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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03068
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 12/19/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03068

Full Text







McRIB
PUEBBQ I
GOODNESS """ ovi
HIGH 80F
LOW 68F

f PARTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE 'RE#1


Sreaffit. ,a]

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Shotn of*



POLICE are investigat-
ing the circumstances sur-
rounding the shooting of a
taxi driver early Tuesday
morning.
While details were
sketchy up to press time,
Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans told TteTri-
SEE page 14


THE PLP and FNM have
agreed that 85 votes should be
thrown out of the ballot box
from the May 2nd Pinewood
election, it was revealed in the
election court yesterday.
Lead attorneys for the FNM
and PLP, Michael Barnett and
Philip "Brave" Davis both con-
sented to the figure, which
comes from the combined list
of 183 from both sides.
In addition to the 85 votes
that should be removed, the
parties agreed that 56 votes
should remain, as the burden
SEE page 10

Sir Jack Hayward:
legal dispute 'is
out of control'
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Sir Jack
Hayward, a principal owner
in the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, has admitted that
the legal dispute between
himself and the St George
family has "gotten out of con-
trol."
"It is being driven by the
lawyers. It's gotten out of con-
trol," he said, when asked by
reporters to respond to com-
ments made by Chris Gray,
SEE page 14

E CORRECTION
IN TUESDAY'S edition of
The Tribune, in the article 'Gov-
ernment plans to pay laid off
Royal Oasis staff before Christ-
mas', it was reported that Har-
court Development Company
owed the government $13 million
in casino taxes and $3.1 million
in union pension funds at the clo-
sure of the sale for the Royal
Oasis Resort in Grand Bahama.
However, it was Driftwood
(Freeport), the former owners of
the resort, who owed the funds,
not Harcourt Development.
The Tribune apologises for this
error and any inconvenience it
might have caused Harcourt
Development Company.


FIFTY-two Dominican
fishermen appeared in
Magistrate's Court yester-
day where they pleaded
guilty to poaching
charges.
Captain Santiago Euse-
bio was fined $50,000 on
the charge of illegal fish-
ing, and $3,000 on each
charge of possession of
prohibited apparatus,
possession of undersized
crawfish and possession
of undersized grouper.
According to court
dockets, the men on Fri-
day, December 14, while
at Ragged Island onboard
the 86-foot vessel El Mis-
mo Espirito, unlawfully
took fish within the exclu-
sive zone of the Bahamas.
Court dockets also stated
that the men were found
in possession of 21 air
compressors, 12 spear
guns, 83 pounds of under-
sized crawfish and 80
pounds of undersized
grouper.
The men were
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel at
Court eight Bank Lane
yesterday afternoon.
The other fifty-one fish-
ermen were dis,.chiged
with a stern warning that
they'could face jail time if
found poaching in
Bahamian waters
again.


Inspired by the sun...

S/ MERRy CH-RISTMAS!


:E MANAGEMENT
D. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
li [leulro | humo
P 31.1104/I'idl;|)i ll B MW1141.-11 3


I-


Edison Key pays back

$6,684.54 to Treasury
E By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net

FNM MP for South Abaco
Edison Key has paid the Trea-
sury back $6,684.54 after it was
discovered that he was receiving J
both a parliamentary pension .. -
and salary..
Mr Key, who said he was not .-
aware he was receiving both R'
payments, tabled a receipt for
the payment of the full amount
he has received since May 2nd,
in the House of Assembly late
Monday night.
This receipt was tabled along
with a letter from Treasurer at
SEE page 14







Never start your
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ranc 1 S
art choice is
n0agement.
O'u can truLst.


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PRICE 750


No.25


A 17-YEAR-OLD boy of
Yellow Elder Gardens was
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court late yesterday after-
noon, charged with the mur-
der of a C V Bethel student.
The juvenile, who was
already on remand for other
matters, was arraigned before
- Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court Eight, Bank Lane,
charged with the murder of
George Oliver. Oliver, a 12th
grade student of CV Bethel
High School became the coun-
try's 57th murder victim when
he was reportedly shot near
Town Centre Mall. Oliver,


who was wearing his school
uniform, was reportedly on his
way home after attending a
church service commemorat-
ing national youth month.
Court dockets state the 17-
year-old being concerned with
another intentionally caused
young Oliver's death. The
juvenile was not required to
plead to the murder charge
and was remanded -to Her
Majesty's Prison. The juvenile
is the second person to be
arraigned for Oliver's murder.
The case was adjourned to
January and transferred to
juvenile court.


Case of officers
accused of beating
is adjourned
THE case of two police offi-
cers accused of brutally beat-
ing a man in June was
adjourned to January 31, 2008
after a local Magistrate
recused herself from hearing
the matter.
The case of Corporal Don-
avon Gardiner has been sent
back to Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez after Magis-
SEE page 14


ROYAL Oasis workers can expect
a long-awaited pay day from the gov- '
ernment as early as this week, The
Tribune has learned.
Following statements made in the
House of Assembly on Monday the
government planned to pay the laid
off workers in Grand Bahama
"before Christmas," however, Min-
ister of State for Finance Zhirvargo
Laing told The Tribune the funds may
be paid this week.
"We are working that out right
SEE page 10


TN I


BAHAMAS EDITION


., ,, .. Parties agree 85
votes should be
thrown out in
Pinewood case
By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
" ..bdean@tribunemedia.net


uvenileI


17-year-old in [

court over the

death of student


Royal Oasis workers

could be paid this week
* By TANEKA THOMPSON --
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net I


,. ..,.,,-.,- .... ,, .. ... ;., .. ., .- :_ -: ,,^ .. .* .. ]' -'.,,INA
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I-'AU 2, WNLSLAY, DCEMBR 19,2007THE TIBUN


* In brief

Man charged

with killing

while driving
dangerously
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A 28-year-old
Eight Mile Rock man has been
charged in Freeport Magistrate's
Court with killing in the course
of dangerous driving.
Raymond Timothee, a resi-
dent of Jones Town, Eight Mile
Rock, was arraigned before
Magistrate Debbie Ferguson in
Court One. He pleaded not
guilty to the charge of killing
Kamis Dames, who was the fifth
traffic fatality for 2007.
Dames, a motorcyclist, died
during the accident, which
occurred on October 6 at Jones
Town, Eight Mile Rock. Timo-
thee was granted $6,000 bail with
two sureties. The matter was
adjourned to May 13, 2008.

Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us on
322-1986 and share your
story.


ANTI-GLOBAL WARMING MOVES DO NOT GO FAR ENOUGH, IT IS FEARED



Climate change measures may


not safeguard Bahamas


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE regulations agreed by
the international community to
counteract climate change may
not be enough to spare coun-
tries like the Bahamas from
experiencing the destructive
effects of global warming, it was
stated yesterday.
* Speaking during the CARI-
COM Secretariat's end-of-year
video conference broadcast
from Guyana, the Secretariat's
assistant secretary general Irwin
La Roque said he is concerned
that the international commu-
nity did not go far enough in
their demands concerning emis-
sion reductions for harmful
greenhouse gases.


Over the last two weeks, Mr
La Roque headed the CARI-
COM delegation which includ-
ed the Bahamas' representative
Minister of Works and Trans-
port Earl Deveaux to the cli-
mate summit in Bali, Indonesia.
After two weeks of climate
talks, some 10,000 delegates
from nearly 190 nations finally
agreed last Saturday to the "Bali
roadmap."
This plan is designed to guide
negotiations until 2009, when
the international community will
have to make a decision on a
replacement for the Kyoto Pro-
tocol.
The majority of delegates at
the Bali conference agreed that
there is a need for industrialized
countries to slash emissions by
25 to 40 per cent of 1990 levels


* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
FOLLOWING a spate of
criticisms last week about the
Ministry of Housing and its
affiliate The Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation, the former minis-
ter in charge of both has sought
to clarify his earlier comments
on the matter.
Current MP for Golden
Gates Shane Gibson, who held
the position of Minister of
Housing for the majority of the
PLP's administration (before
the post was turned over to
Neville Wisdom), also spoke
out against the claims of "shod-
dy workmanship" in the build-
ing of government homes under


by 2020.
However, Mr.
La Roque
said yester-
day he fears
that these
reduction lev-
els will not be
sufficient to
save the
Caribbean from experiencing
effects such as stronger hurri-
canes and rising sea levels.
Mr La Roque said the region
has already seen intensified hur-
ricanes and tropical storms.
He pointed out that the
Caribbean just recently experi-
enced a strong tropical storm
that wreaked havoc in Haiti and
the Dominican Republic. Atyp-
ically, he said, this storm devel-
oped after the closure of the


2007 Atlantic hurricane s
The region, he said, has
past few years also experi
situations where storm sy
come out of nowhere and
op into devastating catego
hurricanes within a 24-hou
od. "We are very, very
cerned," he said.
Mr La Roque added ti
early next year the Cari
should have in hand a first
egy to follow in the face
mate change.
Hosting yesterday's
conference, CARICOM
tary General Edwin Carrm
said that climate chang
been accepted as "a major
of human survival and the
et."
"Small islands and low
states (in the Caribbean),


"I think (the FNM) are being
disingenuous when they are trying
to making it appear that shoddy
workmanship only happened
under the PLP."

Shane Gibson


the PLP. "I think (the FNM)
are being disingenuous when
they are trying to make it
appear that shoddy workman-
.ship only happened under the
PLP. This is the hypocrisy," Mr
Gibson said.
Last week, the MP told The
Tribune that the former admin-
istration left a contingency fund
in place to cover the unforeseen
costs of small home repairs.
In a follow-up interview ear-
lier this week, Mr Gibson clari-
fied his statements. He
explained that a "retention"


fund, not contingency fund, of
approximately five per cent (or
$3,000 $4,000) was placed on
all the mortgages approved
under the former administra-
tion.
For instance, on a $60,000
mortgage $3,000 or five per cent
of the contract, is held for six
months which is allocated to
take care of "defective work"
by contractors.
He said that "more than 90
per cent" of small home repairs
can come out of this retention
fund. However, this retention


-claim

eason. really are the most innocent (in
in the the contribution of C02 emis-
[enced sions) are the ones most in dan-
ystems ger to suffer from the implica-
devel- tions," he said.
r peri- Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
r con- ham earlier this month declared
that it is not possible to overes-
hat by timate the threat global warn-
bbean ing and environmental degra-
t strat- dation pose to the survival of
of cli- small island states such as the
Bahamas. Addressing the
video Caribbean-Central America
Secre- Action (CCAA) conference in
ie has Miami, Mr Ingraham said that
r issue climate change "has the poten-
Splan- tial to undermine the most
vibrant, and for many, the
v lying largest economic sector in the
which region that is tourism."


is only valid for six months after
the date of completion before
becoming void, he explained.
Mr Gibson added that the
current administration may face
problems using this fund for
repairs if they allow the expi-
ration date to elapse.
"The problem the FNM will
have now because they are leav-
ing these houses unoccupied,
the six month window will have
passed because contractors will
release the retention after six
months," he said.
He then further clarified the
statements he made last week,
adding that a contingency fund
was in fact left in place for the
salaries of housing inspectors,
project managers and building
inspectors. Mr Gibson's com-
ments were spurred by last
week's debate in the House of
Assembly when Brensil Rolle,
the FNM's Parliamentary Sec-
retary in the Ministry of Hous-
ing, said that many of the homes
built under the PLP needed
"urgent repairs."


our1


P-AI


Tel: 393-4043


Open tonight
S until 10p.m.


-- t-:it Z, WIUNtbSUAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


TI L


DIti


THE TRIBUNE


lir l" WlhA o-4 i 2- 1L


I -1 1









THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19,2007,CPANEGES3


0 In brief

Entrepreneur

finally realises

her dream
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Young
Bahamian Entrepreneur
Caline Newton has finally
realized her dream of opening
her own retail store in Port
Lucaya 47th Street Gift
Emporium.
Ms Newton's store is located
where the old Androsian store
was initially situated, across
from Prestige Perfumes.
The grand opening was
broadcast live on Love 97 FM
Radio last weekend. Cus-
tomers and invited guests were
provided with light hors d'oeu-
vres and champagne.
"Caline Newton's vision has
become a reality and she felt
that 47th Street Gift Empori-
um could fill a much-needed
void in the Grand Bahama gift
market," said Sarah Kirkby of
Barefoot Marketing.
Ms Newton offers a wide
variety of gift items, ranging
from designer sunglasses by
Versace, Christian Dior and
Gucci to home and kitchen
d6cor items, such as picture
frames, aromatic candles, spice
racks and wine stoppers.
It also offers customers
Bahamian made items such as
straw bags and accessories that
were hand made by Cynthia
and Stephana Saunders and
Marian Russell.
"I wanted to provide the
island of Grand Bahama with
something that I know that I
would love and that other peo-
ple would love also. 47th Street
is an ext' ordinary retail store
specialising in gift ideas and as
time passes the concept will
evolve to include current gift
trends," said Ms Newton.


CONTROVERSY OVER ALLEGED THEME IN BOOK SERIES ON WHICH GOLDEN


COMPASS IS BASED


E-mail suggests Bahamians should




consider boycott of fantasy movie


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AN E-MAIL is being cir-
culated suggesting that
Bahamians consider boy-
cotting blockbuster fantasy
movie The Golden Compass
because of the allegedly
"anti-christian" theme of the
book series on which it is
based.
The e-mail quotes com-
ments made by a US based
"church trainer", Dr Bryan
Cutshall, who claims that the
film is one that Christians
should "protest and oppose",
and the book on which it is
based, Northern Lights,. is
"one of the most alarming
things I have ever read."
This comes after claims that
teachers at Kingsway Acade-
my have also warned their
students that the book behind
the movie is one written by
an author who is against
Christianity and wants to turn
children away from religion.
The movie is ostensibly a
fantasy in which a courageous
young girl in a parallel uni-
verse (where all people have
"daemons", or small animals,
for souls) decides to go on a
journey to free her friend a
young boy who has been
abducted for experimentation
by an evil organisation.
In the meantime, she is
curious to find out more
about "Dust", a magical sub-
stance which appears to rep-
resent knowledge, or con-
sciousness.
However. in the book
series which it is drawn from,


Wendy's employee shot


i4i. foot during robbery

* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
AN EARLY morning robbery at a Wendy's location left
one employee in hospital nursing a gun shot wound on Monday,
policL reported yesterday.
According to a statement released by Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans, shortly after 6am, employees at the Mack-
ey Street location of the popular fast-food chain were opening
the store when they were surprised by two masked gunmen.
The assailants forcibly entered the restaurant and demanded
cash from the store, ASP Evans said. Before fleeing the scene
with an undetermined amount of cash, one of the gunmen shot
a female employee in her left foot.
The victim was taken to hospital where her condition is list-
ed as not life-threatening, ASP Evans said.
A manager of the Wendy's location declined to comment
when contacted by The Tribune yesterday.
Mr Evans warned that the business community can be a tar-
get for thieves during the Christmas shopping season and issued
a warping to business owners: "This is now the Christmas sea-
son and it's an opportune time when persons will use this as an
opportunity to prey upon innocent persons within our society.
During the busy shopping season armed robbers are fully aware
there is a significant amount of cash being exchanged for goods.
"We have been asking the business community to take heed
to the amount of cash they have on hand (and to) pay close
attention to the time of day when they are making deposits, and
increase the number of persons they use to make deposits and
vary their routes to the banks."
Business persons should review security measures very close-
ly and implement closed circuit television and door buzzer sys-
tems as effective tools to deter criminals and ward off potential
thieves, he said.


an anti-organised religion,
and specifically anti-catholic,
theme is more overtly dis-
cernible to some readers.
The US Catholic League
has launched a PR campaign
against the movie. "These
books denigrate Christianity,
thrash the Catholic Church
and sell the virtues of athe-
ism," said Bill Donohue, pres-
ident and CEO of the
Catholic League, according
to Fox News.
It is claimed that the movie
is part of a "stealth cam-
paign" to promote atheism to
children as it will encourage
children to buy author Phillip
Pullman's book series, "His
Dark Materials".
Other secular groups and
fans of the books have taken
the opposite position -
descrying the fact that the
movie has been "sanitised"
of the anti-religious content
of the book in order to satis-
fy "Bible Belt America."
Yesterday, attorney Chrtyl"
Cartwright chairman of the
Plays and Films Control
Board said that in light of
the e-mails circulating and
their opinion of the movie
upon viewing it, the board
had wavered between giving
the movie a T or B rating, but
ultimately settled upon the B
rating. She said the board
understands that while much
of the controversial content
of the book is not included in
the film, some people are
concerned that their children
may ask to purchase the
books after seeing the film.
A T rating would have
allowed children over the age
of 15 to see the film, whereas
B allows children of any age
to see the movie so long as
they are accompanied by a
parent.
The board which came
under fire for banning the
film Brokeback Mountain as
a result of its homosexual

TROPI.CL


E ITERMINATOR


theme, which church figures
said went against Christian
ideals decided that the deci-
sion as to whether children
should see The Golden Com-
pass should be made by par-
ents, and that parents should
have to accompany their chil-
dren to the movie, Mrs
Cartwright said.
The requirement that par-
ents accompany their children
to the movie puts the board
at odds with rating associa-
tions in the UK and the US
who, in rating the movie PG
and PG-13 respectively, have
not imposed this restriction.
Meanwhile, some religious
leaders and organizations in
the US have come out strong-
ly against the movie, but oth-
ers have taken a different
tack, suggesting that it is a
positive development.
Anglican Archbishop of
Canterbury Rowan Williams,
among others, supports the
movie, as he claims it encour-
'ges children to search for
authentic religion.
The archbishop said he
considers the film an attack


SELLER
ON BAHAMAS
GIVE BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
)DUPUCH PUBLICATIONS'


on dogmatic establishments Grace Community Church to
and the use of religion to gain a Bahamian religious
repress. perspective on the issue, but
The Tribune attempted to up to press time he was
reach Pastor Lyall Bethel of unavailable for comment.




