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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03076
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 12/29/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03076

Full Text







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HIGH 85F
LOW 72F

0 SUNNY AND
h .WARM


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 104 No.32 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007 PRICE 750







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,.


Olympic chief


and wife escape


after their car


drives off


Potter's Cay


By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
SIR Arlington Butler and his
wife Lady Sheila narrowly
escaped death yesterday as their
vehicle drove off Potter's Cay
Dock and plunged into the sea.
Their car went underwater after
colliding with a truck and was
washed away by strong currents.
Amazingly, the couple were able
to swim clear after winding down
the car windows.

Three-day
work week
agreed at
Morton Salt
By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribuneme-
dianet
MORTON Salt and the
Bahamas Manufacturing,
Industrial and Allied Work-
ers Union agreed to a three-
day work week as opposed
to a three-month lay-off at
the Ministry of Maritime
Affairs and Labour late last
night.
The supplemental agree-
ment, signed at the minis-
ter's office last night, will
remain effective from Janu-
ray 2, 2008, to March 31,
2008.
The agreement states that
both parties have agreed to
a reduction in the work
week from 40 hours to 24
hours. Also, the company
and union agree that all
employees will take all of
their 2008 vacation in Janu-
ary and February of 2008
and the company would
grant a salary advance
against their 2008 accrued
vacation pay.
The agreement adds:
"The company and union
further agree to allow
employees an additional
week or two leave of
absence without pay later in
2008 and to offer a week
wage advance to employees
that require it.
"Employees receiving this
SEE page 8


Last night, a relieved Sir Arling-
ton relived the moments of hor-
ror when he thought his time was
up.
"My wife was driving and we
got to the end and we were hit by
a red truck," he said. "She con-
tinued going on over and went
straight into the sea. The car went
under water."
The strong current carried the
partially submerged vehicle west
into the middle of the harbour
across from Hurricane Hole Mari-
na.
It was at this point that heavily-
built Sir Arlington and his wife
swam out through the open win-
dows.
"We went in with the car but
were able, fortunately, to get the
windows down, and I was able to
swim out," said Sir Arlington.
Neither he nor his wife were
significantly injured in the acci-
dent, but Sir Arlington was ban-
daged on his right hand and arm
when he spoke to The Tribune.
Two small boats reportedly res-
cued Sir Arlington and Lady
Sheila as they swam clear of their
car.
An eyewitness, who wished to
remain anonymous, said that peo-
ple passing in small boats assisted
with a rope, guiding the Butlers
to safety in the direction of two
larger vessels near the dock.
"They pulled up Ally on Lady
Matilda," he said. "They pulled
up his wife on the Eastwind."
The witness also told The Tri-
bune that a truck was ahead of Sir
Arlington's vehicle going east
when their car went into the truck.
The truck was spun in the oppo-
site direction, the witness said, and
the driver was able to get out of
the way of the car. However, the
car accelerated "straight over-
board" after the initial accident,
he said.
Asst Supt Joe Feast, police offi-
cer in charge of Paradise Island
and Potter's Cay, was on the scene
with other officers while divers
searched for the car, which was
still moving in the current an hour
after the accident.
The car was eventually located
near the Lady Rosalind II, hun-
dreds of feet from where it went
into the sea.
This accident at Potter's Cay
comes three months after a 21-
year-old woman drove into the sea
at the same location.
Repeated accidents at Potter's
Cay illustrate the lack of proper
safety infrastructure at the dock,
where several people have lost
their lives.
SEE page 8


Former South Andros MP Whitney Bastlan, Sir Arlington Butler and Lady Shella Butler
chat after the Butlers and their car drove off Potter's Cay Dock yesterday afternoon.
(Picture: Brent Dean/Tribune Staff)


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
Close to $8,000 was donated
or pledged yesterday in aid of
the Sea Hauler victims after
Bahamians came together for
an end-of-year show of gen-
erosity on a popular radio talk
show.
Dozens of callers responded
throughout More 94 host Ort-
land Bodie's impromptu fund-
raising drive, which was initiat-
ed on Real Talk Live, the morn-
ing show he has been hosting
in place of Jeffrey Lloyd.
Numerous police officers and
teachers, as well as a janitress
and a dump-truck driver, either
brought in money during the
show or promised to do so dur-
ing the afternoon or within the
next few days.
While the average donation
or pledge was around $100, with
some smaller, but no less sig-
nificant offerings of $15 and


upwards, the largest single con-
tribution was made by a caller
who pledged that he would
make available $100 a month
for the victims for a period of 12
months, starting January.
Gaylin Saunders and Brad
Gibson, bosses at the radio sta-
tion, also brought a cheque for
$1,000 into the studio near the
end of the programme.
A janitress at Jordan Prince
William School, who said she
could not offer financial help to
the victims, was given time to
offer a prayer for the victims,
some of whom continue to suf-
fer hardship from injuries they
suffered.
Mr Bodie made a point of
calling on some of Nassau's
higher earners in particular,
from among the Bahamas' 900-
plus members of the Bar to
come forward and offer a frac-
tion of their salaries to the
SEE page 8


Two men

held over

armed

robbery
By TANEKA
THOMPSON
TRIBUNE STAFF
REPORTER
tthompson@tribuneme-
dia.net
POLICE have two men
in custody in connection
with a daylight armed rob-
bery on Thursday and pos-
session of an illegal firearm.
The two men one 35
years old, the other 30 -
are being questioned in rela-
tion to an armed robbery in
Pinewood Gardens on
Thursday, police said.
According to police
reports, two men were held
up at gunpoint and robbed
of an undetermined amount
of cash while walking
through a side road in the
Pinewood Gardens suhdivi-
SEE page 8


'n M. .v ,,
., "Ml . ; .. t . ..


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


Body

found

in condo
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribuneme-
dia.net
FREEPORT A 46-
year-old man who was dis-
covered dead in his apart-
ment in the Caravel Beach
area two days ago has not
been identified by Grand
Bahama police.
Asst Supt Loretta Mack-
ey, press liaison officer,
reported that the man's
body was discovered
around 10.15pm on Thurs-
day.
She said police found no
visible signs of injury or
trauma to the body. It was
SEE page 8


up allnight!
5 1 >l ilc s oivi! v

drllllel t g [, is now open.-


$8,000 pS^legdfor

lTSea Hauler Victims


h













Ambassador targets HIV/AIDS



spread among Bahamian youth


BY NATARIO McKENZIE
US Ambassador Ned Siegel yesterday high-
lighted the importance of generating awareness
about HIV/AIDS among young people during a
visit at the Bahamas HIV/AIDS Centre.
Ambassador Siegel noted that awareness is
important in fight against HIV/AIDS. "We know
in the Bahamas that the HIV infection rate among
the youth is high and one of the ways to deal
with that is by reaching out to the youth so that
they understand the ramifications of their
actions," Mr Siegel said.
Ambassador Siegel noted that awareness
should not simply be highlighted on World AIDS
Day but year round.
He said ignorance and discrimination are some
of the challenges currently being faced in the
fight against the disease.
Ambassador Siegel also highlighted the work of
Youth HIV/AIDS Ambassadors in helping young
people "to understand that their problems are
problems of commonality."
"By using role models, by bringing people in as
spokespersons on the HIV/AIDS issue, (this)
helps break down barriers and that is what we are
all trying to do," he said.
Mr Siegel noted that the purpose of yester-


US Ambassador Ned Siegel


day's visit was to hear and exchange ideas on
how to promote healthy lifestyles among the
youth.
Rosa Mae Bain, director of the HIV/AIDS
Centre, said that young people mostly women -
make up the largest demographic of persons liv-
ing in the Bahamas who have tested positive for
HIV/AIDS. "There is a grave concern for the
females," Mrs Bain said.
Keith Kemp, chairman of the Bahamas Youth
HIV/AIDS Ambassador programme, said that
next year the organisation intends to extend its
mandate to the Family Islands.
"There a whole lot of challenges we are facing
but looking forward to 2008, we are looking at
more ways and more means to get more infor-
mation to young persons, Mr Kemp said.
He noted that funding and resource shortages
are two of the issues affecting the organisation.
Emmy Rossum, US Youth AIDS Ambassador
and actress in films such as Mystic River, The
Day After Tomorrow and Poseidon, expressed
excitement about the opportunity to exchange
creative ideas on how to help foster youth aware-
ness about HIV/AIDS.
Ms Rossum noted that one of the greatest chal-
lenges in the fight against the disease is getting
people to understand it is a serious problem.


