators who did not want to be named. Last night, Ministry of Works officials said they were satisfied with the actions taken by contractors working on the New Providence Road Improvement and Infrastructure Project (NPRIIP). Shenique Albury, environmental specialist with NPRIIP, said: The contractor has to do his work. Hes trenching in that area and he cant skip off a part of trenching. This is the best medium, at all times he will try to at least maintain one access. According to the station operator, one of the two Robinson Road entrances has been blocked off by Jose Cartellon Construction for weeks. While they were advised that access to Robinson Road would always be available, the owners said at no point did anyone advise us, or ask our permission to close the Old Trail exit indefinitely. Owners said normally there are some ten or more vehicles at the pumps at any given time especially on Fri day one of their busiest days of week but after the second entrance was closed busi ness came to a virtual standstill, dropping 70 per cent overnight. Upon inquiry, the Ministry of Works advised Station owners that following a meeting with the road traffic flow committee and a survey completed on the junction by the Texaco Robinson Station it was recommended to the Minister that the entrance be blocked because of serious traffic flow problem experienced, as many motorists would cut across station grounds to get to Robinson Road. Ms Albury added: It was recommended that the access was closed during peak traffic hours. Not only does it create a traffic problem but it is also dangerous and could present a hassle for people who actually want to purchase gas with a line of cars shortcutting through the station. Owners said they are aware of the traffic flow prob lem but believe that policing the area and issuing tickets is a more appropriate solution to blocking an entrance to the station and making a business suffer because of traffic violators. It is unacceptable to make our business pay for the poor policing and enforcement of the traffic laws by the police in that area, said the owner. While understanding that the current road infrastructure project will improve the quality of roads, owners said they have been dealing with issues since road works start ed on Robinson Road more than a year ago and limiting them to just one entrance is not only crippling business but is also a serious safety issue. Fuel trucks make deliveries to our station three to four times a week and it is impossible for other cars to have access to that one entrance when it is there and it is dangerous said an owner. Following letters and numerous phone calls to the Ministry, owners said they were told there would be a meeting to discuss the various complaints however no date was set, nor whether all parties concerned would be invited or notified of the meeting. CHINA has given the Government of the Bahamas a grant of $300,000 for Hurricane Irene relief efforts. In a statement yesterday, officials from the Chinese Embassy in Nassau said the grant is meant "to express the friendship of the Chinese Government and people to the Government and people of the Bahamas." "The Chinese Government has decided to provide a grant of $300,000 in cash for the Bahamas to assist with its rescue work and reconstruction in the wake of Hurricane Irene," the statement said. Irene tore through the Bahamas nearly two weeks ago. The storm damaged and destroyed homes, uprooted trees and knocked down power lines. Residents of Cat Island and Acklins were the hardest hit by the tropical cyclone. Many on Cat Island are still without electricity and telephone services and need supplies to repair damaged homes. Several farmers on Long Island and Eleuthera also complained in the aftermath of the hurricane that they had lost valuable crops. Residents on Eleuthera have complained that they have been without power for two weeks. Earlier this week, the Pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO) launched an international appeal to help 220,000 people affected by Hurri cane Irene. Their appeal was to reduce the public health impact of Hurricane Irene locally and in the Turks and Caicos as well as to raise $400,000. CHINA GIVES $300K GRANT FOR HURRICANE RELIEF FRUSTRATED North Eleuthera residents criticised the slow pace of pow er restoration to the island yesterday. While officials estimate that power will be restored by Friday, residents yesterday bemoaned generator fuel costs. One resident said: It costs $30 to run a genera tor for the night, and we have not had any power since the hurricane. The generator costs are now higher than my monthly light bill. We are suffering, and sick and tired of it. Residents also claim the lack of power has brought on concerns of fuel shortage as a result of the demand for diesel. North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith explained that the area suffered significant damage to infrastructure, and commended the Bahamas Electricity Corpo ration for their efforts. Mr Smith said: Our concerns, their complaints, are based on what they see on the main road and not what is beyond that. BEC has to look at the overall picture. He added: Many of the lines (connecting settlements) were blown into the bush and into the Salt Pond. So theyre replanting about a dozen poles to get elec tricity from Gregory Town, which is the nearest settlement with electricity. After speaking with a BEC manager, Mr Smith said that homes in Upper and Lower Bogue, the Bluff, Current and Current Island, should be restored no later than Friday, with the exception of challenges to individual supply. Telecommunications have been fully restored on the island, according to Mr Smith, who explained that the last two settlements, James Cistern and Spanish Wells, were restored on Sunday. More than 90 per cent of the island has been restored, according to BEC spokeswoman Arnette Ingraham, who said that a total of 83 poles had been knocked down by the storm. Rainbow Cay and James Cistern were said to have received the most damage to infrastructure. Two teams from New Providence and a team from Carilec, an association of electric utilities suppliers, manufacturers and other industry stakeholders in the Caribbean, are assisting local efforts. NORTH ELEUTHERA RESIDENTS HITOUT OVER POWER ISSUES OFFICIALSESTIMATEPOWERRESTORATIONBYFRIDAY NOCOMPLAINTSOFCONGESTIONORLONGWAITS NOMAJOR CHALLENGES WITH BACK-TO-SCHOOL TRAFFIC GAS STATION OWNERS CLAIM BUSINESS LOST 70 PER CENT OVERNIGHT AFTER ROAD CREWS BLOCKED ENTRANCETHEY MIGHT AS WELL SHUT US DOWN ABOVE: Road work crews blocked this entrance to the Texaco service station on Robinson Road. LEFT: The stations owners claimed they lost 70 per cent of business overnight.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. FIRSTI would like to congratulate those Grand Bahama residents who demonstrated in front of the GBPC building. Im quite sure that next Tuesday many, many more will turn out to show this cynical, greedy company that the people of this beautiful island are not fools and will not be exploited. I was very disappointed by the anaemic and cynically evasive response of the GBPC for the following reasons: 1) We all realise that during the summer months we will use more electricity. What we do not expect is for our car ing power provider to send the cost of that energy sky high to coincide with this. 2) The statement admits that the use of the rented generators has reduced the need for GBPC to rely on older, less efficient generation. In other words they are making electricity cheaper this way. So why would they ask the GB Port Authority to add three cents to the surcharge to pay for their rental when these generators are actually saving them money? 3) It states that the recent increase in our bills is due to the increase in world energy (oil) prices which increased the fuel surcharge to cus tomers. But the truth is that about three months ago the cost of oil was about $120 per barrel and the fuel surcharge was at around 17 cents. Since then the price of oil has steadily decreased and now stands at around $85 per barrel and yet the fuel surcharge has gone up by about 40 per cent to 24 cents. 4) Their own graph also contradicts this statement. If you look at the graph of GBPC fuel costs that was printed in the Freeport News, the cost of fuel for May, June and July is the same. The graph is flat and refutes their own argument, ie their fuel costs have not increased. 5) The statement also completely ignores one of the heartbreaking issues that was revealed at the Town Meeting on Monday night. That is their policy of linking power bills to properties as well as people. In other words, residents who have purchased or rented property at which someone else has left a large bill have been forced to pay the bill or be refused connection. Two lawyers who were in attendance both claim that this practice is illegal and encouraged those residents to file suit against GBPC in Magistrates court immediately. 6) The statement also encouraged customers who had difficulty paying these exorbitant bills to discuss a payment plan with their customer service department. But the only plan GBPC has is to demand the customer immediately pay half of the bill, which is, of course, quite outrageous. Especially, as some residents revealed, when the bill is an estimated bill often four or five times higher than the customers average bill! In fact, what it seems is that Emera, this multi-billion dollar company wants to do is to come to Grand Bahama, make absolutely no financial investment of their own, and use our money to expand their plant and make it more efficient. That way they can gouge even higher profits out of us and send that money off the island. In my opinion this is raw, cynical, corporate greed. What I believe the residents of Grand Bahama are asking for is: a) that the GBPC modify their policies and practices so that they become what the Hawksbill Creek Agreement intended them to be, ie, a nonprofit company that provides a service to the community. b) If GBPC is unable or unwilling to do that we ask that our elected government step in to protect its citizens from such greed and questionable practices. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to voice my opinions. ALAN VELLACOTT Nassau, August, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune LimitedNULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P .O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352 IN THIS column yesterday we commented on a proposal to Government by former Bahamian gangleaders to get crime under control by using them to create community jobs for the unemployed. Having formed an alliance United Against Crime (UAC) to mobilise resources and support for community based initiatives, the former gang leaders presented their proposal to National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest and senior members of the Police Force. UACs top priority is to create economic opportunities for the unemployed, who through lack of jobs are driven to crime. Whenever there is poverty there is crime. When people cant pay the bills they find other ways. The police cant do anything, with all due respect, until after the fact, said Valentino Squaw Josey, spokesman for the group. He said that community leaders presumably himself and his fellow former gang members are the key to successful preventative measures. He suggested that community leaders should be employed to do full time community work mediating conflicts, building side walks, cleaning the community, landscaping and performing other tasks. They proposed a partnership with the government and corporate society. He suggested that instead of giving government jobs to big contractors, the jobs should all be kept within the community. For example, he said, a $10,000 contract to paint a school could be given to a community leader, who could then employ other people in the com munity. And by working more closely with the community we stand a chance to eliminate crime. This could be a solution, but it is also the very kernel from which a serious problem could develop in the future. This was partially the story of how the Tivoli Gardens saga started in Jamaica sev eral years ago. It ended last year in the storming by Jamaican security forces of Tivoli Gardens, where it was believed that Tivolis don, Dudus Coke, wanted on drug and gun running charges in the US, was hiding. Tivoli residents, whose very existence depended on the generosity of gangleader Dudus, violently fought off government forces to protect their community leader. Seventy-three Jamaicans were killed in that clash. Mr Turnquest told the leaders that government would not provide them with financial backing without accountability and transparency. We backed Mr Turnquests stand, because we do not believe in arbitrarily cutting off an extended olive branch without a thorough hearing. However, for us there was a caveat and that was the case of Tivoli. We are certain that this is not the intent of our reformed Bahamian gangleaders, nor was it the intent of those of Tivoli Gardens when the political leaders got involved with the community leaders. But in the end it was the unintended that eventually happened. Good intentions ended in tragedy. AMr Patrick Beersingh of Jamaica, having read this column on Tribune242.com, on Monday had the following comment. His interpretation of the proposal: Community work translates to legitimizing gang control Editor, You seem to be supporting the idea, in spirit at least, that the so-called 'Community Leaders' should be employed to do 'full time community work'. That would be a huge mistake. I speak from personal knowledge of having experienced the very same idea implemented in Jamaica in the 1970's. You are so correct when you say that these ideas led to the Tivoli invasion. However, if you explore 'community work' closer you will see that the 'Community Leaders' are the Dons and Gang Leaders, who are attempting to get legitimacy to enforce their particular brand of law and order via intim idation and doling out scarce benefits with in the community. This would see them grow in power until it takes a full scale assault on their neighbourhoods to dislodge them, when they eventually fall afoul of the supremacy of the organs of State, which they most certainly will. Look at the Crash Programme of the 1970's under PM Michael Manley. Now MP's are actually given monies to spend within their constituencies, which they use to influence their affiliated criminal organizations. Work is hardly done any more in exchange for this dole. Apart from the bil lions wasted on these programmes, what they do more than anything else, is to give legitimacy to the local criminals, making them into national and international dons of crime. What they become are state sponsored, Gang Controlled Neighbourhoods. Learn from your neighbour's mistakes! We are certain government will take a long and serious look at UACs proposal. Prime Minister Ingraham has launched another initiative aimed at the unemployed governments job readiness and training programme. The object is to prepare the unskilled for jobs as the economy rebounds. These are the programmes that these young men should be encouraged by their gang leaders to take advantage of. Disappointed with response of the GBPC LETTERSletters@tribunemedia.net Reader warns: Learn from Jamaicas mistakes &+((.2-26(3+RI 3%2;66($67675((71$66$8 %$+$0$6 rfntbrrfr rf tbrrnrf nrtbrfrt trfrftrfrr rrnrrbfr rrfn EDITOR, The Tribune. THIS IS A TRIBUTEto the late Leroy K Brathwaite, policeman, gentleman, public servant and outstanding sportsman and sports administrator. He came here from Barbados as a recruit in the Police Force. He was just 19 years of age. He immediately got involved in sports with the police cricket and soccer teams. His ability as a cricketer delighted Roy Armbrister, the captain of the police team. Leroy was a fast bowler and exceptional batsman. In his career as a cricketer he scored several centuries and there is a double century recorded in his name. As a soccer player he scored many goals for the police team. He had powerful shots with both feet, but it was his header that was most feared by the teams of those years. Leroy eventually accepted administrative roles in cricket and soccer. He was very close to Mr Roscow Davies, President of the Bahamas Football Association, and served as vice president for several years. He was also a member of the executive board of The Bahamas Cricket Association and past president of the Commonwealth Wanderers Cricket Club. On the Police Force, he served as a drum major, a traffic motorcyclist, and was attached to the CID Flying Squad. That squad made up of various nationalities and Bahamians was commended on rumerous occasions for their performance and the large number of arrests of criminals at the scenes of their crimes. It is in that squad that Leroy made his mark as a policeman. He was eventually included in the CID as a detective and con tinued to perform his duties efficiently and effectively. As a police man he was fair, honest, efficient and dedicated. After leaving the police service he continued in the public service at the Civil Aviation Department and later at the Road Traffic Department, where he also made his mark. He has left as his legacy, his sons and daughters, who are all well educated and are making excellent contributions in the police service, the public and private sectors. He will be remembered by all of us and these associations with whom he worked diligently in fundraising events. It was my delight to watch him season and cook steaks at the various fundraising events. Leroy had a good life. He enjoyed the achievements of his children and constantly bragged about them. It was my pleasure to know and associate with Leroy K Brathwaite. PAUL THOMPSON, Sr Nassau, August 29, 2011. Policeman, gentleman and public servant

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By INIGO NAUGHTY ZENICAZELAYA RECENTLY, I celebrated another birthday. First off, let me thank all of you who wished me a happy birthday in whatever way, shape or form on August 31. It truly made my day and was sincerely appreciated. No Jennifer Aniston at the Golden Globe Awards omission on my behalf either: I would like to God, my family, my friends and fans, and I would also like to thank my lovely wife for always making sure my birthday is special. This year was no different. BoxesThis year I opened one gift box only to reveal another inside of it and then yet another smaller box inside of the previous one and so on and so on. After peeling back layer after layer of boxes, gift wrapping and bows, there staring me in my face from out of the last gift box to be opened was a treasure inevery sense of the word. What was my gift you wonder? Only the following: Row A, Section 137 seats 4 and 5 in Tampa Bays Raymond James Stadium, home of the NFLs Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Directly behind the visiting teams bench. Their opponent for the game I hold tickets for? The only team that really matters in the NFL the Dallas Cowboys! Wonderful gifts aside, my birthday has taught me with age comes wisdom; Im a little older and a lot wiser. So heres what I learned over the past year: 1. We Bahamians still cant manoeuvre a roundabout properly. 2. Lil Wayne actively wants to look like The Chocolate Boy George. 3. New roads finished.new roads dug back up two weeks later. 4. The decorative soap in the bathroom is decorative and for visiting guests only. (If not used bya house guest it could lead to death or worsecastration.) 5. Bahamians can prepare for a hurricane on time. 6. Certain government agencies cant function properly preor posthurricanes. 7. LeBron James move to Miami and the Heat was highly overrated and underachieving. He is ring-less, truly still a King without a Crown. (Just like I predicted from day one; call me Naughtydamus.) 8. I still cant find anything nice to say about the sorry Miami Dolphins and their whiny fans. (Ill stay consistent; the Miami Dolphins suck!) 9. Some Bahamians and others have no regard for human life (murder rate nearing 100) or handicapped parking for that matter. 10. The Saxons Superstars are simply the best, and the Valley Boys a whiny second. 11. Baby diapers are toxic and should be used as chemical weapons. 12. By some coincidence there seems to be a decline in the Bahamian Potcake population since the groundbreaking on Baha Mar. (I jest I think.) Most importantly, I learned that a vast major ity of you like to laugh and enjoy reading this column. For that I thank you humbly. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE STAFF of the Farm Road Urban Renewal Centre prepared school supplies and delivered them to children throughout the neighbourhood leading up to the open ing of the new school year. The centres manager Charlene Milfort and her staff together with community partners and volunteers of the Farm Road Urban Renewal Programme organ ised the back-to-school giveaway event last Thursday. Participants of the centres after-school programme and other youth initiatives were given first priority in the distribution process. All youngsters in Farm Road and other communities in the Bahamas are encour aged to get involved in posi tive community programmes as the rewards are endless and worthwhile, Urban Renewal staff said. COMICSVIEW INIGO NAUGHTY ZENICAZELAYAA YEAR OLDER A YEAR WISER! Youngsters encouraged to get involved in community programmes

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE crises in a century. "Unemployment is far, far too high in our country. That is why in addition to providing some stimulus to job creation we are also taking advantage of opportunities for shorter term and temporary placements. "Our economy has begun to recover slowly the economy is growing, though very modestly not nearly fast enough to create needed jobs. "We expect that within the next twelve to eighteen months job growth will pick up," Mr Ingraham said. Mr Ingraham told the chosen few, a mix of recent high school graduates and middleaged parents, to work hard and take the opportunity seriously. The initiative was hailed as a "God send" by participants yesterday. "I needed a job, bills were climbing up and I have to work. I haven't been working for five years," said 49-year-old James Taylor, a former construction worker and father of 12. Recent high school graduate Avenii Johnson said he has been looking for work for a year and wants experience in the engineering field. "It was kind of hard for me to find a job, I came out of high school with seven BGCSEs and a 2.91 GPA. But everywhere I applied said they wasn't hiring," said the 19year-old, who had tried to unsuccessfully to get a job at BEC. The participants of the programme will either receive temporary jobs in the public and private sector or receive subsidised training. Mr Ingraham said he hopes this scheme will encourage long-term employment from businesses who chose to permanently take on those in the initiative. Training opportunities will be made available in the public sector at BEC and the Water and Sewerage Corporation. Two hundred participants, whose areas of interest coincide with available skills training at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute, will enrol in classes for the current semester. Government will pay the cost of the training and give a stipend to participants studying at BTVI and will undertake a similar exercise at the school's Grand Bahama location. The programme will give job seekers new skills; upgrade and enhance existing skills and improve the marketability of the country's workforce. Participants will be paid up to $210 a week for 52 weeks. If a person does not get full-time employment at the end of the year, they will be eligible for unemployment assistance from the National Insurance Board. Over the next few weeks participants from Abaco, Eleuthera and other Family Islands will join the programme. officials, however police have confirmed they believe it was taken from the Lynden Pindling International Airport. A police source said the details were sketchy but he confirmed that police are investigating. He said police received information that three Bahamian men on board a stolen plane experienced engine problems and crashed while on a suspected drug mission. All three died on the scene and their bodies were burned beyond recognition. The men, according to a source, are well known to police for drug activity. A similar incident happened in 2009, when two Bahamian men police sus pected of transporting drugs crashed in Jamaica. The plane was stolen from an airport in north Eleuthera. According to Jamaican media, residents said the aircraft was circling for about an hour before it crashed. The two men, who were believed to be the pilot and a crew member, were burned beyond recognition. Police believe approxi mately 2,000 pounds of compressed marijuana was on the plane. to endanger life. The victims and items stolen during the armed robbery allegedly committed by the three men are: Shantell Dorsett-cash belonging to Island Luck, Delores Rolle $10 hand bag containing $20, Janece Ferguson $400, Lakeisha Adderley a Samsung cell phone worth $400, Wellington Ford $800 and a Nokia worth $300, Anthony Roker $400, Sheila Douglas handbag, cash and a Bahamian passport and Tiffany Turnquest Nokia cell phone worth $250 and $80 handbag. Wimms of Wilton Street was also charged with receiving the Nokia Phone and $800, belonging to Wellington Ford. All three defendants were further charged with three counts of firearm possession with intent to endanger the lives of three police detectives; Insp F Saunders, Sgt 1218 Demeritte and Constable 971 Davis. The men were not allowed to enter pleas to the charges brought against them due to the nature of the offences. Chief Magistrate Gomez informed the accused men that the matter would be tried in the Supreme Court through Voluntary Bills of Indictment which will be served on them Wednesday, November 30. The chief magistrate remanded the men to prison until trial completion after ordering that Yellow Elder resident Thompson be examined by a physician to ensure that gunshot wounds sustained prior to arrest were not reopened. ing stolen goods. He was arraigned with 22-year-old Elroy Wilson, 22, and 21-year-old Neville Knowles, who were charged in connection with the same offences. According to court documents, on Tuesday, August 30, Roker allegedly armed with a handgun, with Wilson and Knowles, robbed Tyrone Butler of a Samsung cell phone and attempted to take his life. A day later, Stephen Thompson became a victim of armed robbery with Roker and Wilson being the alleged culprits. Then on Thursday, September 1, Roker and the two accused men allegedly robbed John Darville of a gold Pulsar mens wrist watch worth $360, a grey Sony Visio Laptop Computer valued at $827, a black BlackBerry Curve worth $489, and a cologne and land bag togeth er valued at $458. The former police officer and the two accused men were further charged with robbing on September 1: Densil Smith of $250 and a Black Berry Storm worth $700, Gabrielle Smith of $15, Burton Wallace of $35 a drivers license, a black G-shock watch worth $120 and an Iphone worth $600, and Chrystal Bethel of $100, a handbag valued at $200 and a white BlackBerry Curve worth $450. The three defendants were charged with receiving Darvilles laptop, Pulsar watch and BlackBerry; Wallaces I-phone, Bethels BlackBerry Curve, and cash belonging to Gabrielle Smith. The defendants were not allowed to enter pleas to the charges brought against them due to the nature of the charges. The prosecution intends to have the matters tried before the Supreme Court through Voluntary Bills of Indictment, which will be served in Court One, Bank Lane on Tuesday, November 29. Mario Duceil, who represented Roker during yesterdays arraignment, indicated to the court that his client, who told police that he had no knowledge of or involvement in the matters against him, became a victim of police brutality and requested that he received medical atten tion. He argued that his client should receive bail as he was not a flight risk or had previous convictions before the courts. He also reminded the court of his clients presumed innocence. Geoffrey Farquharson, lawyer for Wilson, said that his client was subjected to similar treatment while in police custody. He claimed that Wilson, who was allegedly stomped on the chest, has severe shortness of breath and a heart defect, which Accident and Emergency Records at the Princess Margaret Hospital would show. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that the defendants be immediately examined by a physician and then remanded to prison until completion of trial. Knowles was not represented during yesterdays arraignment. FROM page one DISCHARGED POLICE OFFICER IN COURT ON MULTIPLE CHARGES CHARGED: Angelo Roker outside of court. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Resort and PGA Village devel opment in Port Howe have cleared roads, distributed drinking water, provided generators and tarpaulins to people in need since Hurricane Irene hit on August 25. They have also collected hundreds of dollars worth of donations for people in the southern settlements of Cat Island whose homes were damaged and have been living without electricity, running water or telecommunications for nearly two weeks. However they were refused access to these items yesterday for the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) procedure to be followed by island administrator Gloria Bain. After fielding calls from The Tribune yesterday morning, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government Byron Woodside flew to Cat Island to work with local government staff and NEMA representatives responsible for oversee ing the distribution of goods. He said the donations brought in by the volunteers were marked for NEMA and therefore had to be released by NEMAs local representative. When asked why the goods had been left to languish on the dock for three days, he answered: Who works on Sun day? There are persons with good intentions who want to move faster than normal, but there has to be some procedure that has to be followed or there would be anarchy and chaos, he said. They are pretty much organised, and they really had some serious challenges here, but I am advised that, for the most part, there is nobody starving, people have food and water, and they're without elec tricity, but they have got drinking water, and people are surviving. He met a family yesterday who had lost part of their roof and whose home was flooded, but they remained in good spirits yesterday, Mr Woodside said. NEMA director Commander Stephen Russell said he spoke to Mrs Bain twice yesterday and ordered her to release all materials brought in on the ship. Based on assessments we hope to make sure that the per sons entitled to the stuff are getting the stuff, he said. But this will not happen again. FROM page one GOVT OFFICIALS REFUSED TO RELEASE HURRICANE AID TO VOLUNTEERS ORLANDO WIMMS SHAKATOURE THOMPSON TAMICO BANNISTER FROM page one THREE CHARGED WITH ARMED ROBBERY OF WEB CAFE FROM page one THREE MISSING MEN RECENT HIGH SCHOOL graduate Avenii Johnson has been looking for work for a year. Felip Major /Tribune staff PMS WARNING OVER JOB GROWTH FROM page one

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$4.68 $4.51 $4.69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.55 $5.18 $5.38 THETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 SIRbahamas.com t 242.362.4211 ROSE ISLAND #542916 acres sea-to-sea in the protected Lower Harbour.Access by boat is from the south side where there is an all seasons dock with a pathway that leads to a 3 bed 2 bath main house and a 1 bed 1 bath cottage.Water is supplied by a fresh water well,and power is solar. On the north side there is a stretch of beautiful sandy beach and a private honeymoon beach at the eastern end.This property is suited for touristic development,family compound or it can be subdivided into residential lots. Exclusively offered by George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com t 242.362.4211 ROSE ISLAND GETAWAY [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 ByNEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor COLINA HOLDINGS (Bahamas) yesterday said its strong capital and reserve base had given it a priceless ability to withstand external shocks, Junes 75 basis point Prime rate cut having pushed it into a net $709,572 second quarter loss after sparking a more than $7.5 million rise in future policyholder benefit provisions. Despite the unanticipated move by the Central Bank of the Bahamas, which forced Colina Holdings and its Colina Insurance subsidiary to increase reserves to meet future policyholder liabilities, due to the drop in future investment income, Marcus Bosland, the companies resident actuary, said they were still on course for a profitable 2011. Mr Bosland said Colina Insurance and its BISxlisted parent pretty much felt compelled to take the hit from Junes reduction in the Prime rate, from 5.5 per cent to 4.75 per cent, at one-time upfront. The result was that the change in provision for future policyholder benefits increased year-over-year during the three months to end-June from $721,895 to$8.349 million, $6 mil lion of that driven by the Prime reduction. Were fully provided for, from the impact date due to the change in Prime, as of the end of By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The Hotel Corporations chairman yesterday pledged to get the millstone that is the last government-owned hotel off our collective necks, telling Tribune Business it was costing the Corporation and Bahamian taxpayer $500,000 per year to keep Andross Lighthouse Club open. Michael Scott said the Corporation and the Government had received an investment proposal from Illinois-based Scheck Industries that he was inclined to accept, but detailed negotiations were expected to commence in one-two weeks time once a revised Heads of Agreement for the I-Groups Mayaguana project had been concluded and got out the way. Scheck had been asked to re-develop the Lighthouse Club in phases, similar to the manner in which the Ingraham administration wants the I-Group to develop Mayaguana, with land acreages released for each phase only once timelines and milestones are successfully completed by the developer. Estimating that the first phase could involve a $15 million investment by Scheck if a deal is concluded, Mr Scott said he wanted the Lighthouse Clubs redevelopment to act as a catalyst for Andross economy. In principle, were com mitted to doing a deal with him [Scheck], Mr Scott told Tribune Business. We have their proposal in a letter, set out in a phased way, because weve asked them to do it in phases. Weve been exchanging correspondence and think we can come up with a workable formula, but weve put it on the back burner while we deal with Mayaguana. The Minister of Tourisms view is do one thing at a time. Scheck was initially looking a four-phase redevelopment, and the Hotel Corporation chairman added: Weve got the bare bones of a proposal, which were inclined to accept, but we do not have a draft Heads of Agreement. We have to take a view on the last proposal we received from them, and thats on hold until we get this one [Mayaguana] out of the way. Telling Tribune Business that he, the Hotel Corporation and the Government would turn their attention to the Lighthouse Club and Scheck in the next week-two weeks, Mr Scott said: Its finding the right formula, and that is to do a development in stages, so we can control and regulate it without signing away large tracts of land. A key issue, he explained, was how much acreage Scheck received for its first development phase. The Illinois-based developer had wanted 100 acres, and the Hotel Corporation had replied that it might receive 80, given the Governments aversion to handing over significant amounts of acreage in the first phase until they see significant construction on the ground. Scheck, Mr Scott said, was eyeing a significant first phase investment of around $15 million, as it would have to start from scratch by knocking down the existing Lighthouse Club and redeveloping both it and the marina to international standards. Describing Schecks proposed project and investment as very important, Mr Scott said: Its going to act as a catalyst. Theres nothing going on in Andros that Im aware of, apart from little dive resorts in South Andros. But I want to see some real construction on the ground, people in Mayaguana getting back to work and, hopefully, after that we will do the same in Andros and there will be a ripple effect. And he added: As chairman of the Hotel Corporation, Id like to get that millstone [the Lighthouse Club] off our collective necks, By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor CABLE BAHAMAS felt it had grounds to sue the Government for breach of its franchise agreement due to 2009s enactment of amendments to the compul sory TV licensing regime, US diplomatic cables published by Wikileaks reveal. The October 10, 2009, cable entitled No Free TV? which appears to have been authored by the Nassau Embassys charge daffaires, Timothy Zuniga-Brown, details a private conversation in which Anthony Butler, Cable Bahamas president and chief executive, said the BISX-listed communications provider would be well within [its] rights to sue the Government over the amendment. This was allegedly because the 2004 amendment to the Compulsory Licensing Act, which took effect from Octo ber 1, 2009, breached the By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMAShas been urged to privatise as many parts of government as possible, a leading accountant also calling on the Ingraham administration to reform the unsustainable civil service pension scheme. Raymond Winder, managing partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), told Tribune Business that apart from better revenue enforcement the Bahamas also needed to target the spending side of government, describing unfund CABLE HAD GROUNDS TO SUE GOVT WIKILEAKS BISX-listed firm felt franchise agreement that created it breached by change to compulsory licence law US Embassy sympathised with company, helping resolve Englishspeaking content woes COLINA: PRICELESS ABILITY TO ABSORB $6M PRIME HIT GETTING MILLSTONE OFF OUR DUAL NECKS BISX-listed life insurer suffers Q2 loss due to reserve increases as result of rate cut But expects profits to return to normal levels in second half, and end year in back Reinsurance boosts Q2 premiums and benefits SEE page 5B Costing Hotel Corp and taxpayer $500k per year to keep Andros resort open Still inclined to deal with US developer for phased redevelopment First phase investment likely to be $15m SEE page 4B SEE page 4B GOVT URGED: PRIVATISE AS MANY ASSETS AS YOU CAN Top accountant calls for public pension reform, describing it as unsustainable and a sore Urges politicians to be honest on spending pledges SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE INGRAHAM ADMINISTRATION does not want to create a second Freeport in the southern Bahamas, the Hotel Corporations chairman telling Tribune Business that having a foreign developer act as a quasi-governmental authority was an inherently flawed concept. While the original Heads of Agreement signed between the former Christie administration and the Boston-based IGroup envisioned the creation of another Freeport in the southern Bahamas via their 50/50 Mayaguana joint ven ture, Michael Scott said the current administration viewed that deal as creating numerous potential conflicts of interest for the Government. We dont want to achieve that. We dont want to create Freeport in the south, Mr Scott said, when questioned by Tribune Business. If such a course was pursued, he explained, the Government would effectively be licensing a foreign developer to become a quasi-municipal authority exercising government functions. To have a foreign developer function as a quasi-municipal authority, in my opinion, is an inherently flawed conNOCREATION OF A SECOND FREEPORT IN MAYAGUANA SEE page 4B Hotel Corp chairman said inherently flawed concept RAYMOND WINDER managing partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas)

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net ENCOURAGING more active participation by Bahami an-owned small and mediumsized businesses is key to reviving the economy, a leading attorney and former Bar Association president said yesterday, adding that undue empha sis was often placed on foreign direct investment. Wayne Munroe, who was responding to comments made by Raymond Winder, managing partner at Deloitte &Touche (Bahamas), told Tribune Business that rather than looking to foreign attorneys practicing from the Bahamas in non-Bahamian legal matters as a financial services game changer, accountants should drop the auditing and advisory fees they charge Bahamianowned firms. He said: Small to medium Bahamian businesses are the engines that drive the econo my. Weve had this downturn because theyve been put out of business. I dont know what type of rates accountants charge, but they need to be friendly to small to mediumsized businesses. Thats the game changer, encouraging more active participation of the small to medium businesses. Thats what drives all economies. If you talk about a game changer, a big game changer would be for all professionals, accountants and lawyers, to understand that the engine that drives most economies is small to medium businesses and to perhaps, as an association of professionals, become more friendly to small and medium businesses. Mr Winder had told Tribune Business that the Bahamas needs a major game changer, such as allowing foreign attorneys to practice from this nation in non-Bahamian legal matters, which he said was critical to attracting the ultra high net worth individuals necessary to revive the economy. But Mr Munroe responded: Mr Winder probably has a clearer view of how accountants work here than how lawyers work here. In the Bahamas the only matters that are dealt with are Bahamian legal matters. A Chinese high net worth person, for example, wanting advice about Chinese practices would in any event get it in Chi na. If he were to set up a struc ture here to take advantage of some perceived benefit from the Chinese tax structure, theyre still going to have to engage Bahamian lawyers. The structure would have to be legal here in the Bahamas. What Mr Winder may be unaware of is that is how things work now anyway. You have foreign lawyers who correspond with Bahamians lawyers, give advice as to what they are trying to achieve, ask advice on our structures. The only matters that impact here would be Bahamian structures. Mr Munroe added: Thats why I dont really understand his point. His point would regard accountants, for instance, because right now a Bahamian accounting firm would correspond with an international accounting firm if they have issues in the two jurisdictions. Hes probably just unaware that the same thing happens here, so no high net worth indi vidual comes down here other than having his local lawyers in the country where he is from determine that something can happen here. They liaise with a Bahamian lawyer who gives them advice as to what can happen in the Bahamas and they work together. Mr Winder had also noted that while it was not impossible for the Bahamian economy to achieve a significant level of growth, Bahamians had to overcome their suspicion and mistrust of foreign direct investment, as the domestic econo my would not generate enough growth to accomplish this task. Mr Munroe said: It tends to downplay the impact that local entrepreneurs can have in reviving and driving an economy. In most jurisdictions, small businesses employ most peo ple. They would be started by locals. If your only view is that one fellow with a lot of money can come here and do this, that tends to overlook the phenomenon of small businesses employing the vest majority of people, even in the Bahamas. Atlantis may employ 5,000 people but thats not the majority of the people. The outlook is off for two reasons. It fails to recognise how lawyers interact globally and it seems to put undo weight on foreign direct investment. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3B By LARRYGIBSON THE MAJOR GLOBAL economies are all generally struggling to recover from the 2009 recession, which was sparked by the crisis in the financial sector. Some two years later (from the bottom of the cycle), the pace of recovery in the major economies is anemic at best. SLOW GLOBAL GROWTH Recently, the US released revised data that shows its economy growing ata tepid 1 per cent annual rate as of the 2011 second quarter. More telling was the fact that consumer spending grew at a 0.4 per cent annual rate. As weall know, it is consumer spending that fuels overall economic growth. In addition to the US, economic challenges within the European Union (EU) continue to persist. A sharper-than-expected drop in Germany's business confidence survey added to evidence that German economic recovery is faltering. Likewise, recent data showed euro zone growth remained at a two-year low in August. On an annualised basis, euro zone gross domestic product (GDP) rose by 0.7 per cent in the second quartereven weaker than that of the US. For an open economy such as the Bahamas, sluggish economic growth in the US and Europe will undoubtedly mean challenges for us here at home, as most of our tourists and international investors come from those economies. DEBT WOES Almost without fanfare, Moodys Investor Services, the second largest credit rating agency in the world, downgraded the sovereign debt of Japan on August 23, 2011. Moodys cited weak economic growth prospects, frequent changes of government that prevent long-term budget planning, and a build-up of debt since the 2009 global recession as rea sons for cutting Japans grade to Aa3. At the same time, it said Japans rating outlook is stable, and the nation will benefit from low funding costs because domestic demand for government debt is stable and Japan is the worlds largest net creditor. Persistent deflation and slow growth has shackled Japan's economy for years, reducing tax revenues available to the government, which has grown to rely on debt issuance to finance a large part of its budget. The downgrade, while not out of the blue, served as another reminder of the debt burdens that nearly all the world's major advanced economies shoulder, even as policymakers struggle to agree on ways to stimulate sub-par growth without the massive new public spending that will inevitably have to be financed by additional borrowing. The USlost its top-tier AAA rating from Standard & Poor's earlier this month, and Moody's warned in June that it may downgrade Italy as Europe's sovereign debt crisis festers. KEY ECONOMIC INDICATOR One of the key economic indicators that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the main rating agencies monitor closely in assessing the health of economies is the ratio of debt to GDP. The dire economic situation in Greece has served to focus the world, once again, on this key ratio. Greeces ratio is currently estimated to be about 180 per cent, which mean that for every $100 of GDP, Greece has about $180 of debt. The US debt-to-GDP ratio is 100 pe rcent, while Japans was 223 per cent at the time of downgrade, and Italy is hovering around 119 per cent. This contrasts with the Bahamas, which is estimated to be at about 50-60 per cent of GDP. While the Bahamas ratio is low compared to the region and, indeed, many of the major economies, it has been trending higher in recent years. MOODYS DOWNGRADE There seems to be a great deal of misunderstanding surrounding the recent downgrade of the Bahamas by Moodys. Unlike the US and Japan, the debt/credit rating of the Bahamas was not downgraded. Instead, the economic outlook for the Bahamas was downgraded from stable to negative. According to Moodys, the main triggers for the downgrade were: The significant run-up in government debt levels in recent years The country's limited growth prospects; The challenges the Government is likely to face in raising revenues. Therefore, as a result, Moody's expects the Government will have difficulty achieving a meaningful reduction in its debt levels in the near-tomedium term. SLOW BAHAMIAN GROWTH Moodys went on to report: Furthermore, given the Bahamas' historically low growth rates its economy has grown a cumulative total of just a little over 6 per cent over the past 10 years it is unlikely it will be able to grow out of its debt burden, notwithstanding certain recent developments that may give a lift to the economy over the next few years. The Bahamas' economy is highly dependent on tourism, particularly from the US, the near-term economic prospects of which appear increasingly uncertain. In addition, the off shore financial sector, the Bahamas' second most important industry, is facing a rising degree of competition. Consequently, the only way that debt levels will decrease is if the Government is able to reverse the fiscal deficits it has generated over the past several years and begin to repay a portion of its debt. With expenditures still quite low despite recent increases, in all likelihood the Government will have to rely on tax increases and/or the introduction of new taxes in order to accomplish this. I must admit that I was shocked to learn our economy had only grown 6 per cent in the past 10 years. That works out to about 0.6 per cent per annum. If this is correct, when one considers that the official inflation rate has been less than 3 per cent per annum during the period (which, incidentally, no one believes), the country would have had negative growth in real terms over the past decade. Given the above, the downgrade of our outlook could be a precursor for a downgrade in our actual rating if we do not control our bourgeoning debt levels and raise revenues. Moodys concluded: In order for the outlook to return to stable, the Government would need to demonstrate a credible plan not just for stabilising debt, but for reducing it to a level more consistent with the current A3 rating. With general elections likely early next year, the task ahead is not an easy oneno matters who wins. The most pressing concern, from a rating standpoint, would be the Government's resolve to reduce its debt and implement long-term sustainability measures. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vice-president pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas), a wholly-owned sub sidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to Larry.Gibson@atlantichouse.com.bs NO EASY OPTIONS FOR POLICYMAKERS FINANCIALFOCUS BY LARRYGIBSON F F o o r r a a n n o o p p e e n n e e c c o o n n o o m m y y s s u u c c h h a a s s t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s , s s l l u u g g g g i i s s h h e e c c o o n n o o m m i i c c g g r r o o w w t t h h i i n n t t h h e e U U S S a a n n d d E E u u r r o o p p e e w w i i l l l l u u n n d d o o u u b b t t e e d d l l y y m m e e a a n n c c h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e s s f f o o r r u u s s h h e e r r e e a a t t h h o o m m e e , a a s s m m o o s s t t o o f f o o u u r r t t o o u u r r i i s s t t s s a a n n d d i i n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l i i n n v v e e s s t t o o r r s s c c o o m m e e f f r r o o m m t t h h o o s s e e e e c c o o n n o o m m i i e e s s . ACCOUNTANTS URGED: REDUCE FEES LEVIED ON SMALL BUSINESS Former Bar chief urges focus on small and medium-sized business or economic revival, not FDI By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net PRIME MINSISTER HUBERT INGRAHAMyesterday said unemployment in the Bahamas is far to high, and likely to remain so for another 12-18 months, as he launched the first phase of the Governments jobs training initiative. Some 12,800 persons had applied for the National Job Readiness and Training Program, far exceeding the 3,000 spots set aside for the initiative, and the Prime Minister noted: The number of applicants seeking to participate in this programme demonstrates that our economy, like economies throughout the world, is severe ly affected by one of the worst global economic crisis in a century. Unemployment is far, far too high in our country. The need for jobs in the Bahamas is great. By and through this orientation we begin today, we seek to ensure that many, many more Bahamians are trained and skilled to take advantage of opportunities for jobs, and to place even more persons in a position to have access to skills training to be employed when our econo my rebounds and many, many more jobs come on stream. The orientation program is slated for the next two weeks for the first participants. Yesterday, 400 persons in New Providence and 240 in Grand Bahama began the two-week orienta tion prior to their job placement, representing the first of hundreds set to participate in the program. Mr Ingraham said the course work will focus on what are called soft skills needed to ensure success in the work place. The Government has set aside $25 million for the jobs program, which has three main components: job readiness, job training and job placement. Government officials could not confirm yesterday how many employ ers had signed up for the latter initiative. Prime Minister Ingraham said the response from the private sector towards the initiative has been encouraging. The response to our invitation from the private sector has been encouraging, he added. Many employers have agreed to provide work experience and on-the-job training to improve the skills, and to enhance the employability, of the unemployed. Because of this response many, if not all of you, will be provided the opportunity for work placement and skills develUNEMPLOYMENT STILL FAR TOO HIGH SEE page 4B