Fabulous Christmas

Shopping at


SAISON DECOR


[THE PRIRTC HARD DESIGN GROUP
2. .tec


Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE








PAE EDESAY DCEBEO1,H00ETETRIUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B. E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398,
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


The ghost following President Bush


ON AN Autumn night 300 years ago,
Admiral Sir Clowdisley Shovell, hero of the
British Navy, was approached on his quar-
terdeck by a sailor with a warning. According
to the sailor's calculations, the fleet was head-
ed straight for disaster. But Sir Clowdisley
was a bold leader unburdened by doubt. He
was dead certain he was headed in the right
direction.
"Such subversive navigation by an inferior
was forbidden in the Royal Navy," according
to Dava Sobel in her brilliant book "Longi-
tude," and so "Admiral Shovell had the man
hanged for mutiny on the spot."
The 57-year-old Sir Clowdisley stayed the
course, oblivious in his ignorance and upright
in his optimism, until, one by one, his ships
wrecked in the Scilly Isles with great loss of
life, including his own.
Sir Clowdisley kept coming to mind as I
was reading Robert Draper's "Dead Certain,
the presidency of George W. Bush." Dis-
senters were not hanged in the Bush White
House, but their exclusion from the quarter-
deck was the bureaucratic equivalent of the
long drop.-At least Admiral Shovell had a
man in uniform willing to bring him bad news.
In the Bush White House, no one said:
"Let's slow down and rethink this," Draper
writes. ,
"I made the decision to lead," Bush told
:"Draper. "And therefore there'll be times
when you make those decisions; one, it makes
you unpopular; two, it makes people accuse
you of unilateral arrogance. And that may be
true. But the fundamental question is: Is the
world better off as a result of your leader-
ship?"
Sir Clowdisley might have made the same
statement and asked the same question. For
an essential part of leadership is not just dead
certainty, but finding the right course, and
being flexible enough to change it when the
circumstances warrant.
Iraq may be more stable now, but it was an
unnecessary war in the first place and there is
no end in sight. It is destined to drag on long
after Bush has left the stage, perhaps longer
than the Vietnam War, radicalizing another
generation of Muslims, and immeasurably
empowering Iran. And under Bush's lead-
ership, the war in Afghanistan may be lost
too. It will be hard to argue that Bush has left
the world in better shape than when he found
it.
As for the American people, Bush, "the


I ''








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First Optimist, made pessimists out of them,"
Draper writes. A few Bush lieutenants some-
times wonder if, in the end, was "his com-
pulsive optimism ... worth the sacrifice of
credibility?"
Draper poses the question: Was his plain
speech just intellectual laziness, the strate-
gic vision merely disrespect for the process,
the boldness really recklessness, the strength
an unreflective self-certainty? Draper doesn't
answer the question.
The villain may be, however, Bush's "ele-
mental compulsion" to "accomplish big
things." Draper quotes Condoleezza Rice as
saying: "This is a time when the US has
unparalleled power and you can try and sit on
it and husband it and use a little bit here and
a little there ... or you can try to make big
strategic plays that will fundamentally alter
things in the way that the US did after 1947."
It is Bush's big, strategic moves that have
got us into so much trouble, making one look
nostalgically upon the less ambitious, but
infinitely more competent, moves of his
father's administration.
There are some indications, however, that
this administration, inits TIth fio6r, is shed:-
ding some of the "almost petulant heedless-
ness to the outside world" that Draper
ascribes to George W. Bush. His letter to
North Korea's Kim Jong-il would not have
been conceivable when the old we-don't-talk-
to-evil theology reigned in the White House..
Inviting Syria to the recent Middle East sum-
mit was another indication. There is a new
flexibility that is helping to dispel some of
the hubris of the last seven years.
According to Draper, Bush is thinking hard
about his legacy. He is "consuming history
books," Draper writes, with the "same vora-
ciousness" with which he pounds back hot
dogs. "His presidency now all but consigned
to history, Bush (is) immersed in the past,
and gleaning from its portents what the future
would say about America's 43rd president,"
Draper writes. Karl Rove gave him a biog-
raphy of the young Churchill.
Bush looks to the ghosts of Churchill, and
Harry Truman too, as heroes who were at
one time considered failures, upon whom
history now smiles. But, sadly, it's too late. It
is the ghost of Sir Clowdisley that crowds
the Oval Office.
(This column was written by
HDS Greenway, The Boston Globe
correspondent c. 2007).


Basic food


cost,


'are


over-priced'


EDITOR, The Tribune.
YOUR Editorial comment
today (Dec. 8) to my letter
concerning food prices is
invalid as my calculations sup-
ported by first-hand evidence
of visits to Barbados, Trinidad
and Miami totally support my
argument that basic food
prices are 6ver-priced even if
you include wages, customs,
shipping, theft (6 per cent)
etc...
The issue is that in 1994 the
FNM published a glossy pub-
lication with the cover picture
being the Supreme Court
titled: "The Bahamas...a par-
adise for many reasons"; on
last page there is a section
titled: "Areas Reserved for
Bahamians."
We have accepted what is
policy for law although it con-
travenes the Constitution.
Why should wholesale and
retail operations be protected
from competition if that com-
petition will bring better
prices? Surely it is crazy to
protect the wholesale and
retailer and then there is no
restriction from allowing a
retailer to buy direct from a
discount wholesaler or liq-
uidator in Florida or some-
where else?
Surely it should be the poli-
cy of any government, if of
course they have our interests
at heart, especially the major-
ity who have it exceptionally
....difficult to economically sur-
vive because of the price
scales? No, since 1994 both
the FNM and the PLP has
determined that this policy,
not law, will continue to pro-
tect a.selective group and to
hell with Joe Public and the
Constitution.
Today, not like 1994, any-
one can go on-line and pur-
chase building supplies, gro-
ceries from a Florida discount
wholesaler and the joke is that
the Florida provider is basi-
cally operating in the
Bahamas, even in some cases
advertises in the newspapers
in The Bahaiias of their ser-
vices but do not put a dime in
the treasury, put any Bahami-
an to work or contributes to
the economy of The Bahamas
surely this makes what
might have been appropriate
in 1994 totally unacceptable,
hypocritical and redundant
and requires immediate
redundancy?


The. market must be driven
by competition or the public
will be taken with profiteer-
ing. Retailers have an option


anyway to cut off wholesalers
and buy out of the US so what
is the logic to this out of date
policy except total
protectionism to the selective
few?
W THOMPSON
Nassau,
December 8, 2007.


Benefits we have


enjoyed for decades


have been denied us
EDITOR, The Tribune.
AS A vacationer in the Bahamas for the last 25 years and
an owner at Freeport Resort & Club, I am writing to you to
address several grievances that have occurred in the last sev-
eral years in regard to our timeshare. Since the Royal Oasis
closed, benefits that we enjoyed for decades at Freeport
Resort & Club have been denied us.
The short cut path we used to get to the International
Bazaar has been fenced in and we now have to walk seven
times the distance to reach the stores in the Bazaar.
This is a hardship for many owners, many of whom are
senior citizens. This short cut access was enjoyed for 25 years
before being denied to us.
Even our alternate path was closed to us since 2004. It is
heartless and inconsiderate to put us through this misery. The
bottom line is, after 25 years, this prerequisite right has been
denied to us with impunity.
Our second grievance concerns golf privileges at the Ruby
and Emerald courses.
We are asking that they be resumed at a meaningful privi-
leged rate as was delivered over 25 years ago. Golf privilege
was one incentive in land sales offering. There is no right to
stop the privileg-even if no-land is-left-to sell.
To deny golfers this privileged amenity is devastating. Our
timeshare value is greatly diminished without this privilege. It
is a Bahamia Prospectus violation and to not enforce
Prospectus commitments is truly a scandal.
ur third grievance is to rebuild the Bahamia Beach Club.
This has been allbiit stopped or ignoted.It is promised
Bahamia Prospectus amenity and its replacement must be
committed to with authority. Beach access is very important
in the Bahamas.
Harcourt (Dublin, Ireland) is expecting to close on its pur-
chase of the Royal Oasis assets for the Driftwood Compa-
nies. Harcourt is emphatic about not accepting past liabilities,
as unlike Driftwood, Harcourt is buying the assets, not the
companies. We maintain that past obligations go with certain
assets (golf courses and Bahamia Beach Club) and cannot be
evaded by ownership change. Driftwood, not Harcourt, is to
blame. Harcourt should receive concessions to fulfil what
Driftwood breached and Driftwood must be held responsible.
In closing, I would like to say that tourism is very important
to the Bahamian economy. When returning visitors are treat-.
ed like the Bahamas' worst customers it not only goes against
the grain but can be detrimental to the future of tourism in
the Bahamas.
Please help us to regain what we have lost.
WILLIAM BEDARF
114-48-227th Street,
Cambria Heights,
NY 11411 USA,
November 26,2007.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





MONTAORSIMIT
;7Pt. MOTORS LIMITED


Will Be


CLOSING

at 12 noon
On Wednesday Deceitiber 19th
For Our Staff Party.
Holiday Hours:
OPEN: 24th December fom 9:00am I000pm
CLOSED: 25th and 26th December
OPEN: 27th 30th December
OPEN: 31st December 9:00am 1:00pm
We wish our valued customers a
Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year


DON STAINTON

PROTECTION

WE SELL OUTER SPACE
TELEPHONE: 322-8219 322-8160



ALL ALUMINUM PATIO ROOF OR
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MA I


WE DO IT WHEN WE SAY WE WILL!


ALL ALUMINUM CAR PORT
Serving The Bahamian Community Since 1978
^- 0


I


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


~.,.~.~~


THE TRIBUNE








WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


Govt urged to consider creating Port Authority in Nassau


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE creation of a Port Authority
in Nassau is something to which the
government should give "careful and
serious consideration", former minister
for transport Glenys Hanna-Martin
said.
Speaking on a Bill to amend the
Immigration Act in the House of
Assembly on Tuesday, Ms Hanna-Mar-
tin urged the FNM to continue the
work of the former government, who,
she stated, had appointed a commit-
tee to review draft legislation and
assess what role such an authority


could play. She suggested that a Nas-
sau Port Authority could enable more
"concentrated focus" to be brought to
bear on expanding port facilities, col-
lecting revenue, and providing regula-
tory oversight.
It "would act as a possible mecha-
nism for ensuring a more relevant and
modern port facility," she said.
Speaking of the maritime industry
more broadly, Ms Hanna-Martin told
the House that the government should
expedite the process of completing and
bringing to parliament several pieces of
draft legislation left behind by the for-
mer government.
Such legislative upgrades are neces-
sary if the Bahamas is to keep up with


the challenges presented by the expan-
sion of the industry, she said.

Shipping standards
In particular, there is a need for leg-
islation to more effectively govern non-
commercial vessels, and to enable the
state to deal accordingly with Haitian
vessels that do not meet international
shipping standards.
Ms Hanna-Martin noted that as
"everyday weaknesses in our safety
standards and regulations are being
highlighted including incidents of col-
lision in the harbour and vessels miss-
ing at sea", it is critical that legislation


be brought "at the earliest opportuni-
ty to address safety standards at sea
as failure to do so could have further
deadly results."
The arrival of Haitian vessels that
do not meet international standards
into Nassau represents a "disturbing
phenomena" according to the former
minister.
Many fail to seek clearance in Inagua
as they ought to, she noted. For nation-
al security reasons, the government
should bring to parliament legislation,
drafted during her party's term, to
enable the state to "deal with these
vessels accordingly," she said.
While Bahamas Maritime Authority
inspectors had sought to discourage


the arrival of these boats by detaining
them, the port currently has "limited
powers" to act effectively, as these
boats on which "contraband and ille-
gal aliens" are often discovered can-
not be confiscated and destroyed sub-
sequent to their detention.
Turning to Potter's Cay dock, the
former minister said that the infra-
structure has been "outgrown" as the
maritime industry has expanded, which
has led to "dangerous" congestion dur-
ing peak hours.
While work had been carried out to
address this problem, Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin said there is more to be done by
the government.


Bahamas moves closer to



becoming donor country


Govt seeks to join International Development Association


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
THE government has moved
to enable the Bahamas to
become a member of the Inter-
national Development Associ-
ation an organisation that pro-
vides financial assistance to the
world's poorest countries who
are unable to access it else-
where.
Introducing a bill to enable
the Bahamas to join the associ-
ation, Minister of State for
Finance Zhivargo Laing told
parliament on Tuesday that it
will be good for the Bahamas'
reputation at the global level to
be seen as a donor country and
a "good international citizen."
Mr Laing said that while the
Bahamas is fortunate enough
to have the third highest per
capital income in the region
behind the US and Canada,
many other lesser developed
countries, thanks to their
indebtedness and risk profiles,
are unable to access funds in
the private market and continue
to have to turn toth'e-Wotld"'
Bank for financial assistance.


The International Develop-
ment Association is the branch
of the World Bank that aims to
address the development needs
of 80 of the world's poorest
countries, including India, Viet-


nam and Pakistan, said Mr
Laing.
The IpA forwards funds pro-
vided by its member states to
these countries in order to help
them to "progress up the devel-


opment ladder," said Mr Laing.
In order to subscribe to the
association, the Bahamas will
initially outlay just under
$49,000, said the minister.
This represents 10 per cent
of our overall funding obliga-
tion to the IDA.
Speaking on the bill, MP for
Fox Hill Fred Mitchell said that
that the opposition supports the
bill, particularly as there are
several IDA projects underway
in Haiti, and "anything that
helps stabilise that country helps
to stabilise the Bahamas."
Mr Laing took a swipe at the
former administration by
describing how, despite the
Bahamas initially agreeing to
become a member of the IDA
in 2001, the legislation required
to enable that to happen was
not completed during their
tenure.
"On an annual basis the min-
ister of finance would go to
World Bank meetings and they
would ask for the status of the
Bahamas in relation to the
IDA, and we would continue
to say that we are moving for-
ward the legislation to (become
a member)," said Mr Laing.


S ALL


NEW
2008 EDITION I

BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
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rSannin Motors ltdi. Early Christmas at BHS


VN"suYqrFF"


CHRISTMAS came early
for the Bahamas Humane
Society this year thanks to
the generosity of a local com-
pany.
BHS noted that running a
humane society is challenging
and expensive, and there is a
constant struggle to pay all the
bills in order to provide the
standard of service people
have come to expect.
"The financial priorities
mean the animal's needs must
come first, sometimes at the
cost of neglecting some main-
tenance issues and delaying
some plans to modernise,"
said a spokesperson for BHS.
However, this year two
wishes of the BHS were gen-
erously granted by SMG Mill-
works, a subsidiary of Special
Management Group, located
in Mount Pleasant Village.
SMG planned, measured,
made and fitted brand new
sales cabinets, shelves, work
surfaces and cupboards, mod-
ernising the reception and
sales area at the BHS shelter
last week.


SMG grants

wishes of

Bahamas

Humane

Society

Acting manager Percy
Grant had approached SMG
Millworks, which produces
custom cabinetry along with
doors, millworks and mold-
ings.
Having seen there website,
he asked about the possibility
of a discount, but was amazed
when SMG not only complet-
ed the task very quickly and
for free, but also undertook
to replace the dilapidated roof
and doors on the old boarding
kennel block.
Mr Grant said "These jobs
have been on our wish list for
a very long time and we never
have enough cash to address


these sort of projects as main-
taining a charity of this size is
always a big challenge.
"This wonderful donation,
worth many thousands of dol-
lars, has already improved the
working environment for our
staff as well as creating a more
efficient and attractive sales
area for our clients.
"The improved kennels will
address long term leaks and
structural weaknesses making
a safer and more comfortable
environment here for dogs for
many years to come," he said.
"Amidst all the terrible
instances of animal cruelty
which we see daily it is uplift-
ing to see there are such kind
people.
"We are so grateful to SMG
Millworks and SMG Con-
struction for stepping -up to
the plate and helping us help
the animals in such a practical
way.
:They are doing an absolute-
ly superb job. What a won-
derful, charitable gift just
before Christmas," Mr Grant
said.


COLOMBIAN


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209783
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194352 $239.00
233093 $60.00
233034 $120.00


2293
47923
1558.1
239126
239121
239112
232056
219772
239174
239172
239178
239122
240321
239129
236932
233001
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11582


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211477 $260.00


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209413 $1,400.00 $699.00
161426 $1750.00 $1,487.50
70491 $1,500.00 $1,275.00
SKU Was NOW


148439


$690.00


$345.00


148587 $1980.00 $990.00
148506 $1914.00 $957.00


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V


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


i"" -


I-If
Bif rf^Ml .


~~MWWiqiW


je







WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 7


THF TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Dubai-bound Natasha



looks forward to new



Atlantis adventure


Bahamian will prepare underwater exhibits


LIFE is about to get a little
bit more exciting for Atlantis
Natasha Christie as she pre-
pares to assume her new inter-
national position at Kerzner
International's "Atlanis. The
Palm" in Dubai.
Beginning JanuarN 6. lMs
Christie will serve as director
of small exhibits at the 1.539-
room destination resort, a joint
venture project between Kerzn-
er and the Dubai go'ernment-
owned Istithmar PSJC. which
is anticipated to open in 200S
"Just when she thought she
had done it all, Christie's career
is about to climax. as she pre-
pares to travel across the globe.
to do what she loves best nur-
turing, maintaining and con-
ducting marine research on sea
animals," said Kerzner in a
press release.
She is the fifth Bahamian to
receive an
international
promotion to
Atlantis, The
Palm.
As director 5
of small ba t
exhibits, Ms
Christie will be ro sW
instrumental in
preparing the
underwater '
exhibits at the
much antici- * I *
pated resort, t w k
which will be
home to 30,000
ocean crea-
tures. The
company said
she will assist
in leading a dynamic team of
international marine aquarium
specialists.
Michelle Liu, vice president
of marine aquarium operations
at Kerzner International said,
"Nat:ashp's internationall pro-
motierr demonstrates our com-
pany's commitment to provid-
ing deserving Bahamians with
new and rewarding opportuni-
ties.
"From the very start of her
career with the company,
Natasha has exhibited profes-
sional care in the execution of
her duties.
"She is a committed leader
anxd team player and is well
respected by her peers and staff
here at Atlantis.
"I am certain that she will
continue to do an outstanding
job' as she represents Atlantis
and the Bahamas in Dubai."
"It's a huge honour for me to
have been chosen to work for
another one of Kerzner Inter-
national's resort destinations,
this time for Atlantis, The Palm
in Dubai," said Ms Christie.
"It's really exciting because
it's a new project and I feel
comfortable going there
because there's a team in place
who I have worked with before
in the past, and now I will have
the opportunity to work with
them again ... So it feels great
that I am going to be joining
that team and being a part of
the water features initiative at
Atlantis, The Palm," she said.
Ms Christie also looks for-
ward to working with a special
sea creature which she has
grown attached to over the
years.
"I am going back to my
rqots," she explained. "When I
first came to Atlantis, I had the
opportunity to work with the
jelly fish.
"So I am pretty excited to get
back into that area as I really


i' '





.- + I


EMPLOYED with Atlantis, Paradise Island for the
past nine years, Bahamian Natasha Christie has
been named director of small exhibits at Atlantis,
The Palm, Dubai.


liked working
h with them."
For the past
nine years, Ms
Christie said
she has
enjoyed an
exciting and
rewarding
career assisting
with and pro-
viding professional care for the
more than 50,000 sea animals
at Atlantis, Paradise Island,
which is home to giant manta
rays and more than 250 species
of sea creatures.
Ms, Christie joined Kerzner
International in 1998, as a senior
aquarist in the Royal Towers.
In 2001 she was promoted to
curator in the Coral Towers
with responsibility for all
exhibits in the Coral and Beach
Towers.
She has assisted the Marine
Aquarium Operations team in
conducting biological research
on a number of marine animals
at the resort.
The team has also experi-
enced tremendous success in
the care of animals, many of
which have successfully repro-
duced while in captivity.
Most recently she assisted the.
team in the successful birth of
several baby green turtles, born
in captivity at the resort.
The baby turtles were
released into the wild a few
weeks later.
"This project was especially
significant for Atlantis as over
the past several years there has
been. an extensive population
decline of green turtles, which
has led to the protection of this
species by various international
treaties and agreements," said
the company.
Ms Christie now joins fellow
Bahamians from other depart-
ments including Sharon Gibson,
the first Bahamian appointee.
In 2005 Gibson was promoted
to executive assistant and office
manager for Kerzner Interna-
SF 1elle,-nicide,-


H estKontrE


tional's president/managing
director for Atlantis, The Palm,
Alan Leibman.
Exactly two years later, Ger-
ard Moss was appointed vice
president of human resources
for Atlantis, The Palm.
His appointment was fol-
lowed by Roscoe Dickenson.
associate director of Marine
Mammal Operations along with
21-year-old, Cecil Cartwright,
the youngest of the group, who
was appointed a marine mam-
mal specialist in August 2007.