S a~loLand Mconal murersstllusole


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
As the year draws to a close,
police investigations into the
high-profile murders of Harl
Taylor and Thaddeus McDon-
ald remain wide open.
Chief Supt Glenn Miller, offi-
cer in charge of the Central
Detective Unit, said that as of
yesterday, there is still no one in
custody or being held for ques-
tioning in relation to the two
brutal murders, which were
committed in mid-November.
Due to the proximity of the

FrizrFuid
esh11t-o


victim's homes, the time span,
and other similarities in the cir-
cumstances of the killings, spec-
ulation about a connection
between the deaths has been
rife.
Asked yesterday whether any
analysis carried out up to this
point had revealed definitively
whether the killings were
indeed carried out by the same
individual, Chief Supt Hulan
Hanna suggested that due to
the fact that some, but not all,
forensic work had been com-
pleted at this stage, the answer
to this question remains
unknown.
However, Chief Supt Glenn
Miller admitted later that police
"would not want to disclose"
such information at this time -
e\n if they knew.
Chief Supt Hanna said that
police have managed to catch
up with some of the people who


"No one is in
custody or
being held for
questioning."



he referred to as being "mater-
ial to the investigation" in early
December, but nothing signifi-
cant came of these interviews.
Earlier, Chief Supt Hanna
stated that the police were con-
cerned that by making public
comments, they might provide
too much information about the
status of the investigation to
those persons who were still
wanted for questioning. He


admitted that this worry was
behind ongoing police reticence
in relation to the investigations
into the killings.
Chief Supt Hanna was again
unforthcoming with details of
the investigations yesterday,
commenting briefly that the
matters were "progressing."
On Friday, November 16, 59-
year-old Dr Thaddeus McDon-
ald, dean of the faculty of social
and educational sciences at the
College of the Bahamas, was
found bludgeoned to death in
his Queen Street home.
Two days later, 37-year-old
fashion designer Harl Taylor
was found dead in his home,
within a quarter of a mile of Dr
McDonald. Reports suggested
he had been stabbed multiple
times, and that his body was in a
bed at the time it was discov-
ered by a young off-duty police
officer.


The American
applications for


Embassy is
the following:


presently


considering


Realty Assistant

Serves as the senior member of the GSO
Housing Office working interdependently in
administering and managing the complex
legalities and details of an interagency housing pool
that spans from New Providence to Grand Bahama


This position is open to candidates
following qualifications;


with the


An Associate Degree in the area of Business
Administration, real estate or a related field.
Two years of experience in real estate
leasing/ contracting, property management
or related field required.
Must have a good working knowledge of
general office procedures, Microsoft Office
Suite and data base management.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

Must have ability to meet deadlines in a
timely manner and work independently With
minimum supervision


BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:

The successful candidate will be offered an excellent
compensation package 'including performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens
who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00a.m. to
5:00p.m. Monday through Friday at the security area
of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy ad-
dressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
Friday, January 11, 2008.


END OF YEAR


Buy 2 Get1 Free!

On Selected Sparkling Wines & Spirits.


Offer good at all Bristol Wines & Spirits Stores in Nassau, Treasure Cay,
Marsh Harbour, Harbour Island, Governors Harbour & Grand Bahama.


.. ........... .............P 2,3.4,5
.B .* :- -



... ... ...........................P64

.......................................... P 7
... ..... .................7

PAGES

:EDIM9N 8 PAGES
. J --


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007









T~HETRIBUNESTURDAYDECEBER29L2007,PAGES


- - l ,,


S
'P


Unknown insects



infest Long Island


THE southern area of Long Island is report-
edly infested with a peculiar flying insect
(shown in the two photos here) which residents
say they have never seen before.
According to eye witnesses, the insects are
not mosquitos, but are mistaken for them by
some people.
"They get in our hair, up our noses! No one
seems to know what they are and no one seems
to care," one couple told The Tribune.
They said a visitor from England who left
the island a few weeks ago, showed them a
"really thick" layer of the insects under the
boxing outside her room.
"She had been complaining of 'mosquito
bites' throughout her stay," said the couple,


who explained that they called local represen-
tatives of the Department of Environmental
Health, "to tell them they should be spraying
for mosquitos after all the floods we had down
this way.
"It doesn't seem as if they did anything as
now these insects are everywhere on and
around the buildings," the couple said.
They said they called Environmental Health
again last weekend, but the office was closed.
They were also unable to get in contact with
Larry Cartwright, the MP for Long Island, who
was said to be attending a funeral at the time.
"He hasn't called back yet, but we did have a
power cut so maybe he tried and couldn't reach
us," they noted.


: e;. .... -,...- ;.., .,- .' '
i,. -^ ^ ^"-".'^" ^": '


Share

your

news



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Er


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
CB ADMINISTRATION LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that the liquidation for CB
Administration Limited has been completed.

Dated the 12"' day of December, 2007

Craig A. Gomez
Liquidator


-.^


'Beating' victim's



recovery from



coma 'uncertain'


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
THE family of Desmond
Key, allegedly beaten while in
police custody, say they are still
uncertain if the beloved father
of six will emerge from his six
month long coma.
It reportedly costs between
$10,000 to $15,000 a day in hos-
pital fees to care for Desmond,
and some speculate he has med-
ical expenses in excess of $2 mil-
lion, however his grandmother
said the family is focused on
Desmond's welfare not his med-
ical bills.
They are also hopeful the
government will continue the
process of footing the bill, she
said.
Desmond was airlifted from
the Intensive Care Unit (ICU)
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital to the Jackson Memorial
Hospital in Florida on August 4
where he has remained on life
support in a comatose state.
Family members have been at
his bedside since the ordeal,
making bi-weekly trips to Mia-
mi.
Doctors predict that the like-
lihood of Desmond emerging
from his coma is slim and say
the odds he will recover from
the immense damage to his
brain are not good, his grand-
mother said.
"People was speculating that
the bill was over $2 million
(but) I don't question what the
bill is because I know my fami-
ly wouldn't be able to pay for
that bill in my lifetime. The gov-
ernment was co-operative when
the family requested to have
him sent there and I rest that
case in their hands," Verona
Bastian, Desmond's grand-
mother told The Tribune yes-
terday.
His family is now awaiting his
return to Nassau as specialists at
Jackson Memorial Hospital
have rendered a grim prognosis
for recovery.
"(His doctors) said that there
is nothing else they can do, they
have exhausted all avenues and
they can't do anything more to
wake him up.
"While I know he is still get-
ting perfect care over there (in


NVESIMMB SBS
Two (2) storey, shops, office
and three (3) two (2) bedroom
(2/1) apartments.
ft- -B BB


Miami) I want to be sensible
and if he.is not going to wake
up it doesn't make sense having
him there. I prefer to see him go
home with the Lord because
even if he does wake up,
because of his condition he will
just be lying there, and his fam-
ily doesn't want to see him like
that."


loved one off of life support.
It has also raised the issue of
financial support of his six
young children who are
between the ages of six months
and 10 years old.
His grandmother said the
family has not yet pursued any
compensation from the govern-
ment to care for his dependents


Mrs Bastian added that the
family had a meeting with gov-
ernment officials who agreed to
airlift Desmond back to Nas-
sau.
Because of the improbabili-
ty of a recovery, hospital admin-
istration are not likely to place
him back in ICU, Ms Bastian
said.
Due to the grim predictions
from physicians, Desmond's
family has the difficult decision
of whether or not to take their


while he is in hospital but the
need will eventually arise as
Desmond will no longer be able
to provide for them.
Desmond's welfare and med-
ical condition has garnered
national attention after it was
widely reported that he alleged-
ly sustained injuries while in
police custody in June.
Two police officers have been
charged with causing harm in
connection with the June inci-
dent.


fl nUlfnlu nUS. Ui IWE 8wNU I MA 4M Iu WA 1 1UW
P.SILOVEYOU T 105 9330 WA 6l 05 8:5 1040
CHARUEWILSON C i:10 3:35 WA 610 8:35 10.45
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IAMLEGEND T 130 3.10 WAi 620 81 0 M 1040
PERfECT HOUMDAY 1310 3540 WA 6110 8:40 "1054


"His doctors said that there is
nothing else they can do. They
have exhausted all avenues,
and they can't do anything
more to wake him up. While
he is getting perfect care, I
want to be sensible, and if he
is not going to wake up it does-
n't make sense having him
there."


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

CR ADMINISTRATION LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)
Notice is hereby given that the liquidation for CR
Administration Limited has been completed.

Dated the 12th day of December, 2007

Craig A. Gomez
Liquidator


ONTN~iU



\IKD ENS



New Years Eve Dinner Special


Conch Chowder


Caesar Salad
Roast Prime Rib of Beef with Stuffed Bacon
Wrapped Shrimp topped with a sauce
Oven Roast Potatoes with Red Bell Pepper and Onion
Fresh Glazed Carrots
Whole Beans with Onions and
Toasted Almonds


(Deserts

; : oChoice of Mud Pie
... Carrot Cake

S.ie C/Cheese Cake

t 2ri 27.50 Per Person

S pL us15O% Gratuities


P.art favorsfor everyone
. ":Y, 'IYou can alsoorder off the menu
Phone 394e634 for-reservations


L


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 3


. :rrl;p,


,


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007


3DT ORAU -E 6T TO THE*EDIrTOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS A DDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to 7The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. II. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.'E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972--- -

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Graind Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Bhutto represented hope for women