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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE opment through private sector employment exposure. We will also make training opportunities available at the BTVI to individuals interested in a wide range of trades, including auto-collision repair, masonry, welding, air-condi tioning, tiling, dry wall installation, fashion design and manu facture. Mr Ingraham said: Here in Nassau some 200 persons whose interests in skills training coincide with available train ing at BTVI will be accommodated in such training programs, beginning in the current semester. The Government will pay the cost of the training. And the Government will provide a stipend to participants in the Programme at BTVI. We will undertake a similar exercise at BTVI in Grand Bahama. According to the latest Labour Force survey, the national unemployment rate dropped from 14.2 per cent in May 2009 to 13.7 per cent two years later. This still represents more than 25,000 Bahamians, and the number of people who are no longer looking for work (discouraged workers) also dramatically increased by 34.8 per cent to 11,900. The unemployment rate in New Providence dropped slightly from 14 per cent to 13.2 per cent. Grand Bahamas unemployment rate dropped from 17.4 per cent to 15.4 per cent. PRIMEMINISTER Hubert Ingraham UNEMPLOYMENT STILL FAR TOO HIGH FROM page three because just keeping it open and employing 30 people is costing the Hotel Corporation halfa-million a year. No one wants to have a viable proposal for development done for Andros more than me. Tribune Business previously reported that the initial Scheck deal, which aimed to transform the Lighthouse property and surrounding real estate into the Andros Sporting Club, was rejected by the Ingraham Cabinet on the grounds that it did not want to convey to the developer the estimated 6,000-7,000 acres sur rounding the resort property owned by the former Hotel Corporation. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, effectively confirmed this, also acknowledging that the previous Scheck proposal which called for the redevelopment of the Lighthouse property in a project covering 600 acres, 350 freehold and 250 leasehold had involved the surrounding acreage. original franchise agreement between the Government and Cable Bahamas, which was signed in 1994 and provided the legal foundation for the latters creation. The original Compulsory Licensing Act created a copyright controversy not just embroiling Cable Bahamas, but also US-based TV programmers and content distributors plus both the Bahamian and US governments, the latter through its Nassau Embassy and the US Trade Representatives Office. In its original format, the Act allowed Cable Bahamas to decode, download and screen on its cable channels encrypted TV programming from US satellite providers whose footprint extended over the Bahamas. Effectively, it gave Cable Bahamas a legal basis to use this TV content without having to reach commercial agreements with the providers/distributors first. In the latters eyes, this was tantamount to a flagrant breach of copyright, even though the Compulsory Licensing Act required Cable Bahamas to set aside funds to compensate the programmers/distributors, something monitored by the Government-appointed Copyright Royalties Tribunal. The last published figures showed Cable Bahamas had paid some $4.3 million into the specially-created fund. However, none of the USbased programmers or distributors had touched a single cent, apparently fearing that to do so would tacitly imply acceptance of Cable Bahamas activities and the Bahamas compulsory licensing regime. This copyright dispute ultimately raged on for more than a decade, with the US programmers and rights holders frequently pressurising Washington to take action against the Bahamas. It was a key factor behind the Bahamas regular placement on the US Trade Representatives Special 301 watch list, and the 2004 amendment passed by both houses of Parliament was critical in this nations eventual removal from that list in 2007. However, the 2004 amendment was never brought into law until, as revealed by another diplomatic cable obtained by Wikileaks, the US government effectively got out the big stick and threatened the Bahamas with loss of its trade preferences under the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) unless it passed the amendment to its Compulsory Licensing Act. This would have impacted around $125-$140 million worth of Bahamian exports to the US, chiefly from Polymers International and the fisheries industry, undermining their competitiveness. The US diplomatic cable, recording the conversation between Mr Butler and its Nassau embassys unnamed economic officer, believed to be Jeff Dubel, said: In a private conversation, Cable Bahamas president and CEO Anthony Butler told EconOff [Economic Officer] that he believes the amendment is a breach of the franchise agreement between Cable Bahamas and the Government of the Bahamas. Butler said he would be well within (his) rights to sue the Government. The current franchise agreement expires on October 13. Cable Bahamas, he noted, is undergoing renewal talks from a weakened financial position even though he believes the Government of the Bahamas won't enforce the amendment. That interpretation was contradicted by comments from Alexious Rolle, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs economic officer, who apparently told the US Embassy that the Government could enforce the Act through various means, such as cease and desist orders, licence removals and litigation. The US embassy cable then detailed Cable Bahamas side of the situa tion, namely that the US programmers, distributors and rights holders were refusing to enter good-faith negotiations with it to tie down commercial agreements on the grounds that this nation and, by extension, the English-speaking Caribbean were too small a market to be commercially viable. The Bahamas, and other English-speaking nations, fell under the Latin American programming footprint, but Spanish-speaking content was no good to Cable Bahamas. Butler dismissed the idea of moving to the Television Association of Programmers Latin America (TAPLAT) because it does not offer the quantity of American content or timely airing of pop ular shows, the US embassy cable said. He also noted that TAPLAT officials would not meet with his company due to the Compulsory Licensing issue. This is not a Cable Bahamas issue, he [Butler] said. This is a Bahamas issue. Cable Bahamas cannot compete without American programming. Bahamians are accustomed to American programming and aren't going to give it up so easily, and the Government needs to face that. The US cable reported Mr Butler as saying there was very little consideration of Cable Bahamas ability to compete without compulsory licensing, but the company was making a good-faith effort to comply. Branding the US content provider representatives as a bunch of lawyers unwill ing to consider Cable Bahamas viewpoint, Butler added that Cable Bahamas was only established because it was protected under the exception clause of the Compulsory Licensing Act. He said that his $ 250 million operation cannot afford the financing required to obtain premium content at the pricing levels the content providers are offering. The US Embassy in Nassau was sympathetic to Cable Bahamas plight, noting that Bahamians were all-toowilling to purchase and illegally install satellite dishes to extricate encrypted material themselves. Illegal satellite dishes, it said, accounted for 21 per cent of the Bahamian TV market and were increasing, impacting Cable Bahamas competitiveness. Mr Butler, the US cable said, had sought the Embassys assistance in helping Cable Bahamas to reach commercial agreements with the programming rights holders. The Nassau Embassy seemed willing to accede to his request, the cable agreeing: Cable Bahamas may have difficulty entering into commercial agreements with providers, which perceive the Bahamian market as too small. US government support for these negotiations is vital in order to ensure that Cable Bahamas does not fall back into non-compliance. Indeed, this approach paved the way for the ultimate resolution of the longrunning dispute over Cable Bahamas and the compulsory licensing regime. The situation is now effectively water under the bridge, the BISX-listed communications provider having subsequently signed commercial agreements with HBO and other premium content providers, while not going down the route of legal action against the Government. When contacted by Tribune Business yesterday, Mr Butler confirmed that Cable Bahamas had engaged, reached out to both the US Embassy in Nassau and the US Trade Representative in Washington from as far back as 2001 when we realised this was becoming an issue. The company, he added, had worked through four US Ambassadors Arthur Schechter, Richard Blankenship, John Rood and Ned Siegel. The former wrote a letter supporting Cable Bahamas position, Mr Butler said, while Mr Siegel approached the content providers directly a tactic that resulted in an August 5, 2009, meeting in Nassau between all parties to the dispute. From the August 2009 meeting we had, we believed everyone understood the situation the Bahamas and the English-speaking Caribbean was in, Mr Butler told Tribune Business. One, that we were covered under the Latin American feeds and jurisdiction, which meant programming with a lot of Spanish-speaking content. From the meeting that day, there was an understanding from all parties around the table that day from the Government of the Bahamas, the programmers, TAPLAT, the Embassy that they were going to work collectively to recognise the English-speaking Caribbean had a need for Englishspeaking programming. In particular, the Bahamas, with its proximity to the US, and having been exposed to US programming for 30 years, had a special need. Weve all moved forward from there. On the original Compulsory Licensing Act, which became the source of so much friction, Mr Butler explained: It was important when Cable Bahamas first came to the country that we were able to offer a product that was at least equivalent to what was already here, which was US satellite programming. The Government understand that, and amended the Act within [the context of] the franchise agreement. The Cable Bahamas chief executive added that the company had been paying into the copyright licens ing fund throughout its duration. cept, Mr Scott told Tribune Business. Yet he said Article 16 of the Heads of Agreement signed with the Christie administration effectively gave the I-Group such authority, giving the development vehicle, Mayaguana Island Devel opers (MID), the right to licence all third party developers and joint venture partners who came to Mayaguana. And he added that the Heads of Agreement also gave MID, the 50/50 joint venture between the IGroup and Hotel Corporation, representing the Governments inter est, to appoint representatives to Mayaguanas Town Planning Com mittee and other public Boards. This would effectively have left the Government as an owner, operator and regulator of the Mayaguana development. The Government recognises its inherently a conflict and substantially unfair to other developers if it is a partner in the commercial realm and regulator, Mr Scott explained. It gives the project a very unfair advantage over other projects, and you cant see the Government as regulator and negotiator saying no to government in a corporation as a joint venture partner. These are all points that have cropped up. Reaffirming that the Governments role, under the previous Heads of Agreement, as joint venture partner and regulator in Mayaguana was an inherent conflict, Mr Scott questioned what would have happened if a dispute with the I-Group had occurred and the arbitration clause been invoked. What happens is that you get to arbitration, and the Government through the Hotel Corporation is a 50 per cent partner. It becomes ridiculous, the attorney said. How does that work conceptually and practically? I dont see how that can work. Youre in potential conflict with yourself since incep tion. Mr Scott also described the claw back provisions in the existing deal as a joke. MID was granted an initial 5,825 acres of Crown and government land after paying an initial $2 million, and could expand to 9,999 acres in two tranches. A further 2,082 acres was due to be granted once the airport was completed, and an equivalent amount once the infrastructure and bou tique hotels. Yet Mr Scott said the claw back provisions which allowed the Government to reclaim land if MID and the I-Group failed to per form to standard and milestones only kicked in following the final 2,082-acre tranches handover, and only provided for the return of 1,044 acres maximum. This, he added, allowed the developers to retain 8,900 acres, and he asked: Could that be in the best interests of the country. The Cabinet is today due to con sider, and potentially approve, the revised Heads of Agreement with the I-Group, potentially paving the way for the development to resume once several pieces of legislation are passed by Parliament. The project is looking at a potential $100 million build-out over a 10-year period, involving third-party and joint venture developers with the I-Group. The first phase involves comple tion of the airport terminal on Mayaguana and its runway, togeth er with a boutique hotel featuring a minimum 25 rooms and community projects. Mr Scott estimated the first phase would involve a $20-$30 million investment. GETTING MILLSTONE OFF OUR DUAL NECKS FROM page one NO CREATION OF A SECOND FREEPORT IN MAYAGUANA FROM page one CABLE HAD GROUNDS TO SUE GOVERNMENT FROM page one

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ed civil service pension liabilities as a sore that will eat away at investment in public infrastructure projects. Calling on the Government to employ more civil servants on a contract, rather than permanent, basis in a bid to reduce costs, Mr Winder also called on Bahamians to challenge politicians who promised to dramatically increase public expenditure in particular areas. Given the fiscal position, the key question was: Where is the money coming from? The Government is going to have to seek to privatise as many parts of government as possible, Mr Winder told this news paper, assessing possible solutions to the national debt/fiscal deficit woes. Its going to have to break with normal practice for the last 20 years on this issue. Its better to take it inhand now than later, when there will be a greater crisis that will create significant turmoil in this country. The Ingraham administration, albeit slowly, has begun the privatisation process through the sale a a majority 51 per cent stake in the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC) to Cable & Wireless Communications. Other likely privatisation targets include the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC), plus lossmaking turkeys that bleed the Treasury, such as Bahamasair and the Water & Sewerage Corporation. Yet other assets could also be considered, if the Government wants to get out of business and bring in professional private sector management. This has already happened, to a certain extent, with the Lyn den Pindling International Airport (LPIA) and Arawak Cay port, but other activities that could potentially be outsourced to the private sector include hospitals, educa tion and even-revenue generating agencies such as the Registrar Generals Department. All three of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Moodys and Stan dard & Poors have urged the Bahamas to focus sole ly on revenues and new or increased taxes to address the rapid increase in its $4.3 billion national debt, but Mr Winder effectively called for it to adopt a two-pronged approach targeting its $1.68 billion in annual public spending. Going forward, the Government really are going to have to seek to employ more people on a contract basis, as opposed to full employment, Mr Winder said. And he warned that civil service pension liabilities were being missed, not even factored into the expenditure equation. The hidden cost for government employees continues to grow daily, Mr Winder added. At the moment, there is nothing the Government can do to reduce expenditure, even if it stays where it is, because of the pension expenditure attached to individuals. This expenditure is not going away. Government has to look at bringing individuals on on a contract basis, and look at the pension scheme it has. It is unsustainable, and damaging to the longterm future of this country. It does not matter what we do on the revenue side; that will be a sore that eats away at governments abil ity to make new invest ments. Theyve got to look at coming up with a new pension scheme with a new focus. This, though, might be a hard sell, especially as Mr Winder acknowledged that efforts at public sector pension reform would only bear fruit in the medium to long-term. He is not the first, though, to express concern about public sector pensions. James Smith, former minister of state for finance, told Tribune Business earlier this year that with an average of "several hundred" civil servants retiring each year, the Government's pension liabilities to them and other departed colleagues was increasing every month and year. However, this is never disclosed as a Budget line item, these pension liabilities being included with recurrent spending as wages, salaries and emoluments. Meanwhile, Mr Winder also called on the three major political parties FNM, PLP and DNA to be honest in their upcoming 2012 general election campaigns and educate Bahamians on the issues facing the country. Referring to the tendency of budding politicians to make statements about doubling public spending in certain areas, he added: Those statements ought to be challenged from the perspective of: Where are we getting the revenue to fund them? My concern is that were continually raising the expectation level of the average Bahamian citizen, and there isnt those sense that these promises cant be fulfilled unless we raise additional taxes. Peoples expectations are being raised, and people are becoming very frustrated because not everyone understands these issues. When people in power are not fulfilling these obligations, they think the Government is not doing what it ought to be doing. Mr Winder said too many Bahamians were talking as if the Bahamas could afford to pay for more social s without first raising taxes or implementing new ones. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 5B ,Q$FFRUGDQFHZLWK$UWLFOHfRIWKHQLRQV &RQVWLWXWLRQ7KH%DKDPDVXEOLFHUYLFHV 8QLRQZLOOKROGWKH7UL$QQXDO*HQHUDO 0HPEHUVKLSHHWLQJRQ %HJLQQLQJDWSPDWWKH $XGLWRUVHSRUWVZLOOEHSUHVHQWHG $OOPHPEHUVDUHXUJHGWRDWWHQG DQGEHRQWLPH 5HIUHVKPHQWVZLOOEHVHUYHGDIWHUWKHPHHWLQJ June. We dont anticipate anything further at all, Mr Bosland told Tribune Business, attributing the policyholder provision increase almost entirely to the rate cuts effects. For the half-year to June 30, Colina saw the change in provisions for future policyholder benefits more than double, growing 286 per cent to $11.409 million compared to $3.989 million the year before. Life insurers have to match longterm assets to projected long-term liabilities, and the future decline in investment income (an asset) forced Colina Insurance as it will have other Bahamian life insurers to take the action it did. Life insurers rely heavily on investment income, and in a market such as the Bahamas where investment options are relatively limited, a significant proportion are in fixed-income instruments linked to Prime government bonds, Treasury bills and other securities, private sector bonds and preference shares, real estate and bank deposits. The impact on reserves is the biggest part of the change, Mr Bosland said, confirming that future interest coupons received from all Colinas investments tied to Prime would be reduced. However, the impact on its financial statements going forward was expected to be far less marked than the hit taken in the 2011 second quarter and half-year. We are making some adjustments to what we invest in, Mr Bosland told Tribune Business, but materially there arent any safe havens in the Bahamas that you can run to as everything is practically linked to Prime. We are doing some things at the edges, but dont expect anything materially different in the composition of the investment portfolio from this year to the next. There are a few minor things we are doing, but we have $500 million in total assets and its hard to change that in a short period of time. Mr Bosland acknowledged that it was probably our feeling that investment income would be reduced for the foreseeable future. Given that the change in Prime came towards the end of the 2011 second quarter, the main impact on investment income has yet to be felt. It remained relatively flat for the three months to end-June, standing at $7.575 million compared to $7.933 million the year before. The end result was that Colina Holdings (Bahamas) fell to a $709,572 net loss for the quarter, compared to a $8.121 million profit for the year before. Net income for the half-year fell from $10.108 million to $1.632 million but, if the impact of the Prime-induced $7.4 million policyholder benefit provisions increase was stripped out, the BISX-listed firm would only have been about $1 million down on 2010 comparatives. Net income available to ordinary shareholders, though, dropped to $0.4 million or $0.02 per share. Mr Bosland described Colina Insurances ability to withstand events such as the Prime increase as priceless, adding: Weve managed ourselves to be in a strong position to withstand issues like this, and have been fortunate to be disciplined over the years. Cathy Williams, Colina Insurances vice-president of finance, added: Its still business as usual for us as we have a long-term view. Were investing in a lot of software here to improve our business. With our ability to be flexible and withstand these kind of things, we havent changed a lot of our strategies. While retained earnings had dropped from the 2010 year-end, falling from $39.655 million to $36.071 million, Ms Williams said this was due to second quarter dividend payments of $3.9 million to ordinary shareholders and $870,000 to preference shareholders. Without this, and the Prime reduction, retained earnings would be on a normal upward trend. We had a very good first quarter and were doing very well, trending positively. This is unexpected, but we have to account for it and move on, Ms Williams said of the Prime reduction. Mr Bosland added that Colina expected to return to normal levels of profitability ahead during the 2011 second half, and were forecasting ending the year in the black. For the 2011 second quarter, Colina saw a 33.3 per cent increase in gross premium revenues to $34.399 million, compared to $25.792 million the year before. Policyholder benefits paid out, though, rose at a greater rate of 50.6 per cent to $21.608 million compared to $14.347 million the year before. Mr Bosland said Colina had received a boost from short-term health and reinsurance business it did, offering the latter service in the Caribbean and Latin America. He described the reinsurance business as chunky, with peaks and troughs, rather than a smooth income stream. FROM page one GOVT URGED: PRIVATISE AS MANY ASSETS AS YOU CAN FROM page one COLINA: PRICELESS ABILITY TO ABSORB $6M PRIME HIT

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BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE :LQWHUERWKDP,QIRUPDWLRQ 6\VWHPV/LPLWHG WKH&RPSDQ\f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ fRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FW1R RIWKH'LVVROXWLRQRI :LQWHUERWKDP,QIRUPDWLRQ 6\VWHPV/LPLWHG KDVEHHQFRPSOHWHGD&HUWLFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQKDVEHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUH EHHQVWUXFNRIIWKH5HJLVWHU7KHGDWHRIFRPSOHWLRQRIWKH GLVVROXWLRQZDVWKH WK GD\RI$XJXVW $OUHQDR[H\ /LTXLGDWRU INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000) LARKFIELD LIMITED In Voluntary liquidation Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), LARKFIELD LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution is the 2nd day of September, 2011.Paul B E Quayle FCA 19 Shore Road Peel, Isle of Man Liquidator ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6 $&7RRIf %21*(1,1& ,QROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFH ZLWK6HFWLRQfRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO %XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWRRIf %21*(1,1& KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFN RIIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWH RI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGE\WKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKH WK GD\RI $XJXVW <(+&+,1*+81* )R&KLHQ.XR5G 6HFDLSHLDLZDQ /LTXLGDWRU 127,&( 81,217(;$6 $161$7,21$/f/,0,7(' BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WKDWDQ ([WUDRUGLQDU\*HQHUDO0HHWLQJRIWKH6KDUHKROGHUVRI8QLRQ 7H[DVUDQVQDWLRQDOf/LPLWHG LVKHUHE\FDOOHGWREHKHOGDW :HVWODNH3DUN%RXOHYDUG+RXVWRQ7;RQ UG 2FWREHU DWDP7KHREMHFWDQGSXUSRVHRIVDLGPHHWLQJLVWRKDYH ODLGEHIRUHWKH6KDUHKROGHUVRIWKH&RPSDQ\WKHDFFRXQWVRIWKH /LTXLGDWRU'HODQR$UDQKDVKRZLQJWKHPDQQHULQZKLFKWKH ZLQGLQJXSRIWKH&RPSDQ\KDVEHHQFRQGXFWHGWKHSURSHUW\ RIWKH&RPSDQ\GLVWULEXWHGDQGWKHGHEWVDQGREOLJDWLRQVRI WKH&RPSDQ\GLVFKDUJHGDQGDOVRWRKHDUDQ\H[SODQDWLRQWKDW PD\EHJLYHQE\VDLG/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKH UG GD\RIHSWHPEHU '(/$12$5$1+$ /,48,'$725 WASHINGTON Associated Press THE U.S. JOB market is even worse than the 9.1 percent unemployment rate suggests. America's 14 million unemployed aren't competing just with each other. They must also contend with 8.8 million other people not counted as unemployed part-timers who want full-time work. When consumer demand picks up, companies will likely boost the hours of their part-timers before they add jobs, economists say. It means they have room to expand without hiring. And the unemployed will face another source of competition once the economy improves: Roughly 2.6 million people who aren't counted as unemployed because they've stopped looking for work. Once they start looking again, they'll be classified as unemployed. And the unemployment rate could rise.CompetitionIntensified competition for jobs means unemploy ment could exceed its historic norm of 5 percent to 6 percent for several more years. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office expects the rate to exceed 8 percent until 2014. The White House predicts it will average 9 percent next year, when President Barack Obama runs for re-election. The jobs crisis has led Obama to schedule a major speech Thursday night to propose steps to stimulate hiring. Republi can presidential candidates will likely confront the issue in a debate the night before. The back-to-back events will come days after the government said employers added zero net jobs in August. The monthly jobs report, arriving three days before Labor Day, was the weakest since September 2010. Combined, the 14 million officially unemployed; the "underemployed" part-timers who want fulltime work; and "discouraged" people who have stopped looking make up 16.2 percent of workingage Americans. The Labor Department compiles the figure to assess how many people want full-time work and can't find it a number the unemployment rate alone doesn't capture. In a healthy economy, this broader measure of unemployment stays below 10 percent. Since the Great Recession officially ended more than two years ago, the rate has been 15 percent or more. The proportion of the work force made up of the frustrated part-timers has risen faster than unem ployment has since the recession began in December 2007. That's because many companies slashed work ers' hours after the recession hit. If they restored all those lost hours to their existing staff, they'd add enough hours to equal about 950,000 full-time jobs, according to calculations by Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Eco nomic Policy Institute. That's without having to hire a single employee. No one expects every company to delay hiring until every part-timer is working full time. But economists expect job growth to stay weak for two or three more years in part because of how many frustrated part-timers want to work full time. And because employers are still reluctant to increase hours for parttimers, "hiring is really a long way off," says Christine Riordan, a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project. In August, employees of private companies worked fewer hours than in July.WorkersSome groups are disproportionately represented among the broader category of unemployment that includes underemployed and discouraged workers. More than 26 percent of African Americans, for example, and nearly 22 percent of His panics are in this category. The figure for whites is less than 15 percent. Women are more likely than men to be in this group. Among the Americans frustrated with part-time work is Ryan McGrath, 26. In October, he returned from managing a hotel project in Uruguay. He's been unable to find fulltime work. So he's been freelancing asa website designer for small businesses in the Chicago area. Some weeks he's busy and making money. Oth er times he struggles. He's living at home, and sometimes he has to borrow $50 from his father to pay bills. He's applied for "a million jobs." "You go to all these interviews for entry-level positions, and you lose out every time," he says. Nationally, 4.5 unemployed people, on average, are competing for each job opening. In a healthy economy, the average is about two per opening. Facing rejection, mil lions give up and stop looking for jobs. Norman Spaulding, 54, quit his job as a truck driver two years ago because he needed work that would let him care for his disabled 13-year-old daughter. But after repeated rejections, Spaulding conclud ed a few weeks ago that the cost of driving to visit potential employers was n't worth the expense. He suspended his job hunt. He and his family are getting by on his daughter's disability check from Social Security. They're living in a trailer park on Texas' Gulf Coast. "It costs more to look than we have to spend," he says. Eventually, lots of Americans like Spaulding will start looking for jobs again. If those work-force dropouts had been counted as unemployed, August's unemployment rate would have been 10.6 percent instead of 9.1 percent.RetailerEmma Draper, 23, lost her public relations job this summer. To pay the rent on her Washington apartment, she's working part time at the retailer South Moon Under. She's selling $120 Ralph Lauren swimsuits and other trendy clothes. Her search for full-time work has been discourag ing. Employers don't call back for months, if ever. "You're basically on their timeline," Draper says. "It's really hard to find a job unless you know somebody who can give you an inside edge." Retailers, in particular, favor part-timers. They value the flexibility of being able to tap extra workers during peak sales times without being overstaffed during lulls. Some use software to precisely match their staffing levels with customer traffic. It holds down their expenses. "They know up to the minute how many people they need," says Carrie Gleason of the Retail Action Project, which advocates better working conditions for retail workers. "It's almost created a contingent work force." Draper appreciates her part-time retail job, and not just because it helps pay the bills. It takes her mind off the frustration of searching for full-time work. "Right now, finding a job is my job," she says. "If that was the only thing I had to do, I'd be going insane. There is only so much time you can sit at your computer, sending out resumes." UNEMPLOYED FACE TOUGH COMPETITION: UNDEREMPLOYED RYAN MCGRATH ,26, poses in his home in Michigan City, Ind. McGrath has been working part time designing web sites for small businesses but wants steadier full-time work. (AP) USJOBMARKETWORSETHAN9.1%RATESUGGESTS

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DETROIT AssociatedPress PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMAsaid Monday that congressional Republicans must put their country ahead of their party and vote to create new jobs as he used a boisterous Labor Day rally to aim a partisan barb at the GOP. In a preview of the jobs speech he will deliver on Thursday to Congress, Obama said there are numerous roads and bridges that need rebuilding in the U.S., and over1 million unemployed construction workers who are available to build them. Citing massive federal budget deficits, Republicans have expressed opposition to spending vast new sums on jobs programs. But Oba ma said that with widespread suffering, "the time for Washington games is over" and lawmakers must move quickly to create jobs. "But we're not going wait for them," he said at an annual event sponsored by the Metropolitan Detroit AFL-CIO. "We're going to see if we've got some straight shooters in Con gress. We're going to see if congressional Republicans will put country before party." Obama's remarks came as he has been under heavy criticism from the GOP for presiding over a persistently weak economy and high unemployment. Last Fri day's dismal jobs report showed a net job change of zero in August, and the unemployment rate held steady at 9.1 percent. Congress returns from its summer recess this week, with the faltering economy and job market promising to be a dominant theme of the session. The economy is all but certain to also be the top issue of the 2012 presidential and congressional elections. Throughout the speech, the union crowd kept chant ing "four more years." Obama also said lawmakers should extend the temporary reduction in the pay roll tax that workers pay, a cut that will otherwise expire on Jan. 1. Many Republi cans have opposed renewing the payroll tax cut, saying it would increase federal red ink and do little to create jobs. "You say you're the party of tax cuts," Obama said of the GOP argument. "Well, then prove you'll fight just as hard for tax cuts for middle class families as you do oil companies and the most affluent Americans. Show us what you've got." In the speech to Congress, Obama is expected to call for a mix of individual and business tax credits and public works spending. He will also press lawmakers for swift action on those proposals. Underscoring the political dueling on the economy under way, Obama plans to visit Richmond, Va., the day after his address to Congress as the first of several trips he will make to encourage support for his job creation plan. Part of Richmond is represented by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., one of the president's fiercest critics. The president's broader goal is to make a sweeping appeal for bipartisan action on the economy, speaking not only to the members of Congress who will assemble before him, but to the larger American public. In that sense, the speech will mark a pivot point from a fall and summer spent dealing with long-term deficit reduction to a fall campaign devoted to boosting a foot-dragging recovery. Aides say Obama will mount a campaign through out the fall centered on the economy, unveiling different elements of his agenda heading into 2012. If Repub licans reject his ideas, the president and his aides want to enlist the public as an ally, essentially using the megaphone of his presidency to pressure Congress and make the case for his re-election. "People will see a president who will be laying very significant proposals throughout the fall leading up this next State of the Union," Gene Sperling, director of Obama's National Economic Council, said in an interview with the Associated Press. While Obama has said any short term spending proposal will be paid for over the long-term, aides say the speech will not offer details on what deficit reduc tion measures would be used to offset immediate spending measures. The speech also is not expected to include a detailed plan for resolving the nation's housing crisis, a central cause behind the weak econ omy that White House aides and administration officials have been struggling to resolve. "A lot of what will be discussed in greater detail in this economic proposal that he will be making on Thursday night will focus on many things that will have a more immediate, positive effect on getting the recovery to take hold, getting stronger growth spurring job creation, spurring the private sector to invest more," Sper ling said. Asked specifically about housing, he said: You will also see him throughout the fall talking about other issues that are also at very much the heart of this economic agenda." Last week's disappointing jobs report sparked new fears of a second recession and injected fresh urgency into efforts by Obama to help get millions of unemployed people back into the labor market and help improve his re-election chances. Meanwhile, the Chamber of Commerce on Monday surfaced its own jobs plan. In an open letter to Con gress and the White House, the Chamber called for mea sures designed to immediately increase employment, including stepped-up road and bridge construction, more oil drilling and tempo rary corporate tax breaks. Polls show the economy and jobs are the public's top concerns. Public approval of Obama's handling of the economy hit a new low of 26 percent in a recent Gallup survey. The unemployment report also gave Obama's Republi can critics, including those who want to challenge him in next year's presidential election, fresh ammunition to pound him with. GOP presidential candi date Mitt Romney called the report disappointing, unacceptable and "further proof that President Obama has failed." Romney is sched uled to outline his own jobcreation plan in a speech Tuesday in the battleground state of Nevada. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said Monday that both political parties should get behind Obama's efforts to improve the hiring picture. "We do need everyone to be on board," she said on NBC's "Today" show. Solis said Obama "is very mindful of what the needs and concerns are of those individuals who have been out of work for so long." But she also said the jobless have a responsibility to seek training in new skills, if necessary, to better prepare themselves for the kinds of jobs available in today's economy. Obama spent part of the holiday weekend at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland "putting the finishing touches" on the proposals and the speech, said spokesman Jay Carney. Obama won Michigan in the 2008 presidential election and the economically challenged state is crucial to his re-election prospects. The state unemployment rate was 10.9 percent in July, above the national average for that month. The Detroitarea jobless rate was even higher, at 14.1 percent in July. BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 7B &20021:($/7+)+(%$+$0$6 ,1+((0(&2857 &20021/$:$1'(48,7<',9,6,21&/(*(1 %(7:((1 %$+$0$6'(9(/230(17%$1. 3ODLQWLII $1' &+5,6723+(5&855< WD&XUU\VUXFNLQJf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fGD\VEHIRUHWKHGDWHDERYH PHQWLRQHGDFRS\RIDQ\$IGDYLWLQWHQGHG WREHXVHG '$7(' WKLV WK GD\RI-XO\$' 5(*,675$5 7KLV6XPPRQVZDVWDNHQRXWE\0HVVUV *LEVRQ5LJE\t&R&KDPEHUV.LDOH[ +RXVH'RZGHVZHOO6WUHHW1DVVDX7KH %DKDPDV$WWRUQH\VIRUWKHODLQWLII PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA speaks during a Labor Day event at Detroit's Renaissance Center, headquarters of General Motors, Monday. (AP)