TOURWISM.HRUfdGHUTHEUX(1E


ANGELA Cleare, author of History of Tourism in The Bahamas: A
Global Perspective, presented a copy to Mercedes Parker, the only
daughter of Sir Stafford Sands, and her son, Andrew Parker. Sir
Stafford Sands is listed in the book as one of the two giants of
tourism, in light of his pioneering marketing initiatives in the
1950s and 1960s.


WAITING with anticipation for their copy of History of Tourism in
The Bahamas: A Global Perspective by Angela Cleare are (from
left): Neko Grant, Minister of Tourism and Aviation, Branville
McCartney, Minister of State for Tourism and Aviation, and Ver-
nice Walkine, Director General of Tourism. The Ministry of
Tourism has purchased copies for all of its tourist offices in
Nassau and abroad. Mrs Cleare is pictured at the far right at the
presentation.
PHOTOS: Derek Smith/BIS


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Costly book is a


"It is a common delusion that
you make things better by talk-
ing about them." Rose
Macauley

After watching
the recent
exchange in
parliament
over the PLP's expensive "hail
to the chief" promotional book,
I decided to take a closer look.
Of course, the book's real
title is The Bahamas 2007 Spe-
cial Report.
It was produced at exorbi-
tant cost by Caribbean Invest-
ment Profiles, a British PR
firm, and is perhaps best
described as a "souvenir to fol-
ly".
The book was delivered just
before the May 2 general elec-
tion and was therefore instant-
ly out of date.
To be fair, a similar glossy
publication produced by the
same firm was commissioned
by the previous Ingraham
administration in February 2001
shortly after the world-chang-
ing September 11 terror attacks
on the United States.
That one numbered 162
pages.
But the Christie version has a
whopping 290 pages. And it
cost the country 400,000 for
10,000 copies well over


"The Lord spoke to me and
told me to bless Christie as the
next prime minister ... he
came and knelt down in front
of me and I rested my hands
upon him ... I believe he has
been an awesome prime min-
ister."


Pastor Neil Ellis


$800,000 at current exchange
rates.
And that was in addition to
steep fees paid by several gov-
ernment agencies for advertis-
ing.
Those agencies with money
to burn included the Ministries
of Tourism and Labour &
Financial Services, BTC (sev-
eral pages), Bahamasair, Bank
of the Bahamas, College of The
Bahamas, the National Insur-
ance Board, BEC, the Water
& Sewerage Corp, the
Bahamas Maritime Authority,
and the Central Bank.
In parliament FNM minis-
ter Zhivargo Laing wondered
why such a book was produced
so close to the election. He said
if the former administration's
claims that it did an excellent
job managing the economy are
correct, and if the stated pur-
pose of the report to attract
foreign investment is accu-
rate, the book should have been
published much sooner.
"But this was what the peo-
ple's money was spent on," he
said. "And really, if you read
it,.this is in many respects a hail
to the then chief book. That's
what it is."
Well, having thumbed
through this lavishly illustrat-
ed 'vanity fair' we have to
agree.
The book features lengthy
self-serving "interviews" with
cabinet ministers, a few public
officials, one or two financial
sector leaders, an array of well-
known clergymen and a bunch
of big-name investors. Each
article is, of course, accompa-
nied by full-page colour por-
traits of the leaders in their
Sunday best.
The book opens with a tren-
chant message from former
prime minister Perry Christie
who states up front his "unwa-
vering conviction that the good
sense of the Bahamian people,
in which I have the greatest
faith, will ensure the PLP is re-
elected. "
Are you asking what this has


to do with foreign investment?
Well read on.
The PM's message is closely
followed by an interview, in
which he speaks endlessly of
the need for another five year
term to firm up his legacy, and
notes that he is willing to work
18/7 with no holidays to make
that happen, despite the fact
that already "the accomplish-
ments of my government are
without precedent in our his-
tory."
But just how did Mr Christie
get the opportunity to achieve
so much in the first place? Well,
the answer to that investor-
friendly question is provided
by Pastor Neil Ellis in the
Bahamas 2007 Special Report:
"The Lord spoke to me and
told me to bless Christie as the
next prime minister...he came
and knelt down in front of me
and I rested my hands upon
him..:I believe he has been an
awesome prime minister."
The Rev John Rolle of
Andros agreed with that assess-
ment: "God has raised
(Christie) up...Without a shad-
ow of a doubt I believe he will
be elected for second term...I
believe the PLP will govern for
a very long time."
And so did Bishop Elganart
Rahming of the Church of God
of Prophecy: "It is pretty evi-
dent that the hand of the Lord
is upon (Christie)," he con-
firmed.
But the text was not con-
fined to religious endorsements.
There were plenty of political
analyses too.
R retired politico Paul
Adderley (who
described himself as a special
adviser behind the scenes)
believes that "elections are lost
rather than won and Mr
Christie, hardly having put a
foot wrong as prime minister, is
a firm favourite to be re-elected
for another five years...No-one
can complain about the gov-
ernment's performance in the
key economic areas of tourism


JA


4


4


.


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE I


souvenir to follv


and financial services."
Well, except for the com-
plaint that Tourism Minister
Obie Wilchcombe allegedly
fabricated arrival numbers to
mask their decline. And the
complaint that the Christie gov-
ernment ignored the recom-
mendations of its own Finan-
cial Service Consultative
Forum.
Putting that aside, former
financial services minister
Allyson Gibson assured us of
Prime Minister Christie's "com-
pelling vision for transforming
the Bahamas," while ex-foreign
minister Fred Mitchell insisted
that the PLP needed "five more
years to complete what we want
to achieve."
But attorney and close
Christie colleague Philip
'Brave' Davis appeared not to
agree, finding that "as a country
we have certainly over-achieved
in a number of areas."
Ex-minister Vincent .Peet
told us why that was the case:
"The prime minister continues
to be a visionary leader. He is a
very deep thinker...As a party
we are united under Perry
Christie's visionary leadership."
(Not any more it seems).
-One particular ex-minister
was somewhat less effusive
about the prime minister's
achievements. In his interview
he urged "all of my loyal and
faithful party supporters over
these past 25 years to vote for
Bernard J Nottage, who will
serve with great distinction."
And lawyer Sharon Wilson
(wife of PLP financier Franklyn
Wilson) had this to say: "The
prime minister has already left
us a legacy. We are one peo-
ple...If you are capable, main-
tain humility and are manag-
ing the economy...these are the
factors that will help you get
re-elected."
No doubt speaking of his
selection as a cabinet minister,
Shane Gibson (who was forced
to resign over the Anna Nicole
Smith scandal) put the former
prime minister next to the pope
in terms of infallibility, arguing
that Mr Christie had "an ability
to detect competence and talent
like nobody else. I have never
ever seen him make a major
decision that was wrong."


But shrewd PLP lawyer
Sean Mcweeney (another
behind -the-scenes special
adviser) spoke to the former
PM's humility as well as his
greatness: "Prime Minister
Christie's public modesty belies
a formidable intellect...He is
very conscious of his legacy."
Sir Baltron Bethel was pic-
tured beaming in his best Sun-
day-go-to-palace suit. And
according to the Bahamas 2007
Special Report, the old PLP fix-
er had played a "pivotal role"
in making everything happen
over the last five years. Still, he
did not deny that the master-
mind behind it all was Perry
Christie: "It has to do with lead-
ership," Sir Baltron confided.
"(Christie) has brought disci-
pline and careful planning to
government."
Being more mature
than most of us,
wealthy preacher Myles
Munroe was a touch more
thoughtful on this subject: "By
the time I was 14 I was grap-
pling with questions that maybe
40-year-olds were grappling
with...I always say to the (prime
minister) 'what you are trying
to do in the Bahamas is truly
revolutionary' which he
accepts."
And rounding out the book's


political plaudits was an article
on the late Sir Lynden Pindling
(father of the nation) depicting
Mr Christie as one of his pro-
t6g6s. This was accompanied
by an interview with the moth-
er of the nation, Dame Mar-
guerite Pindling, who professed
her absolute confidence that
Christie would win the election:
"Prime Minister Christie is a
great leader of our country. My
husband would have been very
proud of his achievements."
Surprisingly, Garret 'Tiger'
Finlayson, another PLP
financier, disagreed with this
motherly analysis: "Within the
next five years Prime Minister
Christie will surpass Sir Lyn-
den Pindling in terms of his
achievements," he declared
confidently.
And finally, you may be
wondering what message Mr
Christie's celebrated wife con-
tributed to promote foreign
investment in the Bahamas?
Well, here it is:
"If you look at the facts and
the results, you will vote for the
PLP in the next election."
What do you think? Send
comments to larrv@tribuneme-
dia.net
Or visit www.bahamnapun-
dit.com pundit.com


Seasons oGretings IU|
Holiday Store hours for your Shopping Convenience:
THE BRASS & LEATHER SHOPS LTD Sunday, Dec. 23rd -10:00 -6:00
(DOWNTOWN) Monday, Dec. 24th 9:00 7:00
Land, Paklite, Totto and gift items Tuesday, Dec. 25th Closed
Charlotte Street Off Bay, Tel: 322-3806 Wednesday, Dec. 26th-11:30-5:00
Thursday, Dec. 13th -9:00- 3:30- Thursday, Dec. 27
Friday, Dec. 14 thru Saturday, Dec 29th 9:00 5:30
& Saturday, Dec 15th- 9:00- 6:00 Sunday, Dec. 30th- 10:00- 4:00
Sunday, Dec. 16th Closed Monday, Dec. 31st- 9:00- 5:30
Monday, Dec. 17 Tuesday, Jan. 1st- 11:30 5:00
thru Thursday, Dec 20th 9:00 6:00
Friday, Dec. 21st
& Saturday, Dec 22nd -9:00- 6:30 THE BRASS & LEATHER SHOPS LTD
Sunday, Dec. 23rd 12:00 4:00 (MALL AT MARATHON)
Monday, Dec. 24th 9:00 6:30 Land leathergoods and ready-to-wear
Tuesday, Dec. 25 Carla Danelli, Bosca, Kenzia, Kipling, Guess
Paklite and gilt items
& Wednesday, Dec 26th Closed Paklite and gift items
The Mall at Marathon Tel: 394-5676
Thursday, Dec. 27
thru Saturday, Dec 29th 9:00 5:30 Monday, Dec 10
Sunday, Dec. 30th Closed thru Friday, Dec 14th 10:00 -.9:00
Monday, Dec. 31st 9:00 5:30 Saturday, Dec. 15th-10:00-10:00
Tuesday, Jan. 1st Closed Sunday, Dec. 16th 1:00 7:00
Monday, Dec.17
thru Friday, Dec 21st- 10:00-10:00
THE BRASS & LEATHER SHOPS LTD aturdayDec 22nd -10:00-11:00
(DOWNTOWN) Saturday, Dec. 22nd 10:00 11:00
Kipling, Carla Danelli, Bosca, Sunday, Dec. 23rd 1:00 7:00
Land ready-to-wear, Guess,Kenzia and gift items Monday, Dec. 24th 10:00 11:00
Charlotte Street off Bay, Tel: 322-3806 4 Tuesday, Dec. 25
& Wednesday, Dec 26th Closed
Thursday, Dec. 13th 9:00 3:30 Thursday, Dec. 27
Friday, Dec.14 & Friday, Dec 28th 10:00 8:00
& Saturday, Dec 15th 9:00 6:00 Saturday, Dec. 29th 10:00 9:00
Sunday, Dec. 16th Closed Saturday Dec, 29th -10:00-9:00
Monday, Dec.17 Sunday, Dec. 30th Closed
thru Thursday, Dec 20th 9:00 6:00 Monday, Dec. 31st- 10:00 6:00
Friday, Dec. 21st Tuesday, Jan. 1st- Closed
& Saturday, Dec 22nd 9:00 6:30
Sunday, Dec. 23rd 12:00 4:00
Monday, Dec. 24th 9:00 6:30 THE LUGGAGE STORE
Tuesday, Dec. 25 Land, Briggs & Riley, Kipling 4
& Wednesday, Dec 26th Closed Kenzia, Totto, Paklite & gift items
Thursday, Dec. 27 East Ave & 6th Terr, Centreville.
thru Saturday, Dec 29th 9:00 5:30 Tel: 328-1477
Sunday, Dec. 30th Closed Opposite Centreville Food Market
Monday, Dec. 31st- 9:00- 5:30 Monday, Dec. 17
Tuesday, Jan. 1 st -Closed thru Saturday, Dec. 22nd 9:30 6:00
Sunday, Dec. 23rd-12:00 -4:00
MFEIDI Monday, Dec. 24th 9:30 6:00
Corner of Bay & Charlotte Streets Tuesday, Dec. 25
Tel: 322-6300 & Wedinsday, Dec 26th Closed
Thursday, Dec. 13th- 9:00- 3:30 Thursday, Dec. 27
Friday, Dec. 14th- 9:00- 6:00 thru Saturday, De.. 5
Saturday, Dec. 15th 9:00 6:30 Sunday, Dec 30th -Closed
Sunday, Dec. 16th 10:00 6:00 Monday, Dec 31st 9.30-5.30
Monday, Dec. 17 Tuesday, Jan 1st- Closed
thru Thursday, Dec 20th 9:00- 6:30
Friday, Dec. 21 The above store hours are subject
& Saturday, Dec 22nd 9:00 7:00 to change without notice.
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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 9








PAUL 10, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


ANGELA CLEAR
Presents:


"HISTORY OF TOURISM


IN THE BAHAMAS

-A Global Perspective,


The most

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documentation

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Tourism ever

Written.


"History ofTourisrn -A Global Perspective"
traces the history of Tourism from the arrival
of the f-rst visitor in 1492 up to the beginning
of the 21st century Presented against the
background of world tourism and regional
trends, it highlights the marketing and product
initiatives of outstanding visionaries who have
led the industry since the establishment of the
Bahamas Development Board and the Ministry
of Tourism. It also discusses the outlook
and challenges facing the region in the next
decade as well as the soclo-economic Impact
of tourism on the local community.


Its simply a must read

for all Bahamians.

Get your copy today!


85 votes 'should be thrown out'


FROM page one
of proof has not been made
against these voters, with the
remaining 42 votes being in dis-
pute between the parties.
These figures have changed
since Monday after consulta-
tion between the FNM and PLP
when it was stated that the
parties agree that 81 votes
should be thrown out.
With the admission that 85
votes should be removed, Mr
Barnett also acknowledged yes-
terday that scrutiny of the bal-
lots will now be necessary.
Scrutiny a recount'- occurs
when it is determined that more
votes than the margin of victory
are to be removed. In this elec-
tion the margin of victory was
64 votes, and the parties have
already agreed to the removal
of a number greater than this.'
Before Mr Barnett ended his
submission, he argued that dis-
franchising a voter is a serious
act that has serious conse-
quences. The court, he said,
should therefore require cogent,
credible and admissible evi-
dence in making its decision on
the voters in question. If such
evidence was not produced, he
continued, the burden of proof
against the voter has not been
made.
Mr Barnett criticized the PLP
side for not calling numerous
witnesses to testify, and instead,
relying on hearsay evidence by
party canvassers and private
investigators. He also said that
the court has always required a
high standard of proof in these
types of proceedings, and that
standard is not met on flimsy
evidence.
Mr Davis argued during his
submission the allegation by the
Petitioner is that some individ-
uals wrongfully voted in the
May 2nd election in Pinewood.
This argument is in response to
that raised by Mr Barnett that
ordinary residence is the sole
issue the court has to consider
in its deliberations. The PLP
attorney further emphasized
that this case is between the
Petitioner and Respondents,
and not between the Petitioner
and voters.
Therefore, he argued, once
the Petitioner has laid claims or
raised reasonable doubt against
a voter, the burden then shifts
to the Respondent(s) to refute


this charge.
The evidence in the case, Mr
Davis said, falls into three cate-
gories, including the declaration
of the voters themselves; wit-
nesses the voters spoke with
and persons other than the vot-
er witnesses spoke with; and the
evidence of experts.
A debate emerged on this
issue between Messrs Davis and
Barnett. Mr Barnett reiterated
that hearsay evidence is inad-
missible, while Mr Davis argued
that it is. The only issue, said
Mr Davis, is the weight attrib-
uted to the hearsay evidence.
This debate mirrors the argu-
ment at the beginning of the
case. Yesterday, the justices
agreed to renew the transcript
from earlier in the proceeding
to properly recall the agreement
that was made at the time.
Mr Davis also took issue with
Mr Barnett's argument that vot-
ers can have more than one
ordinary residence. The PLP
attorney spent most of the day
on the issue, in essence arguing
that the court has to evaluate
the evidence on the living pat-
tern of voters who fall into this
slot to determine where their
ordinary residence is, among
the places they reside in. He
rejected the suggestion that
individuals have more than one
ordinary residence.
Dawn Lewis, a lawyer from
the office of the attorney gen-
eral who is representing Her-
bert Brown, the returning offi-
cer from the Pinewood con-
stituency, also closed yesterday.
She asked the court not to
make any adverse findings on
the parliamentary commission-
er's office, emphasizing that
allegations of corruption are not
a part of the petition. Ordinary
residence, she said is the issue
before the court.
Mr Davis lashed out at a
claim in the written submission
of Ms Lewis, where it was
charged that he was unworthy
for raising the issue of corrup-
tion. He said that the AG's
office should by now be able to
tell the court what investigation
occurred regarding Taylor's
deportation, as police were
actively investigating his alleged
possession of two Bahamian
voters cards.
Mr Davis said that the court
should make some comment on .
the, issue in.its ruling. To this,


Ms Lewis said that a report is
being done on the Taylor affair.
It is now uncertain when this
election court case will come to
an end, as Mr Davis only began
his evaluation of the 42 voters in
dispute at the end of yesterday.
Mr Barnett is scheduled to
argue two points of law raised
by Mr Davis in his closing argu-
ment, when the PLP attorney
is done, before the case goes to
the justices for deliberation.
Senior Justice Allen said she
is unable to sit on Thursday or
Friday of this week. Therefore,
if there is no conclusion today, it
was suggested that the court
may have to sit again on
December 27th, after the holi-
days.