AT a small evening gathering more than five
years ago in Atlanta, Benazir Bhutto sat among
fellow Pakistanis, savouring the rich cuisine of
her homeland and chatting as though she were
just another friend who'd come to dinner.
The glitz and glamour that usually whirred
about her was absent, though it was hard for
anyone in that room to get past who she was.
She was the kind of woman who had a com- -
manding presence. All those qualities befitting
a queen, really: striking, intelligent, articulate,
charming, powerful and, yes, beautiful.
Maryam Khwaja came that night, curious to
hear what Bhutto had to say. She wanted to go
beyond the persona and know her better.
Khwaja, a 53-year-old Montessori teacher,
was born in Pakistan just a year after Bhutto.
Khwaja is of a generation of South Asian
women who, as little girls, idolized Indira Gand-
hi, the first woman to become prime minister of
India.
I know because I was one of them.
In Gandhi and later in Bhutto, South Asian
women saw hope. They looked in their eyes
and saw stereotypes of their homelands wiped
away. Gandhi and Bhutto were like icoiiic
shields worn into daily battles. They were the
souls in which women found courage.
On that 2002 trip to Atlanta, Bhutto received
a thundering standing ovation at a women's
leadership conference at the World' GMtresss
Centre. I recall feeling pride filling me upiso fast.
and strong that I could hardly speak.
Bhutto, like Gandhi, was the daughter of a
prime minister. Bhutto, like Gandhi, perhaps
more than once disappointed the women who
admired her in her days as a national leader.
Khwaja was angry at Bhutto. The prime min-
ister's reputation was tarnished after she was
ousted from power twice in 1990 and again in
1996 on corruption charges.
Somehow it was more difficult to forgive a
woman who had to work so hard to overcome
obstacles that aren't there for male counter-
parts. In Bhutto's case, it was even more unfor-
givable that the questions dogging her centred ..
around her husband. Why would she let a man
control her after everything she accomplished in
a conservative Muslim country'?
How could she have been so weak, Khwaja
thought. That night at dinner, she finally mus-
tered the courage to ask the former leader why
Pakistanis should trust her.
"Benazir, how can I give you my vote again?"
Khwaja asked the then-exiled prime minister.
Bhutto explained that she had been judged
unfairly and that she needed more time in pow-
er to make things right in Pakistan. "Give me


another chance," she said.
Khwaja came away willing to put her scepti-
cism on hold. She wanted constitutional democ-
racy to return to Pakistan. That was what the
Bhutto family had'always stood for. And what
was the alternative? Military rule?
In the end, Khwaja was perhaps ready to
overlook Bhutto's ills because of who she was
- and what she symbolized.
"Everything comes down to one thing,"
Khwaja told me Thursday, still reeling from
the news of Bhutto's assassination.
"And that is that as a woman she did a real-
ly big thing."
1 listened to Khwaja speak and remembered
thinking the same way on Oct. 31, 1984, That
was the day that Sikh militants gunned down
Indira Gandhi in New Delhi.
I was disappointed in Gandhi for the allega-
tions of election fraud and for her authoritari-
an practices. But I cried the night she was killed.
1 felt the same emotions bubble up Thursday as
I spoke with Khwaja about Bhutto. "She was so
brave fighting all those obstacles placed in her
way," she said. "She was brave to go back."
It occurred to me then that I had asked Bhut-
to in an October interview whether she feared
being thrown in jail if she returned to Pakistan.
She had lived in exile since 1999 and was then
still planning a return home to stand for elec-
tofi8Hs
,i MShe'said her decision to go back was "final
dnd irrevocable." She said she was determined
to wrest her nation from military rule; to return
it to the democracy it deserved. She believed
her mission was essential.
I never imagined then that jail would be noth-
ing compared to the fate she suffered Thursday.
For Khwaja. the flickers of hope she had for
her homeland went out with Benazir Bhutto's
last breath.
She recalled how after that April dinner in
2002, the prime minister had kissed her goodbye
on the cheek. Every year since then, Bhutto
sent the Khwajas a card for Eid. the holiday that
marks the end of Ramadan, the Muslim month
of fasting.
Khwaja thought of those things as she
watched the shocking images from Pakistan on
her television set. And she thought what I did as
my phone starting ringing Thursday with calls
from Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Sri
Lankan friends.
Benazir Bhutto, like Indira Gandhi before
her, left women from South Asia with inner
strength. No assassin can ever take that away.
(This article was written by Moni Basu of the
Cox News Service).


Get real






on 'bogus'






attorneys


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I NOTE with great interest
the recent public comments by
Mr Justice John Lyons and the
current loquacious President of
The Bahamas Bar Council rel-
ative to what they both termed
"bogus" lawyers.
Mr Justice Lyons is one of
the finest and most qualified
judges, whom we have had in
The Bahamas in two decades,
or more. Having appeared
before him, pro se, on a few
occasions and having followed
his stellar career on the bench in
this country, I am able to say,
without fear of contradiction,
that when he speaks, the entire
Bahamas and the powers that
be listen, even if they don't
always see eye to eye with his
pronouncements.
...ThePresident, always seem-
ingly reactive, with all due
respect, weighed in with his own
opinion about "unqualified per-
sons" and "bogus" lawyers.
What he failed to talk about
were those lawyers, comprising
a large number of the current
Rolls of the Supreme Court,
who are known to accept retain-
ers from unsuspecting and
gullible clients and never per-
form the work required or
appear in a court when neces-
sary.
Half the times when they do
condescend to appear in a court,
80 per cent or more of the
"qualified" lawyers are not pre-
pared to launch their cases or
are "too busy" appearing in a
superior court and are granted
endless adjournments, almost
willy-nilly.
Too often, many lawyers in
"good standing" do not know
who to draft and prepare the


most simple of legal documents
and/or pleadings. The client,
inevitably, ends up with the
short end of the stick and pos-
sibly it may be lodged in the
wrong place.
When I was privileged to
practice law, before my disbar-
ment, the profession was about
service and the attainment of
justice for all. Not so today. In
my opinion most of the current
lawyers at the Bar are, seem-
ingly, motivated solely by mon-
ey...pure and simple.
It is precisely because of this
mad rush and crass desire to get
rich that thousands of Bahami-
ans are being "shafted" by
lawyers in "good standing"
every day of the year, with,
seeming, impunity. It is almost
useless to make a complaint to
Bar Council against an attor-
ney because, too often, it will
never see the lightof day,-muck.
less the night.
It is precisely because of this
apparent immunity of most
lawyers at the Bar that many
ordinary Bahamians are forced
to seek assistance from persons
who may well not be qualified
in the true sense of the word.
It is clear that the Bar Associa-
tion is a "closed shop" agency
which has as its priority the pro-
tection of its gilded members.
From time immemorial, suc-
cessive Bar Councils and their
revolving door Presidents, have
issued mealey-mouthed calls for
the introduction of a viable legal
aid system. With more than 900
current members, it is nothing


short of a national disgrace that
the current President, who has
been in office for several years,
and he ds a law firm with over
10 members, has been unable,
for want of a better expression,
to set up even an embryonic
one. How come?
Also, pray tell the good peo-
ple of The Bahamas what would
happen in a scenario where offi-
cers of Bar Council are being
"complained about" or even
sued by disgruntled clients.
Who are they to complain to
and which other lawyer, in good
standing, would even dare to
lodge a Writ of Summons
against the President or Secre-
tary of the council?
Yes, my friends, the public
should be wary of "unqualified"
and "unregistered" legal prac-
titioners but they must also
keep a sharp eye on "legiti-
mate" counsel. Take a casual
look at the Cause List at the
Supreme Court and you will
read about the "horror" stories
applicable to a number of mem-
bers of the Bar who are "in
.-good standing" and are "hon-
ourable men and women."
Talk about who is "real" and
who is "bogus" but let all of the
facts come out.
Which lawyer will actually
sue another lawyer in The
Bahamas? When you find one,
if you ever do, please let me
know. To God then, whose Son,
Jesus Christ, plainly admon-
ished us to: "Beware of the
lawyers and the scribes..." in
all things, be the glory.

ORTLAND
H BODIE Jr
Nassau,
November 23, 2007.


Fiscal prudence




talk just hot air


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE obvious double talk of
the FNM indicates and confirms
that all their talk since May 2,
2007 on fiscal responsibility was
and is simply talk.
Royal Oasis, Grand Bahama
and the commitment of gov-
ernment to lay a charge to
repay employee wages is in no
way fiscally responsible except
that it is politically expedient
for obvious reasons, especially
ensuring the pay-off would be
made on the eve of Christmas!
Get me absolutely correct -
Driftwood Hospitality should
never have been approved as a
licensee of one of the most valu-
able licenses the government


can issue that of a casino.
Where was Driftwoods' expe-
rience? Zero and wit-hin a shot
time we found out to the detri-
ment of government, unpaid
taxes unpaid utility bills to
the Port Authority unpaid
bills in Grand Bahama and, of
course, unpaid legal liabilities
to employees.
In any developed country
such a corporate entity would
never have been permitted to
get off and away from their cor-
porate responsibilities as Drift-
wood was able to.
The PLP was wrong when
they paid off previously and the
FNM was wrong for paying off
the recent remaining amount.
In hindsight I hope in future


NOTICE
-NOTICE is..hereby .given that ALONDIUS DARVILUS of
MOUNT TABOR DRIVE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from.
the 29TH day of December, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE

This is to inform the general public that the private

roadways and parking areas situate in the

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre between

East Bay Street and Shirley Street will be closed

on Tuesday the 1st of January, 2008 in order to

preserve the right of ownership therefore.

The Owners


government will require all
licenses of Casinos to estab-
lish financial bonds which will
safeguard their potential liabil-
ities for closure covering casi-
no taxes through employee
wages, health insurance's and
pensions.
Can the Minister of State for
Finance please confirm what is
actually owed from licensees
operating casino operations at
this time?
I suggest government, FNM
and PLP parties, have created a
precedent with how they dealt
with Royal Oasis which will
haunt the treasury for along
time. It was the wrong way -
Driftwood got away scot free
as did Lehmann!
P STRACHAN
Nassau,
December 26,2007.


Share

your

news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


M!1 1 l 1|1 1 1 'l








THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5


LOA NW


Wh o e?