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LONDON Associated Press WORLD STOCK MARKETS took a beating Monday over fears that the U.S. economy was heading back into a recession just as the European debt crisis was heating up and the eurozone's economic indicators were slumping. Any troubles in the world's largest economy cast a long shadow over the markets, and a report Friday that the U.S. economy failed to add any new jobs in August caused European and Asian stock markets to sink sharply Monday. But the news from Europe was also discouraging. Wall Street, which was closed Monday due to the Labor Day holiday, braced for losses Tuesday after the yields in so-called peripheral eurozone countries Greece, Italy and Spain rose sharply against those of Germany, whose bonds are widely considered a safe haven. Although retail sales in the 17-nation eurozone rose unexpectedly in July, a survey of the services sector Monday showed a slowdown across the continent for the fifth consecutive month. The purchasing managers' index for the eurozone showed the services sectorwasstill growing unlike the manufacturing sector but only barely. That will add pressure on the European Central Bank to keep interest rates on hold when it meets this week. "There's so much uncertainty, so much fear, that investors don't know what to do," said David Kotok, chair man and chief investment offi cer at Cumberland Advisors. "I don't remember the last time stocks were so cheap and nobody wanted them." Investors were also shaken by signs that the Italian government's commitment to its austerity program is wavering. Prime Minister Silvio Berlus coni's government has backtracked on some deficit-cut ting measures, prompting EU officials to urge Italy to stick to its promised plan. The difference in interest rates between the Greek and benchmark German 10-year bonds, known as the spread, spiraled to new records on Monday, topping 17.3 per centage points. Yields on the Greek bonds were above 18 percent. Mario Draghi, the incoming chief of the European Central Bank, told a conference in Paris that among the common currency's problems was a lack of coordinated fiscal policies and that the solution was more integration. He dismissed the idea of eurobonds debt issued jointly by the eurozone countries. Some have argued this would help weaker countries borrow more easily because they wouldn't have to pay such high interest rates. But stable countries like Germany would likely see their rates rise. Instead, Draghi suggested the eurozone should adopt rules that would require more budget discipline. Renewed jitters over the eurozone debt crisis also con tributed to the slump in finan cial stocks amid concerns the banks would need to raise new capital. Deutsche bank closed down 8.9 percent in Frankfurt, while Societe Generale in Paris shed 8.6 percent. The U.S. unemployment cri sis has prompted President Barack Obama to schedule a major speech Thursday night to propose steps to stimulate hiring. Until then, however, traders coming back from the U.S. holiday weekend will have little to hold onto. The August jobs figure was far below economists' already tepid expectations for 93,000 new U.S. jobs and renewed concerns that the U.S. recovery is not only slowing but actually unwinding. U.S. hiring figures for June and July were also revised lower, only adding to the gloom. Many traders have already pulled out of any risky invest ments such as stocks, particularly financial ones, the euro and emerging market currencies and pile into safe havens: U.S. Treasuries, the dollar, the Japanese yen and gold. With Wall Street closed, investors focused their selling in Asia and Europe, where the equity losses Monday were some of the heaviest this year. "We've got some rough rid ing ahead," said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at Harris Private Bank in Chica go, adding he was "concerned that we could see a second wave of selling when most traders are back at their desks." Dow futures were down 1.8 percent at 11,010 points while the broader S&P 500 futures were 2.0 lower at 1,145.70. After Asian indexes closed lower, with the Japan's Nikkei 225 shedding 1.9 percent, European shares booked sharp losses. Britain's FTSE 100 closed the day down 3.6 percent to 5,102.58. Germany's DAX slumped a massive 5.3 percent to 5,246.18, and France's CAC-40 tumbled 4.7 percent to 2,999.54. The health of the U.S. economy is crucial for the wider world because consumer spending there accounts for a fifth of global economic activity. The U.S. imports huge amounts from Japan and China and is closely linked at all levels with the European market. The U.S. has seen a slump in consumer and business sen timents. Traders were hoping for signs that the Federal Reserve might take action at its September meeting to support the economy perhaps a third round of bond purchases, dubbed quantitative easing III or QE3, analysts said. "Right now the possibility has increased," said Linus Yip, a strategist at First Shanghai Securities in Hong Kong. "I think they have to do something. The markets are expecting QE3." Banking stocks were among the hardest hit Monday, partly because the U.S. government on Friday sued 17 financial firms for selling Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac billions of dollars worth of mortgagebacked securities that turned toxic when the housing mar ket collapsed. Among those targeted by the lawsuits were Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., JP Morgan Chase & Co., and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Large European banks includ ing The Royal Bank of Scot land, Barclays Bank and Cred it Suisse were also sued. In Asia, Australia's S&P/ASX 200 followed the broaden trend to close down 2.4 percent and South Korea's Kospi slid 4.4 percent. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 3 percent. Benchmarks in Singapore, Taiwan, New Zealand and the Philippines also were down. Shanghai's benchmark Composite Index down 2 percent to 2,478.74, its lowest close in 13 months. The Shen zhen Composite Index lost 2.4 percent. In currencies, the euro weakened to $1.4100 from $1.4187 in New York late Friday. The dollar was roughly flat at 76.87 yen. Last month, the dollar fell under 76 yen, which was a new post-World War II high for the Japanese currency. Benchmark oil for October delivery was down $2.12 to $84.33 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Crude fell $2.48 to settle at $86.45 on Friday. In London, Brent crude for October delivery was down $1.63 at $110.70 on the ICE Futures exchange. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Securit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.19 0.95AML Foods Limited 1.19 1.19 0.0010,0000.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund 10.63 10.63 0.00 -0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .50 4.40Bank of Bahamas 6.93 6.93 0.00 0.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .53 0.17Benchmark 0.18 0.18 0.00 -0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .84 2.55Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.0300.09090.03.33% 1.96 1.77Fidelity Bank 1.77 1.77 0.00 0.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas 8.48 8.48 0.00 0.2450.31034.63.66% 2.80 2.35Colina Holdings 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.4380.0405.81.57% 8.50 8.33Commonwealth Brewery 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.7400.00011.50.00% 7.00 6.21Commonwealth Bank (S1) 6.88 6.88 0.00 0.4960.26013.93.78% 2.00 1.63Consolidated Water BDRs 1.53 1.53 0.00 0.1110.04513.82.94% 1.77 1.31Doctor's Hospital 1.37 1.37 0.00 0.0740.11018.58.03% 5 .50 4.75Famguard 5.43 5.43 0.00 0.4980.24010.94.42% 8.50 5.35Finco 5.39 5.39 0.00 0.7570.0007.10.00% 9.74 7.75FirstCaribbean Bank 8.29 8.29 0.00 0.4940.35016.84.22% 6.00 5.00Focol (S) 5.75 5.75 0.00 0.4350.22013.23.83% 1.00 1.00Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 0.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.30 5.50ICD Utilities 7.30 7.30 0.00 -0.1220.240-59.8 3.29% 10.809.80J. S. Johnson 9.82 9.82 0.00 0.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Security SymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029) BAH29 99.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + FBB17 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + FBB22 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + FBB13 100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) + FBB15 100.000.00FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%MONDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,398.15| CHG 0.00 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -101.36 | YTD % -6.76BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ A sk $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.06 5.01Bahamas Supermarkets N/A N/A 14.00 -2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.55 0.0010.000256.60.00% 41.00 29.00ABDAB 30.13 31.59 29.00 4.5400.0009.030.00% 0.55 0.40RND Holdings 0.65 0.75 0.40 0.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-Low Fund Name NAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.01602.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund 3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund 1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5730Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.734713.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund 13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund 114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund 118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund 1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS$ -A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221 NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11 A CURRENCY TRADER works in front of screens showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index, left, and the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the South Korean won at the Korea Exchange Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Monday. Asian stock markets took a beating Monday after U.S. companies stopped hiring in August, reviving fears that the world's largest economy is heading back into recession. The Korea Composite Stock Price Index fell 4.39 percent, or 81.92, to close at 1,785.83. (AP) ROME Associated Press ITALY'S PRESIDENTis warning the country's leaders to heed what he calls the "alarming' signals of worsening financial crisis and urgently enact austerity measures. President Giorgio Napolitano's appeal to government and parliament was prompted Monday evening by the widening spread between interest rates on Italian debt and benchmark German rates. Tensions are rising as the nation braces for a general strike called to protest a ?45.5 billion (?68 billion) package of spending cuts and new taxes that unions contend fail to spur job creation. Workers for state railways, buses, trams and subways are set to strike for eight hours Tuesday. Alitalia says the air transport sector strike will force it to reduce its number of national flights, but intercontinental flights won't be affected. ITALY BRACES FOR STRIKES AMID CRISIS A CURRENCY TRADER watches monitors in a trading room in Paris, Monday after the French stock index CAC 40 went down to 2999; down 54 points at around noon. (AP)

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1, P AGE 9B B O D Y A N D M I N D By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer IN an effort to combat the burden of diabetes in the Bahamas, The Adventist Health Professionals Association, is hosting a 12 week program to help persons with diabetes effectively manage their lifestyle.D i e t i t i a n I d a m a e H a n n a s a i d p r o p er d i e t li f e s t y l e ch a ng e a n d m ed i ca t i o n g o e s h a n d i n h a n d i n p r o p e r l y m a n a g i n g d i a b e t e s S h e e x p l a i n e d t h a t t h i s p r o g r a m w i l l e xpose di abeti cs to i nformatio n a nd activities that can make living with the disease much easier. This program is strictly for people who have di abet es Th ere i s a bur den of diabet es in th is count ry a nd so me p e opl e ta lk a bo ut it a s i f it is normal. There are a whole lot of t hin gs th at p eo ple ne ed t o kno w for example how food works, and what i s g o i n g o n i n t h e i r b o d i e s A l s o s om e p e o pl e re ly ju st on m e d ic a t i on B u t m e d i c a t i o n d o e s n o t w o r k alone. There is not a team effort w here do ct or s ar e wo r k in g t oge th er an d d i e t i t i a n s a r e w o r k i n g t o g e t h e r b e c a u se d i e t g oe s h a nd an d w i t h d ia b et e s I f p e op l e ar e n o t t o l d t h a t th ey ne ed to see a d ietit ian the y wi ll n ot a nd th is prog r a m w ill he lp th em i n t h a t w a y s h e t o l d T r i b u n e Health. Dr Hann a sai d the re is gr owing trend of young people, particularly t e e n a g e r s b e i n g d i a g n o s e d w i t h ad ult ty pe d ia bet es. S he e nc ou rag ed p ar en ts t o b ri ng t h eir t een s a lo ng who are also suffering from the dis ease. The re ar e th re e ty p es o f d i ab e te s and t ha t is typ e 1 type 2 a nd ge s tational diabetes. Usually young peo ple h av e ty pe 1 d ia bet es but n ow w e are seeing that they are having the adu lt type di a b etes which is being pushed by obesity, she said. On the fir st day of the pro g r am par ticipants w eight wais t and hip measuremen t s, blood sugar, chole s terol, blood pressure and hemoglo bi n A1 C w i l l b e t a ke n Th e y w i l l a l so fill out a health and nutrition ques t i o n n a i r e T h e s e m e a s u r e m e n t s blood tests and a questionnaire will be administered again at the end in order to evaluate the impact of the pr o g ra m A t e a c h se s si o n of th e se m inar blood sugar will be tested and p a r t i ci p an t s w i ll b e c lo s el y m o n i tored by health professionals. The health professionals will also conduct a scientific study based on the pro g ra m. D at a w il l b e c ol le c te d that w ill sho w how peo ple s l ifesty le can be controlled by a comprehen s i ve p r ogr am as s uch , D r H an na said. S o m e of th e t o p ic s t o b e a d d re s se d are: Diabetes: The Types, The Cause & Complications Ten Challenges for Good Health The Physiology of Diabetes: What is happening to Me? Eating for Health and Glucose Control Exercise is Not an Option Oral Agents and Insulin, How do they Work? Importance of Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Importance of Foot Care for the Diabetic Being Prepared for Emergencies and Sick Days The first two weeks will be intensive and little adjusting to the program is necessary. When you are dealing with diabetes sometimes the blood sugar levels drop and they end up not having enough sugar in the blood. We dont want that to occur. There will be some adjustments, she explained. Dr Hanna said she hopes with the collective effort of every partici pant, there is dent in the burden of diabetes. We came together to help people manage diabetes and every aspect of the disease will be dealt with in this program. We know it works because it has worked before. We hope to see and document that with a comprehensive lifestyle change people can help lower their blood sugar levels and put a dent in the burden of diabetes in the country. This program is sponsored by the Adventist Health Professionals Association along with other possi ble partnerships such as the program sponsoring organisation, the Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Diabetic Research Institute. The program starts August 12 and will be held at Living Faith Seventh Day Adventist Church Old Trail road opposite Solomons Super Centre. For information call 328 5658 or 341-4021. PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD PSI / Caribbea n, a non-profit that o p e ra t e s i n 1 2 C a ri b b e a n c o u n t ri e s t o com bat th e s pr ea d of H I V/ AI D S, launch ed its 1st i nst allm ent of t he B ra n d A m ba s sa d or c o mp e t it i on a p tly t itled Tal k Nah! S a y what you h av e t o say . du ring the pe ak o f c arnival cel ebr ati ons in T ri nida d a nd T o b a g o B a c c h a n a l F r i d a y M a r c h 4 Th e ob j e c t i v e o f t h e c a m p a i g n w a s t arg e te d to wa rd i de nt ify i ng t wo ne w Brand Ambassadors for its Got it? Ge t i t s af e r s e x b r an d. T he cam p a i g n c a l l e d u p o n i n t e r e s t e d Caribbean youth to submit creative videos showcasing their knowledge a bo ut s e x ual h ea lth a nd respo nsib ility. After three months of competit i o n 1 4 v i d e o s u b m i s s i o n s f r o m across the region and close to thirty thous a n d f ans voting, commenting a n d su p p o rt i ng t h e i r v i de o f a v o ur i te s on the Got it? Get it. Facebook fan page, judges selected a shortlist of c a n d i d a t e s A h m a d M u h a m m e d from Tr i nidad an d Toba go and Ni s s a Wi l l i a ms f r o m D o m i ni c a we r e j u d g e d t h e o v e r a l l w i n n e r s a n d b estow ed the tit le of Bra nd Ambass a d o r Co r y M c C u l l o u g h S o c i a l M e d i a O f f i c er f o r P S I / C ar i bb e a n said: Ahmad and Nissa were the p e r f e c t c h oi c e f o r o u r B r a n d A m b a ss a d o r s T h e y h a v e t h e ch a r i s m a passion, and drive not only to repr e s e n t o u r b r a n d b u t t o r e a l l y a d dre ss th e is sue s in a dy na m ic fa shion that appeals to the youth! A s par t of their pr ize, the inau g ur a l B rand Ambassadors trave lled w it h t h e G o t i t? G et it c re w to e x pe rience carnival in St. Lucia and to spread the me s sage about s a fer sex, HIV/AI DS a nd ot her STI prevent i o n A c c o r d i n g t o K e r r y S i n g h PSI /Car ibbean s M ar keti ng Dir ect o r, W e w a n te d t o e n g e n d e r a s e ns e of advocacy among tod ays yout h. We h op e t h at o ur Br an d A m ba s s a d o rs w i l l b e a c a t a l y st fo r c h a ng e i n their communities. Indeed, worldwide, many in our field believe that today s ge neratio n ha s the pow er to end HIV/AIDS. With that in mind the idea of the Brand Ambassador was born. H e w e n t o n t o e x p l a i n t h a t a major objective of the trip was also to engage the St Lucian population through numerous outreach activiti e s a n d s tr e ng t h e n p a rt n e rs hi p s w i t h the National Aids Directorate of St Luc i a, S t Luc i a Pl an ne d Pa ren th oo d Association and other local NGOs and health clinics. S i n c e b e i n g g i v e n t h e t i t l e o f Brand Ambas sador s, both A hma d and Nissa have been engaging in a n um b e r o f i n te r v i e w s f ro m r a di o a n d te lev isi on sta tion s i n bot h i sla nds, t o ta l k a bo u t t he i r e x p e ri e n c e a s w e l l a s spread the work of HIV prevention am on g t he ir pe e rs. The y k ee p c a ll i n g m e E v e r y r a d i o a n d t v p r o gram me w ants me on and I am ha ppy to go and to talk to the youth of Dominica and help them make real li fes tyle changes th at can st op th e s p r ead of HI V/ AI D S. Ni s s a to ld PSI/Caribbean. I t s b ee n a s p ir i t ua l j ou r n ey powerful and moving to know I can gi v e b ac k t o my co mm u ni ty to ma ke a positive change, especially having persona lly see n others dea l w ith the sti gm a th a t su rro und s HIV i nf ec t io n and other sexually transmitted diseases, Ahmad reflected. In a d di tio n to t he i nt erv ie w s, b ot h ambas sador s will continu e s preading awareness by volunteering with G o t i t ? G e t i t ed u cat o r s a nd t h e loc al Pla nne d Paren thood Affi liate s or Family Planning Associations to c on du ct e d uc a tio na l ou tre a c h. Th ei r e x pe ri e nc e w a s c a pt u re d o n fi l m a n d is c urr e ntly be ing turned into a doc u me nt ar y t o h el p r a is e a war en es s and bring an end to HIV/AIDS in t h e Ca r i b be a n. T h e do c u me n t ar y will be released by the end of this y ear o n a ll th e r eg io n al a nd lo cal T V s t a t i o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h e Caribbean. 1: Mr. Nahum Jean Baptiste, Head of the National Aids Directorate meets Nissa and Ahmad at the Ministry of Health Carnival outreach event on Carnival Friday, St. Lucia. 2: Ahmad and Nissa being interviewed at the scenic Pitons lookout, St. Lucia 3: Ahmad and Nissa both strike a pose prior to playing mas on Carnival Monday, St Lucia. 4: Ahmad and Nissa taking a rest at the St. Lucia Groovy Monarch show, Castries St. LuciaGot it? Get itBrand ambassadors talk safe sex to caribbean youth Diabetic Wellness Program 1 2 3 4

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WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE By LINDA A. JOHNSON AP Business Writer D R U G M A K E R A s t r a Z e n e c a P L C s b i g g a m b l e, a n a t t em p t t o p rove its topsell ing drug w ork s be tt e r th a n ri v a l c h o le s te r ol bl o c k b us te r Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A s t u d y m e a n t t o s h o w A s t r a Z e n e c a s c h o l e s t e r o l d r u g Crestor prevents plaque buildup in h e a rt a rt e r i e s b e tt e r t h a n P f i z e r I n c s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. T w o gene r ic vers ions of Li pitor, the world's top-selling drug for sev eral year s are expected to hit the U .S. market on N ove mber 3 0. Anal y s t s w r o t e F r i d a y t h a t t h e s t u d y r e s u l t w i l l m a k e i t h a r d f o r t h e B ritish drugma ker to a rgue pa tients w o u ld f ar e b et te r on its C re st or t ha n on mu c h -cheap er gen eri c ver s ion s of Lipitor. AstraZeneca shares fell $1.27, or 2.7 per cent, to $45.42 in afternoon trading The c ompany relea s ed preliminary study results earlier in the day. The stud y kn ow n by the ac ro ny m S A T U R N f o l l o w e d a b o u t 1 3 0 0 hi gh-ris k patie nts w ith ha r d ening of t he a rte rie s, w hi c h c an c a use strok es o r h e a r t a t t a c k s f o r t w o y e a r s About half got a daily 40-milligram dose of Crestor, known generically as r os uvast atin and the r es t got a da il y 80-milligram dose of Lip itor, known generically as atorvastatin. U s i n g u lt r a s o u nd p r o be s s t ud y i n ve s ti ga t or s m e a su re d pl a q ue le v e ls in a segment in the coronary artery of each patient, comparing levels at the study 's b eg inni ng an d e nd. Do ctors believe reducing plaque thick n e s s c a n c u t c h a n c e s o f h a v i n g a heart attack or stroke. A s t r a z e n e c a s a i d p r e l i m i n a r y results indicated Crestor showed a greater percentage reduction in the v olu me o f p laq ue i n th e cor o nar y ar tery the st udy's main goal but that the difference was not sta ti st i c a ll y si g n if i c a nt m e a n i ng i t c o ul d hav e occ urred by ch anc e. The study did p rod uc e a st ati sti ca ll y sig ni fi ca nt re d u c ti o n i n a s e c o nd a r y g o a l r e du c tion of total plaque volume. Th e f a c t th a t th is ( Ast ra Z e ne c a )f u n d ed t r i a l f ai l e d t o d e f i n i t i v e l y show a benefit in favour of Crestor w i ll a dd to th e n e ga t i v e p r e ssu re t ha t Crestor is already destined to face fr om the imm inent laun ch of gene r ic Li pi tor, B e rnste in R e sea rc h an al yst Dr. T im A nder so n wrot e in a report to investors. "Payers will be abl e to sa y tha t (A s t raZ en ec a ) it self h as s ho wn i n a t r ue hea dto hea d s tudy, Crestor and L ipitor do about the same thing." A n d e r s o n n o t e d p r i o r s t u d i e s showing Crestor's benefit only test ed it al one o r c omp are d i t t o a dummy pill, rather than another choles terol medicine. J e f f e r i e s & Co a n a l y s t J e f f r e y Holford wrote that the data didn't provide a clear positive result that A s t r a Z e n e c a c o u l d h a v e u s e d t o co ntin ue a rgui ng C resto r i s sup erio r to Lipitor. Still, he wrote, the positive trend and statistical significance achieved on the se co nda ry go al w asn' t a cl ea r ne ga tiv e for C resto r. Ho lford a dd ed t ha t t he ar r iv al o f g en er ic L i pi t or w i l l li k e l y c o n t i n u e C re s t or s t re n d o f slow U.S. prescription growth. C r es to r an d L ip it or a re pa rt of t he drug class called statins, which lower levels of LDL or "bad" choleste r o l a n d sl i g h tl y ra i se l e v e ls o f H D L or "good" cholesterol in the blood. S ta ti ns an d ot he r t yp es of cho le st er o l d ru gs t og et he r co mp r is e th e secon d-bigge s t selling c lass of dr u gs i n th e w or ld by re v e nu e a f te r c a n c e r m e d ic in e s a n d h a v e b e e n v e r y l u c r a tive for their makers. Crestor, which came on the mar k e t w e l l a f t e r L i p i t o r b r o u g h t A st r aZen eca abo ut $5.7 b il lio n i n sales last year, barely half the $10.7 bi lli on t hat Li pit or made f or New York-based Pfizer. A straZ e ne c a w ill p rese nt d eta il ed resu lts of th e stu dy o n Nov e mbe r 15 at the American Heart Association conference. Astra Z ene c a and Pfi ze r b oth fa ce significant revenue losses for sever al of their dr u gs to ge neric c ompe t i tion over the next several years. Ander son not ed Ast raZenec a is ex pec ted to get ge neric c omp etition in the U.S. to its top three drugs by 20 16 a ntip syc ho tic d rug Se roq uel in 2012, heartburn treatment Nexiu m i n 2 0 1 4 a n d C r e s t o r i n 2 0 1 6 T o g e t h e r t h e t h r e e a c c o u n t f o r about half the company's $33.3 bill i o n i n a n n u a l r e v e n u e w h i c h And er son no w fo rec a sts wi ll d ec li ne to about $26.4 billion in 2015. He's also reduced his earnings-per-share forecast for the company by 3 perce nt ea ch in 2 013 and 201 4 a nd by 4 per cent in 2015.Root canal myths Aroot canal procedure is a treatment to repair and to save a badly damaged or infected tooth instead of removing it. In the past, if a patient had a tooth with a diseased nerve, he/she would most likely have to lose that tooth. In recent times, with root canal therapy, it is possible to save that tooth. I ns i de o f ev er y to ot h i s th e pu lp ( i t p r o v i d e s n u t r i e n t s a n d n e r v e fi ber s to t he t oo th ). T h e pul p r un s l ike a thic k p iec e o f thread inside of th e to ot hs r oo t s ys t em. Wh en t he pu lp is disea s e d or injure d, the pulp ti ss u e d ies I t th en beco mes n eces s ar y t o r em ov e t he af f ect ed p ul p. Aft er the dent ist r emoves t he pulp, the r oot c anal is c leaned a nd s e aled o f f t o p r o t e c t i t T h i s i s w h a t i s kno wn a s a r oo t can al pr oced ur e. Aft er the r oot canal pro c edur e, the d e n t i s t p l a c e s a c r o w n o v e r t h e to ot h t o hel p m ake it s tr on ger A root c ana l is a rela tive ly simp le pr oced ur e wit h l it tl e or no dis co mfo rt It i s us u ally com pl ete d i n o ne t o t h r e e vi s i t s a n d c an s a v e y o u r t o o t h I t w i l l b y e x t e n s i o n s a v e you r sm il e. M a n y years a go, r oot c anal tr eatm e n t s w e r e p a i n f u l T h i s i s n o l o n g e r t h e c a s e b e c a u s e d e n t a l a d v a n c e s a n d l o c a l a n e s t h e t i c s (n umb ing a ge nts) e ffe cti ve ly red uc e a l m o s t a l l p a i n I t w i l l b e m o r e pai nf ul l ivi ng wi th a d ecaye d ( bad ) to ot h. An ec do ta ll y, ro ot c a na l the ra py is co ns id er ed t he mos t fea re d de nt al p r ocedu r e. T hi s f ear lead s t o ma ny m y t h s b e i n g c r e a t e d a n d s p r e a d T h e in accur at e i nf or mat io n ab ou t r o o t c an a l t h er ap y t h en p r e ve n t s p a t i e n t s f r o m m a k i n g i n f o r m e d d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g t h e i r t e e t h T h er e ar e man y pa ti ent s t hat wil l g o as fa r a s as k ing th at a t oo th be r emoved rat her t han s aving it wit h a r oot can al pr oced ur e.Please learn the truth for yourselfR o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y i s n o t a painfu l proce dure. It is used to a llev ia t e ( g et r i d o f ) p ai n. M an y pe r s o n s wh o h av e co m pl e te d a r o o t c an al p r oc ed ur e pr o f es s t ha t t h ey d i d n o t e x pe r i e nc e an y p a i n d ur i ng the appoi ntment and felt better a f te r war d T h e Am er i can As s o ci ation of Endodontists (persons that s p ec ial i s e in r o o t ca na ls ) ha s co n c l u d e d t h a t t h e i d e a t h a t a r o o t c a n a l p r o ce d u r e i s p a i n f u l s t e m s f rom early tr ea t ment methods u sed t o p e r f o r m t h e p r o c ed u r e. T h e s e m e t h o d s n o l o n g e r e x i s t a n d t h e f e ar i s t h er e fo r e mi s p la ced R o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y d o e s n o t r e q u i r e s e v e r a l a p p o i n t m e n t s I t m ay b e com p le te d in o n e t o t h r ee appoint ments. A number of fac t ors d o d e t e r m i n e t h e n u m b e r o f a p p o i n t m e n t s n e c e s s a r y t o c o m p l e t e a r o o t c a n a l T h e y i n c l u d e h ow b ad t he r oo t in f ect i on is ; ho w cu r v ed the r o ot ca nal syste m is; and h o w c o o p e r a t i v e t h e p a t i e n t i s A l s o p l e as e r e me m b er t h at i t i s always neces sar y to r ebu ild a t oot h a ft er a r o o t ca na l t h er ap y. T hi s is neces sar y t o ens ur e the t ooth fun c t ions pr oper ly. Ther ef ore thi s n ec e s s a r y r e b u i l d i n g s h o u l d n o t b e consider e d as part of t he root canal p r o c e s s R o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y d o e s n o t ca us e illnes s. The idea that bac t e r ia trappe d in s i de a root c an alle d tooth wil l ca us e illness (e.g. heart disease, k idn ey di se as e or art hr i ti s) s t ems f ro m r es ear ch don e 100 year s ago Re ce nt atte mpts to con firm this 1 00 y ea r th eo ry h a s fa i le d It i s t he re fo re no l onger t hough t to be t rue by t he ex per ts T he r at io nal e i s s imp le. B a c t e r i a c a n b e f o u n d i n t h e m o u t h a t a n y t i m e a n d t e e t h f r e e f r o m de ca y an d gu m d is e as e a ls o t es t po s it i ve f o r b act er i a. T h er ef o r e t r a p p e d r o o t c a n a l b a c t e r i a s ho ul d n ot be t ar get ed as a di se as e ca us e mo r e t ha n an y o th er m ou t h b a c t e r i a Ro o t ca n a l t h e r ap y i s n o t o n l y f o r t e e t h t h a t h u r t A t o o t h t h a t r e qu ir e s a r oo t c an al p r o ced ur e is n ot al way s p ai nf u l. I n fa ct a t oo t h t ha t is al r ead y d ea d ma y r eq u ir e a root ca nal pr o ced ure to prev ent the t oo t h f r om b eco m in g in f ect ed R oot c an al th erap y be nef its last a l on g ti me Pa t ie nt s t h in k th at t h e b en e fi t s of r oo t c an al th e r ap y d o n ot l as t ver y lo ng af t er t he pr o ced ur e h as b ee n c om pl et e d. P at ie nt s s o m e t i m e s e x p e r i e n c e a t o o t h br e ak af t er a r o ot ca na l pr o ced u re a n d t h i n k t h e r o o t ca n a l t h er a py has f ail ed. Th is is no t t r ue. When a r oot can al pr o cedu re i s comp let ed, s om et i me s a la r ge fi ll i ng is us e d to c l o s e t h e t o o t h a n d w h e n l a r g e f o r c e s a r e p u t o n t h e t o o t h i t b r e a k s T h e f o r c e s c o m e f r o m g r i n d i n g a n d e a t i n g A c r o w n i s t h e r e f o r e a l w a y s a d v i s e d t o p r e ve nt th i s f r o m ha pp en in g. I t m us t t h er ef o r e b e n o t ed t h a t t h e r o o t c a n a l d i d n o t f a i l t h e t o o t h j u s t br o k e. No w that you k now th e tr ut h, do n o t h e s i t a t e t o m a k e a w e l l in f or m ed d eci s io n a bo u t po s s ib ly ha vin g a r o ot can al p r oced ur e per f or m ed o n a di s ea s ed t oo t h. K eep yo ur s mi le al iv e. Ke ep y ou r m ou th a l i v e This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended and may not be treated as, a substitute for professional medical/dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or dental professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical/dental condition. Never disregard professional medical/dental advice or delay in seek ing it because of a purely informational publication. Copyright 2011 by Dr. Andre R. Clarke. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this article, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission. If you have questions, please send email to dr_andreclarke@hot mail.com. Dr. Andr R. Clarke, DDS, MBBS Special Care Dentistry.AS TRAZENE C A SHARES F ALL O N FL A T CRES T OR RESUL T S T H I S unda t e d pr oduc t image pr ovide d by As t raZene ca s how s t he pharmaceutic al co mpa ny 's ch ole ste rol drug Cre stor. As traZe ne ca PL C's big ga mb le, a n a tte mpt to pr ov e its tops elling drug w orks be t ter than rival c holesterol blockbus t e r Lipitor, app ears to hav e bac kfi r e d. A stu dy mea nt to sh ow Astra Zene ca 's Cresto r prev en ts plaque buildup in he ar t arteries be t ter than Pfiz er Inc.'s Lipitor show ed no c lear advanta ge f or Cr e stor (AP ) B y A N D R E C L A R K EKEEPING YOUR MOUTH ALIVE CONDITIONS that lead to a root canal OAKLAND, Calif Associated Press A M A R I J U A N A s t r e e t f a i r b e in g h e ld i n d ow n to w n O ak l a n d t u r n e d o u t t o b e a p o p u l a r d e s ti n a t i o n th i s w e e k e n d w i t h p e op l e w a it in g in lo ng li n es t o a t te nd th e e v e nt The two -day Inte r n ationa l C a n n a b i s a n d H e m p E x p o w a s b e in g h el d Sa t urd a y a nd S un d a y o ve r se v e ra l bl oc ks in th e c i ty s d ow n to w n, d ir ec t ly o ut s id e O a kl a nd C it y H a ll B esi des v en dors, sp ea ke rs, m u s i c a n d o t h e r o f f e r i n g s o rga ni se rs sa y t he e v en t al so i n c lu de s a de si g na t ed a re a i n f ro nt of C i ty H a ll w h er e th os e w i th a v al i d m e di c a l c a n na b is c a r d w i l l b e a b l e t o s m o k e m a r i j ua n a, or ga n iz e rs sa i d. Or ga n iz er s w e re c a l li ng th e d e s i g n a t e d a r e a t h e 2 1 5 a r e a a re f e re n c e to Pr o p o s i t i o n 2 1 5 t he 19 9 6 st a te b a ll ot m e a sur e that leg alized medical mar ij u an a u se in C al i fo rni a Pa ti e nt s n e ed t o ta k e th e ir m e di c i ne w he n t he y n e e d to K i m C u e a B e rk e le y re si d en t w h o is c h ie f e xe c ut iv e o f th e I n t e r n a t i o n a l C a n n a b i s & H e m p E x p o t o l d t h e S a n F ra n c isc o C h ro ni c l e "B e i n g a pat i ent m ys el f, t ha t' s s om et hi n g t ha t' s ma n da t ory O a k l an d i s k n o w n f o r i t s m a rij ua n a -re la te d b u sin e sse s, i n c l u d i n g a s e c t i o n o f c i t y n e a r b y k n ow n a s O a kst e rda m so na med b eca us e of i t s ab un da n ce o f m ar ij u an a d i s p en s a r i e s C i ty v ot er s in 2 00 4 a ls o v o te d in f av o r of Meas ure Z, a m e a s ur e t ha t m a d e p o sse s si o n o f s m a l l a m o un t s o f m a r i j u a n a t he l ow e st p ri ori ty fo r po l ic e St ill, even wit h O akland 's s ta n c e t o w a rd m e d ic in a l m a ri j u an a u se c it y o ffi c i al s d id n' t want th e me dia tak in g ph ot og ra p hs o r sho ot in g v i de o o f p e o p l e s m o k i n g m a r i j u a n a o u t s id e o f C i ty Ha l l. K T V U T V s h o w e d w h a t app ear e d t o be an Oak la nd o ffic i al i nstruc ti ng th e me di a n ot t o ta k e p ho tos o f pe o pl e s mo ki n g i n fr on t of C it y H a ll Th e of fi c ia l w as no t i d en ti f ied bu t Arturo S an ch ez a n a ss i stant to the c ity admi nist r a to r t ol d t h e s ta ti o n i t s n o t t h a t w e d o n t w a n t th e p i c t u re w e t r y t o k e e p t h i s a re a o f C i t y H a l l ( a n d ) t h i s p u b l i c p a r k f r e e o f sm o ke Th e fa ir w as op e n t o a d ul ts o n ly Org a n ise rs h a d s ai d p re v i o u s l y t h a t t h e y e x p e c t e d a b o u t 2 0 0 0 0 p e o p le to a t te n d L O NG L I N ES AS P EOP LE A T TEND O A KL AN D MA RI J UA N A F AI R IN THIS Sept. 3, 2011 photo, a man rolls joints for during the International Cannabis and Hemp Expo in Oakland, Calif. The marijuana street f a i r t u rn e d o ut t o b e a p op u la r d e s ti n at i on th i s we e k e n d, wi t h p e op l e wa i ti n g i n l on g l i n es to a tt e nd th e e v e n t. B e s id e s v e n d or s s pe a k e rs mu s i c and other offerings, organizers say the event also includes a designated area in front of City Hall where those with a valid medical cannabis card will be able to smoke marijuana, organizers said. (AP)