Royal Oasis

FROM page one

now, we're trying to finalize it
but we are looking to do it this
week," Minister Laing said in a
telephone interview yesterday.
Published reports on ZNS
Tuesday night said government
plans to release these payments,
close to $4 million as early as
Thursday to the elation of the
former staff who are eligible for
payments.
The Royal Oasis Resort
closed in September 2004 fol-
lowing three major hurricanes
which ripped through Grand
Bahama resulting in a number
of lost jobs for Bahamians.
When the resort closed, its for-
mer owners Driftwood
(Freeport) reportedly owed the
government $13 million in casi-
no taxes and $3.1 million in pen-
sion funds to the Bahamas
Hotel and Allied Workers
Union.
In early November 2007, the
Ireland-based company Har-
court Development Ltd
finalised its purchase of the
resort.
As reported by The Tribune
previously, an estimated 1,000
persons will eventually be
employed during the construc-
tion, refurbishment, manage-
ment, and operation stages of
the resort. The resort has a tar-
get re-opening date for early
2009..


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1 uP 2000
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r


I


THE TRIBUNE


""9~1~*Cl~q%~S~CB







THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 11






PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE
A


~I IS A I


YOUNGER children got
to select from fun yet
educational gifts
including V-Smile
Learning Laptops and
craft kits.


Security & General
I N S U R A N CiE


HOI


LY NOTICE


ces witi close
l6day. December 20th


for any inconven


Holiday!
.i


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BIMINI TOY STORY!

St Christmas
gifts galore
for children
BIMINI Holiday cheer
?.. was in the air for the children of
Bimini, who were invited to
attend Bimini Bay Resort's fifth
it annual Christmas celebration
giveaway. b
Bimini Bay Resort provided
O hundreds of gifts to children
between the ages of two and 10.
't l The gift tables for each school
were filled with Rollerblades,
craft kits, footballs, skateboards,
dolls, Razor scooters and a host
of other toys.
The children gathered at the
resort's new marina pavilion
where staff welcomed them and
FOR BIMINI'S young sports enthusiasts, the resort handed out soccer provided a hot dog lunch with
balls, footballs and basketballs. homemade cupcakes for
-dessert.
"For all of us at Bimini Bay
S Resort, nothing expresses the
Qjoy of the Christmas season
more than watching the face of
P O W NIM C a child light up with a smile,"
PREn-W NED said Ben Davis, director of
resort operations. "The kids had
CS A Da great time, and we were hap-
CARS & TRUCKS py to have them. We really
enjoy these types of activities
For the best deal in town on where we get to give back to
pre-owned ca ,with warranty! this great community."
pre-owned cars, with warrantySchools that participated in
this year's toy giveaway include:
N OWN N James Rollie Smith Preschool,
N O W IN Kiddies Safe Haven Pre-School,
OT OW rW G Henson Jacobs Pre-
School, Gateway Christian
T O Academy, Bimini All-Age
'99 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA School. and Holy Name


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SCHOOLCHILDREN were treated
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cupcakes for dessert.


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 13


s serves


up 50 gifts for



children's party


Dominican of f icials say Tropical Storin 01ga Ilillell 33


* SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic
DOMINICAN authorities on Monday reported
discovering nine more bodies in the aftermath of
Tropical Storm Olga, raising to 33 the death toll in
the Caribbean country that was deluged by the
storm last week, according to Associated Press.
The majority of the new bodies were discovered
in the central province of Santiago where officials,
fearing a collapse of a dam, had ordered the release
of billions of gallons (liters) of water into the Yaque
River and inundated seven towns along the water-
way's path.


In a Monday statement, emergency operations
director Juan Manuel Mendez Garcia said Olga
displaced nearly 62,000 inhabitants and left some
190 Dominican towns still isolated by the storm's
road and bridge damage.
He said emergency authorities were continuing
to assess the damage from Olga and the death toll
could rise.
Agricultural Minister Salvador Jimenez has said
the storm ravaged thousands of banana and plan-
tain fields across the Dominican Republic, creating
what could be the country's worst agricultural cri-
sis in years.


SWENDY'S has donated
nearly 50 gifts to the Christ-
mas party held each year for
Underprivileged children by
" Great Commission Ministries.
The company said that in
keeping with its mandate to
help the less fortunate, the
h management and staff joined
the celebration of Great
- Commission Ministries Inter-
national's 20th anniversary.
For two decades, the non
promt organisation has assisted
Bahamians affected by pover-
h ty. crime and drug abuse.
"During this season of giv-
i ing, staff members from the
i: Wendy's location on Bernard
* Road each brought a gift for
: the children who view GMCI
" as a second home," explained
Wendy's in a statement.
According to president
a Chris Tsavoussis, "Wendy's
felt it was imperative to fulfill
its social responsibility by giv-
ing back to a community that
has given so much to us."
He added, "We jumped at
the chance to help the min-
istry which also founded the
Save the Children Club."
That programme was estab-
lished in an effort to reach out
to young people between the
ages five and 19 by providing
afterschool and weekend care
free of charge.
GCMI, which is located at
16 Wulff Road, has alsq
helped prisoners to be suc-
cessfully re-integrated into
; society upon their release
from Her Majesty's Prison by
providing counsellingsessions.
They also operate a suc-


BERNARD ROAD manager Stacy Ferguson and executive
GCMI Minalee Hanchell.


cessful substance abuse pro-
gramme and provide hot
meals daily for poverty strick-
en families.
Mr Tsavoussis said, "Man-
agement would like to com-
mend our fellow partners at


the Bernard Road location for
an effort well done. We
encourage all to take some
time out and spread a little
cheer this holiday season. The
smile you give may be your
very own."


Christ Church Cathedral



December 23rd, 2007 January 6th, 2008
6:00 p.m. Sunday December 23rd, 2007
"Come To Bethlehem To See The King"
A Service of Nine Lessons & Carols
By The Men and Boys Choir

The Eve of The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ
Monday December 24th, 2007
10:30 p.m. "Sounds of Christmas"
A Christmas Eve Concert
Presented by:
Christ Church Cathedral Chorale & Youth Choir
11:45 p.m. Christmas Eve Sung Eucharist
Christmas Day
Tuesday December 25th, 2007
7:30 a.m. Sung Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Sung Eucharist
Monday December 31st, 2007
The Eve of the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
New Year's Eve
11:00 p.m.
This Service leads into the First Mass of The New Year, 2008
6:00 p.m. Sunday January 6th, 2008
Service of Light Co
Presented by The Men & Boys Choir


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THF TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS


_ _____~_







PAGE 4, WDNESDY, DCEMBE 19,2007AHE TNBUN


Shooting of taxi

driver investigated

FROM page one
bune police were investigating the shooting which occurred at
the taxi driver's home.
The identity and condition of the victim was not known up
to press time yester-lay.
Police are also looking for a man who attacked another
man with a stone, leaving him in the Intensive Care Unit.
Around 12.20 am on Tuesday, a 39-year-old man was in the
area of Dean Street when he was approached by a man car-
rying a stone, ASP Evans said. The 39-year-old was hit in the
head by this individual. He was taken to hospital where he is
now in ICU.

FROM page one Case adjourned


trate Janet Bullard at Court
Five, Bank Lane, recused
herself from hearing the mat-
ter. Corporal Gardiner of
Flamingo Gardens, and Con-
stable Tavares Bowleg of
Garden Hills were arraigned
on August 9, charged with
causing grievous harm to
Desmond Key, who was
allegedly beaten while he


was in police custody.
Both officers pleaded not
guilty and were each granted
$10,000 bail.
Key, who has been on life
support for five months, has
received treatment from
Jackson Memorial Hospital
with assistance from the gov-
ernment.


Sir Jack Hayward: legal




dispute 'is out of control'


FROM page one
CEO of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port, who urged the
two feuding partners to quick-
ly resolve and settle their dif-
ferences for the sake of
Freeport.
Lady Henrietta St George,
however, declined to com-
ment.
Sir Jack, and Lady Henri-
etta along with her son, Hen-
ry St George, attended the
$250 million Phase V expan-
sion groundbreaking at the
container port last Thursday
when Mr Gray made his
appeal to both parties.
The St Georges and the
Haywards are currently
involved in a bitter ownership
battle at the Grand Bahama
Port Authority and Port
Group Ltd holding company.
Sir Jack is claiming 75 per


cent ownership. However, the
St Georges were declared to
own 50 per cent in a judgment
by Justice Anita Allen. Both
parties have since filed other
legal action in the courts.
Mr Gray told the partners
that "the dispute, which has
already gone on for over a
year now, is distasteful, dis-
ruptive, and destructive."
He said: "To continue will
only serve to enrich the sup-
porting cast. For the sake of
the future success and well
being of the island, please find
a speedy resolution, settle it
quickly and get on with your
lives and allow this island to
start to develop and achieve
its full potential."
Mr Gray explained that the
main objective of the Hutchi-
son Group which is 50 per
cent partner with the GBPA
in the Grand Bahama Airport


Edison Key pays back

8$6,84.54 to Treasury
FROM page one
the Public Treasury, Eugenia Cartwright, apologizing for not
stopping his pension payments after he was elected on May
2nd.
"Please be advised that the cessation of your parliamentary
pension in accordance with Section 6 of the Parliamentary Pen-
sion Act 1995, was overlooked for the period 2 May 2007 to 30
November 2007," she said in the letter.
"As a result, the sum of six thousand six hundred eighty four
dollars and fifty four cents ($6,684.54) was inadvertently paid
into your bank account."
The controversy regarding Mr Key receiving both his parlia-
mentary pension and salary came after Prime Minister Ingraham
tabled a list of all individuals currently receiving the pensions in
Ihe House last week, and Mr Key was the only active member
on the list.
December 14th is the date the treasurer issued the letter out-
lining the amount Mr Key was required to reimburse the trea-
sury. He repaid the amount the same day.
In addition to being the MP for South Abaco, Mr Key is
also the chairman of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial
Corporation. His parliamentary pension was pegged at
$12,518.40 per year, which is a small sum compared to that of
others on the list.
The largest pension currently issued is to Dame Marguerite
Pindling the widow of Sir Lynden Pindling. She receives an
annual $85,500, with former Deputy Prime Ministers Frank
Watson and Clement Maynard receiving $49,921 and $49,920
respectively.
The pensions are contributory, with six per cent of parlia-
mentary salaries being set aside for the scheme. The rate of the
pension is related to the highest salary earned by the parlia-
mentarian former ministers receive more than those who
were just MPs and members can also chose if they wish to earn
a full pension, or a partial pension and a gratuity.
Three former ministers received substantial gratuities upon
theirretirement from the last parliament. Pierre Dupuch
received $180,369 in gratuity payments; Tennyson Wells,
$182,449.13; and Bradley Roberts, $176,050.09. This amount
came in addition to pension payments.


Au*1 I. A


SEASON'S



GREETINGS

Executive Motors Ltd. & Quality Auto Sales Ltd.
will close at 1pm on Monday, December 24
and re-open on Thursday, December 27, 2007.

We will close at 1 pm on Monday, December 31
and re-open on Wednesday, January 2, 2008


J We would like to thank all our valued customers for their patronage
during the year. We look forward to your continued friendship and
support in 2008 and wish everyone a safe and happy holiday.

%0 0 DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE. ARRIVE ALIVE


EXECUTIVEI i yein, j.,i, 'ia t. I 1#, '
MOTORS LTD : 397-700"MITED
%trnt IIN ul^ D %lTSL ,na,, I nail ,,#1,3T7-1OAMAS
Ti n)D1( IT % F% I F TR arts und trvifL011`t ,i S I ET.S8079 397-1700
Avalla baraindBa mhi aat luailyAutoSasaitFroM tj aOua Ht;yaI y52,6122*Ab2A oMotor Ma onMacKayBIvdl 291 V.Ito6our lhwroonm a Quolay Auto Sale reopora) Li tl m1 a deal4 Q0..n -ar, H.. 35.-.6122
or Abaco Motor Moll, Don MacKoy 81vd, 36742916


r


and Harbour Companies is
to protect its interest and sig-
nificant investment on the
island.
He noted that Hutchison
was prepared to invest major
capital expenditure of some
$50 million required in the
harbour and airport, but
not under the circumstances
that currently exist between
the two owners of the
GBPA.
Mr Gray has also confirmed
that the Hutchison Whampoa
Group of Hong Kong is inter-
ested in acquiring the shares
in IDC Ltd Cayman, the par-
ent company of Port Group
Ltd and the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, and has made
an offer.
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham had also expressed
concern about the dispute
between the parties and its
impact on the Freeport
economy.
a


In the latest news, the St
George.estate has now filed a
claim seeking an order from
the Supreme Court to force
Sir Jack Hayward and his
family trusts to sell their 50
per cent stake in the Port
Authority to them.
They allege that Sir Jack
wishes to leave and has
already set his price at $100
million.
According to reports, Sir
Jack and other defendants in
Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity, are seeking to have
Fred Smith, the attorney for
the St Georges, disqualified
on the grounds that as
the GBPA's former outside
counsel with access to its
files, he has a "conflict of
interest."
While the parties continue
to proceed with legal action
in the courts, the Freeport
economy continues to strug-
gle.


rkcf of dAgsj e unt ra lIapel
Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 Fax: 328-8852

FU E AL ERIE O


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a /
good cause, campaigning //
for improvements in the al
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us.on 322-1986
and share your story.








244 Market Street P.O. Box EE-16634
Tel: 322-2070 or 322-2072



PASTOR NORRIS
GLEN TAYLOR
Pastor of
Mt. Channel Native Baptist Church
will be held on Wednesday,
December 19th, 2007 at 7:00pm at
Mt. Carmel Native Baptist Church,
Mason's Addition.




FULL MILITARY
FUNERAL SERVICE
for
REV. NORRIS GLEN TAYLOR
Pastor of Mt. Carmel Native Baptist Church,
Constable 1020 Royal Bahamnas Police Force", 54
of 685 West Dennis Court, Yellow Elder Gardens will be held on
Friday. December 21st. 2007 at I1:00am at St. John's Native
Baptist Church, Meeting Street. Chief Celebrant Bishop Michael
C. Symonette, assisted by Rev. Dr. C. S. Pinder. Rev. Dr. H. L.
Bain. Rev. A. J. Carroll. Rev. Wellington Collie. Rev. A. A. Hinsey
& Rev. Fr. Stephen Davies. Interment will follow in St. John's
Cemetery.
Left to cherish fond memories are his (4) Brothers: Frankliyn.
Hesley, Associate Pastor Edderley (RBDF) & Godfrey Taylor: 5)
Sisters: Minister Berthamae Taylor-Forbes. Jestina & Ellouise
Taylor. Doraline Taylor-Joseph & Minister Velma Taylor-Stracha'.
(3) Brothers-in-law: Pastor Van Forbes, Enoch Joseph & Lenwvard
Strachan; (2) Sisters-in-law: Minister Andrea & Deaconess Shirley
Taylor: (21) Nieces: Winafred, Loren, Shameka. Latoya, Keniska.
Keisha, Godferinqua, Bernique, Bemisha, Ashanda. Shada & Sally
Taylor, Lavern & Nicola Munnings, Natora Rahming, Vanessa &
Alicia Forbes, Enika & Eniqua Joseph, Leandra & Bianka Strachan:
(12) Nephews: Terrance, Benthly, Demetrius & Turan Taylor.
Lorenzo Knowles, Jason & Elgin Forbes. Elvon Steele, Enoch
Joseph Jr.. Lenward & Donovan Strachan: (8) Aunts: Meril Ash,
Maxine Rolle, Maria & Rowena Taylor, Angie Snuth. Hazel. Dora
& Angie Johnson; (4) Uncles: Preston & Leo Johnson. Vernal
Rolle & Lavinston Ash; A host of other relatives & friends
including: Pastor Dorine McKenzie & family. Rev. Pratt & family,
Rev. David Rolle & family, Elease Burrows & family. Jackie
Saunders & family. Sue & family, Sylvia McKenzie & family.
Mrs. Collie & family. Mother Butler & family. Mrs. Longley &
family. Fernander & family, Jonathan Gibson & family. Rose)y
Taylor & family, the Thompson, Armbrister, Adderley. Smith.
Forbes, Bastian, Deleveaux, Evans & Knowles families. Bishop
Micheal & Rev. Hilda Symonette & the members of St. James
Native Baptist Church, Officers and members of Mt. Carmel
Native Baptist Church, the Royal Bahamas Police Force Fire
Branch Department, Drs. Grant Taylor, Dwayne Sands, Robin
Roberts. Ronald Knowles and McCartney and the Nursing staff
of ICU Doctors Hospital, Staff of Renal House. Bishop Leroy &
Pastor Miriam Emmanuel and the members of Good Samarnilta
Kingdom Ministries, Bishop George and Pastor Savaletha Fowler
and the members of Final Hour Ministries, Management and tafl
of Clarke's Funeral Home and the entire Yellow Elder Gardehs &'
Smith's Hill communities of South Andros.
Viewing will be held on Thursday, December 20th at NMIt. Carmel
Native Baptist Church, Mason Addition from 10:00am to 5:00pm.
No viewing will be held on Friday at the church.