I THOMPSON
SReporter
ribunemedia.n




"1 vex because the garbage
truck is come in my area twice
a week sometimes but they
don't come through my cor-
ner. They only pick up from
the main road but I mean,
they can see
from the
government
lights that
people live
through the
side corner.
Just like that
nyan said in ,
that article
The Tribune
printed the
other day,
we ain' had
our garbage
pick up in
three
weeks!"
Vex in
Village
Road.

"I vex
because
after all
these years
Bahamians still can't get
national events together.
Junkanoo is our celebration
of culture but I couldn't even
enjoy myself because of all
the negative hoopla around
me trying to get to my seat
and finding other people in
it.
Sometimes I wonder if
Bahamians have any sense or
if they follow directions, I
think the whole thing would
have gone smoother if peo-
ple out there was listening
instead of running their
mouth thinking they right."
Albert, Pinewood Gar-
dens.

"I vex at how Bahamians
treat each other when they


driving on the streets.
Because of the job I'm in I
have to be on the road a lot
and it really sickens me that
some people so stink they
can't even let you out of a
corner, dis time they driving
15 miles per hour. Then they
ga' speed up as soon as you
start to inch out."
Barry, Elizabeth
Estates


"I want
S to voice a
small con-
..cern about
the govern-
ment hous-
ing subdi-
vision in
Chipping-
h a m
behind
Perpall
Tract. I
just passed
there yes-
terday and
I see all the
Windows in
the houses
broken. It
look like
t h e y
.stopped
construct-
ing in that area but they need
to have security there all the
time, because I think the van-
dals do their mess during the
day when no security is
there,"
Vex in Chippingham


"Staff at the Ministry of
Tourism don't answer the
telephone. I'm a frequent vis-
itor to The Bahamas and I
have had to call the Ministry a
few times and they were
always picking up the line
sometimes on the first ring.
But today I called there and
the phone rang for at least 20
times. I don't know if they are
having phone problems but I
hope they fix it,"
Brenda F


SFor the stories behind the

news, read Insight
............................. ....................................:


Royal Oasis staff





dispute lay-off pay


Some disappointed with payout

as it 'did not reflect what they

felt their job description was'


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT FNM Senator
Kay Smith said that a number
of employees of Royal Oasis
felt the government's calcula-
tion of the severance pay they
were due was incorrect.
They said the problem came
about due to the hotel's former
practice of paying supervisors
as line staff, and managers as
supervisors.
"So, verbally they were
advised they were managers,
but when the day came to pay
the employees their severance,
in some instances the pay did
not reflect what they felt their
job description was," Senator
Smith explained.
Royal Oasis workers received
their final payment of redun-
dancy money from the govern-
ment on Thursday at the Hilton
Outten Convention Centre in
Freeport.
Many expressed disappoint-
ment and dissatisfaction with
the payout they received. Oth-
ers, however, were just grate-
ful to receive the money.
When Royal Oasis closed in
2004 due to hurricane damage,
about 1,000 laid off workers
were not paid their redundancy
pay by the former owners.
Senator Smith stated that at
"some point the government
has to seek to ensure that
investors coming to the
Bahamas live up to their com-
mitment to conduct their busi-
ness with consideration, yes for
their bottom line, but also with
some consideration for our peo-
ple and our country."
Ms Smith's remarks came-.


I -/- ; : .



." '' ', .f -2',
'/'

1 'a:.
f^::t


during a meeting of the Senate
in which she seconded the Bill
for an Act for the Appropria-
tion of Further Divers Sums of
Money for and toward Defray-
ing Expenses of the Govern-
ment of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas during the Fiscal
Year commencing July 1, 2007
and ending June 2008."
The act allows for a $8 million
to be charged on the Consoli-
dated Fund, above and beyond
the annual budget, to pay $4
million to laid-off employees of
the Royal Oasis Resort in
Freeport and $4 million to Har-
court Development (Bahamas)
Limited for its marketing sup-
port for that hotel.
Ms Smith.said the way the
former owners treated the Roy-
al Oasis employees, who gave
so many years of service, was
not right.
"I have spoken in this place
about the closure of the resort,
and the impact that its closure
has had on the Grand Bahama
economy cannot be overstated.
"I cannot overstate the hard-
ship experienced by many for-
mer employees of the Royal
Oasis Resort, as a result of the
closure of the hotel, especially
during the period 2004 to date,
when the economy of Grand
Bahama was certainly not what
it needed to be for the residents
of Grand Bahama.
"Madam President, our focus
now should be what mecha-
nisms can we as a country and a
government put in place so we
protect workers in this country,
especially when it involves sale
of companies that lead to a
transfer of staff and benefits.
"The ex-gratia payment to
employees may have been long


FNM Senator Kay Smith


in coming, but this good and
caring government wanted to
bring closureifor the people, at
the right time to bring Christ-
mas cheer," she said.


"4
N


III


RSTAURANT

1 (2 T A IT P A NI T


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*;. s4'.7 -*44.

i .f. .:.1;.. .4.......


Vf


TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE PLEASE CONTACT GRAYCLIFF HOTEL B RESTAURANT _o

BOOK NOW AND DON'T MISS THIS ONE ( TELEPHONE 302 9150 / 322 2796) BOOK NOW AND DON'T MISS THIS ONE


By TANEKA
Tribune Staff
tthompson@t


RAY 8MITH
I IeII IaI
Everybody is talking about
Calypso Man.
0 If. I I rz,





' : -


j
'






i
r`
.I


I


I














Diamonds' 100 ATE EWI

'0 0 NATURE CENTER

gifts give kids




sparkling Xmas
pI 9y.:U^y^*^ *'lI m *


Anya Watkins, Ms Bahamas World; a little boy enjoying the party;
and Santa Claus at the Christmas Party, held at Goodmans Bay


THIS Christmas season Dia-
monds International donated
100 gifts to the children of the
Kilarney constituency.
"Diamonds International's
hope is to add these gifts to the
children's 'wish come true list'.
It is always our wish that more
corporate entities come
onboard to support local com-
munity based programmes, in
particular where kids are con-
cerned," said Anthony Smith,
DI marketing manager.
"Diamonds International is
always enthusiastic about lend-
ing our support to the commu-


nity as we have been doing for
the past years, but this particu-
lar project is special as it
involves the Christmas season
where it becomes abundantly
clear that a lot of the kids in
our country are without parents
or their parents are without the
resources necessary to help
make Christmas even more spe-
cial" said Mr Smith.
Dr Hubert Minnis, MP for
Kilarney, and Frank Saunders,
chairman of the constituency,
organised a Christmas party
held on Saturday, December 15
for the children of the area -


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
C iSTItE& DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
S -NAY DECEMBER 30, 2007,
11:30 a.. Speaker
Pastor Rex Major
NO EVENING SERVICE
Monday, December 31, 2007 10:00p.m. Watch Night Service
"Central Gospel Chapel wishes all a spirit-filled New Year"
Sam,




THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OFTHE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
_-_M P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2007
CHRISTMAS SUNDAY
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting
7:00PM, No Service
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Rev. Gerald Richardson
7:00PM Rev. Gerald Richardson
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
S11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
7:00PM No Service

RADIO PROGRAMMES
'RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Charles Sweeting
*lt*l####***********#********************!t*t**
Mrs. Kenris L. Carey, President; Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart Vice
President; Dr. Reginald W. Eldon, Secretary and Mr. Vincent A. Knowles,
Treasurer extends warm Christmas wishes to all Churches In The
Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church and to each and every
person in The Bahamas. We pray that God will bless each other and
everyone with good health, safety and joy at this special Season of the
year.



The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30th, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev.Carla Culmer/Sis. Rosemary Williams
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller
7:00 p.m. Songs of Praises

"C stig urcaesuonHi, orH cre. fr s0 ( Pte57


particularly those in the com-
munities of Gambier, Rock
Crusher Road and Dignity
Estates.
During this party, the chil-
dren were treated to the gifts
from Diamonds International.
Dr Minnis thanked Toni Gad,
island manager of DI, for pro-
viding 100 games that encour-
age thinking and mental devel-
opment.
He said using educational and
entertaining games is one way
to encourage discipline in young
people.
The many children that
attended from the surrounding
communities were also treated
to sweet treats, bouncy castles
and other attractions.
Ms Bahamas World and
spokes model for Diamonds
International, Anya Watkins
was also there to present gifts to
the children.


Pictured at the presentation are some Festival Noel Committee members and sponsors along with the Sabor
team. Back row (left to right): Chef Cheerese Newbold, Sabor; waitress Martha Mott, Sabor; Chef Sigmund
Hal, Sabor; Barbara Stollery, GB BNT committee member. Front Row (left to right) Sarah Kirkby, Festival
Noel Event coordinator, Barefoot Marketing; Taylor Ferguson, news director, Cool 96 FM; Isabel Allison,
manageress of Sabor; Chef Liz Grant, Sabor; Morgan Allison, TOP assistant, Sabor; Chef Emmanuel Smith,
Sabor; Karin Sanchez, chairman, Bahamas National Trust GB branch; Cecilia Bodie, administrator and edu-
cation specialist, Bahamas National Trust; Karen Hall, head waitress, Sabor.