PAGE 15

WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1, P AGE 1 1B NEW YORK Associated Press SO YO U th oug ht the y w e re g on e go ne fore v er un til K ate Mi dd le ton h it the sc e ne Th e n M a r c J a c o b s p ut t h e m o n t h e r un w ay B an a na R ep ub l ic p art ne re d w i t h M a d M e n a n d s u d d e n l y e v ery w he re yo u lo ok she er ho sie ry se e ms to be i n f ash ion a g ai n. S i n c e t h e h e y d a y o f t h e 8 0 s, t h e r e s be en a cas u al r e vo lu t io n, a r ev ol t a g ai nst p ow e r sui ts a nd t he sex y sec re ta ry ski rt. B oth l en t t he mse lv es to c o ve red -bu t-sh ee r l eg s. No w w h y do wo me n ne ed pa nt yh o s e ? T h e y w e a r p a n t s g e t s p r a y t a n s a nd sl ap o n the Sp anx B e ca use le gs l o o k b e t t e r w h e n y o u w e a r t h e m sa y s C a thy Vo lk er, ex ec u tiv e v ic e pre side nt of globa l li censing for Do nna K a r a n i n c l u d i n g D o n n a K a r a n H o s i e r y I t s l i k e m i n e ra l c o sm e t i c s o n y o u r skin but better," s ay s Volker, who p r o m i s e s t h e p a n t y h o s e o f t o d a y b o a st s m an y a d v a nc e s si nc e p re v i o us v e r si on s. T he f a br ic is mo re c o m f or ta bl e, the ela stic less restri cti ng a nd th ey ca n o ff er t on in g an d sh api ng b en ef its, sh e say s. Ce l e b r i t y s t y l i s t S o p h i a B an k s C o l o m a i s s o l d S h e w o r e s h e e r p a n t y h o s e t o a r e c e n t r e d c a r p e t ev ent in L os A ngel es. "I d o t hin k t hey ar e comi ng back. I es pec i ally lov e the m i n b la ck or wh ite w ith a sea m up the b ac k W e 're n ot tal ki ng 'M rs. Doubtfire' tan s toc king s but n i c e f l a t te ri n g p a n t y h o s e a n d t i g h ts E r a s e a n y i m a g e o f b r o w n i s h l o o s e le gw e ar t ha t p ool s a t th e a nk le s, she say s, a nd st art i ma gi ni ng t he styl ish Duc h ess of C a mbri dg e o r h er siste r, Pip pa No o ne is mi sta kin g the m a s s t o d gy o r u n c o o l B a n k s Co l o m a s a y s N o n i Ca v a l i e r e a s o c i a l m e d i a m a r keti ng s pecialist in New Yor k, we a rs the m; he r fav ou rite s are th ose wi th th e se xy C u ba n he el a nd b ac k s e am. Pa ntyh ose flatte r an d h elp a w o m a n a p p e a r p r of e s si o n a l a n d fe m ini ne she sa y s. Yo u ha ve t ha t 'Ma d Men inf luen ce e ve ryw h ere a nd the v ery fe mini ne off ic e look is popular again," say s t he 3 0 -ye a r-ol d Ca v al ie re. I'v e w o r k e d o n W a l l S t re e t w h e re w o m e n w e a r s u i ts a n d h e e l s a n d I v e w o r k e d in the te c h w o rld wh e re p eo pl e w e a r ripp ed je a ns, fli p-f lop s a nd a ri pp ed Tsh i r t I c o u l d n t d o th a t I l i k e l o ok in g li ke a gi rl al l t he ti m e, a nd pa n ty ho se is pa rt o f t ha t." S h e s n o t w e a r i n g t h e m o n t h e h o t t e s t d a y s o f t h e s u m m e r o f c o u r s e bu t on tha t fi rst d ay w ith a f al l c hi ll, she 'l l li ke ly b e roc ki ng the sh ee re st pair she c an find. "I like the shiny o n e s t h a t K a t e M i d d l e t o n w e a r s L i k e t h at co mp r e s s i on o f S p an d ex a n d ho w it lo ok s w it h a pe nc il sk irt. Panty hos e should be a given for jo b in te rv i e w s, sa ys J ul ie P er ez a 2 2 ye aro ld a pparel studies s tude nt a t t h e U n i v e rs i t y o f A r k a n s a s M y p r o fe s so rs s a y H o si e ry y o u sti l l ha v e t o d o i t Y e s i t s 2 0 1 1 b u t y o u h a v e t o do i t.' P e re z sa y s sh e do e sn t re a l l y mi n d. She' s a fan of how the Middle tons lo ok, an d she 's l ov in g th e sh ee r dot c o v e r e d h o s i e r y i n t h e B a n a n a Re pu bl ic ad s. "Ma y be I' m ju st o ld fa shio ne d li ke th at ," she say s. P e rh a ps sto c k i ng s a n d e ve n p a nt y ho se a s B e tty Dra pe r a nd J oa n H ol lo wa y kn ew t he m a re a thi ng of the p a s t s a y s M a d M e n c o s t u m e d e s i gn e r J a n i e B r y a n t an d t h o s e u n c o m f o r t a b l e t h i n g s s h o u l d s ta y t h a t way. B u t i f you'r e t alkin g abo ut a mo de rn p ai r o f te x ture d tig ht s, l ac e t i gh t s o r s ea m ed s h e er s ( wi t h t h e ad de d be ne fi t o f s ha pe wea r) y ou c ou ld b e at th e fo ref ront o f t he n ex t b ig th ing B rya nt sa ys. Th e tre n d of t he n a tu ra l l e g c a m e to be, an d pe ople just gav e in th at this it e m wa s s o un c omf ortable a n d w i t h t h e s u n t a n l e g i t w a s h a rd t o g e t t h e ri g ht c o lo r. I t' s l i ke t he s li p It w a s ol d-fa shi on ed B ut the n the sli p came ba ck in as s t re etwe ar a nd I t hi n k th e t re n d f o r l e g w e a r i s t h at i t' s ba ck an d g oing strong a lthoug h p roba bl y no t t he sun ta n one s." M ar ket res ear c h fi rm NPD put s w om en 's h osi ery sa le s in the U S a t m ore tha n $3 b ill io n, up 2. 9 pe r c en t fro m May 2 0 10 t o Ma y 2 01 1 T i g h t s a r e t h e m a r k e t l e a d e r s s h o w i n g a n a l m o s t 3 0 p e r c e n t i ncr e as e i n s al es an d s t oc ki ng s s ales ar e up t oo. Pan tyho se sal es, b ase d o n dol la r a mo unt d ip pe d 2 7 pe r ce nt ov er the ye ar, b ut Donn a K ara n' s V ol ke r sa ys rec e nt bu sin ess o f sh ee rs i s b oom in g. Fo r t h e M i dd l et on g ene r at io n, hosie ry is ne w to them. The y hav e alw ays worn tig ht s, and they don't se e she ers a s a n ec e ssary e v il, sh e s a ys T h ey s e e i t a s a n en h a nc em e n t I n s t e a d o f f e e l i n g f o r c e d i n t o p an ty hose w i th t he ir sk irt sui t, the y a r e w ea r in g i t "li ke Pippa," pa ired w i th t h e i r d e n i m sk i r t a n d b a l l e t fl a ts V ol ke r o bse rve s. E ri c Da m an c os tum e de si g ne r f or Go ssip G irl ," is la un ch in g a lim ite d ed i t i o n c ol l e ct i o n o f h os i er y wi t h D K NY t hi s se a son a l so c o ur ti ng th e y ou ng er w e are r, a nd Vo lk er e xp ec ts t o se e th ose w i th oth er c asu al sho es. C o m e c o o l e r w e a t h e r B a n k s C o l o m a w i l l pu t h e r c l i e n t s i n h o si e r y w i t h i n t e r e s t i n g p a t t e r n s a n d t e x t u re s b o t h sh ee r a nd o pa que It's a mo ve aw a y f ro m th e m in i m a li sm t ha t d om i n at e d fashion for years a nd a nod to the re turn o f g la mo ur an d d ressi ng u p, sh e ex pl ai ns. K im P uc k et t a p u bl i cr e l at i o n s e x e c u t i v e i n I n d i a n a p o l i s i s n t b u y i n g i n t o it Th e 2 4 -y e a r -o l d w i l l l e a v e a n y re tu rn t o pan t yho se t o th e r oy als c e l e bri ti e s a n d h e r mo th e r, w ho n ev e r g a ve t he m up to be g in w ith "I 'd r ather get a good s pr a y tan a nd h a v e g re a t lo o k i n g l e g s, P u c k e t t sa y s. The p ast c oup le o f y ea rs, I'v e d on e ti gh ts o cc a sio na lly ev en mo re sh ee r tig ht s, bu t, re a lly e v en i n th e w i nte r I' d ra the r h av e c old le g s a nd jus t ru n i nto bu ildi ngs and wear a l on g co at ."B A CK 2 SCHOO L RESOL U T I ONSThe beaches are empty, the salons are crowded, the uniform stores are out of stock and Facebook is becoming a ghost town between the hours of 9am and 3.30pm. Th is ca n me an o nly one t hin g; su mm er is o ff ic i al ly o ve r. It s b ac k t o s c h o o l M i x e d e m o t i o n s o f dre ad in g th e e arl y mo rni ng w a ke up c al ls a nd an ti ci pa ti ng fu n ti me s w ith sc h ool m at es is a f ee li ng I kn ow a ll to o we ll Sch oo l yea r s ar e go ld en o p p o r t u n i t i e s f i l l e d w i t h l i f e c ha ng i ng ex p eri e nc e s tha t bu ild frie nd ship s, c ha ra c te r, an d re pu tat ion This ye a r, ho we v er, l et s p ret e n d i t s 1 1 5 9 p m D e c e m b e r 3 1 a n d l e t s m a k e som e N e w Sc ho ol Y ea r r e s o l u t i o n s R e f l e c t o n w h a t h a p p e n e d o r d i d n t h a p p e n f o r yo u d u r i n g t h e l a s t sc ho ol y ea r. Y ou d idn t m ak e the g r a d es y o u w a n t e d t o m a k e o r m ay be y ou di dn t t ak e a dv a nta ge of ce r ta in extra-c urricul ar a ctiv it ie s ? T r y a d i f f e r e n t a p pro ac h th is y ea r a nd ta ke a ste p i n a mo re proa c tiv e d ire ct ion J u st o v e r a y e a r a g o I w a s a h i g h sc h ool sen ior. Loo kin g b ac k I ca n t e l l y o u t h a t a c a d e m i c s a r e e x trem el y im pot an t. The a c hie v em e n t s y o u g a i n i n y o u r h ig h s c h o o l ye ar s ca n al m os t de p ic t ex ac t ly w h e r e y o u w i l l o r w i l l n o t e n d u p i n life. Exc ell ing an d do ing well in e x am s c a n sa v e yo u a nd y ou r p are nt s a lo t of m on ey an d a lso p ut y o u i n a p o s i t i o n t o p i c k a n d c h oose y our c oll eg e/ job In m ost c a ses, w e a llo w di stra ct ion s to g et t he b est of u s a nd w e of te n miss out on impor ta nt information in t he c la ss.A s s o c i a t eD u r i n g t h i s n e w s c h o o l y e a r a s s o c ia t e y ou rs e l f w i th c l a ss ma t e s w h o a r e g o i n g s o m e w h e r e i n l i f e o r t h o s e w h o a r e r e a c h i n g g o a l s y o u a s p i r e t o reach. You sho uld always tr y to s p e nd t i m e w i t h st ud e n t s w ho a r e d o i ng th e sa m e o r b e t t e r t ha n y o u a c a d e m i c a l l y T h i s c a n g i v e y o u t h a t d ri v e a n d a s e n se o f h e a l t hy c om pe titi on to ac t mo re a gg ressiv el y t o w a r d s e x c e l l i n g i n t h e c l ass r oom Avo id p ers on s w ho y o u kn o w a re n t g o i n g i n t h e sa m e di r e c ti o n a s y o u Org a n ise y o ur pr ior i t ie s T he s ki ll o f p r i o r i t i s i n g i s k e y E l i m i n a t e d i s t r a c t i o n s l i k e F a c e b o o k ce ll phones relatio nsh ip s, e t c w h i c h a re p ow er fu l t im e c on su me rs. T ak e c o nt rol o f t he m an d s ta y a h ea d of t he pa c k A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t p a r t o f s c h o o l i s re c r e a t i o n a n d i n t e ra c t i o n W h i l e ac a de mic s a re e ssen tia l, w e must re m e m b e r t h a t s o c i a l s k i l l s a r e v i t a l as we ll. If sc hool w as on ly ma de f o r l e a r n i n g w e c o u l d a l l h a v e d o n e i t a t h o me S c h o o l i s a l so a t i m e f o r fo r m i n g l i f e l o n g b o n d s a n d f ri e n d sh i ps t ha t s om e t i me s st a n d th e t e st o f t i m e T ak e ad v an t a ge o f t h e op po rt un it y a n d e nj oy th es e y e ar s be c a us e y o u w i l l m is s th e m. I su re d o M y h i g h s c h o o l y e a r s w er e som e of th e be st ti m es of my l i fe I w as a mo ng t he fe w g ra d ua t es w ho actually c r ied at our graduation. Ye s, I di d A n d si n c e w e a re t a l ki n g a b o ut g ra du a t in g a nd se n i or y ea r t o a ll th e s oo n t o b e g r a du a t e s o f 2 0 1 2 t h i s i s y o u r l a s t c h a n c e t o g e t i t r i g h t Y ou r G PA s a re b a si c a ll y a lr ea d y m a rk e d o u t b u t B J C s a n d B G C S E se a s o n i sn t u n t i l n e x t s e m e st e r. D o no t t a k e th e s e e x a m s l i g h tl y If y o u k n o w t h a t y o u a r e e n t e r i n g g r a d e 1 2 at the bott om of y our ga me that me a ns y o u n e ed to sta rt w ork in g a s h a rd a s y o u c a n n o w Le t me be th e f irst t o te ll yo u, aft e r Chris tmas br e ak, t ha t final se m e st e r w i ll fe e l l i k e t h e sh o rt e st on e t h us fa r Th e e x c i t e me n t su rro u n d i n g s e n i o r a c t i v i t i e s c a n r e a l l y c a u se y o u t o p ro c r a st i n a t e a n d e n d u p b e i n g i l l p r e p a r e d f o r f i n a l e x a m s T r y y o u r h a r d e s t t o g e t a l l o f th e c o u r s e w o r k a n d e x a m p re p a ra t io n ou t o f t h e w a y s o t h a t y o u c a n act uall y enj oy y our f inal year I k n o w i t s g o i n g t o b e h a r d t ry i n g t o h a v e f u n a n d s t a y f o c u s e d b u t I l i k e t o c a l l t h e s e n i o r y e a r o f h i g h s c h o o l t he tr a in i n g g r ou n d f or c o l l e g e In o rd e r to su rv i v e c o ll e g e y ou mu s t be ab le to mas ter tim e managem en t Kn o wi ng h ow to b a la nc e sc ho o l w o rk a n d f u n is t h e k e y t o e n jo y i n g h i g h sc h o o l c o l le g e a nd e v e n li f e W h a t e v e r r e s o l u t i o n y o u w a n t t o make t his ye ar make s ur e its a c h a n g e th a t w i l l b e ne f i t y o u i n th e f u t u r e A w o r d o f a d v i c e p l e a s e l i s t en t o yo u r t ea ch er s w he n t he y s p e a k t o y o u Th e i r w a r n i n g s a b o u t h o w h a rd l i f e i s o u t si d e h i g h sc h o ol a n d h ow h a rd i t i s g o in g to b e st a y in g con necte d wit h yo ur fr ien ds f r o m h i g h s c h o o l a r e m o r e t h a n j u s t w ords; it s t he t ruth There is n o f e e l i n g w o r s e t h a n s t a n d i n g a t g r a d u a t i o n w i t h r e g r e t s W h e t h e r y o u r e re g re tt in g no t t a ki n g y o ur ed u c a t io n s e ri o us l y o r e v e n n o t b e i ng a s soc i ab le as y ou co ul d ha v e b ee n, re g re t i s a n aw f u l f ee l i ng to h av e o n th a t d a y N o on e i s p e rf e c t a nd y o u m a y n ot b e a b l e to e n jo y h ig h sc ho ol a s mu c h a s the ot he r pe rs o n b u t y o u m u s t m a k e e v e r y e f f o r t t o e n su re t h a t y o u r re g r e ts p a l e in c o m pa r i so n t o y o u r a c h i e v e m e nt s. E x p e ri e n c e i s th e b e st t e a c h e r, s o l i s te n t o t h o s e o l d e r t h a n y o u h e e d t h ei r c o un s e l a n d c h er i s h t h ei r a d v i c e L et s a pp ro ac h t hi s n ew s c ho ol s e a so n w i t h a n e w a t t i t u d e o f e x c e l l e n c e B y Y A M E A S E S W A I NSPEECH FROM THE THRONE R ETURN OF HOSIER Y : SHEER T OR TURE O R P URE P O LIS H? TIGHTS by Donna Karan. Since the hey day of the 1980s, there's been a casual revolution, a revolt against covered-butsheer legs. Now hosiery is making its comeback. (AP) TIGHTS by Donna Karan. Since the heyday of the 1980s, there's been a casual revolution, a revolt against covered-but-sheer legs. Now hosiery is making its comeback. (AP)

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THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press Messages of good health and positive self-esteem for girls are not hard to come by in kid lit, so what's the deal with all the attention for a not-yet-published rhyming picture book about an obese, unhappy 14-year-old named Maggie? The title, for starters: "Maggie Goes on a Diet."F or s econds lik e-wildf ire cir culati on of a b lurb d escrib ing how the bu llie d g irl is tr a nsf orm e d thr ou gh t im e, e x e rc ise an d ha rd w or k int o a po pul ar, c o nfi dent and aver age si ze soccer s tar And cover art sho w i ng her wis tfu l ly ho ld i ng up a Ci n de r el la dr e s s as s h e st ares at her imagined, mu c h s limmer s elf in a full -lengt h mir r or. An d a n i n si de pa g e t he on l y o ne m os t pe o ple have seen, that shows her hunched over the fridge during a two-fisted eating binge. T hir ds ? Real t eenager s have lon g moved o n from rhy m ing p ic tu re boo ks an d t he re ad i ng l eve l for H aw aii dad Paul Krame r's ama teur is h, sel f-p ublis hed ef for t is r ec o mmended on A mazon f or k ids ages 4 t o 8. The onli ne mess for Kram er be ga n rec e ntly wit h ou tr aged co mmen ter s on A mazon w he re p r e -orde r s hav e not propel led Mag gie a n yw h ere ne ar th e to p o f the ran ki ng s. Th ere is now a "savemag gie" has htag on Twitter, a "Say No t o M aggie Goes on a Diet Facebook page, calls fo r a b oycott and dem ands that Amazon and B ar nes & Noble pu ll th e b o o k Krame r will not disc los e how man y orders he has f or Maggi e, which w il l no t b e in c i rcul at i on un t il Oct o be r. Wh il e m os t o f t h e a t te n ti o n h a s b e e n n e ga t i ve he sa i d, t h e re a re support e r s, like this one w ho responded to a bo o k b as h e r on T wi t te r : "S he 's 1 4, n ot 6 Ar e you ser ious ly s ugges tin g that wit h th e obes ity pr oblem i n this count ry, t hat a book te ach ing childre n to e xerc is e a nd ea t right, is som ehow IM M ORAL ? I b et your f at." K r a m e r w h o we n t o n G o o d M o r n i n g A m e r i c a a n d C N N t o d e f e n d t h e b o o k a lr eady has regrets although using the word di et is not on e of th em Die t, h e sai d, i s no t a d irty w ord as m an y of h is a ng ry cri tic s ha ve d e c l a re d E v e n fo r a b o o k c l e a rl y m o st a p p ro p r i at e f o r l i t t l e k id s ? H e i n s i s t s h e d i dn t h a v e 4 y e a r o l d s i n m i n d t h i n k i n g m o r e along t he lin es of 8 and u p. "Th e main me s sage w as that M a ggie w ent on a diet pred ominan tly bec au se she loves s por ts and wanted to be ab le to r un f ast er, b end mor e eas ily and b e better able t o play s po rt s m or e eff ectiv ely," Kr amer t old T he Asso c ia te d P res s b y ph on e fr om Ma u i, w h er e h e l ives with hi s wife and s occ er -l oving, 16year -o ld s on. Kram er, who st ru ggled with obes ity as a ch ild and a you ng ad ul t an d s ti ll wo rk s to k eep the p ounds of f, wis hes Maggie's fan tas y s elf in t he mir ro r had not b ee n quit e so t hin on t he bo ok's cover. He als o wis hes her t ran sf ormat ion thr ough weight los s had not b e en q u i t e s o m u ch : 5 1 p o u n ds in a l i t t le m ore t han eigh t mo nths "Now t hat I s ee t he c on tr overs y I would s ay that I would have had h er los e about 30 pounds an d still h ave a little w ay to g o," s a id K r a m er wh o i s n e it h e r a ph y s i ci a n no r a n utr iti on exper t. H e sa i d h e i s j u st a g uy w h o w a n t s t o i n sp i r e overweight kids to be healthy. "I regret that people associated the word 'diet' as me trying to push dieting on 4-yearolds and 6-year-olds. I'm not," Kramer said. "T o me d ie t m ea n s a c ha n g e of h a bi ts, ea t in g nutritiously, losing unhealthy weight." Le sl i e Sa n de rs m ed i c al di re c to r of t he E a ting Disorder Program at Goryeb Children's C e n t e r i n S u m m i t N e w J e r s e y t h i n k s Kramer's references to dieting in a rhyming picture book featuring a teen girl are unfor tunate. The same goes for the notion that a child's key to success, beauty and popularity is being thin. "There's a mismatch here," Sanders said. Y o u v e g o t a r h y m i n g b oo k y o u r e r e a d i n g t o a 4-ye ar-old or a 6 -ye ar-old abou t a te enag er f oc us ed on w eight and eating. Why s hould y ou ng chi ld r en b e t hi nk i ng a bo ut wei gh t? T here's no reas on to have l iteratu re about dieting for young children at all." O nce M ag gi e d r o ps t h e we ig ht s he no t on ly g ai n s g a l p a ls b ut e n jo y s t he a tt en ti o n of urg g uy s, a no th er li tt le so me th in g th a t yo un g girls do not really need to think about. S he a lso ge t s hi g he r g ra de s a n d is i nv i te d t o her fi r st sleep over, bring ing alo ng deod or a nt s pr a y s o s h e d o es n' t h av e t o w o r r y a b ou t leaving a smell when she uses the bathroom. Meanwhile, back on the soccer field, the teen encounters a pudgy, smaller girl as she practices and offers some tips. "She remind e d M ag gie o f h ow M a ggi e was be fo r e s he lost the weight," Kramer writes. The book concludes, as Maggie collects a s o c c e r t r o p h y : I t i s s a d t h a t p e o p l e a r e judged mainly because of how they look. A pret ty c ove r d oe s no t n ec e ss a ril y gu ara nte e a good book." OUTRA G E EXPLOD E SOV E R RHYMI N G'DIE T' PICTURE B O OK AN inside page from "Maggie Goes o n a D i e t, b y P a u l M K ra m e r, il l u s t r a ti o ns b y M ar i K uw a ya m a. Th e selfpublishe d book does n't come o u t u n t il O c t o b e r b u t t h e r e s a l re a d y online outrage over it. (AP) T H I S bo ok c ov e r im ag e c o ur te s y o f Alo h a Pu b li sh e rs s h ows th e c o ve r of Ma g gi e G oe s o n a Die t, b y Pa u l M. Krame r a nd Ma ri Kuway am a. The se lf-pu blis he d book doe sn' t c ome out unt il ne xt mon th, but the re' s already online outrage over it. (AP)I regr et that people associated the word 'diet' a s me t r y i ng t o p u sh d i eti n g o n 4 -y ea r o l d s and 6-year -olds. I'm not. P aul Kram er

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By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.netWith a single swing, Antoan Richardson realized the fulfillment of a life-long dream with an unforgettable welcome to Major League Baseball. Richardson singled in his first big league at bat, pinch hitting for pitcher Randall Delgado, when his line drive sailed above the outstretched glove of LA Dodgers second baseman Justin Sellers. Richardson and the Braves rallied for a comefrom-behind 4-3 win at home over the Dodgers at Turner Field. The Braves called up Richardson on Sunday from Double-A Mississippi and added him to their group of six September call-ups. The speedy outfielder was hitting .283 in 91 games for Mississippi. He added 17 stolen bases in 22 attempts and 64 runs scored. Richardson was drafted in the 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2005 Major League Baseball drafts. The San Francisco Giants signed him after they took him in the 2005 draft, and he played in the Giants organisation until he was released in 2009. He then signed with the Schaumburg Flyers of the Northern League. In May of 2010, he signed a sixyear minor league free agent deal with the Atlanta Braves. Regarded as a switch hitter with good speed and high on base percentage, Richardson was highly sought after as an amateur, evident by his four draft selections. He sports a .397 career on base percentage over seven minor league seasons and finished his last 10 minor league games with an OBP of .500 and a batting average of .259. The Braves began a three-game series last night against division rival and National League leader, the Philadelphia Phillies. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea Whenever the new Thomas A Robinson National Stadium is open, the Bahamas Government and the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations is hoping to officially christen it with the hosting of the 2014 IAAF World Junior Championships. Over the weekend, the BAAA submitted the bid to host the cham pionships for junior athletes aged 19 years or younger on December 31 in the year of the championships. It's a biennial event that got started in 1986 in Athens, Greece. If successful, the Bahamas will become just the second nation in the region to host it. The first was Jamaica in 2002. It has never been held in the United States. The last championships was held in Moncton, Canada. The 2012 champi onships is set for Barcelona, Spain, July 10-15. Three countries had anticipated submitting a bid but on the day of the delay, only the Bahamas and US did. Russia pulled out at the last minute. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard said they are very positive in the two months that lie ahead for them to prepare their official proposal to present to the IAAF at their council meeting in Monaco in November. "We will try to send a high-powered delegation and we hope to have all of our Ts crossed and our Is dot ted," he said. "We feel very good about it. It's just a matter of us putting the package all together for submission to the IAAF." IAAF council member Pauline Davis-Thompson, without prejudic ing the decision that will be made when she takes her seat in her second four-year term in office, said it's an ambitious undertaking by the BAAA and the Bahamas Government, but one that she wholeheartedly endorses. "Once we put a very good (package) together when we go before the council, I believe the Bahamas will be successful in winning that bid because the IAAF wants to spread the love around. We want this sport to be a global sport. For it to become a global sport, you have to move these cham pionships around to other areas and different parts of the world. The Bahamas has never hosted anything like this before. But on the world scene, the Bahamas is the greatest smallest country. Who wouldn't THETRIBUNE SECTION E TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 $JHQWVt%URNHUVf/WG0$56+&RUUHVSRQGHQW INSIDE TRAK TTUURRNN TTOO 33EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 44EE......TTUURRNN TTOO 55EE...... PAULINE PRESENTS 4X4 MEDALSCOLTS SAY MANNING DOUBTFUL FOR SUNDAYS OPENERSERENA WILLIAMS ADVANCES TO US OPEN QUARTERFINALS USAIN BOLT DEFINITEL Y LOOKING FORWARD TO LONDON OLYMPICS TTUURRNN TTOO 77EE.. THE Bahamas Rugby Football Union (BRFU) is back on the pitch with the latest tournament set to be used as a tool in the national team selection process. The Autumn 7s tournament, presented by JS Johnson, began last weekend, featuring each of the leagues four teams. This tournament is in preparation for the Caribbean Sevens Championship which is scheduled to be held in Barbados November 12-13. The Autumn 7s season involves three weeks of competition, one week of which will include Freeport, culminating in National 7s trials on October 1. Week two of the tournament is slated for 3pm September 17 at the Winton rugby pitch.AUTUMN 7S TOURNEY A TOOL IN NATIONAL TEAM SELECTIONPhotos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staffPLAYERS take part in the Bahamas Rugby Football Unions Autumn 7s tournament at the Winton rugby pitch. SEE PAGES 2 & 8E Bahamas hopes to christen new stadium with World Juniors S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 E E Braves call up Antoan Richardson ANTOAN RICHARDSON

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B AHAMAS R UGB Y F OO TB ALL UNION AUTUMN 7S T OURNEY SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS PLAYERS take part in the Bahamas Rugby Football Unions Autumn 7s tournament, which was presented by JS Johnson, featuring each of the leagues four teams at the Winton rugby pitch. The tourney will be used as a tool in the national team selection process. Photosby TimClarke/Tribunestaff

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3E want to host this in the Bahamas." Davis-Thompson, a con sultant in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, said the BAAA will be partnering with the Ministry of Tourism to put the package together. She noted that they both have all the details as to what is required of them to complete the deal. "All also have examples of other federations and countries who put in their bids, have won and did an excellent job in hosting the championships. I have been able to pass those examples on to the BAAA. All we have to dois put our Bahamian touch to it and I have no doubt in my mind that we will win the bid." Known worldwide for its prowess in the relays, DavisThompson said there is also some consideration from the IAAF for the Bahamas to host the World Relay Cham pionships, which she indicated will be another feather in the cap for the country. Yannis Nikolaou, the com munication manager for the IAAF who is also responsible for the journalists covering the championships here, said the Bahamas certainly has all the ingredients to successfully host the champi onships, including a new stadium, good weather and a tradition in athletics. He noted that while the Bahamas has won two medals at the championships in the past, everybody is still excited about 2010 champion Shaunae Miller. This year, Miller claimed the IAAF World Youth Championship title, the first time that the feat was achieved. "Soon she will be the new star for our sport," said Niko laou of the 12th grade St Augustine's College student, who had qualified to compete here for the first time her father and coach, Shaun Miller, decided to shut down her season after she ran at the World Youths in Lille, France, in July. Nikolaou warned the Bahamas about the challenges of taking on such a venture. "You will have to work very hard to prepare a very good file because it's a very important meet on the IAAF calendar and they want to make sure that wher ever it is held, it will have all of the amenities to make it work," he said. But if there is any conso lation for the Bahamas, Nikolaou said the demand to accommodate the amount of delegates and worldwide media is not as sufficient as it is for hosting the IAAF World Championships that just wrapped up in Daegu. "The difference between the two is that in juniors you don't get the same amount of media attention and the spectators because it's five days and not nine days and so you don't need a 50,000 to 60,000 stadium to host the World Juniors," he said. "But you must provide the same level of services that is provided for the senior championships. You will have almost 2,000 athletes from all over the world, so you have the hotels, the airports, trans portation and visas. You will have to work very hard to convince the IAAF that the Bahamas can be a good host of the championships." If there is any benefit to be derived from hosting the championships, Nikolaou said the Bahamas only needs to look at Jamaica. Since hosting the championships almost a decade ago, he said their programme has flourished. And he said he will expect the same for the Bahamas and he offered his best wishes. 13th IAAF World Championships By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea IAAF council member Pauline DavisThompson had another special moment on the final morning of competition at the 13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Just before the competition got underway, Davis-Thompson was the presenter of the medals to the winners of the women's 4 x 400 metre relay. They included gold medallists United States of America, who ran a world leading time of three minutes and 18.09 seconds, silver medallists Jamaica in a national record of 3:18.71 and bronze medallists Russia inaa season's best of 3:19.36. "It was good. Anytime you get an opportunity like this, you just have to enjoy it," said DavisThompson, who was decked out in her black suit, white shirt and brown straw hat. "Anytime you do something at this level, it doesn't seem real." As an IAAF council member, Davis-Thompson said she knew that she would have been one of the presenters. Her only wish would have been to present medals to one of the Bahamas relay teams. That never materialized as the Bahamas didn't field a women's 4 x 4 relay team and both the men's 4 x 4 and women's 4 x 1 didnt advance to the final. Davis-Thompson, known for her fierce battle as a member of the golden girls that clashed with the United States and Jamaica over the years, said presenting the medals to her arch-rivals was just as special. "It was really special to still be recognised and involved in the sport of athletics," she stated. "I believe that to whom much is given, much is expected. Track and field has been very good to me. It has given me an education, it has taken me around the world and I have beautiful, warm, lasting friends. Who believed that a girl from Fleming Street would have achieved all that I did and still doing." Walking around with her head held high, Davis-Thompson said every so often she is pinching herself to make sure that what she's doing is real. She said presenting the medals to the women's 4 x 4 relay team was one of those special moments that she will look back and reflect on for quite some time. IAAF COUNCIL MEMBER PAULINE DAVIS-THOMPSON PRESENTS MEDALS TO WOMENS 4X400 RELAY TEAM By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea The script has been written on the 13th IAAF Championships in Athletics. The headline reads: A championship to remember for the Bahamas. The sub topic: One medal overshadowed by one disaster after the other. Let's try not to take anything away from Trevor Barrys sterling bronze medal performance in his first appearance at the biggest global meet on the planet. But not even his rise from the shadows of arch-rival Donald Thomas to his own stardom could not equate to the unusual circumstances over the nine days of competition for Team Bahamas. In sequence of occurrences: Sprinter Adrian Griffith eliminated before he got started with a false start in the first round of the men's 100 metres. He was bitten by the bug that also denied Jamaican sensation Usain Bolt the opportunity to defend his title in the 100m final. Credit it to the IAAF's new rule one false start and the culprit is disqualified. Three men in the semifinal of the men's 400 metres and not one could emerge to the final. For perennial fourth place finisher Chris 'Bay' Brown, it was the most significant departure as he was the first man out in ninth overall. Not sure which was the worst position for him to be in. Quarter-miler Michael Mathieu, now running in the 200 metres, was in position to contest for a spot in the final before his left leg gave out on him. He limped off the track and took a long stroll on the sideline to the finish line. Mathieu can take solace in the fact that he ran to second place in chasing Bolt as he regrouped from the false start in the first round. This one the most disheartening. For the second consecutive championships, the Bahamas failed to field a team in the final of the men's 4x 400 relay after both Demetrius Pinder and Chris Brown were surprisingly left out of the line-up. Head coach Fritz Grant called it a big "mistake" but many feel it was a national disgrace. And just when you thought that it couldn't get any worse, teenager Anthonique Strachan tripped and was bruised and battered as she got the baton from Nivea Smith. She eventually got up and passed the baton to Ferguson-McKenzie. It was what they called "a walk of shame" as FergusonMcKenzie brought it home in an unprecedented time of 50.62 seconds. Leevan 'Superman' Sands, who apologised to the Bahamian people for not liv ing up to his promise of bringing home a medal, best summed up the team's per formance: "I think this has been a rough championships for the whole Bahamas. We still end up with a medal so we have to be fortunate for that. It's Trevors first medal, so I think he needed that. Out of everybody here, I think he needed it the most and that is why he got it." Barry will go down in the almanac of Bahamian athletic history. But for more reasons than one, Bahamians will relive the memories of these championships for quite some time, especially when you realize how close we came from moving from a tied 33rd position with eight other countries and 31st in the placing table. I have to say that despite the hiccups that the team experienced, it only lends credence to the fact that the Bahamas' aquamarine, gold and black uniform was seen as our athletes went out and gave it their best in the colourful Daegu Stadium. If you were not here, you probably would not agree with me, looking at the results. But there was no event at these championships that were not contested at a high level. We just didn't ascend the medal podium more than the one moment Barry gave us to cherish. Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie got a sixth place ranking in the world in the women's 200 metres, although many counted her out at age 35. And 30-year-old Leevan Sands ended up as the sev enth best triple jumper against a cadre of competitors who, in their own rights, could have easily emerged as the world champion. One medal from three finalists. It could have been more. But let's enjoy the suc cess of Trevor Barry. As Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson pointed out after the demise of the women's 4 x 4 relay: "We can't win them all." One got away from Bolt but he turned up the heat after redeeming himself with a gold in the 200. Then before the curtains came down on the championships during the closing ceremonies, he anchored the team of Nesta Carter, Michael Frater and 100m champion Yohan Blake to a world record breaking performance of 37.04 seconds in the 4 x 1 relay in the grand finale. That's why the IAAF made a drastic change in the schedule this year. It was because of the Bolt-led Jamaican mania. This just wasn't the year for the Bahamas to shine, except for Trevor Barry. A CHAMPIONSHIP TO REMEMBER FOR THE BAHAMAS Bronze medal overshadowed by one disaster after another B AHAMAS HOPES TO CHRISTEN NEW STADIUM WITH IAAF WORLD JUNIORS F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E YANNIS NIKOLAOU, IAAF communication manager speaks with Brent Stubbs at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. SPORTS MINISTER Charles Maynard at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. IAAF COUNCIL MEMBER Pauline DavisThompson at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. TRIPPED UP: Anthonique Strachan trips after getting the baton from Nivea Smith in the 4x100m relay heat Sunday on the final day of the 13th IAAF World Athletic Championships in Daegu, South Korea.



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N ASSA U AND BAHAMA ISLANDS LEADING NEWSPAPER PMs warning over job gr owth Volume: 107 No.232TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 PRICE 75 (Abaco and Grand Bahama $1.25 WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 91F LOW 80F By TANEKA THOMPSON Deputy Chief Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net NO new job growth is expected for the next year to y ear and a half, Prime Minster Hubert Ingraham announced yesterday. Mr Ingraham delivered the s ober news at the orientation for the first phase of govern ment's job readiness and t raining programme before a crowd of 400 participants at the Sheraton yesterday. Another 240 attended the p rogramme's launch in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Although the Ingraham administration has invested in numerous infrastructure projects and the $25 million jobs programme to increase employment, thousands of Bahamians are still out of work. About 14,000 unemployed persons applied for the 3,000 jobs available in the programme. Recent unemployment figures released by the Department of Statistic's show unemployment stands at 13.7 per cent. The nation's chief said it is a symptom of the economic crisis that hit many countries in 2008. "The number of applicants seeking to participate in this programme demonstrates that our economy, like economies throughout the world, is severely affected by one of the worst global economic Recovery within 12 to 18 months TRY OUR McFLURRY SNICKERS The Tribune THEPEOPLESPAPER BIGGESTANDBEST LATESTNEWSONWWW.TRIBUNE242.COM Dont stress about Back To School Apply for a FidelityBack To School Loan with a 90 Day Payment Holiday plus a Built-Savings Plan you & your kids are good to go! BACK TO SCHOOLLOANS BACKTOSCHOOLLOAN WOMANSECTION R R H H Y Y M M I I N N G G D D I I E E T T B B O O O O K K O O U U T T R R A A G G E E BASEBALL B B R R A A V V E E S S C C A A L L L L U U P P R R I I C C H H A A R R D D S S O O N N SEEWOMANON12B SEESPORTSSECTIONE SEE page eight EARLYLEARNINGAS SCHOOLYEARSTARTS SCOTTY KING is pictured deep in concentration yesterday at the 2 By 2 Academy as Shacasio Lightbourne looks on. Students across the Bahamas are back in the classroom this week as the school year gets underway. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f By LAMECH JOHNSON A DISCHARGEDpolice o fficer was arraigned in Magi strates Court yesterday afternoon on a number of criminal charges, including attempted murder and armed robbery. F ormer Constable 3340 A ngelo Roker, 20, discharged y esterday from the Royal B ahamas Police Force according to police sources, was c harged before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in con-n ection with an attempted m urder, multiple occurrences of armed robbery and receivDISCHARGED POLICE OFFICER IN COURT ON MULTIPLE CHARGES S EE page eight POLICE in New Providence are inves tigating the disappearance of three Bahamian men, who authorities suspect may have died when their plane crashed during a reported drug mission to Jamaica, last Thursday. These men, who police have yet to officially identify have since been reported missing by their next of kin, police insiders have revealed. Two of the men are believed to be brothers aged 36 and 34, with the third passenger being a 17-year-old. The plane used in this incident was yet to be reported stolen to Civil Aviation DELIVERIES of aid for the battered communities of southern Cat Island were further delayed this weekend as government officials refused to release the goods to waiting volunteers. The first shipment of building materials, tarpaulins, food and water had arrived in Smiths Bay on Friday, yet remained on the dock until yesterday morning as authorities hesitated to release the emergency items to waiting residents and relief volunteers. Staff at the Cat Island Golf and Beach By LAMECH JOHNSON THREE men were arraigned in Magistrates Court yesterday afternoon in con nection with an armed robbery at a popular web cafe in southwestern New Providence. Shakatoure Thompson, 31, Tamico Ban nister, 22, and Orlando Wimms, 27, appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez accused of the Island Luck Webcafe armed robbery that occurred Thursday, September 1. The defendants had 11 charges brought against them, eight being armed robbery and three firearm possession with intent SEE page eight SEE page eight SEE page eight THREE MISSING MEN MAY HAVE DIED IN PLANE CRASH THREE CHAR GED WITH ARMED ROBBERY OF WEB CAFE SOUTHERNCATISLAND COURTNEWS GOV T OFFICIALS REFUSED TO RELEASE HURRICANE AID TO VOLUNTEERS PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaks yesterday.