WILFRED
ALLEN, 84


~M' ~


'.of Rosalee Street,
i Chippingham will be held on
Thursday, 20 December,
2007, 10am at Grants Town
Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Wellington Street.
Officiating will be Pastor Burrows, assisted by Pastor
Danny Clarke and Pastor Leroy Sewell. Interment
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by his wife, Mary; sons, Cedric,
Albert, Wilfred; daughters, Marsha and Georgiana;
sisters, Mildred Thompson and Yvonne Moultrie;
brothers-in-law, John Gibson; sisters-in-law, Ruby
Gibson; daughters-in-law, Gwendolyn, Wilma,
Sandrena; nieces, Mary, Inez, Jackie, Sylvia,
Rubiemae, Jenniemae Johnson, Margaret Daxon,
Jonne Sands, Charmaine, Rosemary, March, June
Pamela; nephews, Lester Gibson, Charles Gibson,
Anthony Gibson, Alfred Gibson; grand children,
Marklyn, Lorenzo, Christopher, AJ, Elon, Troy,
Travon, Allana, Ronald, Marion, Roston; and a host
of other relatives and friends including, Raymond
Scavella, Ms Hanna, The Coakleys, Clement Comlife,
Gino Henry, the Spence and Chippingham families.
Other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respect at The Rock of
Ages Funeral Chapel, Wulff Road and Pinedale on
Wednesday from 9am to 5pm and on Thursday at
the church from 9am until service time.


L-


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


I -A






THETRIUN WENEDYDCEBR 9 207 PAGE15


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THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 15


11Xz.-".


"I, '*


My


i~ilrci






PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


LOA NW


At the Holiday Season, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have made
our progress possible It is in this spirit we say..." ,
Thank you and best wishes for the Christmas and Happy New Year.

Season's Greerines -

OFFICE HOURS: December 27 28
December 24 9am 4:30pm
9am 12noon December 31 Closed
December 25-26 January 1 Closed ..
Closed Re-open Jan. 2 ..

AT CONFIDENCE WE CARE AND WE SERVE
Confidence Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd. "- -,3 'i., -
Shirley St. (2nd floor The Standard House) A L
Phone: 323-6920 Fax: 325-8486 C ....
Exclusive agent of Bahamas First General Insurance Co. Ltd. E


The Charles Davies

a Junkanoo Parade

at the Sandilands

Rehabilitation Centre



















: CHARLES DAVIES takes part in the junkanoo parade named after him
at the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.


















.. ,..


K... Its F r


Cuban agency says
Colombian rebels to
free some hostages
* BOGOTA, Colombia
COLOMBIAN rebels will
release three hostages, including
an aide to former presidential can-
didate Ingrid Betancourt, to Pres-
ident Hugo Chavez of Venezuela,
according to communique
received Tuesday by Cuba's Pren-
sa Latina news agency, i 'o rim,,n
to Associated Press.
The Revolutionary Armed.
Forces of Colombia, or FARC,
said in a communique sent by e-
mail to the Cuban state agency
that it would free Betancourt aide
Clara Rojas, her son, and Con-
suelo Gonzalez, a former con-
grcsswoman kidnapped in 2001,
said Rafael Calcines, the Prensa
Latina correspondent
who received the e- mail in Bogo-
ta.
The statement did not say when
the three would be released.
Rojas was kidnapped as she
accompanied Betancourt in cam-
paigning for Colombia's presi-
dency in February 2(X)2. Last year,
Colombian journalist Jorge
Enrique Botero said in a book
that Rojas had given birth to a
baby boy, lnmmanuel, following
a relationship with one of her
guerrilla captors.
Rojas was last seen in a video
released by the rebels in 2002. -


THE TRIBUNE


I








YTHE TRIBUNE





sNESAY Dess
W E 1) N E S 1) AY, D E C E M B E R 19, 2 0 0 7


$497m boost from




port relocation pla


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

commercial ship-
ping facilities
from downtown
Nassau to south-
western New Providence will
generate $497 million in eco-
nomic benefits for the Bahamas
over a 30-year period, a study
on the proposal presented to
the Government has found,
compared to net. present value
(NPV) costs of $192 million.
The confidential report by
Dutch consultants Ecorys-
Lievense, which is now under-
stood to be sitting on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham's
desk and has been obtained by
The Tribune, concludes that
relocating the shipping compa-
nies to the proposed port, which
would be located between
BEC's Clifton Pier power plant
and Commonwealth Brewery,
would "generate a net socio-
economic benefit of approxi-
mately $50 per TEU [shipping
container] compared with han-
dling the containers at the cur-
rent location".
Finding that the port reloca-
tion proposal, first put forward
under the former Christie gov-
ernment, was "soundly feasible
from a socio-economic per-
spective", Ecorys estimated that
the $235 million cost of con-
structing the new port would be
acceptable given a 15.8 per cent
internal rate of return (IRR) on
investment.
Even in a worst-case scenario,
described by Ecorys as one
where twenty-foot equipment
units (TEUs) would grow by
only 50 per cent to 144,000 units
per annum, rather than the fore-
casted 263,000 units, the report
said "a sound" 12.1 per cent
return on investment would still
be generated.
"Ecorys-Lievense have come
to the conclusion that continu-
ing the cargo handling at exist-
ing locations will lead in the
short to mid-term to growing
congestion at the terminals,
increased waiting times for ships


* Southwestern port 'soundly feasible from a socio-

economic perspective', consultants' report concludes

* $50 per shipping container benefits likely, as move would

lower shipping costs, and cost of goods coming into Bahamas

* Ball now in Ingraham government's court


and their cargos, and negative
spill-over effects to the direct
surroundings of the terminals
(downtown tourism develop-
ment, congestion in Nassau).
These developments will also
lead to substantially increased
handling costs at the current ter-
minal location," the Ecorys
report warned.
It urged the Government to
back the plan to relocate the
main shipping terminals Trop-
ical Shipping, Pioneer Shipping,
Betty K Line and Seaboard
Marine to the southwestern
port, along with the Mosko
Cement Terminal and aggre-
gate operations.
The total construction costs
for the new port, Ecorys esti-
mated, were $222-$223 million.
with a further $10 million need-
ed to purchase the land and $13
million taken up in project
preparation costs.
Ecorys concluded: "The pro-
ject will incur costs (mainly
investment costs), but will lead
to societal benefits as well.
These benefits will comprise
substantial cargo handling ben-
efits, less waiting times for ships,
reduced costs of shipping,
avoided reinvestments in exist-
ing port terminals, hinterland
transport costs savings, traffic
alleviation in Nassau and the
offering of space for the revi-
talisation of the cruise indus-
try."
Ecorys warned that the cost
of maintaining the status quo
and not.relocating the commer-
cial shipping facilities was $315
million to the New Providence
economy.
Without the port relocation,
TEU shipping container han-


dling costs were likely to
increase from the current $150
per TEU to $250 per TEU in
2025, and $350 per TEU in
2035.
Yet Ecorys estimated that if
the commercial shipping facili-
ties were relocated. TEU han-
dling costs would "remain con-
stant at a level of $130 per
TEU".
By eliminating land and sea
congestion, the southwestern
port would increase savings
from $2" per TEU in 2015 to
$220 per TEU in 2035.
The proposed port relocation,
Ecorys said, would reduce the
cost of sea freight coming into
the Bahamas, based on quay-
to-quay costs excluding steve-
doring and receiving/delivery,
from between $525-$925 per


TEU to $465-$865 per TEU in
2035.
Without the port relocation,
the report said TEU costs
would stay at between $600-
$1,000 per TEU.
"Due to economies of ship
size; and increased competition,
some reduction of the sea
freight can be achieved, increas-
ing from $75 per TEU in 2015
to $135 per TEU in 2035," the
report found.
The ball is now firmly in the
Iigraham government's court
as to what to do with the port
relocation proposal, removing
the commercial shipping facili-
ties and revitalising downtown
Nassau.
The Prime Minister has
repeatedly insisted that no plan
to relocate the shipping facilities
was in place when the FNM
took office after the May 2,
2007, general election.
That may be true, but the
Government has given mixed
signals on its intentions, sig-
nalling it is more interested in
short-term solutions to deal
with downtown Nassau's imme-
diate problems.
Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette, who has chaired
meetings on downtown Nassau
despite persistent claims by the
opposition PLP that he has a
'conflict of interest' because his
family is the landlord for at least
one shipping company,
Seaboard Marine, has also been
lukewarm, at best, to the south-
western port proposal.
In meetings with the private
sector, he is understood to have
asked whether options had been
considered, and said the south-
western port would take too


long to construct.
Mr Symonette also chaired a
meeting where a proposal by
Bethel Estates, another ship-
ping company landlord, and the
Moskos to move the shipping
facilities to Arawak Cay, with a
break-bulk facility at Gladstone
Road, was considered.
Another plan is understood
to involve moving the shipping
facilities out into Nassau Har-
bour via an 'offshore' port, but
one source said yesterday that
this "doesn't solve the down-
town problems and leaves no
room for expansion".
The Ecorys report, though,
said the southwestern port
would generate "more efficient
handling of goods and ships",
as the existing shipping facili-
ties suffered from "inefficient
lay-outs" and ship draft limita-
tions.
The new port would produce
gains in labour, equipment and
superstructure savings, plus
allow- for the employment of
larger ships, reducing increased
congestion in Nassau harbour
for container handling and stor-
age.
Bigger ships, and the
improved management of the
new port, would help create
competition that would lower
shipping rates, the Ecorys
report added, while the south-
western port would be able to
accommodate future growth
and thereby avoid the need for
re-investment by its owners.
Traffic congestion in Nassau
would also be reduced, Ecorys
added, which would compen-
sate for the cost caused by
longer transportation distances
from the southwestern port.


Nassau's

shipping

container

imports to

'quadruple'

in next 30

years

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE volume of shipping con-
tainers transported to New
Providence will come close to
quadrupling over the next 30
years, increasing from 66,000
twenty-foot equipment units
(TEUs) to 243,000 TEUs by
2035, a study on relocating
downtown Nassau's commer-
cial shipping facilities has pro-
jected.
The report by Dutch consul-
tants, Ecorys-Lievense, on the
social, economic and environ-
mental feasibility of the pro-
posed southwestern New Prov-
idence report proposed by the
Christie administration, found
that according to Harbour
Department logbooks, the total
volume of loaded shipping con-
tainers handled by the existing

See IMPORTS, pg 4


+


Cruise visitor spend,

numbers boost from

Port relocation


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
NEW PROVIDENCE will
capture a greater share of cruise
passengers to the Bahamas, and
see visitor and crew per capital
spending increase over a 20-
year period, if the commercial
shipping facilities are relocated
from downtown Bay Street to
the proposed new port in south-
western New Providence.
The completed study on the
economic, social and environ-
mental feasibility of the port
facilities that were first pro-
posed under the former Christie
administration, conducted by
Dutch consultants Ecorys-
Lievense.said relocation of the
existing Bay Street-based com-
mercial shipping facilities would
free-up space needed by the
cruise and tourism industries.
Estimating the impact on
cruise passenger visitor num-
bers to Nassau and per capital
spending, the Ecorys report
forecast that without the port
relocation, "the cruise market
in Nassau will show a very lim-
ited growth. The number of
calls will remain more or less
constant, as the average vessel
size is still increasing".
Without the port relocation,
Ecorys estimated that cruise vis-
itor arrivals to Nassau would
grow by 2 per cent per annum
between 2005 and 2015, rising
from 1.87 million to 2.28 mil-
lion.
Between 2015 and 2025, that
growth rate would fall to just 1
per cent annum, total arrivals
to Nassau growing to 2.518 mil-


lion, with the annual growth
rate between 2025 and 2035
projected to be just 0.5 per cent
- total numbers growing from
2.518 million to 2.647 million.
Cruise ship calls would also
increase moderately to start
with, then declined. The Eco-
rys study showed call numbers
growing from 1,162 in 2005 to
1,180 in 2015, then dropping to
1,134 in 2025 and 1,083 in 2035.
Over this 30-year span, the
report now sitting on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham's
desk estimated that Nassau's
share of the total cruise passen-
ger visitors to the Bahamas
would fall from 56 per cent in
2005 to 42 per cent in 2015, 31
per cent in 2025, and 24 per cent
in 2035.
However, the Ecorys study
predicted that if the commer-
cial shipping facilities were relo-
cated'from downtown Bay,
Street:, "Nassau will show
growth rates more or less simi-
lar to the Bahamas, and will
therefore be able to capture a
larger share of the market in
the Bahamas.
"The number of vessel calls
will increase. Crew numbers are
increasing at a similar rate as
passenger numbers, as a con-
stant ratio of one crew member
for every three passengers is
assumed."
With the port relocation,
Ecorys predicted that cruise vis-
itors to Nassau would increase
from 1.87 million in 2005 to
2.768 million in 2015, a per

See CRUISE, page 4


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


Look inward to protect assets


A DEEP-rooted fallacy
among business managers is
that security, or loss preven-
tion, begins and ends with the
security officer at the gate or
entrance. These mangers feel
security is the responsibility
of the uniformed security ser-
vice, and any losses can be
attributed to performance
failures on the part of the
security staff, rather than the
administrative or operating


departments.
This is far from the truth,
as the asset protection
department has no responsi-
bility for auditing the internal
control systems, and is usual-
ly only brought into the pic-
ture after a major loss event
has already occurred. Theft
investigations may be less
productive, as various groups
unite to protect their own
interests. Even though some


Safe &
Secure


Li

''9


for major losses has been sig-
nificantly increased. Data
manipulators or 'hackers'
have a greater capability to
steal from a company 9n a
grand scale without ever car-
rying an ounce of contraband
past a perimeter security con-
trol point. Losing the ability
to deal with such matters on
a human scale makes it
imperative for the security
department to recognize its
dependence upon the other
departments within the com-
pany, and to adapt itself
accordingly.
Exclusive reliance on elec-
tronic surveillance and con-
trol systems may create more
security problems than it
resolves. Some employees
may even sabotage such elec-
tronic systems in protest. For
example, a few drops of
epoxy on a stick can disable
most card access control sys-
tems with insert or aperture-
type readers.
Often, these actions by
employees are not motivated
by hostility to the company
or an attempt to steal. At one
time or another, we have all
witnessed (or perhaps
engaged in) an animated
monologue by an individual
to a vending machine which


employees may face the cor-
porate equivalent of capital
punishment, which is termi-
nation of employment, the
underlying conditions that
led to any dishonest acts will
remain. Perhaps theft will not
occur in exactly the same way
next time, but the losses and
their negative impact on staff
morale and company prof-
itability will continue.
THE CHANGING
CONTEXT OF
OPERATIONS
Today's,modern business
enterprise has fundamentally
changed many traditional
checks and balances that
were present in the older sys-
tem. For example, the depen-
dence on information tech-
nology and database systems
has brought with it significant
changes in internal controls
and loss control techniques.
Essential business informa-
tion is concentrated in fewer
hands, and the potential risk


ColinaIImperial.



y/ay the hope and joy of the Christmas season remain

with you every day of the coming year Thank you for your

patronage In 2007, and we look forward to serving you with

excellence In 2008. Blessings from our family to yours!


BAHAMAS / CAYMAN ISLANDS / TURKS & CAICOS
CALL: (242) 396-2000


* CLICK: www.colinalmperial.com


just swallowed some coins
without delivering a product.
Verbal abuse often shifts to
physical attack, and there are
numerous vending machines
that bear the marks of angry
blows delivered by dissatis-
fied customers.
A major obstacle to over-
come is the reluctance of
management to evaluate the
asset protection department
in other than statistical terms;
losses reported, cases solved,
etc. A year is considered
good when reported losses
are lower than the prior year,
although that may be the
least important criterion in
evaluating the asset protec-
tion programme. There may
not even be a mandated loss
reporting system covering
inventory shortages or other
forms of mysterious disap-
pearances. Most importantly,
the statistics collected may
not address a dishonest envi-
ronment developing in the
workplace. Altering produc-
tion numbers to "make the
boss look good" is only a
short step away from altering
other records to cause valu-
able materials to, first disap-
pear on paper, and then to
disappear physically as well.
TRACING
POTENTIAL'
VULNERABILITIES
A recurring pattern in
many theft investigations is
the degree to which the
established control systems
have been circumvented or
ignored by line and middle
management supervisors. In
many cases, it can be con-
vincingly argued that employ-
ees have been so well trained
in how to "beat the system"
by their own supervisors, it is
just a modest step for them to
apply the same techniques
for their own personal gain.
For example, in one case,
major losses from a locked
storeroom occurring over an
extended period of time were
traced back to a second-shift
supervisor, who had devised
a tool to open the door to the
storeroom in order to fulfill
production needs. On a rou-
tine basis, he sent an employ-
ee to the area to get stock
items necessary for the job.
In time, all the employees
learned how to enter the
locked storeroom, and some

SEE page 9


Sheraton
CableBeach
R"ESORT'
The new 700 room Sheraton Cable Beach Resort, Nassau, The Bahamas is looking for

DIRECTOR OF FUN
The qualified candidate must function as a key leader of the hotel will be responsible to set the
programming and lead the execution of all guest leisure entertainment. The position is responsible
to drive additional revenues and profits for operating departments. This is an Executive Committee
level position.
ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS
* Creation & Execution
* Strategic Planning & Profit Generation '
* Lead the Fun Team
* Metrics & Brand Compliance
* Best Practice/Research & Development
Skills & Abilities
Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written
High level of energy and enthusiasm
Ability to be creative, resourceful, and innovative
Positive attitude
Showmanship and stage presence
Physical Demands
Work tasks will be performed both indoors and outdoors
Requires both weekday and weekend work shifts from as early as dawn
in the morning until late in the evening.
Qualification & Experience
Bachelor's Degree required or equivalent work experience
Minimum of 5 7 years of department head experience in Hotel, Resort,
Cruise, Entertainment or similar industry.
Licenses or Certificates
CPR and First-Aid Certification
Qualified applicants are invited to visit our website
At
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Scotia Capital is the global Investment & Corporate Banking
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subsidiary of The Bank of Nova Scotia.


The role will ultimately support the existing team in all aspects
of the investment, structuring and trading of derivatives,
structured products and alternative assets. Considerable
training will be provided, however, the ideal candidate will have
a highly quantitative background and advanced exposure to
complex derivative products. The ability to work effectively in a
fast-paced and high pressure environment is a necessity.


Qualifications such as a CFA designation or graduate level
financial degree are desired but not required. Relevant job
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All interested applicants should forward a copy of their CV to
scotiabank.bs@scotiabank.com onor before December28,2007.


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EMAIL: Info@colinalmperlal.com









THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 3B


'Put on export thinking caps'


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
BAHAMIAN companies can
now "put on their thinking caps"
and explore new commodities
they can export to the European
Union (EU) as a result of this
nation reaching an agreement to
sign on to the Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA) on a
market access, or 'goods-only'
basis, a leading fisheries execu-
tive said yesterday.
Anthony Mckinney, president
of Paradise Fisheries, a major
fisheries wholesaler, processor
and exporter, who has long
argued that it is vital to preserve
duty-free market access to the
EU for some $60 million in


annual fisheries exports, said the
Government was to be congrat-
ulated on its proposed intention
to sign on to CARIFORUM's
EPA with the EU.
Adding that the arrangement
will help to drive the Bahamas'
export business, Mr McKinney
told Tribune Business he was
pleased to hear that the
Bahamas was working out an
agreement which would allow it
to sign on to CARIFORUM's
EPA.
The agreement, where the
Bahamas was concerned, would
only cover the trade in physical
goods between this nation and
Europe, minister of state for
finance, Zhivargo Laing, said in
the House of Assembly on Mon-
day.