New entrant takes



top restaurant prize


Freeport, Grand Bahama -
After a fierce competition, a
new restaurant and first time
entrant in the Festival Noel
competition came away with the
top prize.
According to organizers,
Sabor, located in the Pelican
Bay hotel under the direction
of Chef Worly Volundarson,
won attendees over with "zest
and pizzazz.
The crowd was said to be
"wowed" with Sabor staffs
cooking and dancing skills, and
attendees lined up wanting
more and more of what the


Worship Time: 11a.m. & 7p.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.
Church School during Worship Service
Speolal Servloes
Candlelight Sunday December 23 0 7:30 pm
Christmas Vigil Monday December 24 0 11pm
Watohnight Monday Deoember 31 0 11pm
Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE


team had to offer.
"I think it's great and
absolutely wonderful that we
won," said Chef Worly. "My
team and I are all so very
pleased with the way things
turned out".
When asked what it was that
he thought tipped the scales in
their favour, Chef Worly stated,
"It was the fact that we pre-
pared everything from scratch
while were out there. We
brought everything and prepped
right there; basically we had the
entire kitchen set up right on
site. Everything was really
fresh."
Restaurants competing this
year were the Harbour Room,
the Ferry House, the Grouper
Grill, China Beach, Sabor and
Joe Ret Catering.
Karin Sanchez, chairman for
the Grand Bahama Regional
Branch of the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust, said she was absolute-


ly thrilled about the way every-
thing turned out and comment-
ed that "I was just so amazed
with the presentation of Chef
Worly and his team, not only
when it came to the-food but
their set up was simply fantastic.
All the restaurants this year
were tremendous.
"We had so many compli-
ments on the variety and quan-
tity of food this year. Our sin-
cere thanks to each restaurant
and their teams."
The winner of this year's
competition receives a month
long blitz of their restaurant on
Cool 96 FM radio, a year's
worth of free advertisements in
the Bahama Buy & Sell publi-
cation, five $100 gift certificates
from Bristol Wines and Spirits,
the main sponsors of the event,
and five embroidered chef uni-
forms with "Chef Noel Winners
2007" compliments of the Uni-
form Place.


vhsV-


edtulng music, draind, and' Jo inspirldiondl
Christinas message, it's a programil thdt will put che itrue
meaning of Chrlstnds bdak into you Y -1
holiday and your life! .





SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning W'!ormlp Service...... 8.3i a.n.
Sunrda School for all ages.. 9,45 a.m.
Adult Education ............... 9.45a.m.
Worship Service .............. 11,00 a.m.
Spanish Service ......... .. 8.00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ....... 6.30 p m,

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yis.
Missionettes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting
RADIO MINISTRY
Sunday at 8:30 am. ZNS 1 TEMPLE TIME
Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God

Co A *ll1 .in e t r rcCe evl

Tel 32-834, ax:32-473. .O.Box N-56


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future


Worship Time: llam & 7pm


Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pmr

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on
Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m
Joy 101I.9 at 8:30a.m Rev. Dr Franklin Knowlle


fLL ARE WELCOME TO RflTERD
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs


I


I


; I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007


I








LC N


Bible


Teachers School


graduates


59 scholars


IN the second ceremony of
its kind held in the Bahamas,
59 scholars graduated last week
from the Bible Teachers School
of Ministries and the Mary
Banks Global Training Centre.
Thirty-eight students from
Grand Bahama, Bimini,
Eleuthera and New Providence
participated in the ceremony,
held at the Bible Teachers Wor-
ship Centre on Andros Drive
in Hawksbill, Grand Bahama.
Prophetess Dr Hazel Salmon
of Kingston, Jamaica, was the
guest speaker and delivered
what attendees described as a
"soul stirring" message to the
graduates.
Mallory Lightbourne, bishop
of operations and lead teacher,
noted that the Bible school
operates on a curriculum of
around 30 courses.
Each course runs for a period
of six weeks, simultaneous with
the academic school calendar.
Some of the courses offered
at the school are: Thought War
I, The Gift is Holy I, Faith is
the Holy Ghost I and How to
Study the Bible 1.
The school said students can
enroll in a one year diploma
programme, a two year associ-
ate of ministry degree or a three
year bachelor of ministry
degree, as well as personal
interest courses.
"Our main objective is to get
them to walk holy. The focus is
not to achieve 100 per cent alto-
gether on their exam papers,
which is good, but to see a
demonstration of what they
have learned in their daily
lives," said Bishop Lightbourne.
At the completion of the
course, graduates receive a cer-
tificate.
A number of awards are then
presented. Cicely Stuart of
Freeport, Grand Bahama was
presented with the Student of
the Year Award.
The ministry was established


STUDENT OF THE YEAR Bible
Teachers School of Ministnes and Mary
Banks Global Training Centre scholar
Cicely Stuart, centre, was presented
with the Student of the Year Award.
From left are bishop of operations Mal-
lory Lightbourne; Stuart: Apostle Dr
Mary Banks, founder and president of
Bible Teachers International and Mary
Banks Ministries.
Pic: Vandyke Hepburn


in the Bahamas 15 years ago
and more than 1,000 students
have since graduated from the
programme. The school said it
offers three methods of learn-
ing:
the classroom
community "video school"
correspondence
"During the classes the
teacher discerns the gifts of the


students and helps to bring
about the development of those
gifts in the classroom," said
Bishop Lightbourne.
"It could be any of the five-
fold ministerial gifts: apostles,
prophets, pastors, evangelists
and teachers; once we see the
gifts in operation and the stu-
dents desire to be developed in
their calling, then wev major in


-U---


that area of studies."
The students hailed from dif-
ferent denominations and rep-
resentatives of 25 churches
made up the graduating class
of 2006/2007.
While Bishop Lightbourne
admits that the membership at
the church is very small, she
said this has not impeded the
organisation from conducting


outreaches in the Communities
of Hawksbill, Pinder's Point,
Mack Town, Lewis Yard and
Hunters.
The school is said to be "like
no other" in that it allows stu-
dents to be not only trained in
theology, but also in the "move-
ment and anointing of the Holy
Spirit". w.
SThe coursgS e free JS7


charge and students are only
required to pay for the materi-
als heeded for each class.

TROPICA
EXTERMNATOR


COB stren


ens


ties with Florida



based university


College of the Bahamas President Janyne Hodder signing the exchange agreement watched by Erin
Fitzgerald, dean of international relations, Johnson and Wales; Dr Larry Rice, vice president and academic
dean, Johnson and Wales; Dr Linda Davis, vice-president of research, graduate programmes and interna-
tional relations, COB; Dr Lincoln Marshall, executive director, CHMI.


Seeking further avenues for
international exchange oppor-
tunities to enhance the experi-
ence of both its students and
faculty, the College of the
Bahamas has strengthened its
ties with Johnson and Wales
University in Florida.
COB described Johnson and
Wales as a "world-class univer-
sity, where students have an
opportunity to pursue a career
in business, hospitality, culinary
arts, or technology":
Administrators of both insti-
tutions have signed a student
and faculty exchange agreement
which will allow students and
faculty from the College of the


Bahamas and Johnson and
Wales campuses to participate
in short and long term exchange
opportunities.
The new agreement opens
doors for partnerships through
the Culinary and Hospitality
Management Institute (CHMI)
and students and faculty from
CHMI will be afforded oppor-
tunities to display and improve
upon their skills in the interna-
tional arena in an academic
environment.
"The exchange agreement
further signifies the commit-
ment of the College of the
Bahamas to provide interna-
tional experiences for deserv-


ing students who desire to study
abroad, said COB in a state-
ment, adding that faculty mem-
bers will also benefit from
opportunities to extend their
repertoires while teaching
abroad.
Conversations have been held
and preliminary planning has
reportedly begun regarding fac-
ulty members participating in
Johnson and Wales exchange
opportunities in February 2008.
COB said students can expect
to begin to take full advantage
of study abroad opportunities
at Johnson and Wales Univer-
sity during the 2008 2009 aca-
demic year.


RHODES MEMORIAL


METHODIST CHURCH


Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly, Rev. Emily A. Demeritte
The Officers, Members and the Entire Parish Family of
Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church

INVITE YOU TO ATTEND


A Eucharistic Watchnight

Service of Consecration
Monday, December 31, 2007
10:00 P.M.


And


The Annual Renewal of

Covenant Service


On The Festival of The Epiphany
Lord's Day, January 6, 2007
10:30 A.M.
Rhodes Memorial Methodist Church
108 Montrose Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas


A Citadel for Christ in the City with the World as
our Parish
Proclaiming: Jesus for All and All for Jesus


May Your New Year Be Filled With God's Glory!


. 0,-. 7 I .,


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


.^, .













Olympic chief in

drowning escape


FROM page one

In 1999, a family of four
drowned after going off the dock
in a heavy rainstorm. In 2003, a
pastor, his wife and their nephew
drowned when they, too, went off
the dock in a storm.
Currently, there are inadequate
concrete slabs at certain parts of
the dock that are no more than a
foot high. Cars can easily drive
over these barriers. There are also
large gaps between these slabs
where mailboats take freight.
When asked what will be done
about the lack of security at the
dock, Minister of Labour and Mar-
itime Affairs Dion Foulkes said a
full review of security at the dock
is necessary.
"What we are going to have to


do is a review of the security for
vehicles at the dock," he said. "As
you know, some work was done
under the last administration as a
result of a few accidents. But we
are going to have to take a serious
look at the security in terms of
vehicles being able to drive off
into the water. That's a very seri-
ous matter."
Mr Foulkes added: "We would
have to look at some permanent
barriers to ensure that accidents
like this do not happen."
Sir Arlington, a former ENM
Cabinet minister, and his wife
were at the dock to get fish cleaned
when the accident occurred.
He has for many years been a
major figure in athletics adminis-
tration and runs a legal practice at
the corner of East Bay and
Deveaux Streets.