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By SANCHESKA BROWN DESPITE fears that road works would add to the usually chaotic back-to-school traffic, Min istry of Works officials said there were no major challenges or traffic jams on New Providence y esterday. Environmental specialist in the Ministry of Works Shenique Albury said despite ongoingroad works in the capital, they received no com plaints of traffic congestion or long waits. "We had people on the ground working with the traffic police to assist (yesterday pretty smoothly. Traffic lines seemed no longer than usual and we did not have any major challenges. We expect everything to continue to run smoothly and will continue to update the public on changes as the work progresses, she said. We were really worried about schools that fall within areas we were working on like St Augustine's College and C I Gibson, but everything seems to have gone pretty well." Ms Albury said parents, teachers and students can access C I Gibson from the Wulff Road roundabout and once Samana Drive is reopened access will be available from Marathon Road/East West Highway Junction. Persons will be able to proceed north on Marathon, turn east (right north (left onto Samana Drive and then back onto Marathon Road. St Augustines College is accessible from the west from Fox Hill Road via Springfield Road and from the east from Prince Charles Drive as usual. Doris Johnson Senior High School is acces s ible from the west on Prince Charles Drive, whereas local access is only available to the schools eastern gate. Access to the school from the east will be diverted through Beatrice Avenue to Bay Lily, on to Sea Breeze Lane and Fox Hill Road and west on to Prince Charles; only the schools eastern gate will be accessible. Ms Albury said some paving was done to Baillou Hill Road and Marathon Road over the weekend. Some additional paving is expected in the next week or two, however, she admitted that there are some challenges. The rain continues to be a big challenge for us, especially in the Market Street area where the water table is very high. When it rains we have to wait until the water dissipates to begin work. But what we have been seeing lately is when the water dries it begins to rain again. As soon as the weather permits we can get back to paving the roads, she said. Despite the challenges, Ms Albury said road works are still scheduled to be completed by the first quarter of 2012. LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3 OWNERS of the Texaco service station on Robinson R oad are claiming their busin ess dropped 70 per cent o vernight after road work crews blocked an important entry way to their station. They further claimed that without any consultation or notification, the Ministry ofW orks last Thursday placed two large concrete columns at the stations entrance from Old Trail Road, leaving only one of three entrances to the station open to the public. The station owner said with t he closure of yet another e ntrance it is becoming i mpossible to keep business flowing. They might as well shut us down, said one of the stations operators who did not want to be named. L ast night, Ministry of W orks officials said they were s atisfied with the actions take n by contractors working on the New Providence Road Improvement and Infrastructure Project (NPRIIP Shenique Albury, environmental specialist with NPRIIP, said: The contractor hasto do his work. Hes trenching in that area and he cant skip off a part of trenching. This is the b est medium, at all times he will try to at least maintain o ne access. According to the station o perator, one of the two R obinson Road entrances has been blocked off by Jose Cartellon Construction for weeks. While they were advised that access to Robinson Road would always be available, the owners said at n o point did anyone advise u s, or ask our permission to close the Old Trail exit indefi nitely. O wners said normally t here are some ten or more vehicles at the pumps at any given time especially on Fri d ay one of their busiest days o f week but after the second entrance was closed busi ness came to a virtual stands till, dropping 70 per cent overnight. Upon inquiry, the Ministry of Works advised Station o wners that following a meeting with the road traffic flow committee and a survey completed on the junction by the Texaco Robinson Station itw as recommended to the Minister that the entrance be b locked because of serious traffic flow problem experienced, as many motoristsw ould cut across station grounds to get to Robinson Road. Ms Albury added: It was r ecommended that the access w as closed during peak traffic hours. Not only does it create a traffic problem but it is also dangerous and could present a hassle for people who actua lly want to purchase gas with a line of cars shortcutting t hrough the station. Owners said they are aware of the traffic flow prob l em but believe that policing the area and issuing tickets isa more appropriate solution to blocking an entrance tot he station and making a b usiness suffer because of traffic violators. It is unacceptable to make our business pay for the poor policing and enforcement oft he traffic laws by the police in that area, said the owner. W hile understanding that the current road infrastructure project will improve theq uality of roads, owners said they have been dealing with issues since road works start ed on Robinson Road more t han a year ago and limiting t hem to just one entrance is not only crippling business but is also a serious safety issue. Fuel trucks make deliveries to our station three to four times a week and it is imposs ible for other cars to have a ccess to that one entrance w hen it is there and it is dangerous said an owner. F ollowing letters and n umerous phone calls to the Ministry, owners said they were told there would be a meeting to discuss the vari-o us complaints however no date was set, nor whether all parties concerned would bei nvited or notified of the meeting. C HINA has given the Government of the Bahamas a grant of $300,000 for Hurricane Irene relief efforts. In a statement yesterday, officials from the C hinese Embassy in Nass au said the grant is meant to express the friendship of the Chinese Government and people to the Government and people of the Bahamas." "The Chinese Government has decided to provide a grant of $300,000 in cash for the Bahamas to assist with its rescue work and reconstruction in the wake of Hurricane Irene," the statement said. Irene tore through the Bahamas nearly two weeks ago. T he storm damaged a nd destroyed homes, uprooted trees and k nocked down power l ines. R esidents of Cat Island and Acklins were the hardest hit by the tropicalc yclone. Many on Cat Island are still without electricity and telephone services and n eed supplies to repair damaged homes. Several farmers on L ong Island and E leuthera also comp lained in the aftermath of the hurricane that theyh ad lost valuable crops. R esidents on Eleuthera have complained that they have been without power for two weeks. Earlier this week, the Pan-American Health Organisation (PAHO l aunched an international appeal to help 220,000 people affected by Hurri cane Irene. T heir appeal was to r educe the public health impact of Hurricane Irene locally and in the Turks and Caicos as well as to raise $400,000. CHINA GIVES $300K GRANT FOR HURRICANE RELIEF FRUSTRATED North Eleuthera residents criticised the slow pace of pow er restoration to the island yesterday. While officials estimate that power will be restoredby Friday, residents yesterday bemoaned generator fuel costs. One resident said: It costs $30 to run a genera tor for the night, and we have not had any power since the hurricane. The generator costs are now higher than my monthly light bill. We are suffering, and sick and tired of it. Residents also claim the lack of power has broughton concerns of fuel shortage as a result of the demand for diesel. North Eleuthera MP Alvin Smith explained that the area suffered significant damage to infrastructure, and commended the Bahamas Electricity Corpo ration for their efforts. Mr Smith said: Our concerns, their complaints, are based on what they see on the main road and not what is beyond that. BEC has to look at the overall picture. He added: Many of the lines (connecting settlements) were blown into the bush and into the Salt Pond. So theyre replanting abouta dozen poles to get elec tricity from Gregory Town, which is the nearest settlement with electricity. After speaking with a BEC manager, Mr Smith said that homes in Upper and Lower Bogue, the Bluff, Current and Current Island, should be restored no later than Friday, with the exception of challenges to individual supply. Telecommunications have been fully restored on the island, according to Mr Smith, who explained that the last two settlements, James Cistern and Spanish Wells, were restored on Sunday. More than 90 per cent of the island has been restored, according to BEC spokeswoman Arnette Ingraham, who said that a total of 83 poles had been knocked down by the storm. Rainbow Cay and James Cistern were said to have received the most damage to infrastructure. Two teams from New Providence and a team from Carilec, an association of electric utilities suppliers, manufacturers and other industry stakeholders in the Caribbean, are assisting local efforts. N OR TH ELEUTHERA RESIDENT S HIT OUT OVER POWER ISSUES OFFICIALS ESTIMA TEPOWERRESTORATIONBYFRIDAY NOCOMPLAINTSOFCONGESTIONORLONGWAITS N O MAJOR CHALLENGES WITH B ACK-TO-SCHOOL TRAFFIC GAS STATION OWNERS CLAIM BUSINESS LOST 70 PER CENT OVERNIGHT AFTER ROAD CREWS BLOCKED ENTRANCE THEY MIGHT AS WELL SHUT US DOWN ABOVE: Road work crews blocked this entrance to theT exaco service station on Robinson Road. LEFT: The stations owners c laimed they lost 70 per cent of business overnight.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. FIRSTI would like to congratulate those GrandB ahama residents who d emonstrated in front of the GBPC building. Im quite sure that next Tuesday many, many more will turn out to show this cyni cal, greedy company that the p eople of this beautiful island are not fools and will not be e xploited. I was very disappointed by the anaemic and cynically eva-s ive response of the GBPC for the following reasons: 1) We all realise that during t he summer months we will u se more electricity. What we do not expect is for our car ing power provider to send t he cost of that energy sky high to coincide with this. 2) The statement admits t hat the use of the rented generators has reduced the need for GBPC to rely on older, less efficient generation. In other words they are making electricity cheaper this way. So why would they ask theG B Port Authority to add three cents to the surcharge to pay for their rental when these generators are actually saving them money? 3) It states that the recent i ncrease in our bills is due to the increase in world energy (oil the fuel surcharge to cus t omers. But the truth is that about three months ago the cost of oil was about $120 per barrel and the fuel surchargew as at around 17 cents. Since then the price of oil has steadily decreased and now stands a t around $85 per barrel and yet the fuel surcharge has gone up by about 40 per centt o 24 cents. 4 ) Their own graph also contradicts this statement. If you look at the graph ofG BPC fuel costs that was printed in the Freeport News, the cost of fuel for May, June a nd July is the same. The graph is flat and refutes their own argument, ie their fuel costs have not increased. 5 ) The statement also completely ignores one of the heartbreaking issues that was r evealed at the Town Meeting on Monday night. That is their policy of linking powerb ills to properties as well as people. In other words, residents who have purchased or rented property at which someone else has left a large bill have been forced to pay the bill or be refused connection. Two lawyers who were in attendance both claim that this practice is illegal and encouraged those residents to file suit against GBPC in Mag-i strates court immediately. 6 ) The statement also encouraged customers who had difficulty paying these e xorbitant bills to discuss a p ayment plan with their customer service department. But t he only plan GBPC has is to demand the customer immediately pay half of the bill, which is, of course, quite outrageous. Especially, as some r esidents revealed, when the b ill is an estimated bill often f our or five times higher than the customers average bill! I n fact, what it seems is that Emera, this multi-billion dollar company wants to do is toc ome to Grand Bahama, make absolutely no financial investment of their own, and use our money to expand their plant and make it more effi-c ient. T hat way they can gouge even higher profits out of us and send that money off the island. In my opinion this is raw, c ynical, corporate greed. W hat I believe the residents of Grand Bahama are asking f or is: a) that the GBPC modify their policies and practices sot hat they become what the Hawksbill Creek Agreement intended them to be, ie, a nonp rofit company that provides a s ervice to the community. b) If GBPC is unable or unwilling to do that we askt hat our elected government step in to protect its citizens from such greed and ques-t ionable practices. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to voice my opinions. ALAN VELLACOTT Nassau, A ugust, 2011. EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. Publisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas I nsurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama TELEPHONES S witchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986 A dvertising Manager (242 I N THIS column yesterday we commented on a proposal to Government by f ormer Bahamian gangleaders to get crime u nder control by using them to create community jobs for the unemployed. H aving formed an alliance United Against Crime (UAC resources and support for community based initiatives, the former gang leaders presented their proposal to National SecurityM inister Tommy Turnquest and senior members of the Police Force. U ACs top priority is to create economic opportunities for the unemployed, who through lack of jobs are driven to crime. Whenever there is poverty there is c rime. When people cant pay the bills they f ind other ways. The police cant do anything, with all due respect, until after the fact, said Valentino Squaw Josey,s pokesman for the group. He said that community leaders presumably himself and his fellow former gang members are the key t o successful preventative measures. H e suggested that community leaders s hould be employed to do full time community work mediating conflicts, buildi ng side walks, cleaning the community, landscaping and performing other tasks. They proposed a partnership with the gove rnment and corporate society. He sug gested that instead of giving government jobs to big contractors, the jobs should all bek ept within the community. For example, he said, a $10,000 contract to paint a school could be given to a community leader, who could then employ other people in the com m unity. And by working more closely with the community we stand a chance to eliminate crime. T his could be a solution, but it is also the very kernel from which a serious problem could develop in the future. T his was partially the story of how the T ivoli Gardens saga started in Jamaica sev eral years ago. It ended last year in the storming by Jamaican security forces ofT ivoli Gardens, where it was believed that Tivolis don, Dudus Coke, wanted on drug and gun running charges in the US,w as hiding. Tivoli residents, whose very existence depended on the generosity of gangleader Dudus, violently fought off government forces to protect their com-m unity leader. Seventy-three Jamaicans were killed in that clash. Mr Turnquest told the leaders that gove rnment would not provide them with financial backing without accountability and transparency. We backed Mr Turnquests stand, because we do not believe in arbitrarily c utting off an extended olive branch without a thorough hearing. However, for us there w as a caveat and that was the case of Tivoli. W e are certain that this is not the intent of our reformed Bahamian gangleaders, nor w as it the intent of those of Tivoli Gardens when the political leaders got involved with the community leaders. But in the end it was the unintended that eventually happened. Good intentions ended in tragedy. A Mr Patrick Beersingh of Jamaica, having read this column on Tribune242.com, on M onday had the following comment. His interpretation of the proposal: Community work translates to legitimizing gang control Editor, You seem to be supporting the idea, in spirit at least, that the so-called 'Community Leaders' should be employed to do 'fullt ime community work'. That would be a huge mistake. I speak from personal knowledge of having experienced the very same i dea implemented in Jamaica in the 1970's. Y ou are so correct when you say that these i deas led to the Tivoli invasion. However, if you explore 'community work' closer you w ill see that the 'Community Leaders' are the Dons and Gang Leaders, who are attempting to get legitimacy to enforce their p articular brand of law and order via intim idation and doling out scarce benefits with in the community. This would see them g row in power until it takes a full scale assault on their neighbourhoods to dislodge them, when they eventually fall afoul of the supremacy of the organs of State, whicht hey most certainly will. Look at the Crash Programme of the 1970's under PM Michael Manley. Now M P's are actually given monies to spend within their constituencies, which they use to influence their affiliated criminal orga-n izations. Work is hardly done any more in e xchange for this dole. Apart from the bil lions wasted on these programmes, what they do more than anything else, is to givel egitimacy to the local criminals, making them into national and international dons of crime. What they become are state spon-s ored, Gang Controlled Neighbourhoods. Learn from your neighbour's mistakes! We are certain government will take a long and serious look at UACs proposal. P rime Minister Ingraham has launched another initiative aimed at the unemployed governments job readiness and traini ng programme. The object is to prepare the unskilled for jobs as the economy rebounds. These are the programmes that these young men should be encouraged by their gang leaders to take advantage of. Disappointed with response of the GBPC LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net Reader warns: Learn from Jamaicas mistakes &+((.2-26(3+RI 3%2;($67675((71$66$8 %$+$0$6 EDITOR, The Tribune. THIS IS A TRIBUTEto the late Leroy K Brathwaite, policeman, gentleman, public servant and outstanding sportsman and sports administrator. He came here from Barbados as a recruit in the Police Force. He was just 19 years of age. He immediately got involved in sportsw ith the police cricket and soccer teams. His ability as a cricketer delighted Roy Armbrister, the captain of the police team. Leroy wasa fast bowler and exceptional batsman. In his career as a cricketer he scored several centuries and there is a double century recorded in his name. As a soccer player he scored many goals for the police team. He had powerful shots with both feet, but it was his header that was most feared by the teams of those years. Leroy eventually accepted administrative roles in cricket and soccer. He was very close to Mr Roscow Davies, President of the Bahamas Football Association, ands erved as vice president for several years. He was also a member of the executive board of The Bahamas Cricket Association and past president of the Commonwealth Wanderers Cricket Club. On the Police Force, he served as a drum major, a traffic motorcyclist, and was attached to the CID Flying Squad. That squad made up of various nationalities and Bahamians was commended on rumerous occasions for their performance and the large number of arrests of criminals at the scenes of their crimes. It is in that squad that Leroy made his mark as a policeman. He was eventually included in the CID as a detective and con tinued to perform his duties efficiently and effectively. As a police man he was fair, honest, efficient and dedicated. After leaving the police service he continued in the public service at the Civil Aviation Department and later at the Road Traffic Department, where he also made his mark. He has left as his legacy, his sons and daughters, who are all well educated and are making excellent contributions in the police service, the public and private sectors. He will be remembered by all of us and these associations with whom he worked diligently in fundraising events. It was my delight to watch him season and cook steaks at the various fundraising events. Leroy had a good life. He enjoyed the achievements of his children and constantly bragged about them. It was my pleasure to know and associate with Leroy K Brathwaite. PAUL THOMPSON, Sr Nassau, August 29, 2011. Policeman, gentleman and public servant

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By INIGO NAUGHTY ZENICAZELAYA RECENTLY, I celebrated another birthday. First off, let me thank a ll of you who wished me a happy birthday in whatever way, shape or form on August 31. I t truly made my day and was sincerely appreciated. No Jennifer Aniston at t he Golden Globe Awards omission on my behalf either: I would like to G od, my family, my f riends and fans, and I w ould also like to thank my lovely wife for alwaysm aking sure my birthday i s special. This year was no differe nt. Boxes T his year I opened one g ift box only to reveal a nother inside of it and t hen yet another smaller box inside of the previous one and so on and so on. After peeling back layer after layer of boxes, gift wrapping and bows, there staring me in my face from o ut of the last gift box to be opened was a treasure in every sense of the word. What was my gift you w onder? O nly the following: Row A, Section 137 seats 4 and 5 in TampaB ays Raymond James Stadium, home of the NFLs Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Directly behind thev isiting teams bench. Their opponent for the game I hold tickets for? The only team that r eally matters in the NFL the Dallas Cowboys! Wonderful gifts aside, m y birthday has taught me w ith age comes wisdom; Im a little older and a lot wiser. So heres what I l earned over the past year: 1. We Bahamians still cant manoeuvre a roundabout properly. 2. Lil Wayne actively wants to look like The Chocolate Boy George. 3. New roads finished.new roads dug back up two weeks later. 4 The decorative soap i n the bathroom is decorative and for visiting g uests only. (If not used b y a house guest it could l ead to death or worsecastration.) 5. Bahamians can prep are for a hurricane on time. 6. Certain government agencies cant function properly preor posthurricanes. 7. LeBron James move t o Miami and the Heat w as highly overrated and u nderachieving. He is ring-less, truly still a Kingw ithout a Crown. (Just l ike I predicted from day one; call me Naughtydamus.) 8. I still cant find anything nice to say about the sorry Miami Dolphins and their whiny fans. (Ill stay c onsistent; the Miami Dolphins suck!) 9. Some Bahamians and o thers have no regard for h uman life (murder rate nearing 100) or handicapped parking for that matter. 1 0. The Saxons Superstars are simply the best, and the Valley Boys aw hiny second. 11. Baby diapers are toxic and should be used as chemical weapons. 1 2. By some coincid ence there seems to be a decline in the Bahamian Potcake population sincet he groundbreaking on Baha Mar. (I jest I think.) Most importantly, I l earned that a vast major ity of you like to laugh and enjoy reading this column. For that I thank youh umbly. LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE S TAFF of the Farm Road U rban Renewal Centre prepared school supplies and d elivered them to children throughout the neighbourhood leading up to the open ing of the new school year. T he centres manager Charlene Milfort and her staff together with communit y partners and volunteers of the Farm Road Urban Renewal Programme organ i sed the back-to-school givea way event last Thursday. Participants of the centres after-school programme ando ther youth initiatives were given first priority in the distribution process. All youngsters in Farm Road and other communities in the Bahamas are encour aged to get involved in posi t ive community programmes as the rewards are endless and worthwhile, Urban Renewal staff said. COMICS VIEW I NIGO NAUGHTY ZENICAZELAYA A YEAR OLDER A YEAR WISER! Youngsters encouraged to get involved in community programmes

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LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE c rises in a century. Unemployment is far, far too high in our country. That is why in addition to providing some stimulus to job creation we are also taking advantage of opportunities for shorter term and temporary placements. Our economy has begun to recover slowl y the economy is growing, though very modestly not nearly fast enough to create needed jobs. "We expect that within the next twelve to eighteen months job growth will pick up," Mr Ingraham said. M r Ingraham told the chosen few, a mix of r ecent high school graduates and middleaged parents, to work hard and take the opportunity seriously. The initiative was hailed as a "God send" by participants yesterday. "I needed a job, bills were climbing up and I have to work. I haven't been workingf or five years," said 49-year-old James Taylor, a former construction worker and father of 12. Recent high school graduate Avenii Johns on said he has been looking for work for a year and wants experience in the engineering field. "It was kind of hard for me to find a job, I c ame out of high school with seven BGCSEs and a 2.91 GPA. But everywhere I applied said they wasn't hiring," said the 19-y ear-old, who had tried to unsuccessfully to get a job at BEC. The participants of the programme will either receive temporary jobs in the public and private sector or receive subsidised training. M r Ingraham said he hopes this scheme w ill encourage long-term employment from businesses who chose to permanently take on those in the initiative. T raining opportunities will be made avail a ble in the public sector at BEC and the Water and Sewerage Corporation. T wo hundred participants, whose areas of interest coincide with available skills training at the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute, will enrol in classes for the currents emester. Government will pay the cost of the traini ng and give a stipend to participants studyi ng at BTVI and will undertake a similar e xercise at the school's Grand Bahama locat ion. The programme will give job seekers new s kills; upgrade and enhance existing skills and improve the marketability of the coun-t ry's workforce. P articipants will be paid up to $210 a week f or 52 weeks. If a person does not get full-time employment at the end of the year, they will be eligible for unemployment assistance from the N ational Insurance Board. Over the next few weeks participants from A baco, Eleuthera and other Family Islands will join the programme. o fficials, however police have confirmed they believe it was taken from the Lynden Pindling International Airport. A police source said the details were sketchy but he confirmed that police are i nvestigating. He said police received information that three Bahamian men on board a s tolen plane experienced engine problems and crashed while on a suspected drug mission. All three diedo n the scene and their bodies were burned beyond recognition. T he men, according to a source, are well known to police for drug activity. A similar incident happ ened in 2009, when two Bahamian men police sus pected of transporting drugs crashed in Jamaica. T he plane was stolen from an airport in north Eleuthera. According to Jamaican media, residents said the aircraft was circling for about an hour before it crashed.T he two men, who were believed to be the pilot and a crew member, were burned beyond recognition. P olice believe approxi mately 2,000 pounds of compressed marijuana was ont he plane. to endanger life. The victims and items stolen during the armed robbery allegedly committed by the three men are: Shantell Dorsett-cash belonging to Island Luck, Delores Rolle $10 hand bag containing $20, Janece Ferguson $400, Lakeisha Adderley a Samsung cell phone worth $400, Wellington Ford $800 and a Nokia worth $300, Anthony Roker $400, Sheila Douglas handbag, cash and a Bahamian passport and Tiffany Turnquest Nokia cell phone worth $250 and $80 handbag. Wimms of Wilton Street was also charged with receiving the Nokia Phone and $800, belonging to Wellington Ford. All three defendants were further charged with three counts of firearm possession with intent to endanger the lives of three police detectives; Insp F Saunders, Sgt 1218 Demeritte and Constable 971 Davis. The men were not allowed to enter pleas to the charges brought against them due to the nature of the offences. Chief Magistrate Gomez informed the accused men that the matter would be tried in the Supreme Court through Voluntary Bills of Indictment which will be served on them Wednesday, November 30. The chief magistrate remanded the men to prison until trial completion after ordering that Yellow Elder resident Thompson be examined by a physician to ensure that gunshot wounds sustained prior to arrest were not reopened. ing stolen goods. He was arraigned with 22-year-old Elroy Wilson, 22, and 21-year-old Neville Knowles, who were charged in connection with the same offences. According to court documents, on Tuesday, August 30, Roker allegedly armed with a handgun, with Wilson and Knowles, robbed Tyrone Butler of a Samsung cell phone and attempted to take his life. A day later, Stephen Thompson became a victim of armed robbery with Roker and Wilson being the alleged culprits. Then on Thursday, September 1, Roker and the two accused men allegedly robbed John Darville of a gold Pulsar mens wrist watch worth $360, a grey Sony Visio Laptop Computer valued at $827, a black BlackBerry Curve worth $489, and a cologne and land bag togeth er valued at $458. The former police officer and the two accused men were further charged with robbing on September 1: Densil Smith of $250 and a Black Berry Storm worth $700, Gabrielle Smith of $15, Burton Wallace of $35 a drivers license, a black G-shock watch worth $120 and an Iphone worth $600, and Chrystal Bethel of $100,a handbag valued at $200 and a white BlackBerry Curve worth $450. The three defendants were charged with receiving Darvilles laptop, Pulsar watch and BlackBerry; Wallaces I-phone, Bethels BlackBerry Curve, and cash belonging to Gabrielle Smith. The defendants were not allowed to enter pleas to the charges brought against them due to the nature of the charges. The prosecution intends to have the matters tried before the Supreme Court through Voluntary Bills of Indictment, which will be served in Court One, Bank Lane on Tuesday, November 29. Mario Duceil, who represented Roker during yesterdays arraignment, indicated to the court that his client, who told police that he had no knowledge of or involvement in the matters against him, became a victim of police brutality and requested that he received medical atten tion. He argued that his client should receive bail as he was not a flight risk or had previous convictions before the courts. He also reminded the court of his clients presumed innocence. Geoffrey Farquharson, lawyer for Wilson, said that his client was subjected to similar treatment while in police custody. He claimed that Wilson, who was allegedly stomped on the chest, has severe shortness of breath and a heart defect, which Accident and Emergency Records at the Princess Margaret Hospital would show. Chief Magistrate Gomez ordered that the defendants be immediately examined by a physician and then remanded to prison until completion of trial. Knowles was not represented during yesterdays arraignment. FROM page one DISCHAR GED POLICE OFFICER IN COURT ON MULTIPLE CHARGES CHARGED: Angelo Roker outside of court. Tim Clarke /Tribune staff Resort and PGA Village devel opment in Port Howe have cleared roads, distributed drinking water, provided generators and tarpaulins to people in need since Hurricane Irene hit on August 25. They have also collected hundreds of dollars worth of donations for people in the southern settlements of Cat Island whose homes were damaged and have been living without electricity, running water or telecommunications for nearly two weeks. However they were refused access to these items yesterday for the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA procedure to be followed by island administrator Gloria Bain. After fielding calls from The Tribune yesterday morning, Minister of State for Lands and Local Government Byron Woodside flew to Cat Island to work with local government staff and NEMA representatives responsible for oversee ing the distribution of goods. He said the donations brought in by the volunteers were marked for NEMA and therefore had to be released by NEMAs local representative. When asked why the goods had been left to languish on the dock for three days, he answered: Who works on Sun day? There are persons with good intentions who want to move faster than normal, but there has to be some procedure that has to be followed or there would be anarchy and chaos, he said. They are pretty much organised, and they really had some serious challenges here, but I am advised that, for the most part, there is nobody starving, people have food and water, and they're without elec tricity, but they have got drinking water, and people are surviving. He met a family yesterday who had lost part of their roof and whose home was flooded, but they remained in good spirits yesterday, Mr Woodside said. NEMA director Commander Stephen Russell said he spoke to Mrs Bain twice yesterday and ordered her to release all materials brought in on the ship. Based on assessments we hope to make sure that the per sons entitled to the stuff are getting the stuff, he said. But this will not happen again. F ROM page one GOVT OFFICIALS REFUSED TO RELEASE HURRICANE AID TO VOLUNTEERS O RLANDO WIMMS S HAKATOURE THOMPSON T AMICO BANNISTER FROM page one THREE CHARGED WITH ARMED ROBBERY OF WEB CAFE FROM page one THREE MISSING MEN R ECENT HIGH SCHOOL g raduate Avenii Johnson h as been looking for work for a year. Felip Major /Tribune staff PMS WARNING OVER JOB GROWTH F ROM page one

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$4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69T he information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $5.55 $5.18 $5.38 T HETRIBUNE SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.netTUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 SIRbahamas.com t 242.362.4211 ROSE ISLAND #542916 acres sea-to-sea in the protected Lower Harbour.Access by boat is from the south side where there is an all seasons dock with a pathway that leads to a 3 bed 2 bath main house and a 1 bed 1 bath cottage.Water is supplied by a fresh water well,and power is solar. On the north side there is a stretch of beautiful sandy beach and a private honeymoon beach at the eastern end.This property is suited for touristic development,family compound or it can be subdivided into residential lots. Exclusively offered by George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com t 242.362.4211 ROSE ISLAND GETAWAY [Learn more at royaldelity.com] BAHAMASNassau:242.356.9801 Freeport:242.351.3010BARBADOSSt.Michael:246.435.1955 By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor COLINA HOLDINGS (Bahamas its strong capital and reserve base had given it a priceless ability to withstand external shocks, Junes 75 basis point Prime rate cut having pushed it into a net $709,572 second quarter loss after sparking a more than $7.5 million rise in future policyholder benefit provisions. Despite the unanticipated move by the Central Bank of the Bahamas, which forced Colina Holdings and its Colina Insurance subsidiary to increase reserves to meet future policyholder liabilities, due to the drop in future investment income, Marcus Bosland, the companies resident actuary, said they were still on course for a profitable 2011. Mr Bosland said Colina Insurance and its BISxlisted parent pretty much felt compelled to take the hit from Junes reduction in the Prime rate, from 5.5 per cent to 4.75 per cent, at one-time upfront. The result was that the change in provision for future policyholder benefits increased year-over-year during the three monthsto end-June from $721,895 to $8.349 million, $6 mil lion of that driven by the Prime reduction. Were fully provided for, from the impact date due to the change in Prime, as of the end of By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T he Hotel Corporations chairman yesterday pledged to get the millstone that is the last government-owned hotel off our collective necks, telling Tribune Business it was costing the Cor-p oration and Bahamian taxpayer $500,000 per year to keep Andross Lighthouse Club open. Michael Scott said the Corporation and the Government had received an investment proposal from Illinois-based Scheck Industries that he was inclined to accept, but detailed negotiations were e xpected to commence in o ne-two weeks time once a revised Heads of Agreement for the I-Groups Mayaguan a project had been conclude d and got out the way. S check had been asked to re-develop the Lighthouse C lub in phases, similar to the manner in which the Ingraham administration wants the I -Group to develop Mayaguana, with land acreagesr eleased for each phase only once timelines and milestones are successfully completed by the developer. E stimating that the first phase could involve a $15 mill ion investment by Scheck if a d eal is concluded, Mr Scott said he wanted the Lighthouse Clubs redevelopment t o act as a catalyst for A ndross economy. In principle, were com mitted to doing a deal with h im [Scheck], Mr Scott told Tribune Business. We have their proposal in a letter, set out in a phased way, because w eve asked them to do it in phases. Weve been exchang-i ng correspondence and think we can come up with a workable formula, but weve put it on the back burner whilew e deal with Mayaguana. The Minister of Tourisms view is d o one thing at a time. S check was initially looking a four-phase redevelopment, and the Hotel Corpor ation chairman added: Weve got the bare bones of a proposal, which were inclined to accept, but we don ot have a draft Heads of Agreement. We have to take a view on the last proposal we received from them, and t hats on hold until we get this one [Mayaguana] out of the way. Telling Tribune Business that he, the Hotel Corpora-t ion and the Government w ould turn their attention to the Lighthouse Club and Scheck in the next week-two weeks, Mr Scott said: Its finding the right formula, and that is to do a developmenti n stages, so we can control a nd regulate it without signing away large tracts of land. A key issue, he explained, was how much acreageS check received for its first d evelopment phase. The Illinois-based developer had wanted 100 acres, and theH otel Corporation had replied that it might receive 80, given the Governmentsa version to handing over sign ificant amounts of acreage in the first phase until they see significant construction on the ground. Scheck, Mr Scott said, was eyeing a significant first p hase investment of around $15 million, as it would have to start from scratch by knocking down the existing Lighthouse Club and re-d eveloping both it and the m arina to international standards. Describing Schecks proposed project and investment as very important, Mr Scott said: Its going to act as ac atalyst. Theres nothing g oing on in Andros that Im aware of, apart from little dive resorts in South Andros. But I want to see some r eal construction on the g round, people in Mayaguana getting back to work and, hopefully, after that we willd o the same in Andros and there will be a ripple effect. And he added: As chair m an of the Hotel Corporat ion, Id like to get that millstone [the Lighthouse Club] off our collective necks, By NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor CABLE BAHAMAS f elt it had grounds to sue theG overnment for breach of its franchise agreement due to 2009s enactment ofa mendments to the compul s ory TV licensing regime, US diplomatic cables published by Wikileaks reveal. The October 10, 2009, c able entitled N o Free TV? which appears to have been authored by the Nassau E mbassys charge daffaires, Timothy Zuniga-Brown, details a private conversation in which Anthony Butler, Cable Bahamas president and chief executive, said the BISX-listed communications provider would be well within [its] rights to sue the Government over the amendment. This was allegedly because the 2004 amendment to the Compulsory Licensing Act, which took effect from Octo ber 1, 2009, breached the B y NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE BAHAMAShas been u rged to privatise as many parts o f government as possible, a leading accountant also calling on the Ingraham administrationt o reform the unsustainable civil service pension scheme. Raymond Winder, managing partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas better revenue enforcement the Bahamas also needed tot arget the spending side of government, describing unfund CABLE HAD GROUNDS TO SUE GOVT WIKILEAKS BISX-listed firm felt franchise agreement that created it breached by change to compulsory licence la w US Embassy sympathised with company, helping resolve Englishs peaking content woes COLINA: PRICELESS A BILITY TO ABSORB $6M PRIME HIT GETTING MILLSTONE OFF OUR DUAL NECK BISX-listed life insurer suffers Q2 loss due to reserve increases as result of rate cut But expects profits t o return to normal levels in second half, and end year in back Reinsurance boosts Q2 premiums and benefits SEE page 5B Costing Hotel Corp and taxpayer $500k p er year to keep Andros resort open Still inclined to deal with US developer for phased redevelopment First phase investment likely to be $15m SEE page 4B SEE page 4B GOVT URGED: PRIVATISE AS MANY ASSETS AS YOU CAN Top accountant calls for public pension reform, describing it as unsustainable and a sore Urges politicians to be honest on spending pledges SEE page 5B By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE INGRAHAM ADMINISTRATION d oes not want to create a second Freeport in the southern Bahamas, theH otel Corporations chairman telling Tribune Business that h aving a foreign developer act as a quasi-governmental authority was an inherently flawed concept. While the original Heads of Agreement signed between t he former Christie administration and the Boston-based IGroup envisioned the creation of another Freeport in the southern Bahamas via their 50/50 Mayaguana joint ven t ure, Michael Scott said the current administration viewed that deal as creating numerous potential conflicts of interest for the Government. We dont want to achieve that. We dont want to create F reeport in the south, Mr Scott said, when questioned by Tribune Business. If such a course was pursued, he explained, the Govern m ent would effectively be licensing a foreign developer to become a quasi-municipal authority exercising government functions. To have a foreign developer function as a quasi-munic ipal authority, in my opinion, is an inherently flawed conN O CREATION OF A SECOND FREEPORT IN MAYAGUANA SEE page 4B Hotel Corp chairman said inherently flawed concept RAYMOND WINDER m anaging partner at Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas

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By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net ENCOURAGING more active participation by Bahami an-owned small and mediumsized businesses is key to reviving the economy, a leading attorney and former Bar Association president said yesterday, adding that undue empha sis was often placed on foreign direct investment. Wayne Munroe, who was responding to comments made by Raymond Winder, manag ing partner at Deloitte &Touche (Bahamas bune Business that rather than looking to foreign attorneys practicing from the Bahamas in non-Bahamian legal matters asa financial services game changer, accountants should drop the auditing and advisory fees they charge Bahamianowned firms. He said: Small to medium Bahamian businesses are the engines that drive the econo my. Weve had this downturn because theyve been put out of business. I dont know what type of rates accountants charge, but they need to be friendly to small to mediumsized businesses. Thats the game changer, encouraging more active participation of the small to medium businesses. Thats what drives all economies. If you talk about a game changer, a big game changer would be for all professionals, accountants and lawyers, to understand that the engine that drives most economies is small to medium businesses and to perhaps, as an association of professionals, become more friendly to small and medium businesses. Mr Winder had told Tribune Business that the Bahamas needs a major game changer, such as allowing foreign attorneys to practice from this nation in non-Bahamian legal matters, which he said was critical to attracting the ultra high net worth individuals necessary to revive the economy. But Mr Munroe responded: Mr Winder probably has a clearer view of how accountants work here than how lawyers work here. In the Bahamas the only matters that are dealt with are Bahamian legal matters. A Chinese high net worth person, for example, wanting advice about Chinese practices would in any event get it in Chi na. If he were to set up a struc ture here to take advantage of some perceived benefit from the Chinese tax structure, theyre still going to have to engage Bahamian lawyers. The structure would have to be legal here in the Bahamas. What Mr Winder may be unaware of is that is how things work now anyway. You have foreign lawyers who correspond with Bahamians lawyers, give advice as to what they are try ing to achieve, ask advice on our structures. The only matters that impact here would be Bahamian structures. Mr Munroe added: Thats why I dont really understand his point. His point would regard accountants, for instance, because right now a Bahamian accounting firm would correspond with an international accounting firm if they have issues in the two jurisdic tions. Hes probably just unaware that the same thing happens here, so no high net worth indi vidual comes down here other than having his local lawyers in the country where he is from determine that something can happen here. They liaise with a Bahamian lawyer who gives them advice as to what can happen in the Bahamas and they work together. Mr Winder had also noted that while it was not impossi ble for the Bahamian economy to achieve a significant level of growth, Bahamians had to overcome their suspicion and mistrust of foreign direct investment, as the domestic econo my would not generate enough growth to accomplish this task. Mr Munroe said: It tends to downplay the impact that local entrepreneurs can have in reviving and driving an econo my. In most jurisdictions, small businesses employ most peo ple. They would be started by locals. If your only view is that one fellow with a lot of money can come here and do this, that tends to overlook the phenomenon of small businesses employing the vest majority of people, even in the Bahamas. Atlantis may employ 5,000 people but thats not the majority of the people. The outlook is off for two reasons. It fails to recognise how lawyers interact globally and it seems to put undo weight on foreign direct investment. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3B By LARRYGIBSON THE MAJOR GLOBAL economies are all generally struggling to recover from the 2009 recession, which was sparked by the crisis in the financial sector. Some two years later (from the bottom of the cycle pace of recovery in the major economies is anemic at best. SLOW GLOBAL GROWTH Recently, the US released revised data that shows its economy growing at a tepid 1 per cent annual rate as of the 2011 second quarter. More telling was the fact that consumer spending grew at a 0.4 per cent annual rate. Aswe all know, it is consumer spending that fuels overall economic growth. In addition to the US, economic challenges within the European Union (EU sharper-than-expected drop in Germany's business confidence survey added to evidence that German economic recovery is faltering. Likewise, recent data showed euro zone growth remained at a two-year lowin August. On an annualised basis, euro zone gross domestic product (GDP ond quartereven weaker than that of the US. For an open economy such as the Bahamas, sluggish economic growth in the US and Europe will undoubtedly mean challenges for us here at home, as most of our tourists and international investors come from those economies. DEBT WOES Almost without fanfare, Moodys Investor Services, the second largest credit rating agency in the world, downgraded the sovereign debt of Japan on August 23, 2011. Moodys cited weak economic growth prospects, frequent changes of government that prevent long-term budget planning, and a build-up of debt since the 2009 global recession as rea sons for cutting Japans grade to Aa3. At the same time, it said Japans rating outlook is stable, and the nation will benefit from low funding costs because domestic demand for government debt is stable and Japan is the worlds largest net creditor. Persistent deflation and slow growth has shackled Japan's economy for years, reducing tax revenues available to the government, which has grown to rely on debt issuance to finance a large part of its budget. The downgrade, while not out of the blue, served as another reminder of the debt burdens that nearly all the world's major advanced economies shoulder, even as policymakers struggle to agree on ways to stimulate sub-par growth without the massive new public spending that will inevitably have to be financed by additional borrowing. The USlost its top-tier AAA rating from Standard & Poor's earlier this month, and Moody's warned in June that it may downgrade Italy as Europe's sovereign debt crisis festers. KEY ECONOMIC INDICATOR One of the key economic indicators that the International Monetary Fund (IMF cies monitor closely in assessing the health of economies is the ratio of debt to GDP. The dire economic situation in Greece has served to focus the world, once again, on this key ratio. Greeces ratio is currently estimated to be about 180 per cent, which mean that for every $100 of GDP, Greece has about $180 of debt. The US debt-to-GDP ratio is 100 pe rcent, while Japans was 223 per cent at the time of downgrade, and Italy is hovering around 119 per cent. This contrasts with the Bahamas, which is estimated to be at about 50-60 per cent of GDP. While the Bahamas ratio is low compared to the region and, indeed, many of the major economies, it has been trending higher in recent years. MOODYS DOWNGRADE There seems to be a great deal of misunderstanding surrounding the recent downgrade of the Bahamas by Moodys. Unlike the US and Japan, the debt/credit rating of the Bahamas was not downgraded. Instead, the economic outlook for the Bahamas was downgraded from stable to negative. According to Moodys, the main triggers for the downgrade were: The significant run-up in government debt levels in recent years The country's limited growth prospects; The challenges the Government is likely to face in raising revenues. Therefore, as a result, Moody's expects the Government will have difficulty achieving a meaningful reduction in its debt levels in the near-tomedium term. SLOW BAHAMIAN GROWTH Moodys went on to report: Furthermore, given the Bahamas' historically low growth rates its economy has grown a cumulative total of just a little over 6 per cent over the past 10 years it is unlikely it will be able to grow out of its debt burden, notwithstanding certain recent developments that may give a lift to the economy over the next few years. The Bahamas' economy is highly dependent on tourism, particularly from the US, the near-term economic prospects of which appear increasingly uncertain. In addition, the off shore financial sector, the Bahamas' second most important industry, is facing a rising degree of competition. Consequently, the only way that debt levels will decrease is if the Government is able to reverse the fiscal deficits it has generated over the past several years and begin to repay a portion of its debt. With expenditures still quite low despite recent increases, in all likelihood the Government will have to rely on tax increases and/or the introduction of new taxes in order to accomplish this. I must admit that I was shocked to learn our economy had only grown 6 per cent in the past 10 years. That works out to about 0.6 per cent per annum. If this is correct, when one considers that the official inflation rate has been less than 3 per cent per annum during the period (which, incidentally, no one believes), the country would have had negative growth in real terms over the past decade. Given the above, the downgrade of our outlook could be a precursor for a downgrade in our actual rating if we do not control our bourgeoning debt levels and raise revenues. Moodys concluded: In order for the outlook to return to stable, the Government would need to demonstrate a credible plan not just for stabilising debt, but for reducing it to a level more consistent with the current A3 rating. With general elections likely early next year, the task ahead is not an easy oneno matters who wins. The most pressing concern, from a rating standpoint, would be the Government's resolve to reduce its debt and implement long-term sustainability measures. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vice-president pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamas sidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major shareholder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to Larry.Gibson@atlantichouse.com.bs NO EASY OPTIONS FOR POLICYMAKERS FINANCIAL FOCUS BY LARRYGIBSON F F o o r r a a n n o o p p e e n n e e c c o o n n o o m m y y s s u u c c h h a a s s t t h h e e B B a a h h a a m m a a s s , s s l l u u g g g g i i s s h h e e c c o o n n o o m m i i c c g g r r o o w w t t h h i i n n t t h h e e U U S S a a n n d d E E u u r r o o p p e e w w i i l l l l u u n n d d o o u u b b t t e e d d l l y y m m e e a a n n c c h h a a l l l l e e n n g g e e s s f f o o r r u u s s h h e e r r e e a a t t h h o o m m e e , a a s s m m o o s s t t o o f f o o u u r r t t o o u u r r i i s s t t s s a a n n d d i i n n t t e e r r n n a a t t i i o o n n a a l l i i n n v v e e s s t t o o r r s s c c o o m m e e f f r r o o m m t t h h o o s s e e e e c c o o n n o o m m i i e e s s . ACCOUNTANTS URGED: REDUCE FEES LEVIED ON SMALL BUSINESS Former Bar chief urges focus on small and medium-sized business or economic revival, not FDI By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Business Reporter nmckenzie@tribunemedia.net PRIME MINSISTER HUBERT INGRAHAMyesterday said unemployment in the Bahamas is far to high, and likely to remain so for another 12-18 months, as he launched the first phase of the Governments jobs training initiative. Some 12,800 persons had applied for the National Job Readiness and Training Program, far exceeding the 3,000 spots set aside for the initiative, and the Prime Minister noted: The number of applicants seeking to participate in this programme demonstrates that our economy, like economies throughout the world, is severe ly affected by one of the worst global economic crisis in a century. Unemployment is far, far too high in our country. The need for jobs in the Bahamas is great. By and through this orientation we begin today, we seek to ensure that many, many more Bahamians are trained and skilled to take advantage of opportunities for jobs, and to place even more persons in a position to have access to skills training to be employed when our econo my rebounds and many, many more jobs come on stream. The orientation program is slated for the next two weeks for the first participants. Yesterday, 400 persons in New Providence and 240 in Grand Bahama began the two-week orienta tion prior to their job placement, representing the first of hundreds set to participate in the program. Mr Ingraham said the course work will focus on what are called soft skills needed to ensure success in the work place. The Government has set aside $25 million for the jobs program, which has three main components: job readiness, job training and job placement. Government officials could not confirm yesterday how many employ ers had signed up for the latter initiative. Prime Minister Ingraham said the response from the private sector towards the initiative has been encouraging. The response to our invitation from the private sector has been encouraging, he added. Many employers have agreed to provide work experience and on-the-job training to improve the skills, and to enhance the employability, of the unemployed. Because of this response many, if not all of you, will be provided the opportunity for work placement and skills develUNEMPLOYMENT STILL FAR TOO HIGH SEE page 4B