"We are delighted that the
Government has taken this step.
It is good move for the Bahamas
because it will open the door to
the European Union for
Bahamians," said Mr McKinney.
He said Bahamians will now
have tremendous benefits to
become entrepreneurs by sup-
plying goods to those countries.
"This provides Bahamians
with an opportunity to put on
their thinking caps and find dif-
ferent commodities that they can
export to these countries. This
arrangement gives them a very
competitive edge in the world
marketplace. You know the
world is a community, and we
cannot just rely on sun, sand and
sea. This is giving us the oppor-
tunity to look at various indus-


tries to get into," he added.
Mr McKinney said that is
something not a lot of countries
have the benefit of. "We are
delighted that the Government
has done this. We think that it is
a step in the right direction."
He added that the Govern-
ment needs to be commended
for not only reaching the agree-
ment, but also for the length of
time in which it was done.
"This was done in record
time," Mr McKinney said.
According to Mr Laing, this
position would preserve duty-
free market access to the EU for
the Bahamian fisheries industry,
Polymers International and oth-
er exporters to Europe, without
compromising or binding the
services sector, which accounts


Wilson: No concerns on Coke property deal


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE purchaser of the former
Coca-Cola warehouse on JFK
Drive yesterday told The Tri-
bune it had "no concerns" that
the deal would be impacted by
opposition to the transaction
from the vendor's majority
shareholder.
The Tribune revealed on
Monday that Clifford Culmer,
joint liquidator for Mosaic
Composite, which holds 50.8
per cent of the shares in BISX-
listed investment fund, Premier
Commercial Real Estate Invest-
ment Corporation, had written
to the fund's Board warning
that he opposed the transaction
because the value of the com-
pany and its assets were being
undermined.
Mr Culmer, via his attorney,
Callender's & Co partner
Michael Scott, warned that the
sale of the former JFK drive
warehouse for Caribbean Bot-
tling, the Bahamian Coca-Cola
franchise, should not go through
unless they gave prior approval.
Mosaic's joint liquidators, Mr
Culmer and Canadian Ray-
mond Massi, warned that if they
did not first approve the JFK
Drive warehouse sale, they
"reserve the right to take such


further action against the Board
as they my be advised, including
without limitation, replacing the
Board in an Extraordinary Gen-
eral Meeting (EGM)".
However, Franklyn Wilson,
chairman of the proposed pur-
chaser, the Sunshine Group of
Companies, told The Tribune
in relation to the affair: "We
have no concerns.
"My position is that we dealt
with people we held in high
regard and deemed to be hon-
ourable. As far as we were
aware, they had the proper
authority to negotiate and a
deal's a deal.
"As far as we're concerned,
it's done. It's in motion and
can't be reversed."
Mosaic's liquidators said they
"view with alarm" any attempt
to dispose of Premier's real
estate holdings, which include
Freeport's First Commercial
Centre and three properties
owned by the Bahamian Coca-
Cola franchise, and questioned
whether such a course of action
was prudent for the company
and its shareholders.
Noting that Mosaic was "the
registered holder of 550,000
shares in Premier", giving it a
majority 50.8 per cent stake, Mr
Scott referred to recent reports
that the company, which oper-


ates as a real estate investment
trust (REIT) or investment
fund, had agreed in principle to
sell the Coca-Cola franchise's
former warehouse to Franklyn
Wilson's Sunshine Group.
Mr Scott questioned whether
Premier's Board was also
intending to sell the two other
Caribbean Bottling properties
owned by the fund, the head
office and production plant on
Thompson Boulevard, and
another distribution centre in
Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Referring to reports that Mr
Wilson had said the sales price
for the former Coca-Cola ware-
house on JFK was slightly less
than the $3 million asking price,
Mr Scott wrote: "It is under-
stood that the Board intends to
sell one or more of these assets
to the Sunshine Group of Com-
panies for a consideration which
may not be concomitant with
its or the actual market value.
"The joint official liquidators
view with alarm this course of
action, which is to be effected
without consultation with
them....... In the circumstances,
we are instructed by the joint
official liquidators to formally
notify the Board that no such
sale should take place or be
completed until such time as the
joint official liquidators have


been fully informed about any
proposed transaction and
approve any such sale."
Mr Scott added: "With spe-
cific reference to the intended
sale referred to in this letter, we
inform you that the joint official
liquidators do not approve this
transaction and propose to with-
hold their approval until they
are fully satisfied that any such
transaction is in the best interest
of the company and, for exam-
ple, is not a sale at an under-
value.
"In this connection, please
provide immediately current
valuations or appraisals of the
properties the Board intends to
dispose of by way of sale to the
Sunshine Group and all docu-
mentation, correspondence or
other material relevant to the
same."
For good effect, Mr Scott
said: "Finally, we are instructed
to place the Board of Directors
on notice that should the Board
effect this transaction without
the approval of the joint offi-
cial liquidators, the joint offi-
cial liquidators reserve the right
to take such further action
against the Board as they may
be advised, including without
limitation replacing the Board
in an Extraordinary General
Meeting of Premier."


for most of the Bahamas' eco-
nomic activity.
Instead, Mr Laing said it
would take six months for the
Bahamas to develop an EPA
offer on services and invest-


ments, as the Government
would need to consult the pri-
vate sector on this. When com-
pleted, a services offer by the
Bahamas would be added on to
the CARIFORUM's agreement.


MAINTENANCE/


HANDYMAN WANTED
A leading retail company has an immediate
opening for a Maintenance/Handyman

Basic Requirements

1. Should have a basic working
knowledge electrical, plumbing and
general carpentry repairs.

2. Must have a clean current Police Record

3. Must have own transportation

4. Must be a self-starter with drive and
determination

5. Must be able to work with minimum
supervision.

6. Previous experience not required but
would be an asset.

Persons meeting the above requirements should
submit their Resumes via fax to the address
below.

The positions offer career opportunities with
excellent salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902


lor dmid .,iuA i in u,ui ~OJ 2004 to all uiiJ-.rgrri-.Jtl c full lin" |I|J piln tlnn,: O .c4-'
,dlJ diplunim pr..-Tjiiinnne
LV,1 MliMuIji .l :it'r r I 2u1i):7 I, J,.uri.in1 I I i '
c, 1 it ll it id '.i A u ei,,Uri' (..I nll.n -t.- 'r.ill it hiix.r 12 '.. l.07l' L. .J. s'iuAJl A '.ii e
For information on indergaidtuate programmes with eniry requlrenienls ottered at. these
campuses, please review the Instruction booklel on our
webslte at www.mona.uwledu/ad'milssios or contact the Admissions Section of the
Campus of choice.
Applicants are encouraged to 1. APPLY ONLINE FRMEE OF CHARGS
2. SUBMIT SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS BY THE CLOSING DATE. SupporUng documents
Include original land copy of birth certificate or passport anid records of acaderilc qualillications.
Originals can be certified as 'seen' by designated personnel at itll UWI Centres
throughout Jamaica and the Region.

Cg Cmpletc the ipplil tioun onllni .,i the campus site of your choice at
(Mona)l www.inw,.uw,.edu cJihing date January 11. 2008
(Cave Hill) www.cavehill,uwI.edu & (St. Augustine) www.sta.uwi.edu
closing date January 31. 2008. Submit all supporting documents to campus of
first choice before closing date.


uDonlioad the appll.iUton lurm I'rom the campus website. complete and'
' si nitmi n1ii siipp, rithie, i ..,ariils and application processing fee receipt
,, ihth Arinissilr.n. Set itihn ol [ile campus of your choice.

P. applin.3im i 1r,, c ssiIh le I' managers cheque/bank draft in EC or
UIS dollars nmde pvtkble to tLie University of the West Indies
(Munal J$9U0, (Cove Hill) b.IDSJ.U, ISt. Augustinc) TI$90 or US$30.

Appitranti irii i Grade I in CSEC/CXC English A. or a Grade Ain GCE English
Lirni...t'i or a Lrjd.', I ,.-r _.r.i.Jt 2 in CAPE Communication Studies or
a Grade A iii GCE CGein-ra Pape'r, or approved equivalent, will be exempt from the
English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT).
All others will be required to take the ELFT
The test dates are: November 23, 2007, January I1, 2008, February 1. 2008 and
March 7. 2008. Please visit our website .at
www.mona.uwi.edu/dilp/languagefelptu/index.htm for test registration and
other Information,

'\pplicantll are enrouraunigeitl lt ake the UWI Open Scholarship Examination on
F'.hru.ry 25 2. 2006 l'c.,s it.niact the UWI Representative in your country.


PLEASE NOTE THAT ONY APPLICATIONS WITH ALL SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS WILL BE PROCESSED.


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PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


A further beneficiary from
the port relocation, the Ecorys
study argued, would be a rise
in per capital passenger and
crew spending in Nassau.
The report said: "Passenger
come ashore rates will be 85 per
cent, and 40 per cent for crew.
Passenger and crew spending
figures are assumed to rise to
the current Caribbean averages
of respectively $98 and $75 on
average."
Taking data from a 2006
study commissioned by the


Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:.

(a) MINERVA OVERSEAS LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions-of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolutiofi of said Company commenced on December 18, 2007
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 29th day of January, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be
excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before such
debts are proved.
December 19, 2007

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY




Legal Notice

NOTICE


ROCKYSTONE GROOVES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
14th day of November 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





NOTICE


FORTIS COGENT VENTURES LIMITED

(In Voluntary.Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that Fortis Cogent Ventures Lim-
ited, an international business company, number 73,823B,
with its registered office at New Providence Financial
Center, Suite 1000, East Bay Street, P.O. Box CR-56766,
New Providence, The Bahamas is in dissolution, The dis-
solution commenced on 30th November 2007 and the liq-
uidator is Cogent Limited of PO. Box 409, Sarnia House,
Le Truchot, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 3WA


WINDERMERE CORPORATE MANAGEMENT LIMITED
New Providence Financial Center, Suite 1000,
East Bay Street, PO Box CR-56766, New Providence,
The Bahamas


CRUISE, from pg 1
annum growth rate of 4 per
cent.
Between 2015 to 2025, this
annual growth rate would be
3.5 per cent, total cruise arrivals
reaching 3.905 million in the lat-
ter year. This figure would grow
to 5.247 million by 2035, a per
annum growth rate of 3 per cent
in the 10 years since 2025.
Ship calls to Nassau would
rise from 1,162 to 2,148 by 2035,
the study forecast.


Florida-Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA), the Ecorys
report noted that "the Bahamas
is among the destinations
receiving low passenger aver-
age spending, and the lowest
average crew spending".
The 2006 figures for the
Bahamas were $61 for passen-
gers, and $20 per crew member,
a decline from 2000's levels of
$78 arid $33 per head respec-
tively.
Relocating the commercial
shipping facilities from down-
town Nassau to the southwest-
ern port, Ecorys suggested,
would enable Bay Street's har-
bourfront to become "an attrac-
tive waterfront, with restau-
rants, bars and a shopping area.
Other development ideas may
include apartments, condos or a
marina".
In short, downtown Nassau's
revitalisation and redevelop-
ment depends on the relocation
of the shipping facilities.
The Bahamas' share of
Caribbean cruise tourism had
declined from more than 50 per
cent in the early 1990s to 35 per
cent in 2005, with the number of
passengers visiting Nassau stag-
nating and "under pressure".
"The lack of attractiveness of
downtown Nassau to cruise pas-
sengers puts a pressure on pas-
senger numbers," the Ecorys
report found. "There is a rela-
tively small area with shops and
restaurants around Bay Street,
roughly in between West Street
and East Street, that looks
attractive and well maintained.
"East of East Bay Street,


BETTER INVESTMENTS LTD.
(Company number 42,055B)


An International Business Company


(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Pursuant to Section 137 (4) of the International Business Companies
Act, 2000 notice is hereby given that the voluntary winding-up and
dissolution of the Company commenced on the 7th day of December,
2007 and that Roger Palma of 11 rue Generale Dufour, Case Postale
5156, 1204 Geneva 11, Switzerland has been appointed Liquidator.

Dated this 7th day of December, 2007


Roger Palma
Liquidator




Legal Notice

NOTICE


ROCKYSTONE GROOVES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
14th day of November 20Q7. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


where the freight terminals are,
the area looks less attractive.
Many buildings lack mainte-
nance and many shops are
closed.
"It seems that the cruise
product in Nassau has not
developed much, whereas over
the years consumers have
become more demanding and
other cruise ports developing
into attractive destinations,
offering a good shopping expe-
rience and an extensive pro-
gramme of excursions."
The physical infrastructure at
Prince George's Wharf was
another handicap, the Ecorys
report found, as its berthing
capacity, coupled with the port
entrance and turning circle,
were under pressure from
increase in cruise ship size.
On peak days, usually at
weekends, berthing capacity in
Nassau became "tight" with
seven to eight ships looking to
call on the city. Some requests
for these peak days had been
turned down, meaning that
expansion of Prince George's
Wharf either eastwards or west-
wards needed to be examined.
"In the times cruise ships
were considerably smaller, up
to 10 cruise ships have called at
Nassau simultaneously," the
Ecorys report said.
"This is not possible any-
more. The size of cruise ships
is increasing, with a growing
number of cruise ships with a
length in excess .of 900 feet.
With the present mix of ships
calling, six ships appears to be
the practical maximum."


IMPORTS, from page 1
Bay Street-based shipping companies was 73,000 TEUs in 2006.
These containers were handled at the separate terminals of
Tropical Shipping, Pioneer Shipping, Seaboard Marine and Bet-
ty K Line on east Bay Street, with non-containerised cargo esti-
mated to total some 127,000 tons per annum handled by Betty
K. Meanwhile, Pioneer Shipping annually imported about 2,500
cars to the Bahamas via its terminal.
The 73,000 TEUs were generally handled, the Ecorys report
found, by a mixture of roll on/roll off and load on/load off con-
tainer ships, plus multi-purpose ships, which could on average car-
ry 400 TEUs per voyage, had deadweight of 7,500 tons and draft
depth of 9.5 metres.
Ecorys found that the 73,142 TEUs offloaded in Nassau dur-
ing 2006 brought in 670,000 metric tons of cargo, with 1.6 ship
calls per day. Each vessel carried an average of 72 TEUs.
Tropical Shipping was found to have the biggest market share
by volume at 46 per cent, a figure that Ecorys said underestimated
its true position because during peak business periods it also
offloaded containers at Arawak Cay, not its downtown Bay
Street terminal.
Drawing on historical data, the Ecorys report found that TEU
throughput at Bay Street's commercial shipping facilities
increased from 38,700 in 1995 to 61,000 in 2000, while this figure
again increased between 2000 and 2006 to the present 73,000
TEUs.
Also of note, Ecorys said, was that the share of 40-foot shipping
containers the larger variety rose from 56 per cent in 1990 to
81 per cent in 2006.
Based on the fact that Bahamian gross domestic product
(GDP): was estimated to double by 2035, and the average per
annum growth rates for the 10-year periods leading up to 2015,
2025, and 2035 were projected to be 3.3 per cent, 2.7 per cent and
2.2 per cent respectively, Ecorys concluded that this heightened
economic activity due to major resort projects being in full
operation would drive TEU importation to New Providence.
"Container throughput will double from 66,000 TEUs at pre-
sent to 198,000 TEUs in 2025, and further to 243,000 TEUs in
2035," the Ecorys report said.
Meanwhile, car imports in bulk coming into Nassau had
increased from 5,554 units in 2001 to 6,829 units in 2006, with an
average growth rate of 4.2 per cent per year a rate higher than
GDP increases.
Ecorys estimated that "car ownership will increase for some
time and at a level higher than GDP" in the Bahamas, projecting
that car imports will increase at per annum growth rates of 4.3 per
cent, 3.1 per cent and 2.2 per cent for the 10-year periods tO
2015, 2025 and 2035 respectively.
As a result, the total number of car imports to Nassau is pro-
jected to rise to 19,784 by 2035. Given that car carriers drop
130 to 150 cars per shipment, the number of ship calls was esti-
mated to increase from the current 40 to 103 calls in 2035.



NOTICE


ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
CONGO (MER PROFONDE SUD) LIMITED


Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on-the 10th day of December,
A.D., 2007.

Dated the 17th day of December, A.D., 2007.


KAREN FLOYD
LIQUIDATOR OF
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
CONGO (MER PROFONDE SUD) LIMITED


LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


MANNING SERVICES LIMITED
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)


In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
MANNING SERVICES LIMITED is in dissolution. Martin
Willaume Richardson is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
Douceville Farm, Mont Cochon, St Helier, Jersey, JE2 3JB. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts to the Liquidator before the 21st day of December, 2007.










NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF
M1IICHAEL KENNETH
FAIRHURST, late of The Herons,
Heronswood Road, Kidderminster
Worcestershire, deceased
NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before
the 5th day of March 2008 after which
date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only


Pricing Information As Of: .F A L'"
Tuesday, 18 December 200 7C A

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Closp Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.66 0.54 Abaco Markets 1.59 1.55 -0.04 2,000 0.157 0.000 9.9 0.00%
11.74 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.65 11.65 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.8 3.43%
9.60 8.03 Bank of Bahahmas 9.60 9.60 0.00 0.733 0.260 13.1 2.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 6.000 0.188 0.020 4.5 2.35%
3.74 1.75 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.275 0.090 13.3 2.46%
2.70 1.22 Fidelity Bank 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.058 0.040 46.6 1.48%
12.05 9.99 Cable Bahamas 12.05 12.05 0.00 1.030 0.240 11.7 1.99%
3.15 1.90 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.6 1.27%
8.27 4.17 Commonwealth Bank (Si) 8.26 8.27 0.01 3,908 0.426 0.260 19.4 3.14%
7.22 4.74 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.76 5.96 0.20 0.129 0.050 44.7 0.87%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.28 2.28 0.00 0.316 0.020 7.2 0.88%
6.95 5.70 Famguard 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.713 0.280 9.7 4.03%
12.85 12.02 Finco 12.80 12.85 0.05 1,000 0.829 0.570 15.5 4.44%
14.75 14.15 FirstCaribbean 14.50 14.50 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.5 3.24%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.359 0.140 15.6 2.50%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.73 0.74 0.01 1,200 -0.4'15 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.00 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
11.00 8.60 J.S. Johnson 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.991 0.590 11.1 5.36%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%|
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
1.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.3663 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.366332"
3.5388 2.9728 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.5388***
2.9902 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990218*
1.2827 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.282687*
11.8192 11.3075 Fideliy Prime Income Fund 11.8192***
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 1.000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price AV KEY
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ -Selling prico of Colinoa nd fidelity 30 November 2097
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 30 June 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week "" 31 October 2007
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths .. 31 July 2007
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 818/2007
81) 3-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007


to the claims of which he shall then
have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that
all persons indebted to the said Estate
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
vt mentioned.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew's Court, Frederick St.
Steps
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Executors -
David Fairhurst and Peter Fairhurst


' I BU INESSI









THE RIBUE WENESDY, DCEMBR 19 200,SPAEESS


Year's end brings chance to re-examine investment goals


* By TIM PARADISE
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) It's a
time of year when we make
promises of self-betterment
that we have little intention of
keeping. Stre, failing to drop
those last few pounds or slog
through a big read like
"Ulysses" might be disap-
pointing, but losing sight of
investment goals can lead to
longer-lasting troubles.
The latest round of resolu-
tion-making comes after a frac-
tious year on Wall Street, one
that has no doubt drawn atten-
tion even from investors who
would normally take more
interest in improving their golf
swing or cleaning out the
garage. But in the face of the
stock market's volatility,
knuckling down with a back-
to-basics strategy can offer the
best course for many investors,
Wall Street observers say.
"Remain diversified, keep
an eye on costs and don't buy
the strategy-of-the-month
fund," said Jeff Tjornehoj, an
analyst at fund tracker Lipper
Inc. It's a quick checklist on
such things as fund fees and
strategies for riding out uncer-
tainty on Wall Street.
As year-end reports of fund
performances begin flowing in,
it can be tempting to jump into
areas that have put up huge
returns in 2007. Dumping a


bunch of money into a hot area
might work for a while, but
ultimately leaves an investor
more susceptible to losing out,
Tjornehoj said.
He sees, for example, the
strong performance this year
of emerging market funds as
an enticing draw for many
investors. But a hasty move
into funds that invest in China
and other developing countries
could bring unwelcome prob-
lems in the coming year. "It's
fine to have some allocation
to those economies, you just
don't need to go whole-hog,"
he said. "It looks great right
now. It looks like you can't
miss. Inevitably when enough
people think like that, that's
when the other shoe drops."
Retirement
Tom Foster, a retirement
plans expert at The Hartford, a
financial services and insurance
company, says many investors
see the market's volatility and
think they can put aside less
for retirement and instead gen-
erate bigger returns by divert-
ing some savings into shorter-
term bets on the market's
movements. But correctly call-
ing the next winning move on
Wall Street is hugely difficult
even for professional investors.
Foster said investors should set
aside as much money as possi-
ble for retirement and use only


any extra money to play the
market.
"In a time of market volatil-
ity, the best place to have mon-
ey is a tax-deferred bucket,"
he said. "You're in it for the
long haul."
With the long-term goals in
mind, the end of the year is a
good time for investors to
examine their stable of invest-
ments. But a review doesn't
necessarily mean dumping a
fund that has had a lackluster
run recently.
"I think sometimes people
look at a loss as an indication
that they made a mistake and
that they need to get out," Fos-
ter said. "It's not unusual for
great funds to have some peri-
od in which they're just down
relative to the rest of the mar-
ket."
He said dropping a fund for
a weak showing over a short
period isn't wise investing.
In searching for stronger
returns, investors too often
treat long-term vehicles like
mutual funds as stocks, jump-
ing in and out of them, racking
up trading costs and perhaps
missing long-term gains, he
said.
Investors who re-examine
where their money sits ahead
of the new year shouldn't lim-
it the review to what is found
in their 401(k) plan, Tjornehoj
said. Tweaking mutual fund
investments doesn't matter


Established Insurance Agency invites suitably qualified individuals to apply for the
Temporary Position ofAccounting Clerk

1. Preparation of monthly Bank-k nations, ImiCiany mt skmmaries
2. Preparation of Monthly Journal Entries
3. Customer StatementfNotice processing
4. Cheque/Payment Preparation
5. Maintenance of General Ledger Sub ledger schedules
(Fixed Assets, Misc Receivables, Accounts Payables)
6. Assisting in the preparation of Month-end Financial Report
7. Liasing with external Auditors
8. Verification of Daily Cash Deposits
9. Misc. accounting assignments
Education And/Or Experience
Minimum of an Associates Degree in Accounting with at least 3 years prior experience.
SAl applications should be mailed (by Wednesday, December 19, 2007) to:
Attention of the Chief Financial Officer at
Financel20o74@yahoo.con





THE CLEARING BANKS ASSOCIATION
Announces



G Christmas and New Years


Holidays rankingg Hours




Monday, December 24, 2007

9:30 1:00p.m.


Tuesday, December 25,2007 Closed

Wednesday December 26, 2007 Closed



Regular Banking hours will resume on
thursday, December 27, 2007 (9:30a.m. 3:00p.m.)j t
Friday, December 28,2007 (9:30a.m. 4:30p.m.)

,Monday, December 31,2007 (9:30a.m.- 1:00p.m.) w


Tuesday, January 1,2008 Closed



Regular Banking hours will resume on

Wednesday, January 2,2008



Bank of The Bahamas Limited
Citibank, N.A.
Commonwealth Bank Limited
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribben International Bank (Bahamas) Limited,
Royal Bank of Canada
Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited


much if fees from credit card
debt, for example, are steadily
outpacing gains from fund
holdings.
In addition to paying down
debt, investors who might be
due for bonuses or',raises
should consider ratcheting up
contributions to retirement
plans as a way to save more
without feeling like they are
taking more money out of their
pocket today.
Tjornehoj noted that
investors should also make
sure they are contributing as
much money as possible to
their retirement accounts, par-
ticularly in cases where a com-
pany matches a portion of an
employees' savings. To do any
less is to leave money on the
table, he said.
Taking time to examine
where they stand gives
investors a chance to plug any
holes in their investment strat-
egy, Foster said.
"It's always good to reflect at
this time of year on what we
did last year in all our various
investments and make sure
we're still on track," he said.


Client Relationship
Manager


.SG Hambros

SG
Private Banking
SOCIETY CENERALE GROUP


Nassau Plastics

Company
Sign Post & Trophy Case
HOLIDAY HOURS
Please note that our offices will be closed from
5pm on Friday, December 21, 2007
Reopening for business at
8:30 am on Wednesday, January 2, 2008


SG I-ambros is currently k..kiio o I
Relationship Mainager. Your p),uui, ry roi v;
to introduce. mainland and grow rpaiofirbie ni
relaioniiships in North A, erica. r SO H '"
& Trust (Bahamas) Lited and e : ::
legal, regulatory and industry stancr.:
SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
You should ideally hold the Chartered Institute o. Bankers
Diploma or equivalent professional qualifications, and have at
least 8 to 10 years' international private banking/ marketing/sales
experience.
You should have excellent client relationship and selling skills
and an in-depth knowledge of investment, trust and banking
products. Working knowledge of Spanish and or Pcrtuguese
-would be an asset, and proficient in th- Computers.
The incumbent will be required to travel a regular basis to
designated marketing regii,c.
The position offers an attractive salary hrneritsspackacsq
including group insurances, pensioir .-. nus schemes.
Applications should be submitted to the following address,
to arrive on or before 21 December 2007.


Head of Human Resources
SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
PO Box N7789
Nassau
Bahamas
SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahdlns)J Lrmited is hcenscd
under the Banks and Trust Comp nies R-gulation Act


CREDITSUISSE


Credit


Suisse (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a


I.T. SPECIALIST (Senior Globus System Developer)
Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards th.it
go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele
with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional portfolio
management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on their
financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

+ Qualifications:
At least Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and tioihk 'ti 1in a
banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUS/T24 Banking Application in both supo i .
development roles
Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equiv..
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 5.3, tNT IR.EIS JBASE, PLSQJ
Experience in working with GlobusiT24 related migrate i ti in i. .

* Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Good technical and problem solving skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hums :a~s ovcri'.
Previous experience of working in a production support role in Iuaint:ing i.'(11%;: 12, 4
system is a plus.

*: Other Duties:
Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff
Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
Ensure that "Business Contingency Planning" requirements are followed
Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

+ Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and external c~ireer development training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not nmeetinl tile milnimum requirements
need not apply.
Applications should be submitted to'
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: 21 DECEMIBER.2007


I


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


'''''' ~i~j;l








A~GE 6B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


GN-625











SUPREME

COURT


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 1996/PRO/NPRJ00050

Whereas GREGORY LAWRENCE BAKER, of the
Western District and STEPHEN LEON BAKER, of
the Southern District both of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the will annexed de
bonis non of the Real and Personal Estate of HERBERT
A. BAKER, late of, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


2007/PRO/NPR/00607


PROBATE DIVISION


IN THE ESTATE OF DORIS MA Y COOPER,
domiciled and late of Thousand Acres, Bradley Road,
Bournstream, Wooton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof,4pplication will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for,.obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted
to CHRISTOPHER JOHN NORTHOVER, the
Executor of the Estate, by the District Probate Registry
at Bristol in the High Court of Justice on the 14th day
of August, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAUREEN ELIZABETH
ROBERTS (a.k.a.) MAUREEN ELIZABETH
YATES, late of Rowan House, Hall Road, Wenhaston,
Halesworth, Suffolk, England in the United Kindgom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by WARREN SCOTT WARD of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate
in the above estate granted to ROBERT ANTHONY
DOLMAN and JOHN MICHAEL DYSON, the
Executors of the Estate, by the High Court of Justice,
the District Probate Registry at Winchester,. on the 23rd
day of October 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00628

IN THE ESTATE OF MYRTLE M. REIMER a.k.a.
MYRTLE REIMER, late of 238 Butte des Morts Dr.,
Menasha, Winnebago County in the State of Wisconsin
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by VANRIA M. LIGHTBOURN of
Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to CAROL J. REIMER, the Personal


Representative of the Estate, by the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Winnebao County, on the 26th day of
March 1984.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas PAULETTE MARIE MITCHELL-GREEN
of Golden Gates NO. 2 in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate of WILIAM RICHARD GREEN late
of Golden Gates No.2 in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00630

Whereas LORNA ELOISE BETHUNE of Southern
Heights off Baillou Hill Road in the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of KAY VERONICA
BETHUNE late of Stapledon Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00631

Whereas GAYNELL DELORES BULLARD of No.
8 Cashier Road, Eastern Estates In the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of MICHAEL PETER BULLARD late of No. 8
Cashier Road, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00633

IN THE ESTATE OF FRIDOLIN STAHELI, late of
Fidazerstrasse 19C, CH-7019 Fidaz-Flims, in the Canton
of Graubunden, Switzerland, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SARAH L. P. KING of Love
Beach in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to RETO
DORA, the Executor of the Estate, by Trins District
Office, Casa Communala, on the 5th day of April 2005.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00634

Whereas JUDY MAE TAYLOR of White's Subdivision
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made


application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of PERRY NEWTON TAYLOR late of White's
Subdivision in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00635

IN THE ESTATE OF LOUISE McCULLOUGH, late
of Clifton Bay Drive, Lyford Cay in the Western District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by ANTHONY NOMIKOS
KLONARIS and PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS
both of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorneys-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to
FRANCIS C. ROONEY JR., the Executor of the
Estate, by the Surrogate's Court of the County of New
York, on the 30th day of
November 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


2007/PRO/NPR/00639


PROBATE DIVISION


IN THE ESTATE OF LESLIE HODGSON, late of
38, East Avenue Riverview Park, Althorne in the
Chelmsford District, of the County of Essex of the
United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER of the
Western District, New Providence, one of the Istiids
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The BahamaS- for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to AUDREY VERA HODGSON, the
Executrix of the Estate, by the High Court of Justice,
the District Probate Registry at Winchester on the 28th
day of November 1994.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00640

Whereas CAROLYN AZALEA BARTLETT, PAULA
LOUISE MITCHELL and ALBERTHA LOUISE
BARTLETT all of the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS, late of
Watlings Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00641

Whereas CHERYL ROLLE of the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
BETTY SAUNDERS, late of Flamingo Gardens,
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


'THE TRIBUNE


-AQGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007









GN-625





SUPREME


COURT




COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00642

Whereas CARL NAIRN, JR., of the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of CARL NAIRN, SR., late of Baillou Hill Estates, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00644

Whereas LILLIAN CECELIA MILLER, of No. 9 Melrose Avenue, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EDWARD ERVIN MILLER,
late of South Beach Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the'Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




PROBATE DIVISION
2007/PRO/NPR/00645

IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN FOSTER MORAN, SR., late of 9321 W. Outer
Dri'Ve, Detroiti Michigan, one of the States of the United States of America,
"-deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the
date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahapnas in
the Probate Division by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of
Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Authority for Personal
Representative in the above estate granted to JOHN F. MORAN, JR., and
RICHARD D. MORAN the Personal Representatives of the Estate, by the
Probate Court in the County of Wayne in the State of Michigan one of the States
of the United States of America on the 22nd day of August 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00647

Whereas SAMANTHA MAE PRISCILLA WILLIAMS of the Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MAE WILLIAMS nee
MCKINNEY, late of No. 52 Old Cedar Street, Yellow Elder Gardens, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00648


Whereas ZILPHA JANET WILLIAMS of No. 8 Taylor Street, Nassau Village,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of AMBROSE
ALEXANDER WILLIAMS, late of No.8 Taylor Street, Nassau Village, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 7B


UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
CONDENSED BALANCE SHEE I'(unaudited)

September 30 December 31
2007 2006
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 3,061 $ 181,379
Accounts receivable, net 1,550,626 1.391,238
Invest'ment in associate (note 3) 112,856
Inventory 434,689 402,061
Advances another assets 25,021 22,491
Deposits 12,900 12,900
Total current assets 2.139,153 2.010069
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment, net (notes 5 and 8) 7.038,131 6,056,616
Total assets $ 9,177,284 8,066,685
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Liabilities
Bank overdraft 15,461
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities 498,669 326,605
Security deposits 372,525 331,423
Total liabilities 886,655 658,028
Shareholders' equity
Authorized: 10,000,000 shares ot'S0.01 each
Issued and fully paid: 4.200.000 shares
Share capital 42.000 42,000
Contributed surplus .2,752.113 2.752.113
Retained earnings 5,496,516 4.614.544
Total shareholders' equity' 8,290.629 7,408657
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity S 9,177.284 $ 8,066,685
BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF
INCOME AND RETAINED EARNINGS (unaudited)


Nine months ended September 30
2007 2006
Sales and services rendered S 6,034,718 $ 5,089,036
Cost of sales and direct expenses. 3.683,545 3.204.184
Gross profit 2351,173 1.884.852
Expenses
Operating 1,463,803 1.186.327
Interest and bank charges '1f5,398 7411
Total operating expenses ,, *9.201 1193.738 ,
Net income from operations 881.972 691.114
Retained earnings at beginning ot'period 4,614.544 3.845.483
5.496.516 4.536,597
Dividends
Retained earnings at end of period 5.496,516 S 4.536.597
Earnings per share (note 4) S 0.21 $ 0.16
BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited)

Nine months ended September
2007 2006
Cash and cash equivalents provided bs (used for):
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income $ 881,972 $ 691.114
Adjustments for items not inol ing use of cash
Bad debt c\pense 22,031 16,431
Depreciation 883,427 797,038
1,787,430 1,504.583
Change in non-cashl working capital itemn
Increase in accounts receivable (181,419) (59.570)
Increase l inventory and other assets (32,628) (123.732)
Increase in accounts payable and
accrued liabilities 172,064 54.199
Increase in security deposits 41,102 22.890
Net cash provided bs (used for) operating activities 1,786,549 1.398,370
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Purchase of fi ed assets (1.864.942) (1.021,072)
Investment in associate (112,856)
Advances (collections) of loans (2,530) (22,727)
Net cash used for investing acti ity (1,980.328) (1.043.799)
Net change in cash ndcash equi agents (193,779) 354.571
Cash and cash equivalents at begi;ining of period 181.379 (14,402)
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period (12,400) S 340.169
BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED
NOTES TO UNAUDIITED CONDENSED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
September 30. 2007


I. CORPORATE INFORMATION
Bahamas Waste Limited ("BWL.") w'as incorporated under lie laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18. 19S7 under the inace of Blahamas Waste Systcnms Limited. On December
7. 1999. the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Litmed. 1 lie latest audited accounts of
the BWL wtc e prepared on l)ecemhber 31,. 200.
The quarter ends of BWL fall oni March 31. June 30I and September .0, with the yea end of the
Company being Decembei 11.

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTIING POLICIES
These condensed interim tina.ial statements have been prepared in accordance with International
Accounting Standaid 3.1. Inlctin in.lnctil c lRepolting, using the same accounting policies applied in
the IDeccmbe .1 I, 2)00l audited financial statements.

3. INVESTMENT IN ASSOCIATE
The investment in associates represent BWL's investment in Green Systems Limited (GSL). During
the quarter BWL purchased lo of the outstanding shares of GSL. The Company accounts for this
investment under the equity method. An associate is an entity in w which BWL has significant
influence and winch' is neither ai subsidiary nor ait joint venture, Investment in associate are
accounted for under the equity itethod, the insestmtent in tlie associate is carried in the balance shtet
at cost plus post acquisition changes in the (Company's share of net assets of the associate The
income statement rcllects the share of the results of operations of the asoesals Where there has
beei a change recognized directly in the equity of the associate, the Company recogizc s its share
of any changes and discloses this, when applicable. Profits and losses resulting from transactions
between the Company and the associate :ie eliinnatl. to the extent of theic interest in the associate.
4. EARNINGS PER SHARE
Earnings per share w.ere calculated sed on tie shares outstadntng at the end of the period, which
approximatted average sales outstanding during the period


2107


Shares otstanitdintu ii Scpletinhcir l


4.200,000


2006


4.200.000


S. RELATED PARTY I TRANSACTIONS
During the quarter c. i WIet. entered into aunsictlions wth ilntedli pnrties. All transactions were
coiuclted al 111111 length and i no siginicant otligations to tie telattA patiies existed it Marchi 31.
2007.
6. COMMITMENTS ANI) CONTINGENCIES
The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period fronm the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guanintecs.