Drug arrests made


FROM page one

taken to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, where doctors officially
pronounced the man dead at
1125pm.
Supt Mackey said police are
awaiting the results of an autop-
sy report to determine the cause
of death.
SUSPECTS ARRESTED
FOR POSSESSION OF DAN-
GEROUS DRUGS
Two male residents of Eight
Mile Rock were arrested and
taken into custody by police
after they were allegedly found
with a large quantity of sus-
pected marijuana.


Police on patrol in Fishing
Hole Road on Thursday around
4.45pm spotted a Dodge Stratus
car with two male occupants
acting in a suspicious manner.
The officers followed the
vehicle to Eight Mile Rock
where the driver drove behind a
shopping plaza. A passenger got
out of the vehicle with a black
travelling bag and was observed
by the officers going into near-
by bushes.
Police recovered the bag,
which contained nine-and-a-half
pounds of suspected mariua-
na. The suspects aged 32 and
$3 years were arrested.
The accused men were tak-
en into police custody. They
were to be arraigned before
Magistrate Debbie Ferguson


The spot on the eastern end of Potter's Cay Dock where Sir Arlington and Lady Shella went over In their car.
(Pic: Brent Dean/Tribune Staff)


2,j-



M- ----
,h* ^ ... .. -. -:- .- c ,,, -
_ =la "'
. .... = . .


Two questioned


on armed robbery


FROM page one

sion around 2 pm. The victims
were two men, 23 and 28 years
old.
The incident was reported to
-the East Street South Police
Station moments later and offi-


cers subsequently arrested two
male suspects. They also found
a 9mm handgun which con-
tain6d S'den'lliWfdunds of
amnidlition. ftlsz 8
The gun and ammunition
were confiscated and the sus-
pects were arrested.


Only the bumper remains of the Toyota Camry driven by Lady
Shella Butler, at the eastern end of Potter's Cay Dock, where the vehi-
cle went overboard with she and Sir Arlington Butler on board.
Large gaps along the dock sides are visible, illustrating the lack of
security Infrastructure at the dock where several people have died
in recent years.


Morton Salt and trade union

avoid three-month lay-offs


UJE'TDrn i, x i-


(Pic: Brent Dean/Tribune Staff) FROM page one


advance would be required to
repay it by future payroll reduc-
tions. The union and the com-
pany also agree that any steps
taken by the parties to institute
a reduced work week, and the
introduction of a reduced work
week, shall not, in any respect,
amount to a breach of the
industrial agreement."


Goodwill

show for

Sea Hauler

victims

FROM page one

cause, but up until the end of
the show, none appeared to fol-
low through on his appeal.
However, Mr Bodie
described the public response
as "overwhelming."
The show of goodwill comes
days after some of the victims
were frustrated in their efforts
to speak with Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham at his Cable
Beach office on Christmas Eve
about the status of their claim
for compensation from the gov-
ernment, which a commission
found partly liable in 2004.
In a move that shocked the
victims who, along with the
rest of the public, had heard
him frequently speak of their
plight as "tragic" before and
during the election campaign
which brought him to power,
and condemn the former gov-
ernment for inaction Mr
Ingraham refused to speak with
them, instead briskly leaving his
office and quickly getting into
his waiting car.
Sofia Antonio, one of the vic-
tims, said she concluded from
Mr Ingraham's reaction that
day that he had merely "used"
their plight as part of an election
time "strategy" to win votes.
The Sea Hauler/United Star
collision occurred in 2003, when
the former boat was on its way
to the Cat Island regatta. Twen-
ty-five people were injured and
four people died.


The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following:

Senior Management Assistant

Serves as the Senior Assistant to the Management
Officer; ICASS Coordinator; Management
Technologies Coordinator and Administrative
Services/Support.

This position is open to candidates with the
following qualifications;

A University degree in administration,
finance business administration or
communication.
Five years of experience in general
administrative work.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Mustdemonstrate strong computer skills,
including facility with Microsoft office Suite,
data based programs and population of web
pages, and familiarity with other electronic
tools.
Must have experience with budgeting and
event planning
Must be able to work independently, display
good people skills and have strong tact and
diplomacy skills
Must be fluent in English, both spoken
and written, and be able to prepare clear and
concise briefing papers, letters, etc.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidate will be offered an excellent
compensation package including performance-based
incentives, medical and dental insurance, life insurance,
pension and opportunities for training development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens
who are eligible for employment under Bahamian laws
and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00a.m. to
5:00p.m. Monday through Friday at the security area
of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy
addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than
Friday, January 11, 2008.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007


~IIPb~Ur.. i.


.
-.

i-









THE TIBUNESATURAY, DCEMBE 29,C007,NAGES


Castro:


I've outgrown


power-hungry urges


By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HAVANA (AP) Fidel
Castro said yesterday that as a
young man he hoped to cling
to power but has long since out-
grown the urge, the latest
ambiguous statement about his
future at the helm of the coun-
try he has ruled for nearly five
decades.
In a letter read at Cuba's
year-end session of parliament.
the ailing 81-year-old clarified
an assertion he made Dec. 17,
that he "was not a person cling-
ing to power."
"Let me add that I was for a
time, because of excessive youth
and lack of conscience," Castro
wrote. "What made me change?
Life itself."
By the time he led Cuba's
1959 revolution, he had already
realized it was his "duty to fight
for (socialist) goals or die in
combat," not to stubbornly hold
on to power, the letter said.
Castro's words drew a stand-
ing ovation from 509 lawmakers
at the legislature on Friday,
where his chair sat empty next
to his 76-year-old brother, Raul
Castro.
Castro has not said when -
or if he will step aside for
good after emergency intestinal
surgery forced him to cede


"provisional" authority to his
brother 17 months ago. He has
not been seen in public since,
but remains the head of Cuba's
Council of State, its highest gov-
erning body.
Castro has vowed not to
stand in the way of younger
leaders, but remains on the bal-
lot in parliamentary elections
Jan. 20 a candidacy the Com-
munist Party supports, Raul
Castro said, suggesting his
brother has no plans to retire.
Re-election to parliament is
essential for the older Castro to
retain his post atop the Council
of State.
Also at the session, Econo-
my Minister Jose Luis
Rodriguez announced Cuba's
economy had grown 7.5 percent
in 2007, well short of official
forecasts for 10 percent growth.
He predicted 8 percent growth
in 2008.
Cuba includes state spending
on free health care, education
and food rations when calculat-
ing gross domestic product -
an uncommon methodology
that critics say inflated its
growth figures for 2005 and
2006, which were 11.8 percent
and 12.5 percent, respectively.
Officials have spent months
debating how to shape Cuba's
economic future, alleviate crip-
pling housing and transporta-


* CUBAN LEADER FIDEL CASTRO


(AP Photo)


tion shortages, and boost agri-
cultural output, Raul Castro
told the assembly.
"We'd all like to move faster,
but it's not always possible," he
said.
"Those who occupy positions
of leadership should know how
to listen and create an environ-
ment that is favorable for every-
one to express themselves with
absolute freedom," he said.
"Criticism, when used appro-
priately, is essential to advanc-
ing."
Agricultural production rose
nearly 25 percent in 2007, while
the industrial and transporta-
tion sectors grew about.8 per-
cent each, Rodriguez said.
Exports of goods and services
rose by a quarter, largely
because the island sends so
many doctors to provide free
medical care in Venezuela in
exchange for discounted oil.
But Osvaldo Martinez, head
of the legislature's economic
affairs commission, said the
island's sugar harvest and a
government push to build new
homes had failed to meet
expectations.
He blamed slowing growth
on an "intense rise" in the cost
of food and fuel imports the
island spends $1.6 billion to
import food each year and
on falling tourism.