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BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE opment through private sector employment exposure. We will also make training opportunities available at the BTVI to individuals interested in a wide range of trades, including auto-collision repair, masonry, welding, air-condi tioning, tiling, dry wall installation, fashion design and manu facture. Mr Ingraham said: Here in Nassau some 200 persons whose interests in skills training coincide with available train ing at BTVI will be accommodated in such training programs, beginning in the current semester. The Government will pay the cost of the training. And the Government will provide a stipend to participants in the Programme at BTVI. We will undertake a similar exercise at BTVI in Grand Bahama. According to the latest Labour Force survey, the national unemployment rate dropped from 14.2 per cent in May 2009 to 13.7 per cent two years later. This still represents more than 25,000 Bahamians, and the number of people who are no longer looking for work (discouraged workers ically increased by 34.8 per cent to 11,900. The unemployment rate in New Providence dropped slightly from 14 per cent to 13.2 per cent. Grand Bahamas unemployment rate dropped from 17.4 per cent to 15.4 per cent. PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham UNEMPLO YMENT STILL FAR TOO HIGH FROM page three because just keeping it open and employing 30 people is costing the Hotel Corporation halfa-million a year. No one wants to have a viable proposal for development done for Andros more than me. Tribune Business previously reported that the initial Scheck deal, which aimed to transform the Lighthouse property and surrounding real estate into the Andros Sporting Club, was rejected by the Ingraham Cabinet on the grounds that it did not want to convey to the developer the estimated 6,000-7,000 acres sur rounding the resort property owned by the former Hotel Corporation. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, effectively confirmed this, also acknowledging that the previous Scheck proposal which called for the redevelopment of the Lighthouse property in a project covering 600 acres, 350 freehold and 250 leasehold had involved the surrounding acreage. o riginal franchise agreement between the Government and Cable Bahamas, which was signed in 1994 and provided the legal foundation for the latters creation. The original Compulsory L icensing Act created a c opyright controversy not j ust embroiling Cable Bahamas, but also US-based TV programmers and content distributors plus both the Bahamian and US governments, the latter throughi ts Nassau Embassy and the U S Trade Representatives Office. In its original format, the Act allowed Cable Bahamas to decode, download and screen on its cable channels encrypted TV programming from US satellite providers whose footprint extended over the Bahamas. Effectively, it gave Cable Bahamas a legal basis to use this TV content without having to r each commercial agreem ents with the providers/dist ributors first. I n the latters eyes, this was t antamount to a flagrant b reach of copyright, even though the Compulsory Licensing Act required Cable Bahamas to set aside funds to compensate the programmers/distributors, something monitored by the Gove rnment-appointed Copyright Royalties Tribunal. The last published figures s howed Cable Bahamas had p aid some $4.3 million into t he specially-created fund. However, none of the US-b ased programmers or dist ributors had touched a single cent, apparently fearing that to do so would tacitly imply acceptance of Cable Bahamas activities and the Bahamas compulsory licens ing regime. This copyright dispute ultim ately raged on for more than a decade, with the US programmers and rights h olders frequently pressurisi ng Washington to take action against the Bahamas. It was a key factor behind the Bahamas regular placement on the US Trade Representatives Special 301 watch list, and the 2004 a mendment passed by both houses of Parliament was critical in this nations eventual removal from that list in 2007. However, the 2004 amendm ent was never brought into law until, as revealed by another diplomatic cable o btained by Wikileaks, the U S government effectively g ot out the big stick and t hreatened the Bahamas with l oss of its trade preferences u nder the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI passed the amendment to its Compulsory Licensing Act. This would have impacted around $125-$140 million worth of Bahamian exports t o the US, chiefly from Polym ers International and the fisheries industry, undermini ng their competitiveness. T he US diplomatic cable, r ecording the conversation between Mr Butler and its Nassau embassys unnamede conomic officer, believed to be Jeff Dubel, said: In a private conversation, Cable Bahamas president and CEO Anthony Butler told EconOff [Economic Officer] that he believes the amendm ent is a breach of the franc hise agreement between Cable Bahamas and the Government of theB ahamas. Butler said he would be well within (his s ue the Government. The current franchise agreement expires on October 13. Cable Bahamas, he noted, is undergoing renewal talks from a weakened financial position even though he b elieves the Government of the Bahamas won't enforce the amendment. That interpretation was contradicted by comments from Alexious Rolle, the M inistry of Foreign Affairs economic officer, who apparently told the US Embassy t hat the Government could e nforce the Act through vari ous means, such as cease a nd desist orders, licence r emovals and litigation. T he US embassy cable then detailed Cable Bahamas side of the situa tion, namely that the US programmers, distributors and rights holders were refusing to enter good-faith negotiat ions with it to tie down comm ercial agreements on the grounds that this nation a nd, by extension, the Engl ish-speaking Caribbean w ere too small a market to be commercially viable. The Bahamas, and other E nglish-speaking nations, fell under the Latin American programming footprint, but Spanish-speaking content was no good to Cable Bahamas. Butler dismissed the idea o f moving to the Television A ssociation of Programmers Latin America (TAPLAT because it does not offer theq uantity of American cont ent or timely airing of pop u lar shows, the US embassy c able said. He also noted that TAPLAT officials would not meet with his company due to the Compulsory Licensing issue. This is not a Cable Bahamas issue, he [Butler] s aid. This is a Bahamas issue. Cable Bahamas cannot compete without American programming. Bahamians are accustomed to American programming and aren't g oing to give it up so easily, and the Government needs to face that. T he US cable reported Mr B utler as saying there was v ery little consideration of C able Bahamas ability to c ompete without compulsory l icensing, but the company was making a good-faith effort to comply. Branding the US content provider representatives as a bunch of lawyers unwill ing to consider CableB ahamas viewpoint, Butl er added that Cable Bahamas was only establ ished because it was prot ected under the exception c lause of the Compulsory Licensing Act. He said that his $ 250 mill ion operation cannot afford the financing required to obtain premium content at the pricing levels the content providers are offering. The US Embassy in Nassau was sympathetic to Cable B ahamas plight, noting that B ahamians were all-toowilling to purchase and illegally install satellite dishes toe xtricate encrypted material t hemselves. Illegal satellite dishes, it said, accounted for 21 per cent of the Bahamian TV market and were increasing, i mpacting Cable Bahamas c ompetitiveness. M r Butler, the US cable said, had sought the Embassys assistance in helping Cable Bahamas to reach commercial agreements with t he programming rights holde rs. The Nassau Embassy seemed willing to accede to his request, the cable agreeing: Cable Bahamas may have difficulty entering into c ommercial agreements with p roviders, which perceive the B ahamian market as too small. US government support for these negotiations is vital in order to ensure that Cable B ahamas does not fall back i nto non-compliance. I ndeed, this approach p aved the way for the ultim ate resolution of the longrunning dispute over Cable Bahamas and the compulsory licensing regime. T he situation is now effectively water under the bridge, the BISX-listed communications provider having s ubsequently signed commercial agreements with H BO and other premium content providers, while not g oing down the route of legal action against the Governm ent. W hen contacted by Trib une Business yesterday, Mr B utler confirmed that Cable Bahamas had engaged, reached out to both the US Embassy in Nassau and the US Trade Representative in Washington from as far back as 2001 when we r ealised this was becoming an issue. The company, he added, h ad worked through four US A mbassadors Arthur S chechter, Richard Blankenship, John Rood and Ned Siegel. The former wrote al etter supporting Cable Bahamas position, Mr Butler said, while Mr Siegel approached the content providers directly a tactic t hat resulted in an August 5, 2 009, meeting in Nassau b etween all parties to the dispute. From the August 2009 meeting we had, we believed everyone understood the situ ation the Bahamas and the E nglish-speaking Caribbean was in, Mr Butler told Tribune Business. One, that we were covered under the Latin American feeds and jurisdiction, w hich meant programming w ith a lot of Spanish-speaki ng content. From the meeting that day, there was an understanding from all parties around the table that day f rom the Government of the B ahamas, the programmers, T APLAT, the Embassy t hat they were going to work c ollectively to recognise the English-speaking Caribbean had a need for Englishspeaking programming. In particular, the Bahamas, with its proximity to the US, and having been exposed to US programm ing for 30 years, had a special need. Weve all moved f orward from there. On the original Compuls ory Licensing Act, which became the source of so m uch friction, Mr Butler e xplained: It was important w hen Cable Bahamas first c ame to the country that we were able to offer a product that was at least equivalent to what was already here, which was US satellite programming. The Government unders tand that, and amended the Act within [the context of] the franchise agreement. T he Cable Bahamas chief e xecutive added that the c ompany had been paying into the copyright licens ing fund throughout its d uration. c ept, Mr Scott told Tribune Business. Yet he said Article 16 of the Heads of Agreement signed with the Christie administration effectively gave the I-Group sucha uthority, giving the development v ehicle, Mayaguana Island Devel opers (MID all third party developers and jointv enture partners who came to Mayaguana. And he added that the Heads of Agreement also gave MID, the 50/50 joint venture between the IGroup and Hotel Corporation, representing the Governments inter est, to appoint representatives to M ayaguanas Town Planning Com mittee and other public Boards. This would effectively have left the Government as an owner, o perator and regulator of the Mayaguana development. The Government recognises its inherently a conflict and substantially u nfair to other developers if it is a partner in the commercial realm and regulator, Mr Scott explained. It gives the project a very unfair advantage over other projects, and you cant see the Government asr egulator and negotiator saying no t o government in a corporation as a joint venture partner. These are all points that have cropped up. R eaffirming that the Governments role, under the previous Heads of Agreement, as joint ven-t ure partner and regulator in Mayaguana was an inherent conflict, Mr Scott questioned what w ould have happened if a dispute with the I-Group had occurred and the arbitration clause been invoked. What happens is that you get to arbitration, and the Government through the Hotel Corporation is a 5 0 per cent partner. It becomes ridiculous, the attorney said. How does that work conceptuallya nd practically? I dont see how t hat can work. Youre in potential conflict with yourself since incep tion. M r Scott also described the claw back provisions in the existing deal as a joke. MID was granted ani nitial 5,825 acres of Crown and government land after paying an initial $2 million, and could expand t o 9,999 acres in two tranches. A further 2,082 acres was due to be granted once the airport was completed, and an equivalent amount o nce the infrastructure and bou tique hotels. Yet Mr Scott said the claw back p rovisions which allowed the Government to reclaim land if MID and the I-Group failed to per f orm to standard and milestones o nly kicked in following the final 2,082-acre tranches handover, and only provided for the return of1 ,044 acres maximum. This, he added, allowed the developers to retain 8,900 acres,a nd he asked: Could that be in the best interests of the country. The Cabinet is today due to con s ider, and potentially approve, the revised Heads of Agreement with the I-Group, potentially paving the way for the development to resume o nce several pieces of legislation are passed by Parliament. The project is looking at a potent ial $100 million build-out over a 10-year period, involving third-par ty and joint venture developers w ith the I-Group. T he first phase involves comple tion of the airport terminal on Mayaguana and its runway, togeth e r with a boutique hotel featuring a minimum 25 rooms and community projects. Mr Scott estimated thef irst phase would involve a $20-$30 million investment. GETTING MILLSTONE OFF OUR DUAL NECK FROM page one NO CREATION OF A SECOND FREEPORT IN MAYAGUANA FROM page one CABLE HAD GROUNDS TO SUE GOVERNMENT FROM page one

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e d civil service pension liabilities as a sore that will eat away at investment in p ublic infrastructure projects. C alling on the Government to employ more civil servants on a contract, rather than permanent,basis in a bid to reduce c osts, Mr Winder also c alled on Bahamians to challenge politicians who promised to dramaticallyi ncrease public expenditure in particular areas. Given the fiscal position, the key question was: Where is them oney coming from? The Government is going to have to seek to privatise as many parts ofg overnment as possible, Mr Winder told this news paper, assessing possible s olutions to the national d ebt/fiscal deficit woes. Its going to have to break with normal practice for the last 20 years on thisi ssue. Its better to take it in hand now than later, when there will be ag reater crisis that will create significant turmoil in this country. T he Ingraham administ ration, albeit slowly, has b egun the privatisation process through the sale a a majority 51 per cent stake in the Bahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Wireless Communications. Other likely privatisation targets include the B ahamas Electricity Corp oration (BEC m aking turkeys that bleed t he Treasury, such as B ahamasair and the Water & Sewerage Corporation. Yet other assets could also be considered, if the Government wants to get out of business and bring in professional private sec tor management. This has a lready happened, to a certain extent, with the Lyn den Pindling International Airport (LPIAA rawak Cay port, but other activities that could potentially be outsourced to the private sectori nclude hospitals, educa tion and even-revenue gen erating agencies such as the Registrar GeneralsD epartment. All three of the International Monetary Fund (IMF d ard & Poors have urged the Bahamas to focus sole ly on revenues and new o r increased taxes to a ddress the rapid increase in its $4.3 billion national debt, but Mr Winder effectively called for it to adopt a two-pronged approach targeting its $1.68 billionin annual public spending. Going forward, the Government really are going to have to seek to employ more people on a contract basis, as opposed to full employment, Mr Winder said. And he w arned that civil service p ension liabilities were b eing missed, not even fact ored into the expenditure e quation. The hidden cost for government employees continues to grow daily, Mr Winder added. At the moment, there is nothing the Government can do to reduce expenditure, eveni f it stays where it is, because of the pension expenditure attached to individuals. This expendi-t ure is not going away. Government has to look at bringing individuals on on a contract basis, andl ook at the pension scheme it has. It is unsustainable, and damaging to the longterm future of this country.I t does not matter what we do on the revenue side; that will be a sore that eats away at governments abil i ty to make new invest ments. Theyve got to look at coming up with a newp ension scheme with a new f ocus. This, though, might be a hard sell, especially as Mr Winder acknowledged that efforts at public sector pension reform would only bear fruit in the medium to long-term. He is not the first, though, to express concern about public sector pensions. James Smith, former minister of state for finance, told Tribune Busin ess earlier this year that w ith an average of "several h undred" civil servants r etiring each year, the Gove rnment's pension liabilit ies to them and other departed colleagues was increasing every month and year. However, this is never disclosed as a Budget line item, these pension liabili-t ies being included with recurrent spending as wages, salaries and emoluments. M eanwhile, Mr Winder also called on the three major political parties FNM, PLP and DNA to be honest in their upcoming 2012 general election c ampaigns and educate B ahamians on the issues f acing the country. R eferring to the tendenc y of budding politicians to m ake statements about doubling public spending in certain areas, he added: Those statements ought to be challenged from the perspective of: Where are we getting the revenue tof und them? My concern is that were continually raising the expectation level of thea verage Bahamian citizen, and there isnt those sense that these promises cant be fulfilled unless we raise additional taxes. Peoples expectations a re being raised, and peop le are becoming very frust rated because not everyo ne understands these i ssues. When people in power are not fulfilling these obligations, they think the Government is not doing what it ought to be doing. Mr Winder said too m any Bahamians were talking as if the Bahamas could afford to pay for more social s without firstr aising taxes or implementing new ones. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 5B ,Q$FFRUGDQFHZLWK &RQVWLWXWLRQ7KH%DKDPDVXEOLFHUYLFHV 8QLRQZLOOKROGWKH7UL$QQXDO*HQHUDO 0HPEHUVKLSHHWLQJRQ $XGLWRUVHSRUWVZLOOEHSUHVHQWHG $OOPHPEHUVDUHXUJHGWRDWWHQG DQGEHRQWLPH 5HIUHVKPHQWVZLOOEHVHUYHGDIWHUWKHPHHWLQJ June. We dont anticipate anything further at all, Mr Bosland told Tribune Business, attributing the policyholder provision increase almost entirely to the rate cuts effects. For the half-year to June 30, Colina saw the change in provisions for future policyholder benefits more than double, growing 286 per cent to $11.409 million compared to $3.989 million the year before. Life insurers have to match longterm assets to projected long-term liabilities, and the future decline in investment income (an asset Colina Insurance as it will have other Bahamian life insurers to take the action it did. Life insurers rely heavily on investment income, and in a market such as the Bahamas where investment options are relatively limited, a significant proportion are in fixed-income instruments linked to Prime government bonds, Treasury bills and other securities, private sector bonds and preference shares, real estate and bank deposits. The impact on reserves is the biggest part of the change, Mr Bosland said, confirming that future interest coupons received from all Colinas investments tied to Prime would be reduced. However, the impact on its financial statements going forward was expected to be far less marked than the hit taken in the 2011 second quarter and half-year. We are making some adjustments to what we invest in, Mr Bosland told Tribune Business, but materially there arent any safe havens in the Bahamas that you can run to as everything is practically linked to Prime. We are doing some things at the edges, but dont expect anything materially different in the composition of the investment portfolio from this year to the next. There are a few minor things we are doing, but we have $500 million in total assets and its hard to change that in a short period of time. Mr Bosland acknowledged that it was probably our feeling that investment income would be reduced for the foreseeable future. Given that the change in Prime came towards the end of the 2011 second quarter, the main impact on investment income has yet to be felt. It remained relatively flat for the three months to end-June, standing at $7.575 million compared to $7.933 million the year before. The end result was that Colina Holdings (Bahamas $709,572 net loss for the quarter, compared to a $8.121 million profit for the year before. Net income for the half-year fell from $10.108 million to $1.632 million but, if the impact of the Prime-induced $7.4 million policyholder benefit provisions increase was stripped out, the BISX-listed firm would only have been about $1 million down on 2010 comparatives. Net income available to ordinary shareholders, though, dropped to $0.4 million or $0.02 per share. Mr Bosland described Colina Insurances ability to withstand events such as the Prime increase as priceless, adding: Weve managed ourselves to be in a strong position to withstand issues like this, and have been fortunate to be disciplined over the years. Cathy Williams, Colina Insurances vice-president of finance, added: Its still business as usual for us as we have a long-term view. Were investing in a lot of software here to improve our business. With our ability to be flexible and withstand these kind of things, we havent changed a lot of our strategies. While retained earnings had dropped from the 2010 year-end, falling from $39.655 million to $36.071 million, Ms Williams said this was due to second quarter dividend payments of $3.9 million to ordinary shareholders and $870,000 to preference shareholders. Without this, and the Prime reduction, retained earnings would be on a normal upward trend. We had a very good first quarter and were doing very well, trending positively. This is unexpected, but we have to account for it and move on, Ms Williams said of the Prime reduction. Mr Bosland added that Colina expected to return to normal levels of profitability ahead during the 2011 second half, and were forecasting ending the year in the black. For the 2011 second quarter, Colina saw a 33.3 per cent increase in gross premium revenues to $34.399 million, compared to $25.792 million the year before. Policyholder benefits paid out, though, rose at a greater rate of 50.6 per cent to $21.608 million compared to $14.347 million the year before. Mr Bosland said Colina had received a boost from short-term health and reinsurance business it did, offering the latter service in the Caribbean and Latin America. He described the reinsurance business as chunky, with peaks and troughs, rather than a smooth income stream. FROM page one GOVT URGED: PRIVATISE AS MANY ASSETS AS YOU CAN FROM page one COLINA: PRICELESS ABILITY TO ABSORB $6M PRIME HIT

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BUSINESS PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE :LQWHUERWKDP,QIRUPDWLRQ 6\VWHPV/LPLWHG WKH&RPSDQ\f 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK6HFWLRQ RIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO%XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV RI WKH 'LVVROXWLRQ RI :LQWHUERWKDP,QIRUPDWLRQ 6\VWHPV/LPLWHG KDVEHHQFRPSOHWHG&HUWLFDWHRI 'LVVROXWLRQKDVEHHQLVVXHGDQGWKH&RPSDQ\KDVWKHUHIRUH EHHQVWUXFNRIWKH5HJLVWHU7KHGDWHRIFRPSOHWLRQRIWKH GLVVROXWLRQZDVWKH WK GD\RI $OUHQDR[H\ /LTXLGDWRU INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT (No. 45 of 2000 LARKFIELD LIMITED In Voluntary liquidation Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), LARKFIELD LIMITED is in Dissolution. The date of commencement of dissolution is the 2nd day of September, 2011.Paul B E Quayle FCA 19 Shore Road Peel, Isle of Man Liquidator ,17(51$7,21$/%86,1(66&203$1,(6 %21*(1,1& ,QROXQWDU\OLTXLGDWLRQ 1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWLQDFFRUGDQFH ZLWK6HFWLRQRIWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO %XVLQHVV&RPSDQLHV$FWRI %21*(1 KDVEHHQGLVVROYHGDQGVWUXFN RIIWKH5HJLVWHUDFFRUGLQJWRWKH&HUWLILFDWH RI'LVVROXWLRQLVVXHGWKH5HJLVWUDU *HQHUDORQWKH WK GD\RI $XJXVW <(+&+,1*+81* 6HFDLSHLDLZDQ /LTXLGDWRU 1 2 7 & ( 81,217(;$6 $161$7,21$/f/,0,7(' BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 127,&(,6+(5(%<*,9(1 WKDWDQ ([WUDRUGLQDU\*HQHUDO0HHWLQJRIWKH6KDUHKROGHUVRI8QLRQ 7H[DVUDQVQDWLRQDOf/LPLWHG LVKHUHE\FDOOHGWREHKHOGDW :HVWODNH3DUN%RXOHYDUG+RXVWRQ7;RQ UG 2FWREHU DW7KHREMHFWDQGSXUSRVHRIVDLGPHHWLQJLVWRKDYH ODLGEHIRUHWKH6KDUHKROGHUVRIWKH&RPSDQ\WKHDFFRXQWVRIWKH /LTXLGDWRU'HODQR$UDQKDVKRZLQJWKHPDQQHULQZKLFKWKH ZLQGLQJXSRIWKH&RPSDQ\KDVEHHQFRQGXFWHGWKHSURSHUW\ RIWKH&RPSDQ\GLVWULEXWHGDQGWKHGHEWVDQGREOLJDWLRQVRI WKH&RPSDQ\GLVFKDUDQGDOVRWRKHDUDQ\H[SODQDWLRQWKDW PD\EHJLYHQE\VDLG/LTXLGDWRU 'DWHGWKH UG GD\RIHSWHPEHU '(/$12$5$1+$ /,48,'$725 WASHINGTON Associated Press THE U.S. JOB market is even worse than the 9.1 percent unemployment rate suggests. A merica's 14 million unemployed aren't competing just with each other. They must also contend w ith 8.8 million other people not counted as unemployed part-timers who w ant full-time work. W hen consumer demand p icks up, companies will likely boost the hours oft heir part-timers before they add jobs, economists s ay. It means they have room to expand without h iring. And the unemployed will face another source of c ompetition once the e conomy improves: R oughly 2.6 million people who aren't counted asu nemployed because t hey've stopped looking for work. Once they start looking again, they'll be classified as unemployed. And the unemployment rate could rise. Competition I ntensified competition f or jobs means unemploy ment could exceed its historic norm of 5 percent to6 percent for several more years. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office expects the rate toe xceed 8 percent until 2014. The White House predicts it will average 9 percent next year, whenP resident Barack Obama runs for re-election. The jobs crisis has led Obama to schedule am ajor speech Thursday night to propose steps to stimulate hiring. Republi can presidential candidates w ill likely confront the issue in a debate the night before. The back-to-back events will come days after the g overnment said employers added zero net jobs in August. The monthly jobs r eport, arriving three days before Labor Day, was the weakest since September 2 010. C ombined, the 14 mill ion officially unemployed; the "underemployed"p art-timers who want fullt ime work; and "discouraged" people who have stopped looking make up 16.2 percent of workingage Americans. The Labor Department compiles the figure to a ssess how many people want full-time work and can't find it a numbert he unemployment rate alone doesn't capture. In a healthy economy, this broader measure of unemployment stays below 10 percent. Since the Great Recession offic ially ended more than t wo years ago, the rate has b een 15 percent or more. The proportion of the w ork force made up of the f rustrated part-timers has risen faster than unem ployment has since the recession began in Decem-b er 2007. That's because many companies slashed work e rs' hours after the recession hit. If they restored all those lost hours to their existing staff, they'd adde nough hours to equal a bout 950,000 full-time jobs, according to calculations by Heidi Shierholz,a n economist at the Eco nomic Policy Institute. That's without having to hire a single employee. N o one expects every company to delay hiring until every part-timer is working full time. Bute conomists expect job g rowth to stay weak for t wo or three more years in part because of how manyf rustrated part-timers want t o work full time. And because employers are still reluctant to increase hours for parttimers, "hiring is really a long way off," says Christine Riordan, a policy anal yst at the National E mployment Law Project. I n August, employees of p rivate companies worked fewer hours than in July. Workers Some groups are disprop ortionately represented a mong the broader category of unemployment t hat includes underemp loyed and discouraged w orkers. More than 26 percent of African Americans, for example, andn early 22 percent of His p anics are in this category. The figure for whites is less than 15 percent.W omen are more likely than men to be in this group. Among the Americans f rustrated with part-time w ork is Ryan McGrath, 26. In October, he returnedf rom managing a hotel p roject in Uruguay. He's been unable to find fulltime work. So he's been freelancing a s a website designer for small businesses in the Chicago area. Some weeks he's busy and making money. Oth er times he struggles. He's living at home, and somet imes he has to borrow $50 from his father to pay bills. He's applied for "a million j obs." You go to all these i nterviews for entry-level positions, and you lose oute very time," he says. N ationally, 4.5 unemployed people, on average, a re competing for each job opening. In a healthy economy, the average is a bout two per opening. Facing rejection, mil lions give up and stop l ooking for jobs. Norman Spaulding, 54, quit his job as a truck driver two years ago becauseh e needed work that would let him care for his disabled 13-year-old daughter. B ut after repeated rejections, Spaulding conclud ed a few weeks ago that t he cost of driving to visit p otential employers was n't worth the expense. He suspended his job hunt. He and his family are g etting by on his daughter's disability check from Social Security. They'rel iving in a trailer park on Texas' Gulf Coast. It costs more to look than we have to spend," he says. E ventually, lots of A mericans like Spaulding w ill start looking for jobs again. If those work-forced ropouts had been counte d as unemployed, August's unemployment r ate would have been 10.6 percent instead of 9.1 percent. Retailer Emma Draper, 23, lost her public relations jobt his summer. To pay the rent on her Washington apartment, she's working part time at the retailer South Moon Under. She's selling $120 Ralph Lauren swimsuits and other trendyc lothes. H er search for full-time work has been discourag ing. Employers don't call back for months, if ever. "You're basically on their timeline," Draper says. "It's really hard tof ind a job unless you know s omebody who can give you an inside edge." R etailers, in particular, favor part-timers. They value the flexibility of b eing able to tap extra w orkers during peak sales t imes without being overstaffed during lulls. Someu se software to precisely m atch their staffing levels with customer traffic. I t holds down their expenses. "They know up to the m inute how many people they need," says Carrie Gleason of the RetailA ction Project, which advocates better working conditions for retail workers. "It's almost created ac ontingent work force." Draper appreciates her part-time retail job, and not just because it helpsp ay the bills. It takes her mind off the frustration of searching for full-timew ork. Right now, finding a job is my job," she says. "If that was the only thingI had to do, I'd be going i nsane. There is only so much time you can sit at your computer, sendingo ut resumes." UNEMPLOYED FACE TOUGH COMPETITION: UNDEREMPLOYED RYAN MCGRATH 26, poses i n his home in Michigan City, I nd. McGrath has been working part time designing web sites for small businesses but wants steadier full-time work. (AP USJOBMARKETWORSETHAN9.1%RATESUGGESTS

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DETROIT A ssociatedPress PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMAsaid Monday that congressional Republicansm ust put their country a head of their party and vote to create new jobs ashe used a boisterous Labor D ay rally to aim a partisan barb at the GOP. In a preview of the jobs speech he will deliver onT hursday to Congress, Obama said there are numerous roads and bridges that need rebuilding in the U.S., ando ver 1 million unemployed construction workers who are available to build them. C iting massive federal b udget deficits, Republicans have expressed oppositionto spending vast new sums on jobs programs. But Oba m a said that with widespread suffering, "the time for Washington games is over" and lawmakers must move quickly to create jobs. "But we're not going wait for them," he said at an annual event sponsored by the Metropolitan Detroit AFL-CIO. "We're going to see if we've got some straight shooters in Con gress. We're going to see if congressional Republicans will put country before party." Obama's remarks came as he has been under heavy criticism from the GOP for presiding over a persistently weak economy and high unemployment. Last Fri day's dismal jobs report showed a net job change of zero in August, and the unemployment rate held steady at 9.1 percent. Congress returns from its summer recess this week, with the faltering economy and job market promising to be a dominant theme of the session. The economy is all but certain to also be the top issue of the 2012 presidential and congressional elections. Throughout the speech, the union crowd kept chant ing "four more years." Obama also said lawmakers should extend the temporary reduction in the pay roll tax that workers pay, a cut that will otherwise expire on Jan. 1. Many Republi cans have opposed renewing the payroll tax cut, saying it would increase federal red ink and do little to create jobs. "You say you're the party of tax cuts," Obama said of the GOP argument. "Well, then prove you'll fight just as hard for tax cuts for middle class families as you do oil companies and the most affluent Americans. Show us what you've got." In the speech to Congress, Obama is expected to call for a mix of individual and business tax credits and public works spending. He will also press lawmakers for swift action on those proposals. Underscoring the political dueling on the economy under way, Obama plans to visit Richmond, Va., the day after his address to Congress as the first of several trips he will make to encourage support for his job creation plan. Part of Richmond is represented by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., one of the president's fiercest critics. The president's broader goal is to make a sweeping appeal for bipartisan action on the economy, speaking not only to the members of Congress who will assemble before him, but to the larger American public. In that sense, the speech will mark a pivot point from a fall and summer spent dealing with long-term deficit reduction to a fall campaign devoted to boosting a foot-dragging recovery. Aides say Obama will mount a campaign through out the fall centered on the economy, unveiling different elements of his agenda heading into 2012. If Repub licans reject his ideas, the president and his aides want to enlist the public as an ally, essentially using the megaphone of his presidency to pressure Congress and make the case for his re-election. "People will see a president who will be laying very significant proposals throughout the fall leading up this next State of the Union," Gene Sperling, director of Obama's National Economic Council, said in an interview with the Associated Press. While Obama has said any short term spending proposal will be paid for over the long-term, aides say the speech will not offer details on what deficit reduc tion measures would be used to offset immediate spending measures. The speech also is not expected to include a detailed plan for resolving the nation's h ousing crisis, a central c ause behind the weak econ o my that White House aides and administration officials have been struggling tor esolve. "A lot of what will be discussed in greater detail int his economic proposal that he will be making on Thursday night will focus on many things that will have a morei mmediate, positive effect o n getting the recovery to take hold, getting stronger growth spurring job cre-a tion, spurring the private sector to invest more," Sper ling said. Asked specifically about h ousing, he said: You will also see him throughout the fall talking about other issues that are also at very much the heart of this economic agenda." Last week's disappointing j obs report sparked new f ears of a second recession a nd injected fresh urgency into efforts by Obama to help get millions of unemployed people back into the labor market and help improve his re-election chances. Meanwhile, the Chamber of Commerce on Monday surfaced its own jobs plan. In an open letter to Con gress and the White House, the Chamber called for mea sures designed to immediately increase employment, including stepped-up road and bridge construction, more oil drilling and tempo rary corporate tax breaks. Polls show the economy and jobs are the public's top concerns. Public approval of Obama's handling of the economy hit a new low of 26 percent in a recent Gallup survey. The unemployment report also gave Obama's Republi can critics, including those who want to challenge him in next year's presidential election, fresh ammunition to pound him with. GOP presidential candi date Mitt Romney called the report disappointing, unacceptable and "further proof that President Obama has failed." Romney is sched uled to outline his own jobcreation plan in a speech Tuesday in the battleground state of Nevada. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis said Monday that both political parties should get behind Obama's efforts to improve the hiring picture. "We do need everyone to be on board," she said on NBC's "Today" show. Solis said Obama "is very mindful of what the needs and concerns are of those individuals who have been o ut of work for so long." B ut she also said the jobless h ave a responsibility to seek training in new skills, if necessary, to better preparet hemselves for the kinds of jobs available in today's economy. O bama spent part of the holiday weekend at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland "puttingt he finishing touches" on the proposals and the speech, s aid spokesman Jay Carney. O bama won Michigan in t he 2008 presidential election and the economically challenged state is crucial toh is re-election prospects. The state unemployment rate was 10.9 percent in July,a bove the national average for that month. The Detroitarea jobless rate was even higher, at 14.1 percent inJ uly. BUSINESS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 7B &20021:($/ ,1+((0(&2857 &20021/$$1'(48,7< %(7:((1 %$+$0$6'(9(/230(17%$1. 3ODLQWLII $1' &+5,6723+(5&855< VUXFNLQJf 'HIHQGDQW 6800216 /(7$//3$57,(6 FRQFHUQHGDWWHQG EHIRUHWKH 'HSXW\5HJLVWUDU0HHUHV S \ J RIWKH 6XSUHPH&RXUW6XSUHPH&RXUW%XLOGLQJ $QVEDFKHU+RXVH UG )ORRU(DVW6WUHHW 1RUWK1DVVDX7KH%DKDPDVRQ )ULGD\ \ WKH UG GD\RI 6HSWHPEHU S DW RFORFNLQWKH DIWHUQRRQ RQWKHKHDULQJRIDQ DSSOLFDWLRQRQWKHSDUWRIWKH3ODLQWLIIRUDQ 2UGHUIRUOHDYHWRHQWHU-XGJPHQWLQ'HIDXOW RI$SSHDUDQFHSXUVXDQWWR2UGHURIWKH 5XOHVRIWKH6XSUHPH&RXUWIRUWKHDPRXQW FODLPHGLQWKHVXSSRUWLQJ$IGDYLWKHUHLQ ZLWKLQWHUHVWDQGFRVWV 7$.(127,&( WKDWSDUW\LQWHQGLQJ WRRSSRVHWKLVDSSOLFDWLRQRUWRDSSO\IRU VWD\RIH[HFXWLRQVKRXOGVHQGWRWKHRSSRVLWH SDUW\RULWV$WWRUQH\VWRUHDFKKLPQRWOHVV WKDQWKUHHGD\VEHIRUHWKHGDWHDERYH PHQWLRQHGFRS\RIDQ\$IGDYLWLQWHQGHG WREHXVHG '$7(' WKLV WK GD\RI-XO\ 5(*,675$5 7KLV6XPPRQVZDVWDNHQRXW0HVVUV *LEVRQ5LJE\&KDPEHUV.LDOH[ +RXVH'RZGHVZHOO6WUHHW1DVVDX7KH %DKDPDV$WWRUQH\VIRUWKHODLQWLI P RESIDENT BARACK OBAMA s peaks during a Labor Day event at Detroit's Renaissance Center, headquarters of General Motors, Monday. (AP

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LONDON Associated Press W ORLD STOCK MARKETS t ook a beating Monday over fears that the U.S. econ-o my was heading back into a recession just as the European debt crisis was heating up and t he eurozone's economic indic ators were slumping. Any troubles in the world's largest economy cast a long s hadow over the markets, and a report Friday that the U.S. economy failed to add any n ew jobs in August caused European and Asian stock markets to sink sharply Mon-d ay. B ut the news from Europe was also discouraging. Wall Street, which was closed Mon-d ay due to the Labor Day holiday, braced for losses Tuesday after the yields in so-called p eripheral eurozone countries Greece, Italy and Spain rose sharply against those of Germany, whose bonds are w idely considered a safe haven. Although retail sales in the 1 7-nation eurozone rose unexpectedly in July, a survey of the services sector Monday showed a slowdown across the c ontinent for the fifth consecutive month. The purchasing managers' index for the euro-z one showed the services sector was still growing unlike the manufacturing sector but only barely. That will add pressure on the European Central Bank to keep interest rates on hold when it meets this week. "There's so much uncertainty, so much fear, that investors don't know what to do," said David Kotok, chair man and chief investment offi cer at Cumberland Advisors. I don't remember the last time stocks were so cheap and nobody wanted them." I nvestors were also shaken by signs that the Italian government's commitment to its austerity program is wavering.P rime Minister Silvio Berlus coni's government has backtracked on some deficit-cut ting measures, prompting EU officials to urge Italy to stick to its promised plan. The difference in interest rates between the Greek and benchmark German 10-year bonds, known as the spread, spiraled to new records on Monday, topping 17.3 per centage points. Yields on the Greek bonds were above 18 percent. M ario Draghi, the incoming chief of the European Central Bank, told a conference in P aris that among the common currency's problems was a lack of coordinated fiscal policies and that the solution was morei ntegration. He dismissed the idea of eurobonds debt issued jointly by the eurozone countries. Some have argued this would help weaker countries borrow more easily because they wouldn't have to pay such high interest rates. But stable countries like Germany would likely see their rates rise. Instead, Draghi suggested the eurozone should adopt rules that would require more budget discipline. R enewed jitters over the eurozone debt crisis also con tributed to the slump in finan c ial stocks amid concerns the banks would need to raise new capital. Deutsche bank closed down 8.9 percent in Frankfurt,w hile Societe Generale in Paris shed 8.6 percent. The U.S. unemployment cri sis has prompted President Barack Obama to schedule a major speech Thursday night to propose steps to stimulate hiring. Until then, however, traders coming back from the U.S. holiday weekend will have little to hold onto. The August jobs figure was far below economists' already tepid expectations for 93,000n ew U.S. jobs and renewed c oncerns that the U.S. recovery is not only slowing but actually unwinding. U.S. hiring figures for June and July were also revised lower, only adding to the gloom. M any traders have already pulled out of any risky invest ments such as stocks, particularly financial ones, the e uro and emerging market currencies and pile into safe h avens: U.S. Treasuries, the d ollar, the Japanese yen and gold. With Wall Street closed, i nvestors focused their selling in Asia and Europe, where the equity losses Monday were some of the heaviest this year. "We've got some rough rid ing ahead," said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at H arris Private Bank in Chica go, adding he was "concerned that we could see a secondw ave of selling when most t raders are back at their desks." Dow futures were down 1.8 percent at 11,010 points while the broader S&P 500 futures were 2.0 lower at 1,145.70. A fter Asian indexes closed lower, with the Japan's Nikkei 225 shedding 1.9 percent,E uropean shares booked sharp losses. Britain's FTSE 100 closed the day down 3.6 percent to 5,102.58. Germany's DAX slumped a massive 5.3 percent to 5,246.18, and France's CAC-40 tumbled 4.7 percent to 2,999.54. The health of the U.S. economy is crucial for the wider world because consumer spending there accounts for a fifth of global economic activity. The U.S. imports huge amounts from Japan and China and is closely linked at all levels with the European market. The U.S. has seen a slump in consumer and business sen timents. Traders were hoping for signs that the Federal Reserve might take action at its September meeting to support the economy perhaps a third round of bond purchases, dubbed quantitative easing IIIo r QE3, analysts said. Right now the possibility has increased," said Linus Yip, a strategist at First Shanghai Securities in Hong Kong. "I think they have to do something. The markets are expect-i ng QE3." Banking stocks were among the hardest hit Monday, partly because the U.S. government o n Friday sued 17 financial firms for selling Fannie Mae a nd Freddie Mac billions of d ollars worth of mortgagebacked securities that turned toxic when the housing mar k et collapsed. Among those targeted by the lawsuits were Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., JP Morgan Chase & Co., and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Large European banks includ i ng The Royal Bank of Scot land, Barclays Bank and Cred it Suisse were also sued. I n Asia, Australia's S &P/ASX 200 followed the broaden trend to close down 2.4 percent and South Korea's Kospi slid 4.4 percent. Hong Kong's Hang Seng slid 3 percent. Benchmarks in Sin-g apore, Taiwan, New Zealand and the Philippines also were down. S hanghai's benchmark Composite Index down 2 percent to 2,478.74, its lowest close in 13 months. The Shen zhen Composite Index lost 2.4 percent. In currencies, the euro weakened to $1.4100 from $1.4187 in New York late Friday. The dollar was roughly flat at 76.87 yen. Last month, the dollar fell under 76 yen, which was a new post-World War II high for the Japanese currency. Benchmark oil for October delivery was down $2.12 to $84.33 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Crude fell $2.48 to settle at $86.45 on Friday. In London, Brent crude for October delivery was down $1.63 at $110.70 on the ICE Futures exchange. BUSINESS PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 THE TRIBUNE 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1 .190.95AML Foods Limited1.191.190.0010,0000.1550.0807.76.72% 10.639.05Bahamas Property Fund10.6310.630.00-0.6420.080-16.6 0.75% 7 .504.40Bank of Bahamas6.936.930.000.2300.10030.11.44% 0 .530.17Benchmark0.180.180.00-0.0480.000N/M0.00% 2 .842.55Bahamas Waste2.702.700.000.0300.09090.03.33% 1.961.77Fidelity Bank1.771.770.000.0970.04018.22.26% 11.108.29Cable Bahamas8.488.480.000.2450.31034.63.66% 2.802.35Colina Holdings2.552.550.000.4380.0405.81.57% 8.508.33Commonwealth Brewery8.508.500.000.7400.00011.50.00% 7.006.21Commonwealth Bank (S1 6.886.880.000.4960.26013.93.78% 2.001.63Consolidated Water BDRs1.531.530.000.1110.04513.82.94% 1.771.31Doctor's Hospital1.371.370.000.0740.11018.58.03% 5 .504.75Famguard5.435.430.000.4980.24010.94.42% 8 .505.35Finco5.395.390.000.7570.0007.10.00% 9 .747.75FirstCaribbean Bank8.298.290.000.4940.35016.84.22% 6.005.00Focol (S 5.755.750.000.4350.22013.23.83% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 7.305.50ICD Utilities7.307.300.00-0.1220.240-59.8 3.29%1 0.809.80J. S. Johnson9.829.820.000.8800.64011.26.52% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.001.2070.2008.32.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 99.4699.46Bahamas Note 6.95 (2029BAH2999.460.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +FBB17100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +FBB22100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +FBB13100.000.00 100.00100.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +FBB15100.000.00FINDEX: YEAR END 2008 -12.31%30 May 2013 20 November 2029 7% RoyalFidelityMerchantBank&TrustLtd(Over-The-CounterSecurities) 29 May 2015BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:7% Interest 19 October 2022 Prime + 1.75% Prime + 1.75% 6.95%MONDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER 2011BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,398.15| CHG 0.00 | %CHG 0.00 | YTD -101.36 | YTD % -6.76BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing basis)Maturity 19 October 2017 W WW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM | TELEPHONE: 242-677-BISX (2479) | FACSIMILE: 242-323-2320 5 2wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A s k $Last PriceDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 10.065.01Bahamas SupermarketsN/AN/A14.00-2.9450.000N/M0.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.350.400.550.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB30.1331.5929.004.5400.0009.030.00% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.650.750.400.0290.00024.130.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNAVYTD%Last 12 Months %NAV 3MTH 1.57791.4674CFAL Bond Fund1.5779263.39%5.87%1.548717 3.01602.9020CFAL MSI Preferred Fund3.02482.63%3.94%2.981382 1.61281.5289CFAL Money Market Fund1.61512.61%4.53%1.591803 2.86862.5730Royal Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund2.5730-5.41%-9.79% 13.734713.2291Royal Fidelity Prime Income Fund13.73472.82%1.94% 114.128999.4177CFAL Global Bond Fund114.09222.35%13.88%114.128861 118.4255101.6693CFAL Global Equity Fund118.42552.30%8.26%116.580785 1.17491.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.17492.48%5.16% 1.13431.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.13431.41%5.17% 1.17641.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.17642.38%5.39% 9.9952 9.5078Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 19.94330.98%4.58% 11.498510.5308Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 210.96520.78%5.70% 10.68139.4372Royal Fidelity Bah Int'l Investment Fund Principal Protected TIGRS, Series 310.60135.75%13.20% 8.85647.8830Royal Fidelity Int'l Fund Equities Sub Fund8.65073.01%18.38% BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007 (S1) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/200731-Jul-11 31-Jul-11 31-Jul-11TO TRADE CALL: CFAL 242-502-7010 | ROYALFIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-752531-Jul-11 30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 5-Aug-11 30-Jun-11MARKET TERMS30-Jun-11 31-Jul-11 RoyalFidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Ltd (Over-The-Counter Securities) CFAL Securities Ltd. (Over-The-Counter Securities) BISX Listed Mutual Funds30-Jun-11 30-Jun-11 NAV 6MTH 1.535365 2.952663 1.580804 111.469744 115.762221 NAV Date 31-May-11 30-Jun-11 A CURRENCY TRADER works in front of screens showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index, left, and the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the South Korean won at the Korea Exchange Bank headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, Monday. Asian stock markets took a beating Monday after U.S. companies stopped hiring in August, reviving fears that the world's largest economy is heading back into recession. The Korea Composite Stock Price Index fell 4.39 percent, or 81.92, to close at 1,785.83. (AP ROME Associated Press ITALY'S PRESIDENT is warning the country's lead ers to heed what he calls the "alarming' signals of worsening financial crisis and urgently enact austerity measures. President Giorgio Napolitano's appeal to government and parliament was prompted Monday evening by the widening spread between interest rates on Italian debt and benchmark German rates. Tensions are rising as the nation braces for a general strike called to protest a ?45.5 billion (?68 billion age of spending cuts and new taxes that unions contend fail to spur job creation. Workers for state railways, buses, trams and subways are set to strike for eight hours Tuesday. Alitalia says the air transport sector strike will force it to reduce its number of national flights, but intercontinental flights won't be affected. IT ALY BRACES FOR STRIKES AMID CRISIS A CURRENCY TRADER w atches monitors in a trading room in Paris, Monday after the French stock index CAC 40 went down to 2999; down 54 points at around noon. (AP

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1, P AGE 9B B O D Y A N D M I N D By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Features Writer I N an effort to combat the burden of diabetes in the Bahamas, The Adventist Health Professionals Association, is hosting a 12 week program to help persons with diabetes effectively manage their lifestyle. D i e t i t i a n I d a m a e H a n n a s a i d p r o p er d i e t li f e s t y l e ch a ng e a n d m ed i ca t i o n g o e s h a n d i n h a n d i n p r o p e r l y m a n a g i n g d i a b e t e s S h e e x p l a i n e d t h a t t h i s p r o g r a m w i l l e xpose di abeti cs to i nformatio n a nd activities that can make living with the disease much easier. "This program is strictly for peo ple who have di abet es Th ere i s a bur den of diabet es in th is count ry a nd so me p e opl e ta lk a bo ut it a s i f it is normal. There are a whole lot of t hin gs th at p eo ple ne ed t o kno w for example how food works, and what i s g o i n g o n i n t h e i r b o d i e s A l s o s om e p e o pl e re ly ju st on m e d ic a t i on B u t m e d i c a t i o n d o e s n o t w o r k alone." "There is not a team effort w here do ct or s ar e wo r k in g t oge th er an d d i e t i t i a n s a r e w o r k i n g t o g e t h e r b e c a u se d i e t g oe s h a nd an d w i t h d ia b et e s I f p e op l e ar e n o t t o l d t h a t th ey ne ed to see a d ietit ian the y wi ll n ot a nd th is prog r a m w ill he lp th em i n t h a t w a y s h e t o l d T r i b u n e Health Dr Hann a sai d the re is gr owing trend of young people, particularly t e e n a g e r s b e i n g d i a g n o s e d w i t h ad ult ty pe d ia bet es. S he e nc ou rag ed p ar en ts t o b ri ng t h eir t een s a lo ng who are also suffering from the dis ease. The re ar e th re e ty p es o f d i ab e te s and t ha t is typ e 1 type 2 a nd ge s tational diabetes. Usually young peo ple h av e ty pe 1 d ia bet es but n ow w e are seeing that they are having the adu lt type di a b etes which is being pushed by obesity," she said. On the fir st day of the pro g r am par ticipants w eight wais t and hip measuremen t s, blood sugar, chole s terol, blood pressure and hemoglo bi n A1 C w i l l b e t a ke n Th e y w i l l a l so fill out a health and nutrition ques t i o n n a i r e T h e s e m e a s u r e m e n t s blood tests and a questionnaire will be administered again at the end in order to evaluate the impact of the pr o g ra m A t e a c h se s si o n of th e se m inar blood sugar will be tested and p a r t i ci p an t s w i ll b e c lo s el y m o n i tored by health professionals. The health professionals will also conduct a scientific study based on the pro g ra m. D at a w il l b e c ol le c te d that w ill sho w how peo ple 's l ifesty le can be controlled by a comprehen s i ve p r ogr am as s uch ," D r H an na said. S o m e of th e t o p ic s t o b e a d d re s se d are: Diabetes: The Types, The Cause & Complications Ten Challenges for Good Health The Physiology of Diabetes: What is happening to Me? Eating for Health and Glucose Control Exercise is Not an Option Oral Agents and Insulin, How do they Work? Importance of Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Importance of Foot Care for the Diabetic Being Prepared for Emergencies and Sick Days The first two weeks will be intensive and little adjusting to the program is necessary. "When you are dealing with diabetes sometimes the blood sugar levels drop and they end up not having enough sugar in the blood. We don't want that to occur. There will be some adjustments," she explained. Dr Hanna said she hopes with the collective effort of every partici pant, there is dent in the burden of diabetes.' "We came together to help people manage diabetes and every aspect of the disease will be dealt with in this program. We know it works because it has worked before. We hope to see and document that with a comprehensive lifestyle change people can help lower their blood sugar levels and put a dent in the burden of diabetes in the country." This program is sponsored by the Adventist Health Professionals Association along with other possi ble partnerships such as the program sponsoring organisation, the Bahamas Ministry of Health and the Diabetic Research Institute. The program starts August 12 and will be held at Living Faith Seventh Day Adventist Church Old Trail road opposite Solomon's Super Centre. For information call 328 5658 or 341-4021. PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD PSI / Caribbea n, a non-profit that o p e ra t e s i n 1 2 C a ri b b e a n c o u n t ri e s t o com bat th e s pr ea d of H I V/ AI D S, launch ed its 1st i nst allm ent of t he B ra n d A m ba s sa d or c o mp e t it i on a p tly t itled "Tal k Nah! S a y what you h av e t o say ." du ring the pe ak o f c arnival cel ebr ati ons in T ri nida d a nd T o b a g o B a c c h a n a l F r i d a y M a r c h 4 Th e ob j e c t i v e o f t h e c a m p a i g n w a s t arg e te d to wa rd i de nt ify i ng t wo ne w Brand Ambassadors for its Got it? Ge t i t s af e r s e x b r an d. T he cam p a i g n c a l l e d u p o n i n t e r e s t e d Caribbean youth to submit creative videos showcasing their knowledge a bo ut s e x ual h ea lth a nd respo nsib ility. After three months of competi t i o n 1 4 v i d e o s u b m i s s i o n s f r o m across the region and close to thirty thous a n d f ans voting, commenting a n d su p p o rt i ng t h e i r v i de o f a v o ur i te s on the Got it? Get it. Facebook fan page, judges selected a shortlist of c a n d i d a t e s A h m a d M u h a m m e d from Tr i nidad an d Toba go and Ni s s a Wi l l i a ms f r o m D o m i ni c a we r e j u d g e d t h e o v e r a l l w i n n e r s a n d b estow ed the tit le of Bra nd Ambass a d o r Co r y M c C u l l o u g h S o c i a l M e d i a O f f i c er f o r P S I / C ar i bb e a n said: "Ahmad and Nissa were the p e r f e c t c h oi c e f o r o u r B r a n d A m b a ss a d o r s T h e y h a v e t h e ch a r i s m a passion, and drive not only to rep r e s e n t o u r b r a n d b u t t o r e a l l y a d dre ss th e is sue s in a dy na m ic fa shion that appeals to the youth!" A s par t of their pr ize, the inau g ur a l B rand Ambassadors trave lled w it h t h e G o t i t? G et it c re w to e x pe rience carnival in St. Lucia and to spread the me s sage about s a fer sex, HIV/AI DS a nd ot her STI prevent i o n A c c o r d i n g t o K e r r y S i n g h PSI /Car ibbean 's M ar keti ng Dir ect o r, W e w a n te d t o e n g e n d e r a s e ns e of advocacy among tod ay's yout h. We h op e t h at o ur Br an d A m ba s s a d o rs w i l l b e a c a t a l y st fo r c h a ng e i n their communities. Indeed, world wide, many in our field believe that today 's ge neratio n ha s the pow er to end HIV/AIDS. With that in mind the idea of the Brand Ambassador was born." H e w e n t o n t o e x p l a i n t h a t a major objective of the trip was also to engage the St Lucian population through numerous outreach activi ti e s a n d s tr e ng t h e n p a rt n e rs hi p s w i t h the National Aids Directorate of St Luc i a, S t Luc i a Pl an ne d Pa ren th oo d Association and other local NGO's and health clinics. S i n c e b e i n g g i v e n t h e t i t l e o f Brand Ambas sador s, both A hma d and Nissa have been engaging in a n um b e r o f i n te r v i e w s f ro m r a di o a n d te lev isi on sta tion s i n bot h i sla nds, t o ta l k a bo u t t he i r e x p e ri e n c e a s w e l l a s spread the work of HIV prevention am on g t he ir pe e rs. The y k ee p c a ll i n g m e E v e r y r a d i o a n d t v p r o gram me w ants me on and I am ha ppy to go and to talk to the youth of Dominica and help them make real li fes tyle changes th at can st op th e s p r ead of HI V/ AI D S. Ni s s a to ld PSI/Caribbean. "I t 's b ee n a s p ir i t ua l j ou r n ey powerful and moving to know I can gi v e b ac k t o my co mm u ni ty to ma ke a positive change, especially having persona lly see n others dea l w ith the sti gm a th a t su rro und s HIV i nf ec t io n and other sexually transmitted dis eases," Ahmad reflected. In a d di tio n to t he i nt erv ie w s, b ot h ambas sador s will continu e s preading awareness by volunteering with G o t i t ? G e t i t ed u cat o r s a nd t h e loc al Pla nne d Paren thood Affi liate s or Family Planning Associations to c on du ct e d uc a tio na l ou tre a c h. Th ei r e x pe ri e nc e w a s c a pt u re d o n fi l m a n d is c urr e ntly be ing turned into a doc u me nt ar y t o h el p r a is e a war en es s and bring an end to HIV/AIDS in t h e Ca r i b be a n. T h e do c u me n t ar y will be released by the end of this y ear o n a ll th e r eg io n al a nd lo cal T V s t a t i o n s t h r o u g h o u t t h e Caribbean. 1: Mr. Nahum Jean Baptiste, Head of the National Aids Directorate meets Nissa and Ahmad at the Ministry of Health Carnival outreach event on Carnival Friday, St. Lucia. 2: Ahmad and Nissa being interviewed at the scenic Pitons lookout, St. Lucia 3: Ahmad and Nissa both strike a pose prior to playing mas on Carnival Monday, St Lucia. 4: Ahmad and Nissa taking a rest at the St. Lucia Groovy Monarch show, Castries St. Lucia Got it? Get it Brand ambassadors talk safe sex to caribbean youth Diabetic Wellness Program 1 2 3 4

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WOMAN P AGE 10B, TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1 THE TRIBUNE By LINDA A. JOHNSON AP Business Writer D R U G M A K E R A s t r a Z e n e c a P L C s b i g g a m b l e, a n a t t em p t t o p rove its topsell ing drug w ork s be tt e r th a n ri v a l c h o le s te r ol bl o c k b us te r Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A s t u d y m e a n t t o s h o w A s t r a Z e n e c a s c h o l e s t e r o l d r u g Crestor prevents plaque buildup in h e a rt a rt e r i e s b e tt e r t h a n P f i z e r I n c s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. T w o gene r ic vers ions of Li pitor, the world's top-selling drug for sev eral year s are expected to hit the U .S. market on N ove mber 3 0. Anal y s t s w r o t e F r i d a y t h a t t h e s t u d y r e s u l t w i l l m a k e i t h a r d f o r t h e B ritish drugma ker to a rgue pa tients w o u ld f ar e b et te r on its C re st or t ha n on mu c h -cheap er gen eri c ver s ion s of Lipitor. AstraZeneca shares fell $1.27, or 2.7 per cent, to $45.42 in afternoon trading The c ompany relea s ed preliminary study results earlier in the day. The stud y kn ow n by the ac ro ny m S A T U R N f o l l o w e d a b o u t 1 3 0 0 hi gh-ris k patie nts w ith ha r d ening of t he a rte rie s, w hi c h c an c a use strok es o r h e a r t a t t a c k s f o r t w o y e a r s About half got a daily 40-milligram dose of Crestor, known generically as r os uvast atin and the r es t got a da il y 80-milligram dose of Lip itor, known generically as atorvastatin. U s i n g u lt r a s o u nd p r o be s s t ud y i n ve s ti ga t or s m e a su re d pl a q ue le v e ls in a segment in the coronary artery of each patient, comparing levels at the study 's b eg inni ng an d e nd. Do ctors believe reducing plaque thick n e s s c a n c u t c h a n c e s o f h a v i n g a heart attack or stroke. A s t r a z e n e c a s a i d p r e l i m i n a r y results indicated Crestor showed a greater percentage reduction in the v olu me o f p laq ue i n th e cor o nar y ar tery the st udy's main goal but that the difference was not sta ti st i c a ll y si g n if i c a nt m e a n i ng i t c o ul d hav e occ urred by ch anc e. The study did p rod uc e a st ati sti ca ll y sig ni fi ca nt re d u c ti o n i n a s e c o nd a r y g o a l r e du c tion of total plaque volume. Th e f a c t th a t th is ( Ast ra Z e ne c a )f u n d ed t r i a l f ai l e d t o d e f i n i t i v e l y show a benefit in favour of Crestor w i ll a dd to th e n e ga t i v e p r e ssu re t ha t Crestor is already destined to face fr om the imm inent laun ch of gene r ic Li pi tor, B e rnste in R e sea rc h an al yst Dr. T im A nder so n wrot e in a report to investors. "Payers will be abl e to sa y tha t (A s t raZ en ec a ) it self h as s ho wn i n a t r ue hea dto hea d s tudy, Crestor and L ipitor do about the same thing." A n d e r s o n n o t e d p r i o r s t u d i e s showing Crestor's benefit only test ed it al one o r c omp are d i t t o a dummy pill, rather than another choles terol medicine. J e f f e r i e s & Co a n a l y s t J e f f r e y Holford wrote that the data didn't provide a clear positive result that A s t r a Z e n e c a c o u l d h a v e u s e d t o co ntin ue a rgui ng C resto r i s sup erio r to Lipitor. Still, he wrote, the positive trend and statistical significance achieved on the se co nda ry go al w asn' t a cl ea r ne ga tiv e for C resto r. Ho lford a dd ed t ha t t he ar r iv al o f g en er ic L i pi t or w i l l li k e l y c o n t i n u e C re s t or s t re n d o f slow U.S. prescription growth. C r es to r an d L ip it or a re pa rt of t he drug class called statins, which low er levels of LDL or "bad" choleste r o l a n d sl i g h tl y ra i se l e v e ls o f H D L or "good" cholesterol in the blood. S ta ti ns an d ot he r t yp es of cho le st er o l d ru gs t og et he r co mp r is e th e secon d-bigge s t selling c lass of dr u gs i n th e w or ld by re v e nu e a f te r c a n c e r m e d ic in e s a n d h a v e b e e n v e r y l u c r a tive for their makers. Crestor, which came on the mar k e t w e l l a f t e r L i p i t o r b r o u g h t A st r aZen eca abo ut $5.7 b il lio n i n sales last year, barely half the $10.7 bi lli on t hat Li pit or made f or New York-based Pfizer. A straZ e ne c a w ill p rese nt d eta il ed resu lts of th e stu dy o n Nov e mbe r 15 at the American Heart Association conference. Astra Z ene c a and Pfi ze r b oth fa ce significant revenue losses for sever al of their dr u gs to ge neric c ompe t i tion over the next several years. Ander son not ed Ast raZenec a is ex pec ted to get ge neric c omp etition in the U.S. to its top three drugs by 20 16 a ntip syc ho tic d rug Se roq uel in 2012, heartburn treatment Nexi u m i n 2 0 1 4 a n d C r e s t o r i n 2 0 1 6 T o g e t h e r t h e t h r e e a c c o u n t f o r about half the company's $33.3 bil l i o n i n a n n u a l r e v e n u e w h i c h And er son no w fo rec a sts wi ll d ec li ne to about $26.4 billion in 2015. He's also reduced his earnings-per-share forecast for the company by 3 per ce nt ea ch in 2 013 and 201 4 a nd by 4 per cent in 2015. Root canal myths A root canal procedure is a treatment to repair and to save a badly damaged or infected tooth instead of removing it. In the past, if a patient had a tooth with a diseased nerve, he/she would most likely have to lose that tooth. In recent times, with root canal therapy, it is possible to save that tooth. I ns i de o f ev er y to ot h i s th e pu lp ( i t p r o v i d e s n u t r i e n t s a n d n e r v e fi ber s to t he t oo th ). T h e pul p r un s l ike a thic k p iec e o f thread inside of th e to ot h's r oo t s ys t em. Wh en t he pu lp is disea s e d or injure d, the pulp ti ss u e d ies I t th en beco mes n eces s ar y t o r em ov e t he af f ect ed p ul p. Aft er the dent ist r emoves t he pulp, the r oot c anal is c leaned a nd s e aled o f f t o p r o t e c t i t T h i s i s w h a t i s kno wn a s a r oo t can al pr oced ur e. Aft er the r oot canal pro c edur e, the d e n t i s t p l a c e s a c r o w n o v e r t h e to ot h t o hel p m ake it s tr on ger A root c ana l is a rela tive ly simp le pr oced ur e wit h l it tl e or no dis co mfo rt It i s us u ally com pl ete d i n o ne t o t h r e e vi s i t s a n d c an s a v e y o u r t o o t h I t w i l l b y e x t e n s i o n s a v e you r sm il e. M a n y years a go, r oot c anal tr eatm e n t s w e r e p a i n f u l T h i s i s n o l o n g e r t h e c a s e b e c a u s e d e n t a l a d v a n c e s a n d l o c a l a n e s t h e t i c s (n umb ing a ge nts) e ffe cti ve ly red uc e a l m o s t a l l p a i n I t w i l l b e m o r e pai nf ul l ivi ng wi th a d ecaye d ( bad ) to ot h. An ec do ta ll y, ro ot c a na l the ra py is co ns id er ed t he mos t fea re d de nt al p r ocedu r e. T hi s f ear lead s t o ma ny m y t h s b e i n g c r e a t e d a n d s p r e a d T h e in accur at e i nf or mat io n ab ou t r o o t c an a l t h er ap y t h en p r e ve n t s p a t i e n t s f r o m m a k i n g i n f o r m e d d e c i s i o n s r e g a r d i n g t h e i r t e e t h T h er e ar e man y pa ti ent s t hat wil l g o as fa r a s as k ing th at a t oo th be r emoved rat her t han s aving it wit h a r oot can al pr oced ur e. Please learn the truth for yourself R o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y i s n o t a painfu l proce dure. It is used to a llev ia t e ( g et r i d o f ) p ai n. M an y pe r s o n s wh o h av e co m pl e te d a r o o t c an al p r oc ed ur e pr o f es s t ha t t h ey d i d n o t e x pe r i e nc e an y p a i n d ur i ng the appoi ntment and felt better a f te r war d T h e Am er i can As s o ci ation of Endodontists (persons that s p ec ial i s e in r o o t ca na ls ) ha s co n c l u d e d t h a t t h e i d e a t h a t a r o o t c a n a l p r o ce d u r e i s p a i n f u l s t e m s f rom early tr ea t ment methods u sed t o p e r f o r m t h e p r o c ed u r e. T h e s e m e t h o d s n o l o n g e r e x i s t a n d t h e f e ar i s t h er e fo r e mi s p la ced R o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y d o e s n o t r e q u i r e s e v e r a l a p p o i n t m e n t s I t m ay b e com p le te d in o n e t o t h r ee appoint ments. A number of fac t ors d o d e t e r m i n e t h e n u m b e r o f a p p o i n t m e n t s n e c e s s a r y t o c o m p l e t e a r o o t c a n a l T h e y i n c l u d e h ow b ad t he r oo t in f ect i on is ; ho w cu r v ed the r o ot ca nal syste m is; and h o w c o o p e r a t i v e t h e p a t i e n t i s A l s o p l e as e r e me m b er t h at i t i s always neces sar y to r ebu ild a t oot h a ft er a r o o t ca na l t h er ap y. T hi s is neces sar y t o ens ur e the t ooth fun c t ions pr oper ly. Ther ef ore thi s n ec e s s a r y r e b u i l d i n g s h o u l d n o t b e consider e d as part of t he root canal p r o c e s s R o o t c a n a l t h e r a p y d o e s n o t ca us e illnes s. The idea that bac t e r ia trappe d in s i de a root c an alle d tooth wil l ca us e illness (e.g. heart disease, k idn ey di se as e or art hr i ti s) s t ems f ro m r es ear ch don e 100 year s ago Re ce nt atte mpts to con firm this 1 00 y ea r th eo ry h a s fa i le d It i s t he re fo re no l onger t hough t to be t rue by t he ex per ts T he r at io nal e i s s imp le. B a c t e r i a c a n b e f o u n d i n t h e m o u t h a t a n y t i m e a n d t e e t h f r e e f r o m de ca y an d gu m d is e as e a ls o t es t po s it i ve f o r b act er i a. T h er ef o r e t r a p p e d r o o t c a n a l b a c t e r i a s ho ul d n ot be t ar get ed as a di se as e ca us e mo r e t ha n an y o th er m ou t h b a c t e r i a Ro o t ca n a l t h e r ap y i s n o t o n l y f o r t e e t h t h a t h u r t A t o o t h t h a t r e qu ir e s a r oo t c an al p r o ced ur e is n ot al way s p ai nf u l. I n fa ct a t oo t h t ha t is al r ead y d ea d ma y r eq u ir e a root ca nal pr o ced ure to prev ent the t oo t h f r om b eco m in g in f ect ed R oot c an al th erap y be nef its last a l on g ti me Pa t ie nt s t h in k th at t h e b en e fi t s of r oo t c an al th e r ap y d o n ot l as t ver y lo ng af t er t he pr o ced ur e h as b ee n c om pl et e d. P at ie nt s s o m e t i m e s e x p e r i e n c e a t o o t h br e ak af t er a r o ot ca na l pr o ced u re a n d t h i n k t h e r o o t ca n a l t h er a py has f ail ed. Th is is no t t r ue. When a r oot can al pr o cedu re i s comp let ed, s om et i me s a la r ge fi ll i ng is us e d to c l o s e t h e t o o t h a n d w h e n l a r g e f o r c e s a r e p u t o n t h e t o o t h i t b r e a k s T h e f o r c e s c o m e f r o m g r i n d i n g a n d e a t i n g A c r o w n i s t h e r e f o r e a l w a y s a d v i s e d t o p r e ve nt th i s f r o m ha pp en in g. I t m us t t h er ef o r e b e n o t ed t h a t t h e r o o t c a n a l d i d n o t f a i l t h e t o o t h j u s t br o k e. No w that you k now th e tr ut h, do n o t h e s i t a t e t o m a k e a w e l l in f or m ed d eci s io n a bo u t po s s ib ly ha vin g a r o ot can al p r oced ur e per f or m ed o n a di s ea s ed t oo t h. K eep yo ur s mi le al iv e. Ke ep y ou r m ou th a l i v e This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended and may not be treated as, a substitute for professional medical/dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or dental professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical/dental condition. Never disregard professional medical/dental advice or delay in seek ing it because of a purely informational publication. Copyright 2011 by Dr. Andre R. Clarke. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this article, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission. If you have questions, please send email to dr_andreclarke@hot mail.com. Dr. AndrŽ R. Clarke, DDS, MBBS Special Care Dentistry. AS TRAZENE C A SHARES F ALL O N FL A T CRES T OR RESUL T S T H I S unda t e d pr oduc t image pr ovide d by As t raZene ca s how s t he pharmaceutic al co mpa ny 's ch ole ste rol drug Cre stor. As traZe ne ca PL C's big ga mb le, a n a tte mpt to pr ov e its tops elling drug w orks be t ter than rival c holesterol blockbus t e r Lipitor, app ears to hav e bac kfi r e d. A stu dy mea nt to sh ow Astra Zene ca 's Cresto r prev en ts plaque buildup in he ar t arteries be t ter than Pfiz er Inc.'s Lipitor show ed no c lear advanta ge f or Cr e stor (AP ) B y A N D R E C L A R K E KEEPING YOUR MOUTH ALIVE CONDITIONS that lead to a root canal OAKLAND, Calif Associated Press A M A R I J U A N A s t r e e t f a i r b e in g h e ld i n d ow n to w n O ak l a n d t u r n e d o u t t o b e a p o p u l a r d e s ti n a t i o n th i s w e e k e n d w i t h p e op l e w a it in g in lo ng li n es t o a t te nd th e e v e nt The two -day Inte r n ationa l C a n n a b i s a n d H e m p E x p o w a s b e in g h el d Sa t urd a y a nd S un d a y o ve r se v e ra l bl oc ks in th e c i ty s d ow n to w n, d ir ec t ly o ut s id e O a kl a nd C it y H a ll B esi des v en dors, sp ea ke rs, m u s i c a n d o t h e r o f f e r i n g s o rga ni se rs sa y t he e v en t al so i n c lu de s a de si g na t ed a re a i n f ro nt of C i ty H a ll w h er e th os e w i th a v al i d m e di c a l c a n na b is c a r d w i l l b e a b l e t o s m o k e m a r i j ua n a, or ga n iz e rs sa i d. Or ga n iz er s w e re c a l li ng th e d e s i g n a t e d a r e a t h e 2 1 5 a r e a a re f e re n c e to Pr o p o s i t i o n 2 1 5 t he 19 9 6 st a te b a ll ot m e a sur e that leg alized medical mar ij u an a u se in C al i fo rni a Pa ti e nt s n e ed t o ta k e th e ir m e di c i ne w he n t he y n e e d to K i m C u e a B e rk e le y re si d en t w h o is c h ie f e xe c ut iv e o f th e I n t e r n a t i o n a l C a n n a b i s & H e m p E x p o t o l d t h e S a n F ra n c isc o C h ro ni c l e "B e i n g a pat i ent m ys el f, t ha t' s s om et hi n g t ha t' s ma n da t ory O a k l an d i s k n o w n f o r i t s m a rij ua n a -re la te d b u sin e sse s, i n c l u d i n g a s e c t i o n o f c i t y n e a r b y k n ow n a s O a kst e rda m so na med b eca us e of i t s ab un da n ce o f m ar ij u an a d i s p en s a r i e s C i ty v ot er s in 2 00 4 a ls o v o te d in f av o r of Meas ure Z, a m e a s ur e t ha t m a d e p o sse s si o n o f s m a l l a m o un t s o f m a r i j u a n a t he l ow e st p ri ori ty fo r po l ic e St ill, even wit h O akland 's s ta n c e t o w a rd m e d ic in a l m a ri j u an a u se c it y o ffi c i al s d id n' t want th e me dia tak in g ph ot og ra p hs o r sho ot in g v i de o o f p e o p l e s m o k i n g m a r i j u a n a o u t s id e o f C i ty Ha l l. K T V U T V s h o w e d w h a t app ear e d t o be an Oak la nd o ffic i al i nstruc ti ng th e me di a n ot t o ta k e p ho tos o f pe o pl e s mo ki n g i n fr on t of C it y H a ll Th e of fi c ia l w as no t i d en ti f ied bu t Arturo S an ch ez a n a ss i stant to the c ity admi nist r a to r t ol d t h e s ta ti o n i t s n o t t h a t w e d o n t w a n t th e p i c t u re w e t r y t o k e e p t h i s a re a o f C i t y H a l l ( a n d ) t h i s p u b l i c p a r k f r e e o f sm o ke Th e fa ir w as op e n t o a d ul ts o n ly Org a n ise rs h a d s ai d p re v i o u s l y t h a t t h e y e x p e c t e d a b o u t 2 0 0 0 0 p e o p le to a t te n d L O NG L I N ES AS P EOP LE A T TEND O A KL AN D MA RI J UA N A F AI R IN THIS Sept. 3, 2011 photo, a man rolls joints for during the International Cannabis and Hemp Expo in Oakland, Calif. The marijuana street f a i r t u rn e d o ut t o b e a p op u la r d e s ti n at i on th i s we e k e n d, wi t h p e op l e wa i ti n g i n l on g l i n es to a tt e nd th e e v e n t. B e s id e s v e n d or s s pe a k e rs mu s i c and other offerings, organizers say the event also includes a designated area in front of City Hall where those with a valid medical cannabis card will be able to smoke marijuana, organizers said. (AP)