_i _*Nigeria reassigns its

oe thdchargesco anti-corruption chief
By MICHAEL WINES Natal province where he hand- n W i ci
c.007 New York Times News ed out Christmas presents to
Service children, refused to comment
on the charges, according to i
JOHANNESBURG, South news reports. By LYDIA POLGREEN researcher at Human Rights a long-prqngipd push .rid government coffers.,
Africa A South African anti- South Africa's National Pros-c.2007 New York Times News Watch who studies Nigeria. "It Nigeria of graft. His inygfiga- But to Nigerians, the mios
corruption strike force revived ecuting Authority, which is tak- Service is a very bad sign." tions won him praise from the serious form of corruption is the
and expanded criminal charges ing up the charges, has long: The move comes as Nigeria public and made him a darling malfeasance of officials, which
on Friday against Jacob G. indicated that the corruption: DAKAR Senegal Nigeri- enters a turbulent period. Ear- of Western donors. has left the nation. Africa's


Zuma, the new leader of South
Africa's dominant political par-
ty and the front-runner to
become the nation's next presi-
dent.
The charges, confirmed in an
e-mail message by Zuma's
lawyer, threaten to catapult the
country into a political and legal
crisis that could last well
through 2009, when the next
national elections are scheduled
to be held.
The lawyer, Michael Hulley,
said in the e-mail message that
prosecutors delivered a sum-
mons to Zuma's Johannesburg
home on Friday ordering him
to stand trial for "various counts
of racketeering, money laun-
dering, corruption and fraud."
He did not elaborate, and a
spokesman for the prosecutors
did not return telephone calls.
But the charges appear to stem
from a lengthy investigation
into bribes paid to secure a
major military contract for a
French arms maker in 2001. A
court in Durban convicted
Zuma's business adviser last
year of funneling roughly
$170,000 to Zuma in exchange
for help in winning contracts.
The corruption strike force,
nicknamed the Scorpions,
sought last year to prosecute
Zuma on charges related to that
case, but a judge rejected that
effort on procedural grounds.
With Friday's summons, that
effort appears to have been
revived.
Zuma, reached at a ceremony
on his home turf of KwaZulu-


investigation of Zuma would
eventually lead to a trial. But
the timing of Friday's summons
raised tensions in an already
heated political struggle.
Last week, Zuma, 65, wrest-
ed the leadership of the African
National Congress from South
Africa's president, Thabo Mbe-
ki, in a bitter showdown at a
party conference. The victory
capped a political comeback for
Zuma, who had been deputy
president and Mbeki's heir
apparent until he was ensnared
in the arms scandal in 2005, and
Mbeki fired him.
Since then, the charismatic
Zuma has cast himself as the
victim of a government-led
vendetta, while a party rebel-
lion against Mbeki's more dis-
tant leadership has sent his for-
tunes into decline.
Zuma's ascension to the pres-
idency of the African National
Congress effectively splits the
leadership of the nation in half,
with Mbeki heading the presi-
dency and Zuma in charge of
the machinery that has elected
most of the nation's municipal
officials and many members of
Parliament.
Right or wrong, said Karima
Brown, the political editor of
the South African newspaper
Business Day, many will see Fri-
day's announcement of revived
charges as an attempt to sabo-
tage Zuma's career before he
can absorb what is left of Mbek-
i's domain. "It's going to be a
very testy time politically," she
said.


a's top anticorruption official,
whose investigations have
ensnared some of the country's
wealthiest politicians, is being
sent to a yearlong course at a
remote training institute,
according to senior law enforce-
ment officials, provoking criti-
cism from many who described
the move as an attempt to side-
line him.
The official, Nuhu Ribadu, is
a police investigator who has
risen to become one of the most
powerful and feared figures in
Nigeria.
Late Thursday, the top police
official, Mike Okiro, said the
decision to send Ribadu to
study for a year was not an
effort to push him aside, but
part of routine training for
senior officers.
"I don't see any hue and cry
that should be raised from
Nuhu going on course," Okiro
told reporters, according to The
Guardian, a local Nigerian
newspaper.
"He is a police officer; he
must go on course to develop
himself and also develop the
police."
But the reassignment inspired
outrage from advocates of
greater transparency in a coun-
try where hundreds of billions
of dollars in oil money have dis-
appeared from the public trea-
sury since independence in
1.960.
"It destroys the credibility of
the war on corruption," said
Chris Albin-Lackey, a


lier this month Ribadu's com-
mission arrested James Ibori, a
powerful former governor from
an oil-rich state who is accused
of stealing more than $85 mil-
lion.
Ibori was a crucial part of the
team that helped the country's
new president, Umaru Yar'Ad-
ua, win an election in April that
international observers said was
too deeply flawed to be credi-
ble.
An independent tribunal is
expected to rule next month on
the legitimacy of the election,
and some analysts and diplo-
mats say the chances of Yar'Ad-
ua's victory being annulled are
increasing.
Add to that the public out-
rage over what many see as the
firing of a man who commands
more respect than almost any
figure in Nigerian public life,
and the country could be head-
ed for serious trouble, said Ayo
Obe, one of Nigeria's leading
lawyers.
"There is a sense of vulnera-
bility there," Obe said. "It will
not be easy to discount the pow-
er of public opinion."
Ribadu was plucked from
obscurity by Olusegun Obasan-
jo, then the president, to run an
anticorruption commission after
it was formed in 2002 as part of


But Ribadu was also criti-
cized for being selective in his
targets and sometimes ignoring
due process. The politicians
who found themselves in his
cross hairs were often enemies
of Obasanjo, while allies of the
president largely escaped scruti-
ny.
One of the problems with the
election in April was the
attempt by the electoral com-
mission to exclude many can-
didates because of corruption
allegations.
Virtually all those candidates
were members of opposition
parties c members of the ruling
party who had fallen out of
favor. The Supreme Court later
ruled that candidates could not
be barred for unproven allega-
tions.
Since the end of military rule
in 1999, Nigeria has been strug-
gling to remake its image, which
has been seriously tarnished by
corruption.
That reputation has been
cemented in the minds of many
outsiders by the ubiquitous
fraudulent e-mail messages that
flood "in" boxes across the
globe, purporting to be from
the widows, brothers or sons of
high officials, asking recipients
for banking details in exchange
for a cut of money filched from


most populous, as one of the
poorest countries, despite
exporting billions of dollars in
oil each year.
Ribadu has estimated that
corrupt government officials
have siphoned $380 billion of
the nation's wealth since inde-
pendence, with the greed equi-
tably shared between the mili-
tary and civilian rulers who have
traded places at the helm over
the years.
. The evidence of this perpetu-
al robbery is everywhere in
Nigeria: in the broken roads
that kept many Nigerians from
visiting family members over
Christmas; in the health care
systems so rotted that simple
diseases like malaria and
measles kill; in the police offi-
cers who demand 15-cent bribes
from passing drivers because
their salaries are so low they
cannot afford drinking water
while on duty.
But it is also evident in the
flashy cars and elaborate man-
sions of the political elite.
Before he was indicted by
Ribadu's commission in 2005
for bilking his constituents of
millions, the governor of oil-
rich Bayelsa state was using
government money to build
himself.a sprawling estate, com-
plete with an artificial lake.


' -GRAHAM,THOMPSON & Co.
A


I~L~


c


Monc
And I


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW NOTARIES PUBLIC
To our Valued Clents please note our'

SPECIAL HOLIDAY HOURS

Eday, Wednesday
14, 25 and 26 Closed

)ecember 27 Normal Business Hours


december 28

ecember31
day, January 1


F peesday, January 2


Nassau Chambers
Sass,.. n Houst
Shirle\ Street & \' .to
Pu-Box 2 N:27


Closed at 1:00 pm


Closed


Normal Business Hou
Freeport Chambers
The Firsi Comnimemil eCin>.'
Ird Floor. Suite 9
PT Box F-429531
Frecpoli. Gi( 3,d B3,hEau'b"1
Tel 12421 351- 7_474: EaL i"-4


Nassau Glass Company



will be closing at


1:00pm Monday Dec 31st


and reopening on Wednesday January 2


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


U


?rfr .t









PMAGE 1Mll0, A UTRY E M 0T R B




British Colonial Hilton, Little Switzerland




team up for special winter promotion


TO top the year off with the
gift of giving, the British Colo-
nial lilton and Little Switzer-
land have teamed up for a spe-
cial winter promotion.
Guests staying at the Hilton
over the holiday season have
the chance to win a number of
prizes from Little Switzerland
by just stopping at the ginger-
bread winter wonderland and
dropping their name and
address into the little box.
Every week, a name is
picked out of the box, located
in front of the winter wonder-
land, and the winner is
announced the following week.
Last week's winner was Kelsey
Nottage.
The final prize will be drawn
the week of January 5, 2008.


PROMOTIONS REPRESENTATIVE
Deirdree Andrews (left) poses with
third week winner Kelsey Nottage
and marketing and leisure sales
manager LaToya Hanna-Moxey.


Showcasing .




the vocal



talents of



our youth .


OVER the course of 2007,
the British Colonial Hilton led
a number of efforts to raise
money in support of less for-
tunate children in the
Bahamas.
With this in mind, the
Resort's management said it
was only fitting to end the year
with a display of the many tal-
ents of children from around
the island, as well as a sam-
pling of the talents of children
from abroad.
On December 11 Win-
sonette Major, a former
National Arts Festival winner,
belted out a melodious rendi-
tion of "O Holy Night" at the
unveiling of the Hilton's 'win-
ter wonderland'.
Then, on December 14, the
voices of the Polish children's
choir rang out in a series of
beautiful songs on the hotel's
lobby staircase.
However the big surprise,


according to the management,
was the little children of
Bayview Academy, a local
school with just over 50 stu-
dents in grades one to six.
The Bayview group sang "O
Tannembaum" in German, led
by their sixth'grade choir direc-
tor, Krishawn Butler.
The Hilton also showcased
the ihamas national Chil-
dren s Choir in the lobby on
Tuesday, December 18, and
again on Thursday, December
20.
"It indeed was a festive time
at the British Colonial Hilton
and has not only become a
Hilton tradition, but an oblig-
ation to broaden the aware-
ness of the great potential pos-
sessed by the children in the
Bahamas and to showcase the
positive efforts made by them
and those around them," said
the hotel's management in a
statement.