PAGE 15

WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDA Y SEPTEMBER 6, 201 1, P AGE 1 1B NEW YORK Associated Press SO YO U th oug ht the y w e re g on e go ne fore v er un til K ate Mi dd le ton h it the sc e ne Th e n M a r c J a c o b s p ut t h e m o n t h e r un w ay B an a na R ep ub l ic p art ne re d w i t h M a d M e n a n d s u d d e n l y e v ery w he re yo u lo ok she er ho sie ry se e ms to be i n f ash ion a g ai n. S i n c e t h e h e y d a y o f t h e 8 0 s, t h e r e s be en a cas u al r e vo lu t io n, a r ev ol t a g ai nst p ow e r sui ts a nd t he sex y sec re ta ry ski rt. B oth l en t t he mse lv es to c o ve red -bu t-sh ee r l eg s. No w w h y do wo me n ne ed pa nt yh o s e ? T h e y w e a r p a n t s g e t s p r a y t a n s a nd sl ap o n the Sp anx B e ca use le gs l o o k b e t t e r w h e n y o u w e a r t h e m sa y s C a thy Vo lk er, ex ec u tiv e v ic e pre side nt of globa l li censing for Do nna K a r a n i n c l u d i n g D o n n a K a r a n H o s i e r y I t s l i k e m i n e ra l c o sm e t i c s o n y o u r skin but better," s ay s Volker, who p r o m i s e s t h e p a n t y h o s e o f t o d a y b o a st s m an y a d v a nc e s si nc e p re v i o us v e r si on s. T he f a br ic is mo re c o m f or ta bl e, the ela stic less restri cti ng a nd th ey ca n o ff er t on in g an d sh api ng b en ef its, sh e say s. Ce l e b r i t y s t y l i s t S o p h i a B an k s C o l o m a i s s o l d S h e w o r e s h e e r p a n t y h o s e t o a r e c e n t r e d c a r p e t ev ent in L os A ngel es. "I d o t hin k t hey ar e comi ng back. I es pec i ally lov e the m i n b la ck or wh ite w ith a sea m up the b ac k W e 're n ot tal ki ng 'M rs. Doubtfire' tan s toc king s but n i c e f l a t te ri n g p a n t y h o s e a n d t i g h ts E r a s e a n y i m a g e o f b r o w n i s h l o o s e le gw e ar t ha t p ool s a t th e a nk le s, she say s, a nd st art i ma gi ni ng t he styl ish Duc h ess of C a mbri dg e o r h er siste r, Pip pa No o ne is mi sta kin g the m a s s t o d gy o r u n c o o l B a n k s Co l o m a s a y s N o n i Ca v a l i e r e a s o c i a l m e d i a m a r keti ng s pecialist in New Yor k, we a rs the m; he r fav ou rite s are th ose wi th th e se xy C u ba n he el a nd b ac k s e am. Pa ntyh ose flatte r an d h elp a w o m a n a p p e a r p r of e s si o n a l a n d fe m ini ne she sa y s. Yo u ha ve t ha t 'Ma d Men inf luen ce e ve ryw h ere a nd the v ery fe mini ne off ic e look is popular again," say s t he 3 0 -ye a r-ol d Ca v al ie re. I'v e w o r k e d o n W a l l S t re e t w h e re w o m e n w e a r s u i ts a n d h e e l s a n d I v e w o r k e d in the te c h w o rld wh e re p eo pl e w e a r ripp ed je a ns, fli p-f lop s a nd a ri pp ed Tsh i r t I c o u l d n t d o th a t I l i k e l o ok in g li ke a gi rl al l t he ti m e, a nd pa n ty ho se is pa rt o f t ha t." S h e s n o t w e a r i n g t h e m o n t h e h o t t e s t d a y s o f t h e s u m m e r o f c o u r s e bu t on tha t fi rst d ay w ith a f al l c hi ll, she 'l l li ke ly b e roc ki ng the sh ee re st pair she c an find. "I like the shiny o n e s t h a t K a t e M i d d l e t o n w e a r s L i k e t h at co mp r e s s i on o f S p an d ex a n d ho w it lo ok s w it h a pe nc il sk irt. Panty hos e should be a given for jo b in te rv i e w s, sa ys J ul ie P er ez a 2 2 ye aro ld a pparel studies s tude nt a t t h e U n i v e rs i t y o f A r k a n s a s M y p r o fe s so rs s a y H o si e ry y o u sti l l ha v e t o d o i t Y e s i t s 2 0 1 1 b u t y o u h a v e t o do i t.' P e re z sa y s sh e do e sn t re a l l y mi n d. She' s a fan of how the Middle tons lo ok, an d she 's l ov in g th e sh ee r dot c o v e r e d h o s i e r y i n t h e B a n a n a Re pu bl ic ad s. "Ma y be I' m ju st o ld fa shio ne d li ke th at ," she say s. P e rh a ps sto c k i ng s a n d e ve n p a nt y ho se a s B e tty Dra pe r a nd J oa n H ol lo wa y kn ew t he m a re a thi ng of the p a s t s a y s M a d M e n c o s t u m e d e s i gn e r J a n i e B r y a n t an d t h o s e u n c o m f o r t a b l e t h i n g s s h o u l d s ta y t h a t way. B u t i f you'r e t alkin g abo ut a mo de rn p ai r o f te x ture d tig ht s, l ac e t i gh t s o r s ea m ed s h e er s ( wi t h t h e ad de d be ne fi t o f s ha pe wea r) y ou c ou ld b e at th e fo ref ront o f t he n ex t b ig th ing B rya nt sa ys. Th e tre n d of t he n a tu ra l l e g c a m e to be, an d pe ople just gav e in th at this it e m wa s s o un c omf ortable a n d w i t h t h e s u n t a n l e g i t w a s h a rd t o g e t t h e ri g ht c o lo r. I t' s l i ke t he s li p It w a s ol d-fa shi on ed B ut the n the sli p came ba ck in as s t re etwe ar a nd I t hi n k th e t re n d f o r l e g w e a r i s t h at i t' s ba ck an d g oing strong a lthoug h p roba bl y no t t he sun ta n one s." M ar ket res ear c h fi rm NPD put s w om en 's h osi ery sa le s in the U S a t m ore tha n $3 b ill io n, up 2. 9 pe r c en t fro m May 2 0 10 t o Ma y 2 01 1 T i g h t s a r e t h e m a r k e t l e a d e r s s h o w i n g a n a l m o s t 3 0 p e r c e n t i ncr e as e i n s al es an d s t oc ki ng s s ales ar e up t oo. Pan tyho se sal es, b ase d o n dol la r a mo unt d ip pe d 2 7 pe r ce nt ov er the ye ar, b ut Donn a K ara n' s V ol ke r sa ys rec e nt bu sin ess o f sh ee rs i s b oom in g. Fo r t h e M i dd l et on g ene r at io n, hosie ry is ne w to them. The y hav e alw ays worn tig ht s, and they don't se e she ers a s a n ec e ssary e v il, sh e s a ys T h ey s e e i t a s a n en h a nc em e n t I n s t e a d o f f e e l i n g f o r c e d i n t o p an ty hose w i th t he ir sk irt sui t, the y a r e w ea r in g i t "li ke Pippa," pa ired w i th t h e i r d e n i m sk i r t a n d b a l l e t fl a ts V ol ke r o bse rve s. E ri c Da m an c os tum e de si g ne r f or Go ssip G irl ," is la un ch in g a lim ite d ed i t i o n c ol l e ct i o n o f h os i er y wi t h D K NY t hi s se a son a l so c o ur ti ng th e y ou ng er w e are r, a nd Vo lk er e xp ec ts t o se e th ose w i th oth er c asu al sho es. C o m e c o o l e r w e a t h e r B a n k s C o l o m a w i l l pu t h e r c l i e n t s i n h o si e r y w i t h i n t e r e s t i n g p a t t e r n s a n d t e x t u re s b o t h sh ee r a nd o pa que It's a mo ve aw a y f ro m th e m in i m a li sm t ha t d om i n at e d fashion for years a nd a nod to the re turn o f g la mo ur an d d ressi ng u p, sh e ex pl ai ns. K im P uc k et t a p u bl i cr e l at i o n s e x e c u t i v e i n I n d i a n a p o l i s i s n t b u y i n g i n t o it Th e 2 4 -y e a r -o l d w i l l l e a v e a n y re tu rn t o pan t yho se t o th e r oy als c e l e bri ti e s a n d h e r mo th e r, w ho n ev e r g a ve t he m up to be g in w ith "I 'd r ather get a good s pr a y tan a nd h a v e g re a t lo o k i n g l e g s, P u c k e t t sa y s. The p ast c oup le o f y ea rs, I'v e d on e ti gh ts o cc a sio na lly ev en mo re sh ee r tig ht s, bu t, re a lly e v en i n th e w i nte r I' d ra the r h av e c old le g s a nd jus t ru n i nto bu ildi ngs and wear a l on g co at ." B A CK 2 SCHOO L RESOL U T I ONS T he beaches are empty, the salons are crowded, the uniform stores are out of stock and Facebook is becoming a ghost town between the hours of 9am and 3.30pm. Th is ca n me an o nly one t hin g; su mm er is o ff ic i al ly o ve r. It 's b ac k t o s c h o o l M i x e d e m o t i o n s o f dre ad in g th e e arl y mo rni ng w a ke up c al ls a nd an ti ci pa ti ng fu n ti me s w ith sc h ool m at es is a f ee li ng I kn ow a ll to o we ll Sch oo l yea r s ar e go ld en o p p o r t u n i t i e s f i l l e d w i t h l i f e c ha ng i ng ex p eri e nc e s tha t bu ild frie nd ship s, c ha ra c te r, an d re pu tat ion This ye a r, ho we v er, l et' s p ret e n d i t s 1 1 5 9 p m D e c e m b e r 3 1 a n d l e t s m a k e som e N e w Sc ho ol Y ea r r e s o l u t i o n s R e f l e c t o n w h a t h a p p e n e d o r d i d n t h a p p e n f o r yo u d u r i n g t h e l a s t sc ho ol y ea r. Y ou d idn 't m ak e the g r a d es y o u w a n t e d t o m a k e o r m ay be y ou di dn' t t ak e a dv a nta ge of ce r ta in extra-c urricul ar a ctiv it ie s ? T r y a d i f f e r e n t a p pro ac h th is y ea r a nd ta ke a ste p i n a mo re proa c tiv e d ire ct ion J u st o v e r a y e a r a g o I w a s a h i g h sc h ool sen ior. Loo kin g b ac k I ca n t e l l y o u t h a t a c a d e m i c s a r e e x trem el y im pot an t. The a c hie v em e n t s y o u g a i n i n y o u r h ig h s c h o o l ye ar s ca n al m os t de p ic t ex ac t ly w h e r e y o u w i l l o r w i l l n o t e n d u p i n life. Exc ell ing an d do ing well in e x am s c a n sa v e yo u a nd y ou r p are nt s a lo t of m on ey an d a lso p ut y o u i n a p o s i t i o n t o p i c k a n d c h oose y our c oll eg e/ job In m ost c a ses, w e a llo w di stra ct ion s to g et t he b est of u s a nd w e of te n miss out on impor ta nt information in t he c la ss. A s s o c i a t e D u r i n g t h i s n e w s c h o o l y e a r a s s o c ia t e y ou rs e l f w i th c l a ss ma t e s w h o a r e g o i n g s o m e w h e r e i n l i f e o r t h o s e w h o a r e r e a c h i n g g o a l s y o u a s p i r e t o reach. You sho uld always tr y to s p e nd t i m e w i t h st ud e n t s w ho a r e d o i ng th e sa m e o r b e t t e r t ha n y o u a c a d e m i c a l l y T h i s c a n g i v e y o u t h a t d ri v e a n d a s e n se o f h e a l t hy c om pe titi on to ac t mo re a gg ressiv el y t o w a r d s e x c e l l i n g i n t h e c l ass r oom Avo id p ers on s w ho y o u kn o w a re n t g o i n g i n t h e sa m e di r e c ti o n a s y o u Org a n ise y o ur pr ior i t ie s T he s ki ll o f p r i o r i t i s i n g i s k e y E l i m i n a t e d i s t r a c t i o n s l i k e F a c e b o o k ce ll phones relatio nsh ip s, e t c w h i c h a re p ow er fu l t im e c on su me rs. T ak e c o nt rol o f t he m an d s ta y a h ea d of t he pa c k A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t p a r t o f s c h o o l i s re c r e a t i o n a n d i n t e ra c t i o n W h i l e ac a de mic s a re e ssen tia l, w e must re m e m b e r t h a t s o c i a l s k i l l s a r e v i t a l as we ll. If sc hool w as on ly ma de f o r l e a r n i n g w e c o u l d a l l h a v e d o n e i t a t h o me S c h o o l i s a l so a t i m e f o r fo r m i n g l i f e l o n g b o n d s a n d f ri e n d sh i ps t ha t s om e t i me s st a n d th e t e st o f t i m e T ak e ad v an t a ge o f t h e op po rt un it y a n d e nj oy th es e y e ar s be c a us e y o u w i l l m is s th e m. I su re d o M y h i g h s c h o o l y e a r s w er e som e of th e be st ti m es of my l i fe I w as a mo ng t he fe w g ra d ua t es w ho actually c r ied at our graduation. Ye s, I di d A n d si n c e w e a re t a l ki n g a b o ut g ra du a t in g a nd se n i or y ea r t o a ll th e s oo n t o b e g r a du a t e s o f 2 0 1 2 t h i s i s y o u r l a s t c h a n c e t o g e t i t r i g h t Y ou r G PA s a re b a si c a ll y a lr ea d y m a rk e d o u t b u t B J C s a n d B G C S E se a s o n i sn t u n t i l n e x t s e m e st e r. D o no t t a k e th e s e e x a m s l i g h tl y If y o u k n o w t h a t y o u a r e e n t e r i n g g r a d e 1 2 at the bott om of y our ga me that me a ns y o u n e ed to sta rt w ork in g a s h a rd a s y o u c a n n o w Le t me be th e f irst t o te ll yo u, aft e r Chris tmas br e ak, t ha t final se m e st e r w i ll fe e l l i k e t h e sh o rt e st on e t h us fa r Th e e x c i t e me n t su rro u n d i n g s e n i o r a c t i v i t i e s c a n r e a l l y c a u se y o u t o p ro c r a st i n a t e a n d e n d u p b e i n g i l l p r e p a r e d f o r f i n a l e x a m s T r y y o u r h a r d e s t t o g e t a l l o f th e c o u r s e w o r k a n d e x a m p re p a ra t io n ou t o f t h e w a y s o t h a t y o u c a n act uall y enj oy y our f inal year I k n o w i t s g o i n g t o b e h a r d t ry i n g t o h a v e f u n a n d s t a y f o c u s e d b u t I l i k e t o c a l l t h e s e n i o r y e a r o f h i g h s c h o o l t he tr a in i n g g r ou n d f or c o l l e g e In o rd e r to su rv i v e c o ll e g e y ou mu s t be ab le to mas ter tim e managem en t Kn o wi ng h ow to b a la nc e sc ho o l w o rk a n d f u n is t h e k e y t o e n jo y i n g h i g h sc h o o l c o l le g e a nd e v e n li f e W h a t e v e r r e s o l u t i o n y o u w a n t t o make t his ye ar make s ur e it's a c h a n g e th a t w i l l b e ne f i t y o u i n th e f u t u r e A w o r d o f a d v i c e p l e a s e l i s t en t o yo u r t ea ch er s w he n t he y s p e a k t o y o u Th e i r w a r n i n g s a b o u t h o w h a rd l i f e i s o u t si d e h i g h sc h o ol a n d h ow h a rd i t i s g o in g to b e st a y in g con necte d wit h yo ur fr ien ds f r o m h i g h s c h o o l a r e m o r e t h a n j u s t w ords; it' s t he t ruth There is n o f e e l i n g w o r s e t h a n s t a n d i n g a t g r a d u a t i o n w i t h r e g r e t s W h e t h e r y o u r e re g re tt in g no t t a ki n g y o ur ed u c a t io n s e ri o us l y o r e v e n n o t b e i ng a s soc i ab le as y ou co ul d ha v e b ee n, re g re t i s a n aw f u l f ee l i ng to h av e o n th a t d a y N o on e i s p e rf e c t a nd y o u m a y n ot b e a b l e to e n jo y h ig h sc ho ol a s mu c h a s the ot he r pe rs o n b u t y o u m u s t m a k e e v e r y e f f o r t t o e n su re t h a t y o u r re g r e ts p a l e in c o m pa r i so n t o y o u r a c h i e v e m e nt s. E x p e ri e n c e i s th e b e st t e a c h e r, s o l i s te n t o t h o s e o l d e r t h a n y o u h e e d t h ei r c o un s e l a n d c h er i s h t h ei r a d v i c e L et s a pp ro ac h t hi s n ew s c ho ol s e a so n w i t h a n e w a t t i t u d e o f e x c e l l e n c e B y Y A M E A S E S W A I N SPEECH FROM THE THRONE R ETURN OF HOSIER Y : SHEER T OR TURE O R P URE P O LIS H? TIGHTS by Donna Karan. Since the hey day of the 1980s, there's been a casual revolution, a revolt against covered-butsheer legs. Now hosiery is making its comeback. (AP) TIGHTS by Donna Karan. Since the heyday of the 1980s, there's been a casual revolution, a revolt against covered-but-sheer legs. Now hosiery is making its comeback. (AP)

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THE TRIBUNE SECTION B TUESD A Y SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press M essages of good health and positive self-esteem for girls are not hard to come by in kid lit, so what's the deal with all the attention for a not-yet-published rhyming picture book about an obese, unhappy 14-year-old named Maggie? The title, for starters: "Maggie Goes on a Diet." F or s econds lik e-wildf ire cir culati on of a b lurb d escrib ing how the bu llie d g irl is tr a nsf orm e d thr ou gh t im e, e x e rc ise an d ha rd w or k int o a po pul ar, c o nfi dent and aver age si ze soccer s tar And cover art sho w i ng her wis tfu l ly ho ld i ng up a Ci n de r el la dr e s s as s h e st ares at her imagined, mu c h s limmer s elf in a full -lengt h mir r or. An d a n i n si de pa g e t he on l y o ne m os t pe o ple have seen, that shows her hunched over the fridge during a two-fisted eating binge. T hir ds ? Real t eenager s have lon g moved o n from rhy m ing p ic tu re boo ks an d t he re ad i ng l eve l for H aw aii dad Paul Krame r's ama teur is h, sel f-p ublis hed ef for t is r ec o mmended on A mazon f or k ids ages 4 t o 8. The onli ne mess for Kram er be ga n rec e ntly wit h ou tr aged co mmen ter s on A mazon w he re p r e -orde r s hav e not propel led Mag gie a n yw h ere ne ar th e to p o f the ran ki ng s. Th ere is now a "savemag gie" has htag on Twitter, a "Say No t o M aggie Goes on a Diet Facebook page, calls fo r a b oycott and dem ands that Amazon and B ar nes & Noble pu ll th e b o o k Krame r will not disc los e how man y orders he has f or Maggi e, which w il l no t b e in c i rcul at i on un t il Oct o be r. Wh il e m os t o f t h e a t te n ti o n h a s b e e n n e ga t i ve he sa i d, t h e re a re support e r s, like this one w ho responded to a bo o k b as h e r on T wi t te r : "S he 's 1 4, n ot 6 Ar e you ser ious ly s ugges tin g that wit h th e obes ity pr oblem i n this count ry, t hat a book te ach ing childre n to e xerc is e a nd ea t right, is som ehow IM M ORAL ? I b et your f at." K r a m e r w h o we n t o n G o o d M o r n i n g A m e r i c a a n d C N N t o d e f e n d t h e b o o k a lr eady has regrets although using the word di et is not on e of th em Die t, h e sai d, i s no t a d irty w ord as m an y of h is a ng ry cri tic s ha ve d e c l a re d E v e n fo r a b o o k c l e a rl y m o st a p p ro p r i at e f o r l i t t l e k id s ? H e i n s i s t s h e d i dn t h a v e 4 y e a r o l d s i n m i n d t h i n k i n g m o r e along t he lin es of 8 and u p. "Th e main me s sage w as that M a ggie w ent on a diet pred ominan tly bec au se she loves s por ts and wanted to be ab le to r un f ast er, b end mor e eas ily and b e better able t o play s po rt s m or e eff ectiv ely," Kr amer t old T he Asso c ia te d P res s b y ph on e fr om Ma u i, w h er e h e l ives with hi s wife and s occ er -l oving, 16year -o ld s on. Kram er, who st ru ggled with obes ity as a ch ild and a you ng ad ul t an d s ti ll wo rk s to k eep the p ounds of f, wis hes Maggie's fan tas y s elf in t he mir ro r had not b ee n quit e so t hin on t he bo ok's cover. He als o wis hes her t ran sf ormat ion thr ough weight los s had not b e en q u i t e s o m u ch : 5 1 p o u n ds in a l i t t le m ore t han eigh t mo nths "Now t hat I s ee t he c on tr overs y I would s ay that I would have had h er los e about 30 pounds an d still h ave a little w ay to g o," s a id K r a m er wh o i s n e it h e r a ph y s i ci a n no r a n utr iti on exper t. H e sa i d h e i s j u st a g uy w h o w a n t s t o i n sp i r e overweight kids to be healthy. "I regret that people associated the word 'diet' as me trying to push dieting on 4-yearolds and 6-year-olds. I'm not," Kramer said. "T o me d ie t m ea n s a c ha n g e of h a bi ts, ea t in g nutritiously, losing unhealthy weight." Le sl i e Sa n de rs m ed i c al di re c to r of t he E a ting Disorder Program at Goryeb Children's C e n t e r i n S u m m i t N e w J e r s e y t h i n k s Kramer's references to dieting in a rhyming picture book featuring a teen girl are unfor tunate. The same goes for the notion that a child's key to success, beauty and popularity is being thin. "There's a mismatch here," Sanders said. Y o u v e g o t a r h y m i n g b oo k y o u r e r e a d i n g t o a 4-ye ar-old or a 6 -ye ar-old abou t a te enag er f oc us ed on w eight and eating. Why s hould y ou ng chi ld r en b e t hi nk i ng a bo ut wei gh t? T here's no reas on to have l iteratu re about dieting for young children at all." O nce M ag gi e d r o ps t h e we ig ht s he no t on ly g ai n s g a l p a ls b ut e n jo y s t he a tt en ti o n of urg g uy s, a no th er li tt le so me th in g th a t yo un g girls do not really need to think about. S he a lso ge t s hi g he r g ra de s a n d is i nv i te d t o her fi r st sleep over, bring ing alo ng deod or a nt s pr a y s o s h e d o es n' t h av e t o w o r r y a b ou t leaving a smell when she uses the bathroom. Meanwhile, back on the soccer field, the teen encounters a pudgy, smaller girl as she practices and offers some tips. "She remind e d M ag gie o f h ow M a ggi e was be fo r e s he lost the weight," Kramer writes. The book concludes, as Maggie collects a s o c c e r t r o p h y : I t i s s a d t h a t p e o p l e a r e judged mainly because of how they look. A pret ty c ove r d oe s no t n ec e ss a ril y gu ara nte e a good book." OUTRA G E EXPLO D E S OV E R RHYMI N G 'DIE T' PICTURE B O OK AN inside page from "Maggie Goes o n a D i e t, b y P a u l M K ra m e r, il l u s t r a ti o ns b y M ar i K uw a ya m a. Th e selfpublishe d book does n't come o u t u n t il O c t o b e r b u t t h e r e s a l re a d y online outrage over it. (AP) T H I S bo ok c ov e r im ag e c o ur te s y o f Alo h a Pu b li sh e rs s h ows th e c o ve r of Ma g gi e G oe s o n a Die t, b y Pa u l M. Krame r a nd Ma ri Kuway am a. The se lf-pu blis he d book doe sn' t c ome out unt il ne xt mon th, but the re' s already online outrage over it. (AP) I regr et that people associated the word 'diet' a s me t r y i ng t o p u sh d i eti n g o n 4 -y ea r o l d s and 6-year -olds. I'm not. P aul Kram er

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B y RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net W ith a single swing, Antoan Richardson realized thef ulfillment of a l ife-long dream with an unforgettable welcome to Major League Baseball. Richardson singled in his first big l eague at bat, pinch hitting for pitche r Randall Delgado, when his line drive sailed above the outstretched g love of LA Dodgers second basem an Justin Sellers. R ichardson and the Braves rallied for a comefrom-behind 4-3 win at home over the Dodgers at Turner Field. The Braves called up Richardson o n Sunday from Double-A Mississ ippi and added him to their group of six September call-ups. The speedy outfielder was hitting .283 in 91 games for Mississippi. He added 17 stolen bases in 22 attempts and 64 runs scored. R ichardson was drafted in the 2 001, 2002, 2004 and 2005 Major L eague Baseball drafts. The San Francisco Giants signed him after they took him in the 2005 draft, and he played in the Giants organisation until he was releasedi n 2009. He then signed with the S chaumburg Flyers of the Northern League. In May of 2010, he signed a sixyear minor league free agent deal with the Atlanta Braves. Regarded as a switch hitter with g ood speed and high on base perc entage, Richardson was highly s ought after as an amateur, evident by his four draft selections. He sports a .397 career on base percentage over seven minor league seasons and finished his last 10 minorl eague games with an OBP of .500 a nd a batting average of .259. The Braves began a three-game series last night against division rival and National League leader, the Philadelphia Phillies. By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea Whene ver the new Thomas A Robinson N ational Stadium is open, the Bahamas Government and the Bahamas Association of Athletic Associations is hoping to officially christen it with the hosting of the 2014 IAAF World Junior Champi-o nships. Over the weekend, the BAAA submitted the bid to host the cham pionships for junior athletes aged 1 9 years or younger on December 31 in the year of the championships. I t's a biennial event that got started i n 1986 in Athens, Greece. If successful, the Bahamas will become just the second nation int he region to host it. The first was J amaica in 2002. It has never been held in the United States. The last championships was held in Moncton, Canada. The 2012 champi onships is set for Barcelona, Spain, July 10-15. T hree countries had anticipated submitting a bid but on the day of the delay, only the Bahamas and US did. Russia pulled out at the last m inute. Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Charles Maynard said they a re very positive in the two months that lie ahead for them to prepare their official proposal to present tot he IAAF at their council meeting in Monaco in November. "We will try to send a high-pow e red delegation and we hope to have a ll of our Ts crossed and our Is dot ted," he said. "We feel very good about it. It's just a matter of us putting the package all together for submission to the IAAF." IAAF council member Pauline Davis-Thompson, without prejudic ing the decision that will be made when she takes her seat in her second four-year term in office, said it's an ambitious undertaking by the BAAA and the Bahamas Government, but one that she wholeheartedly endorses. "Once we put a very good (pack age) together when we go before the council, I believe the Bahamas will be successful in winning that bid because the IAAF wants to spread the love around. We want this sport to be a global sport. For it to become a global sport, you have to move these cham pionships around to other areas and different parts of the world. The Bahamas has never hosted anything like this before. But on the world scene, the Bahamas is the greatest smallest country. Who wouldn't THETRIBUNE SECTION E TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 $JHQWVt%URNHUVf/WG0$56+&RUUHVSRQGHQW INSIDE TRAK T T U U R R N N T T O O 3 3 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 4 4 E E . . . T T U U R R N N T T O O 5 5 E E . . . PAULINE PRESENTS 4X4 MEDALS COLTS SAY MANNING DOUBTFUL FOR SUNDAYS OPENER SERENA WILLIAMS ADV ANCES TO US OPEN QUARTERFINALS USAIN BOL T DEFINITEL LOOKING FOR W ARD TO LONDON OLYMPICS T T U U R R N N T T O O 7 7 E E . THE Bahamas Rugby Football Union (BRFU pitch with the latest tournament set to be used as a tool in the national team selection process. The Autumn 7s tournament, presented by JS Johnson, began last weekend, featuring each of the leagues four teams. This tournament is in preparation for the Caribbean Sevens Championship which is scheduled to be held in Barbados November 12-13. The Autumn 7s season involves three weeks of competition, one week of which will include Freeport, culminating in National 7s trials on October 1. Week two of the tournament is slated for 3pm September 17 at the Winton rugby pitch. AUTUMN 7S TOURNEY A TOOL IN NATIONAL TEAM SELECTION P h o t o s b y T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f PLAYERS take part in the Bahamas Rugby Football Unions Autumn 7s tournament at the Winton rugby pitch. SEE PAGES 2 & 8E Bahamas hopes to christen new stadium with World Juniors S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 E E Braves call up Antoan Richardson ANTOAN RICHARDSON

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BAHAMAS RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION AUTUMN 7S TOURNEY SPORTS PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 TRIBUNE SPORTS PLAYERS take part in the Bahamas Rugby Football Unions Autumn 7s tournament, which was presented by JS Johnson, featuring each of the leagues four teams at the Winton rugby pitch. The tourney will be used as a tool in the national team selection process. P h o t o s b y T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011, PAGE 3E want to host this in the Bahamas." Davis-Thompson, a con sultant in the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Culture, said the BAAA will be part nering with the Ministry of Tourism to put the package together. She noted that they both have all the details as to what is required of them to complete the deal. "All also have examples of other federations and coun tries who put in their bids, have won and did an excellent job in hosting the cham pionships. I have been able to pass those examples on to the BAAA. All we have to do is put our Bahamian touch to it and I have no doubt inmy mind that we will win the bid." Known worldwide for its prowess in the relays, DavisThompson said there is also some consideration from the IAAF for the Bahamas to host the World Relay Cham pionships, which she indicated will be another feather in the cap for the country. Yannis Nikolaou, the com munication manager for the IAAF who is also responsible for the journalists covering the championships here, said the Bahamas certainly has all the ingredients to successfully host the champi onships, including a new sta dium, good weather and a tradition in athletics. He noted that while the Bahamas has won two medals at the championships in the past, everybody is still excited about 2010 champion Shaunae Miller. This year, Miller claimed the IAAF World Youth Championship title, the first time that the feat was achieved. "Soon she will be the new star for our sport," said Niko laou of the 12th grade St Augustine's College student, who had qualified to compete here for the first time her father and coach, Shaun Miller, decided to shut down her season after she ran at the World Youths in Lille, France, in July. Nikolaou warned the Bahamas about the challenges of taking on such a venture. "You will have to work very hard to prepare a very good file because it's a very important meet on the IAAF calendar and they want to make sure that wher ever it is held, it will have all of the amenities to make it work," he said. But if there is any conso lation for the Bahamas, Nikolaou said the demand to accommodate the amount of delegates and worldwide media is not as sufficient as it is for hosting the IAAF World Championships that just wrapped up in Daegu. "The difference between the two is that in juniors you don't get the same amount of media attention and the spectators because it's five days and not nine days and so you don't need a 50,000 to 60,000 stadium to host the World Juniors," he said. "But you must provide the same level of services that is provided for the senior championships. You will have almost 2,000 athletes from all over the world, so you have the hotels, the airports, trans portation and visas. You will have to work very hard to convince the IAAF that the Bahamas can be a good host of the championships." If there is any benefit to be derived from hosting the championships, Nikolaou said the Bahamas only needs to look at Jamaica. Since hosting the championships almost a decade ago, he said their programme has flourished. And he said he will expect the same for the Bahamas and he offered his best wishes. 13th IAAF World Championships By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea IAAF council member Pauline DavisThompson had another special moment on the final morning of competition at the 13th IAAF World Championships in Athletics. Just before the competition got underway, Davis-Thompson was the presenter of the medals to the winners of the women's 4 x 400 metre relay. They included gold medallists United States of America, who ran a world leading time of three minutes and 18.09 seconds, silver medallists Jamaica in a national record of 3:18.71 and bronze medallists Russiain a a season's best of 3:19.36. "It was good. Anytime you get an opportunity like this, you just have to enjoy it," said DavisThompson, who was decked out in her black suit, white shirt and brown straw hat. "Anytime you do something at this level, it doesn't seem real." As an IAAF council member, D avis-Thompson said she knew that she would have been one of the pres enters. Her only wish would have been to present medals to one of the Bahamas relay teams. That never materialized as the Bahamas didn't field a women's 4 x 4 relay team and both the men's 4 x 4 and women's 4 x 1 didnt advance to the final. Davis-Thompson, known for her fierce battle as a member of the golden girls that clashed with the United States and Jamaica over the years, said presenting the medals to her arch-rivals was just as special. "It was really special to still be recognised and involved in the sport o f athletics," she stated. "I believe that to whom much is given, much is e xpected. Track and field has been very good to me. It has given me an education, it has taken me around the world and I have beautiful, warm, lasting friends. Who believed that a girl from Fleming Street would have achieved all that I did and still doing." Walking around with her head held high, Davis-Thompson said every so often she is pinching herself to make sure that what she's doing is real. She said presenting the medals to the women's 4 x 4 relay team was o ne of those special moments that she will look back and reflect on for q uite some time. IAAF COUNCIL MEMBER PAULINE DAVIS-THOMPSON PRESENTS MEDALS TO WOMENS 4X400 RELAY TEAM B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net DAEGU, South Korea The script has been written on the 13th IAAF Champio nships in Athletics. T he headline reads: A championship to remember f or the Bahamas. The sub topic: One medal o vershadowed by one disaster a fter the other. L et's try not to take anyt hing away from Trevor Barrys sterling bronze medal performance in his first appearance at the biggest global meet on the planet.B ut not even his rise from the shadows of arch-rival Dona ld Thomas to his own stard om could not equate to the unusual circumstances over the nine days of competitionf or Team Bahamas. I n sequence of occurrences: Sprinter Adrian Griffith eliminated before he gots tarted with a false start in the first round of the men's 100 metres. H e was bitten by the bug that also denied Jamaican sensation Usain Bolt the opportunity to defend his title i n the 100m final. Credit it to the IAAF's new rule one false start and the culprit is d isqualified. Three men in the semifi nal of the men's 400 metres a nd not one could emerge to the final. For perennial fourth place finisher Chris 'Bay' Brown,i t was the most significant departure as he was the first man out in ninth overall. Not sure which was the worst p osition for him to be in. Quarter-miler Michael Mathieu, now running in the 200 metres, was in position to contest for a spot in the final before his left leg gave out on him. He limped off the track and took a long stroll on the sideline to the finish line. Mathieu can take solace in the fact that he ran to sec ond place in chasing Bolt as he regrouped from the false start in the first round. This one the most disheartening. For the second consecutive championships, the Bahamas failed to field a team in the final of the men's 4 x 400 relay after both Demetrius Pinder and Chris Brown were surprisingly left out of the line-up. Head coach Fritz Grant called it a big "mistake" but many feel it was a national disgrace. And just when you t hought that it couldn't get any worse, teenager Anthonique Strachan tripped and was bruised and battered as she got the baton from Nivea Smith. She eventually got up and passed the baton to Ferguson-McKenzie. It was what they called "a walk of shame" as FergusonMcKenzie brought it home in an unprecedented time of 50.62 seconds. Leevan 'Superman' Sands, w ho apologised to the Bahamian people for not liv ing up to his promise of bringing home a medal, best summed up the team's per formance: "I think this has been a rough championships for the whole Bahamas. We still end up with a medal so we have to be fortunate for that. It's Trevors first medal, so I think he needed that. Out of everybody here, I think he n eeded it the most and that is why he got it." Barry will go down in the almanac of Bahamian athletic history. But for more reasons than one, Bahamians will relive the memories of these championships for quite some time, especially when you realize how close we came from moving from a tied 33rd position with eight other countries and 31st in the placing table. I have to say that despite t he hiccups that the team e xperienced, it only lends cred ence to the fact that the Bahamas' aquamarine, gold a nd black uniform was seen as our athletes went out andg ave it their best in the c olourful Daegu Stadium. If you were not here, you probably would not agree with me, looking at the r esults. But there was no e vent at these championships that were not contested at a h igh level. We just didn't a scend the medal podium more than the one moment Barry gave us to cherish. D ebbie Ferguson-McKenz ie got a sixth place ranking in the world in the women's 200 metres, although manyc ounted her out at age 35. And 30-year-old Leevan Sands ended up as the sev e nth best triple jumper against a cadre of competitors who, in their own rights, could have easily emerged as t he world champion. One medal from three finalists. It could have been m ore. But let's enjoy the suc cess of Trevor Barry. As Sheniqua 'Q' Ferguson point-e d out after the demise of the w omen's 4 x 4 relay: "We can't win them all." One got away from Bolt b ut he turned up the heat after redeeming himself with a gold in the 200. Then before the curtains came down on t he championships during the closing ceremonies, he anchored the team of NestaC arter, Michael Frater and 100m champion Yohan Blake to a world record breaking performance of 37.04 seconds in the 4 x 1 relay in the grand finale. That's why the IAAF made a drastic change in the schedule this year. It was because of the Bolt-led Jamaican mania. This just wasn't the year for the Bahamas to shine, except for Trevor Barry. A CHAMPIONSHIP TO REMEMBER FOR THE BAHAMAS Bronze medal overshadowed by one disaster after another B AHAMAS HOPES TO CHRISTEN NEW STADIUM WITH IAAF WORLD JUNIORS F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 E E YANNIS NIKOLAOU, IAAF communication manager speaks with Brent Stubbs at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. SPORTS MINISTER Charles Maynard at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. IAAF COUNCIL MEMBER Pauline DavisThompson at the 13th IAAF Worlds in Daegu, South Korea. T RIPPED UP: A nthonique Strachan trips after getting the baton from Nivea Smith in the 4x100m relay heat Sunday on the final day of the 13th IAAF World Athletic Championships in Daegu, South Korea.


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