SW c ir d ie r


RISE
Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday, 27 December 200 7 C F A L"
8.ISKX U ST6 & .1 TAQED Q eURzIfr. q,qI' J'AMAS.COM FO6 M6E D bATA & INFORMATION
BI1X ?sLL SHARE f %CrG 0.17 YTD 387.36 I YTD % 23.11
52..KHI 52 ..Lc.. Se..ur.i Pravioua, Close Toda,-s Cl.:.so Charnge.e D n, ci EPS 1 DI. b P .
1.66 0.54 Abaco Markets 1.55 1.64 0.09 11,050 0.157 0.000 10.4 0.00%
11.74 11.00 Bahlanas Property Fund 11.65 11 65 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.8 3.43
9.60 8.03 Bank of Bahamras 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.733 0.260 13.1 2.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.030 4.5 3.53%
3.74 1.75 Bahamas Wasto 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.289 0.090 12.7 2.46%
2.70 1.22 Fidelity Bank 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.7 1.51%
12.05 10.00 Cable Bahamas 12.05 12.05 0.00 1.030 0.240 11.7 1.99%
3.15 1.90 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.6 1.27%
8.40 4.17 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 8.33 8.37 0.04 1,700 0.426 0.260 19.6 311%
7.22 4.74 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.30 5.51 0.21 0.129 0.050 11 0.94
2.60. 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.316 0.020 74 O.t5%
7 15 5.70 Famrguard 7.10 7.15 0.05 1,000 0.713 0.280 10.0 3.92%
12.95 12.02 Finco 12.95 12.95 0.00 1,000 0.829 0.570 15. 4 0%
14.75 14.15 FlrstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.914 0.470 16.0 3.22%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.18 5.18 0.00 0.359 0.140 14.4 2.70%
1.00 0.54 F report C to 0.74 0.77 0.03 3,500 0.017 0.000 45.3 000%
8.00 7.10 ICD Utilitios 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4 14%
11.00 8.60 J.S. Johnson 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.059 0.590 10.4 5.36%
10.00 1000 Plrmior Real Estate 1 100 in On n nn 1 i7 n .nn I -- 8 nn-
SFId Jftial~l- -CEltyterr secures
52.1-hi. 2..i .L.:,. .T.r,.iI Bid I r% 5. t1 L. t i Fr,.:... iee l, .:i EFPS i L.. 1 PiL ,PI1.
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%
.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 035 040 0 20 .000 n non) Prn non-
S " ii...'"" .' I'." Seourltid
- 1 1.n1 abCi.ABB 41 00 4300 r, 4 -- -. -,
14.60 14.u0 Banamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71I
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 45 -0.030 0000 N/M 0.00%
BISX I lalad Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3679 1.2983 Colina Monney Mrket iFundr I 6788*


3.5388 2.9728 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.5388***
2.9902 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990218*
1.2827 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund '1.282687*
11 8192 11 3075 Fi.ilrli. FPrime Incomre Fund 11 8192"--
B ,.;- : '^V -. ,-; -,.^ , -.' .. ; ', '... .-t "z" ." :... .. .. .. .
,-., ,- -
B I..LL ;-I ,,.E- IlirUtDt. Ia rl i0.. Iiu a.u U MARKE r TERM YIELD lest 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-HI Highest closing prico in I.nl 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collne end Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In leat 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Clino nnd fidelity 19 Docomlbn, 2
Previous Close Previous day's weighteod price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price "- 30 Junoi 2007
Today's Close Curront day's welghled price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week "' 11 i(c.t,ii '
Change Chllge in closing price trolrl day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings pot share for ile last 12 ilh, s .. 1 Ju1lyhI -
Daily Vol. Number of total shares trailed today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the lost 12 mncnlhs N/M Not Moanringul
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index Janualy 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
1) 3-or-1 Stock Split Effectivo Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA g424502-1010 I/ ~illilT 42466-7f/4 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242 1394-2503


[2)7
1007
[111


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that AULIUS TELUSNORD of PALM
BEACH STREET OFF ROBINSON RD, P.O. BOX N-3331,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of
December, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MONIKA ZEIDLER of PARADISE
ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of December, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,.
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JULIE CHARLES of HANNAH
ROAD, P.O. BOX N-8889, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 22ND day of December, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NIXON CEPOUDY OF
BRUCE AVENUE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be 'granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of DECEMBER,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


F






SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 11


THF TRIRIUNE


LCAL EW


Bamboo Shack



Christmas Yard



Competition '07


ups team s.


TO mark the festive season
and brighten the environs of
its five locations, the manage-
ment of the Bamboo Shack
held a competition for the best
decorated restaurant.
The management noted that
Christmas, "the celebration of
the birth of Jesus Christ", is a
time to spread love, joy, peace
and goodwill. They said this
was the underlying motive
behind the Bamboo Shack
Christmas Yard Competition
2007.
It was also said that the occa-
sion reinforced team spirit, and
brought out the talents and
abilities of staff members.
The five displays were
judged on colour, design, tex-
ture, space, balance, "and were
presented with enthusiasm and
flair," management said.
The Carmichael Road and
Wulff Road locations shared
first place with 94 points each.
They were followed by Soldier
Road with 81 points.
Nassau Street came in third
with 78 points, followed by
Baillou Hill Road with 65
points:
Said the management in a
statement: "We are grateful to
the managers who led their


teams in such fierce competi-
tion. We encourage them to be
at their best at all times. To
the judges, we are appreciative
of the time and effort, as they
have done an outstanding job.
We thank the public for their
patronage over the year and
invite them to view the displays
at their leisure."
The themes for the displays
were:
Nassau Street
Theme: Heavenly shimmer
A suspended angel watched
over the premises, while
Christmas ornaments adorned
a roof-top covered with snow.
The colour scheme of white,
blue and silver was described
as "superb".
Baillou Hill Road
Theme: Simply elegant
Shimmering rust coloured
fabric covered the poles and
porch. Bright lights adorned
the foliage surrounding the
building.
Carmichael Road
Theme: May your days be
merry and bright
The company's logo (a shack
made of bamboo) served as a


nativity scene complete with a
family of chickens. Judges said
the bold use of pink and aqu&
as well as the design, originaf-
ity and quality of entertain-
ment at this location "lifted the
competition to the next level".
Soldier Road
Theme: Christ the saviour is
born
This presentation was based
around the nativity scene. Red
dominated the colour scheme,
as Santa Claus brought gifts
for all. Live entertainment by a
young band and fireworks
filled the air with music and
excitement.
Wulff Road
Theme: Christmas Bahami-
an Style
Bahamian cuisine, rhythmic
music and dance influenced
this presentation. It featured
'Mama' preparing the Johnny
Cake.
Animated ornaments and
other Christmas favourites as
well as a junkanoo rush-out
involved the entire community.
"Creativity, colour, texture,
and the arrangement of dis-
plays enhanced the competi-
tion," according to judges.


HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO
ALL OUR CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS
FROM


PREMIER


MAY THE NEW YEAR OF 2008 BRING GOOD
HEALTH, PEACE AND PROSPERITY

WE WILL CLOSE FOR THE HOLIDAYS
AT 12:15 P.M.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29TH
AND REOPEN AT 7:30 A.M.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2ND, 2008


St. Alban's Dr. off West Bay St.
P.O. Box N-1085
Tel (242) 322-8396
Fax (242) 323-7745


East Bay and Mackey St.
Bridge Plaza Commons Bldg.
Tel/Fax (242) 393-4210
Tol Free (242) 300-7035


SUPER


Comn cddsme Tf


Stesm At


EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God
E December 30, Sunday @ 6:30 p.m.
Cadmle Ligbt
Service




Eve Service

This year, got more out of Christmas than credit card bills.
Remember the Christmas magic you had as a child? Come
rekndle that wonder at Evangelistic Temple. We are celebrating
the seaon with exciting programs for the whole family.
Featuring music, drama, and inspirational Christmas messages,
programs that will put the true meaning of Christmas back Into
your holiday and your Ifel
Cl isvn a4tTrcC tel


+


IIIL- I I


I


Cfisretnu


INSIGHT~Y~

For the storie






PAGE~~~~~ 12, SAURAY DEEBR29 07THRBN


iy Franlyi I Fr eguson


NASSAU EVENTS CAPTURED ON CAMERA


Happy Bipthday to Justice

A fantastic evening of exquisite dining, dancing, live entertainment and the who's-
who of guests marked the 60th birthday celebration of Senior Justice Anita Allen.
The event was held at Tanderra, the Allen's 'get-away' home in Coral Harbour..
----------------------------------------------


s181
JUSTICE ALLEN WITH SIBLINGS Shown (1-r) are George Bethell, Beryl Dillet, Senior Justice Allen, Edward
Bethell and Stephanie Dean


JUSTICE ALLEN WITH COLLEAGUES Shown (1-r)
are Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez, Justice Vera
Watkins, Senior Justice Allen, Justice Jon Isaacs,
Assistant Registrar of the Supreme Court Tabitha
Cumberbatch and Justice Stephen Isaacs


JUSTICE ALLEN WITH FAMILY Shown (1-r): Antoine, a final year veterinary medical student at UWI; Amil,
a final year neuroscience major at Johns Hopkins University; Aliya, an attorney at Graham Thompson & Co;
Algernon Sr, Senior Justice Allen; Phylicia, student at the College of the Bahamas; Attorney Algernon Jr, asso-
ciate at Allen, Allen & Co.


MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest
speaks with businessman Franklyn Wilson


SHOWN (1-r): Attorney Phillip 'Brave' Davis and his
wife, Ann Marie; Michael and Camille Barnett


, rankldn 0. )TFrg uson


t-- //a4


(242) 357-8472


~ire"e


P.O. Box N-4659,
Nassau, Bahamas


I


I
,csS_,t~'i


- -


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2007


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