Harbour



Island



resort



names



general



manager


HOSPITALITY veteran
Anne K Ward has been
named as general manager (tf
the Romora Bay Club and
Resort on Harbour Island,
where she will head a staff of
35 during property renova-
tions scheduled to start in
April 2008.
Her responsibilities will
include managing hotel opei-
ations for the waterfront 25-
villa property, as well as
assisting with the re-design
and development.
"Ms Ward will head up
hotel operations at a critical
time when we want to satisfy
our current and return guests,
while beginning the re-birth
of Romora Bay as a bou-
tique, world-class resort and'
marina," said Bryan Bentley,
a director of Bonachella
Investments Ltd. which pur-1
chased the five-and-a-half-
acre property in 2004.
Mr Bentley said the com-
pany wants to redevelop
itself as an upscale, nautical-
themed condo hotel with vil
las and an eco-friendly maril
na.
"Anne is not only an expert
rienced manager who has
spent 16 successful years in
island and residential propet-
ties, including the prestigious
Ocean Reef Club in Key
Largo, she is an extraordinar-
ily versatile professional, an1
accomplished equestrian, an4
a -registered/accre'dited-dAetij-
ian," Mr Bentley said. t
For the past four years, Ms
Ward headed up divisions at
Ocean Reef, a 6,000-mem-
ber-owned club and resort
with annual revenues of moi e
than $65 million. She was re
promoted to executive direct
tor of lodging operations,
after serving as director of
conference and convention
services, and before that wag
revenue and reservations
manager.
From 1994-2003. she was
assistant manager, then gen-
eral manager of the Rat-
tlesnake Island Club on LakV
Erie, Ohio, where she assist-j
ed in the renovation of the
64-acre island club and
resort, including marina
expansion, interior, exterior,
operations systems and ser-
vice upgrades.
Ms Ward competed in
Grand Prix and racing events
throughout the US. and has
ridden for some of the best-
known stables including
Callar Racing Stables.








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PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Chairman's Review
Of the Results
For the year ended October 31, 2007

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited earned a consolidated net income of $109.9 million
for the 2007 fiscal year. This represented an increase of $9.2 million or 9% over last year's restated net
income. Excluding the impact of the changes as described in notes 3, 5 and 6 to these financial statements
net income for the year would be $3 million (3%) higher than last fiscal year end, as a result of higher cost
of domestic deposits and lower returns on the US dollar investment portfolios.

Total revenues for the year amounted to $179.3 million, a $7.4 million (4%) increase over last year with
the main driver being operating income. Earnings on our US dollar investment portfolios were adversely
impacted by global widening of credit spreads which started during the third quarter.

Interest income rose 18% or $43 million over last year primarily due to increases in loan and investment
volumes, as yields on US placements declined. Interest expenses increased by $50 million or 55% due to
higher customer deposit volumes and repurchase agreements entered into at the end of last year, coupled
with increased interest rates in our local currency with no corresponding prime rate movement
Consequently, the Bank's net interest income for the year declined by $6.9 million (4%) from the prior
year.

Operating expenses for the year were $57.1 million, a reduction of $8.8 million (13%) from last year and
the ratio of expenses to revenue improved by 6% over last year to 31.8%. Excluding the impact of the
changes noted above, operating expenses would be flat to the prior year at $65 million. Loan loss expense
was $12 million, an increase of $7 million over last year as loan provisions were prudently made during
the year.

The total assets of the Bank at October 31, 2007 were $4.6 billion, representing growth of $183 million or
4% since last fiscal year end.

Earnings per share was 91.4 cents, 7.6 cents greater than last year. Excluding the impact of the changes as
noted above, earnings per share was 84.8 cents for the year.

The return on assets for the fiscal year was 2.4%, and the return on tangible equity was 25.2%.

The Directors have approved the payment of a final dividend of 25 cents per share which will be payable
to shareholders of record on December 28, 2007 on January 7, 2008. An interim dividend of 22 cents per
share was paid, so that the total dividend is 47 cents per share for 2007.

I thank the Board, management, staff and most importantly our customers for their continued support





Michael K. Mansoor
Chairman


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
BS'000
Unaudited
October 31. 2007


Assets
Cash and balances with banks
Securities
Loans and advances to customers
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Other assets

Total assets

Liabilities

Q er boirowed funds


Total liabilities


Equity
Share capital & reserves
Retained earnings


Total liabilities and equity


Director


230,177
1,686,888
2,414,745
187,748
26.955
79,774

4,626,287


3,631.219



3,979,875


439,376
207,036

646,412

4,626,287


Audited
October 31. 2006
(Restated)


366,960
1,358,846
2,425,951
187,747
29,209
55,248

4,423,961


3,503,903
281,344
41,976


3,827,223


436,030
160,708

596,738

4,423,961


Director


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Equity
B$'000


Share Capital &
Reserves


Balance at October 31, 2005
as previously reported
Prior period adjustment
Balance at October 31, 2005 as restated
Net income for the year
as previously reported
Prior period adjustment
Net Income as restated
Dividends
Revaluation gains/(losses)
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund Turks & Caicos Islands
Transfer to Statutory Loan Reserve
Balance at October 31, 2006


Balance at October 31, 2006
as previously reported
Prior period adjustment
Balance at October 31, 2006

Net income for the period
Dividends
Revaluation losses
Transfer to Statutory Reserve Fund Turks & Caicos Islands
Release from Statutory Loan Reserve
Balance at October 31, 2007


417,281


Retained Earnings


143,958
830


Total


561,239
830


417,281 144,788 562,00,

110,672 110,672
(9,972) (9,972)
100,700 100,700
(66,119) (66,119)
88 88
4,000 (4,000)
14,661 (14,661)
436,030 160,708 596,738


435,556 169,850 605,406
474 (9,142) (8,668)
436,030 160,708 596,738
109,860 109,860
(56,498) (56,498)
(3,688) (3,688)
5,200 (5,200)
1,834 (1,834)
439,376 207,036- 646,412


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Income
BS'000


Total interest income
Total interest expense

Net interest income
Operating income


Operating expenses
Loan loss expense


Net income


Unaudited
Quarter Ended
October 31, 2007 October 31, 2006
(Restated)

77,108 75,050
(36,260) (29,027)

40,848 46,023
3,771 (8,795)
44,619 37,228

15,657 15,514
4,293 3,909
19,950 19,423

24,669 17,805


Weighted average number of common
shares outstanding for the period


Unaudited
Year Ended


Audited
Year Ended


October 31. 2007 October 31, 2006
(Restated)

288,601 245,479
(141,440) (91,407)

147,161 154,072
32,143 17,825
179,304 171,897

57,104 65,873
12,340 5,324
69,444 71,197

109,860 100,700


120,216,204


120,216,204


Earnings per share (in cents)


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
B$'000


Net cash from (used in) operating activities


Net cash from (used in) financing activities


Net cash used in investing activities

Net Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period


Unaudited
Year Ended
October 31. 2007


193,573


(39,248)


Audited
Year Ended
October 31, 2006
(Restated)


(253,390)


214,573


(186,016) (523,210)

(31,691) (562,027)

180,084 742,111

148,393 180,084


FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
Year Ended
October 31, 2007


1. Accounting Policies
The accountingpoliciesused in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are consistentwith those used in the annual financial statementsfor
tie year eind October 31, 2006.
The consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of the following wholly owned subsidiaries:
FirstCaribbean International Finance Corporation (Bahamas) Limited
FirstCaribbean International (Bahamas) Nominees Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Land Holdings (TCI) Limited


2. Comparatives
Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to comply with changes in presentation in the current year.
In the prior year, in accordance with IAS 18 Revenue, loan fee income, which would have been consideredto be an intergralpart of the effectiveinterestrate
of the financial instruments, was deferred and recognized as an adjustment to the effective interest yield on the loan. This adjustment was applied
retrospectively, and as such, the comparative statements for 2005 were restated. The 2006 previously published comparatives have also been restated to
reflect this adjustment In addition, the 2006 comparative amounts have bean restated to reflect the reclassification of this unearned loan fee income from
other liabilities to loans in the amount of $19.4 million, and operating income to interest income in the amount of $5.7 million.

During the year, a review of the Bank's hedge accounting revealed that one of the criteria was not fully met and this resulted in the restatementof the prior
year's results. Opening retained earnings for 2006 was increased by $0.8 million, revaluationreserveswere increased by $0.5 million, net income attributable
to the equity holders of the Bank for 2006 was reduced by $9.9 million with a correspondingreduction in retained earnings, and total assets were reduced by
$8.6 million.

3. Change In Accounting Estimate
Effective November 1, 2006, the Bank changed its estimate on the useful life of software which resulted in an increase in the depreciation charge for the year
in the amount of $836.


4. Change in Accounting Policy
Effective March 1, 2007, the Bank changed the date on which all purchases and sales of financial assets at fair value through the profit and loss are to be
recognized from trade date to settlement date. The audited October 31, 2006 balances have been restated to reflect this change. The impact on the audited
October 31, 2006 balances was to reduce trading securities by $157 million, other assets by $82 million and other liabilities by $239 million. There was no
impact on the year to date October 31, 2006 balances.


5. Post Retirement Benefits
Effective January 1, 2007 certain changes to the Bank's post retirement health benefit schemes were made which resulted in the recognitionof a curtailment
gaint of $8.7 million.


6. Related Party Transactions
The agreementwith Barclays Bank PLC whereby the Bank would receivean annual paymentfrom Barclay Bank PLC of $ I'0 millions an incentiveto retain
deposit placementswith Barclays Capital expired on December 31, 2005. The comparativeperiod ended October31, 2006 would thereforeincludeincome for
the fimn. two months in the amount of $1.7 million within operating income.


7. Deposits

Included in deposits are deposits from related entities in the amount of $597 million (October 31 2006: $484 million) which may be repaid within the year.


|8. Issuance of Debt Instruments
On November 3.2006. the Bank issued $20 million redeemable floating rate notes at prime plus 0.75% which mature November 3, 2011.


__


e ir!







Cal: 02=35








THE TRIBUNE


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007, PAGE 9B


Look inward to protect assets


FROM page 2

began to remove other items
for their own personal use or
for sale if they had an outside
market value. The supervisor,
an individual with a high
sense of personal integrity,
was shocked to learn of the
role he had played in the
theft when it was finally
uncovered.
Every department has
unscheduled emergencies at
one time or another, which
require some degree of
"walking around the system".
However, these do-it-yourself
shortcuts are later used by
unscrupulous employees for
their own personal gain, to
the detriment of the employ-
er. There is a need for greater
personal accountability by all
employees for materials and
equipment that are furnished
to them. But minor losses are
often not reported to security
in a timely manner, if at all.
The identification of com-
pany property is a problem in
itself, and is usually honoured
more in the breach than in


the practice at the line super-
visor's level. This oversight
leads to unreported "borrow-
ing" between employees and
departments, the develop-
ment of the impression that
the company does not know
or care how such matters are
handled, and an "every man
for himself" attitude. New
materials and equipment are
ordered, and that is the end
of it in most cases.

DEVELOPING A
LOSS PREVENTION
ENVIRONMENT
It is in this area that the
unique skills of the profes-
sional asset protection man-
ager can be effectively used.
Rather than wait for the loss-
es to occur, management
should actively work to cre-
ate a climate in which every
employee accepts personal
responsibility for the integrity
of the work area.
Supervisors should be
instructed to report every
instance of a mysterious dis-
appearance to the asset pro-
tection organisation, and


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELVEUS ESTERLIN OF P.O.
BOX MPO #02, ROCK SOUND, ELEUTHERA, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that NADIA BIEN-AIME OF ROYAL
PALM STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENTTO CHANGE NAME BY DEEDPOLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ALPHEUS HENRY
BRICE of 9B Tasman Circle, Freeport, Bahamas, intend
to change my name to ALPHEUS BRICE MORLEY. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll,
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box F-43536, Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that CEDIEUMENE PIERRE OF #36
PINE DALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MICHELINE PIERRE OF
CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and 'signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 12TH day of DECEMBER, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


Legal Notice

NOTICE


WAHOO INVESTMENT LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION.
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 WAHOO INVEST-
MENT LTD. is in dissolution.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17th December
2007. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Build-
ing 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of WAHOO
INVESTMENT LTD. All persons having claims against the above-
named company are required to send their address and particulars of
their debts to the Liquidator before the 17th January 2008.


higher levels of supervision
should not approve the pur-
chase of replacement equip-
ment or tools unless they
have been assured that the
supervisor has formally
reported the loss. Security,
like safety, should become a
performance measure of the
supervisor.
Just as the safety engineer
provides safety support, so
should the professional asset
protection manager provide
security support. But the ulti-
mate responsibility for inter-
nal security within a depart-
ment must rest with the line
supervisor. Whenever such a
direct line of accountability
exists, many of the so-called
"mysterious disappearance"
losses suddenly cease.

DOCUMENTING
LOSSES
Effectively documenting
losses requires a degree of
formality, which is not usual-
ly found in most security pro-
grammes. The supervisor is
required to do more than
make a brief verbal report,
but must completely docu-
ment the loss and forward the
report to the asset protection
organisation through the next
level of supervision. A copy
of the loss report must
accompany any purchase


request for replacement tools
or materials.
As cumbersome as this sys-
tem may appear on the sur-
face, it is designed to moti-
vate supervisors to exercise
the kind of tight controls
within their respective
departments that will avoid
the necessity of filing lengthy
reports, which will go against
their department perfor-
mance record. Again, preven-
tion is the goal, not the detec-
tion and apprehension of the
offender after the loss has
occurred. The asset protec-
tion manager will have the
opportunity to make a
favourable impact upon the
internal control system in a
manner that could never be
achieved during the course of
a typical internal theft inves-
tigation.
In every workforce there is
a group of employees who
would not steal under any cir-
cumstances. At the other end
of the spectrum, there is a
group of employees who will
attempt to steal under any
circumstances. Between these
two groups there is a large
group of basically honest
employees who, if sufficiently
tempted, may cross the line
into dishonesty.
An effective asset protec-
tion programme must have at


Hurricane Hole, Paradise Island, Tel: 363-3588

Bay Street, Nassau, New Providence Island Tel: 356-8000 356-4921

Freeport, Pioneers Way, Grand Bahama Island Tel: 352-8391

East Mall, Freeport, Grand Bahama Island Tel: 352-6651

Govenor's Harbour, Eleuthera Island Tel: 322-2300

Marsh Harbour, Great Abaco Island Tel: 367-2166/367-2152

New Plymouth, Green Turtle Cay Tel: 365-4144

Hope Town Great Abaco Island Tel: 366-0296

Man-0-War Cay, Great Abaco Island Tel: 365-6098

Sandyport, Nassau, New Providence Tel: 327-8361

Marathon Mall, Nassau, New Providence Tel: 393-4386

Palmdale, Nassau, New Providence Tel: 322-1231

Shirley Street, Nassau, New Providence Tel: 322-8455

Harbour Bay, Nassau, New Providence Island Tel: 393-2334

JFK Branch, Nassau, New Providence Island Tel: 323-2422

Thompson Boulevard, Nassau, New Providence Island Tel: 323-6062


least two elements; the first
to deter theft by educating
the employees, and the sec-
ond to implement internal
controls to stop theft. The
basically honest employee
will respond to the educa-
tional effort.
The employee who is
determined to steal must be
dealt with through detection,
investigation, termination of
employment, and possibly


criminal prosecution.
NB: Gamal Newry is presi-
dent of Preventative Mea-
sures, a security and law
enforcement training and
consulting company.
Comments are welcomed
and can be sent to PO Box
N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas or
Email: info@preveentataive-
measures.net or visit us at:
www.preventa-
tivemesures.net


We take this opportunity to thank all

our valued customers for your

business and support throughout this

year. Join us for refreshments at all of

our branches, all day Wednesday

December 19th and Thursday

December 20th.


We at FirstCaribbean wish you

and yours the very best for the
season,


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.


Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE HEDGE ALTERNATIVE BOND FUND LTD.
IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act 2000 BLUE HEDGE AL-
TERNATIVE BOND FUND LTD. is in dissolution.
The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17th December
2007. David Thain of Arner Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd., Build-
ing 2 Caves Village, PO. Box N-3917 is the Liquidator of BLUE
HEDGE ALTERNATIVE BOND FUND LTD. All persons having
claims against the above-named company are required to send their
address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 17th
January 2008.


K-i
-5-*








PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas losing 'millions' in tour revenues


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is losing
"millions of dollars" in excur-
sion and transport-related rev-
enues by failing to meet the
demand for adventurous tours
among cruise ship passengers,
a report prepared for the Min-
istry of Tourism reveals, with
this nation lacking the infra-
structure and vision to max-
imise the industry's benefits.
The report, completed by
Jeffrey Beckles of RAJ Man-
agement Services, warned that
the Bahamian cruise tourism
product was coming under
severe pressure and criticism
from both the cruise lines and
Bahamian private sector par-
ticipants.
The end result was "that
many cruise lines have changed
their thinking about the
Bahamas and have begun
strategic reviews of their long-
term planning and itineraries'.
This involved developing
new cruise ports elsewhere in
the Caribbean, such as Carni-
val's $40 million project in the


Turks & Caicos Islands, to
bypass the Bahamas on three-
to-five-night cruises; shortening
port stays in Nassau; "down-
playing and downselling" Nas-
sau as a port of call; and alter-
ing cruise ship itineraries to
"reflect odd arrival times" in
Nassau.
By failing to recognize that
cruise passengers were now
'adventure seekers', demand-
ing excursions, attractions and
tours that reflected this, the
report warned that the
Bahamas was losing "million"
in excursion, transportation,
food and beverage, payroll and
services.
The report for the Ministry
of Tourism warned that rival
destinations, such as Jamaica,
Barbados, Belize and Mexico,
had adapted to this trend,
resulting in higher passenger
counts and a 38 per cent repeat
cruise passenger rate.
The Bahamas, though, had
yet to benefit from this, and
some cruise lies were arguing
that low passenger approval
ratings for Nassau meant they
lost money on shore excursions


THE REPORT warned that the Bahamian cruise tourism product was coming under severe pressure and criticism from both the cruise lines
and Bahamian private sector participants. Here, tourists watch cruise ships docked at Prince George Wharf, New Providence. The Atlantis resort
on Paradise Island can be seen in the background.


and activities, excursions, amenities and
Yet the cruise lines were attractions, not Bahamians.
doing rather better via their "The privately-owned and
private islands, where they operated islands offer state-of-
control and own all the tours, the art tours, excursions and


more amenities than any of the
local providers can, even col-
lectively," the report said.
"Offering everything from
sport fishing, parasailing, jet


skies, banana boats,
snorkelling, diving, nature
tours, horseback riding,
stingrays, shopping, just to
name a few.
"In short, the local [Bahami-
an] providers are 'out budget-
ed' in capital dollars by the
mega cruise line companies.
And since these itineraries are
approved such that the cruise
lines can call at their own
island first, it makes it harder
for local businesses to entice
passengers to spend more
money on the same activities
within 12 hours of visiting the
private islands."

Among the major criticisms
of the Bahamas that the report
obtained from cruise line exec-
utives, captains, crew and
industry partners, were:
The Bahamas lacks strate-
gy and vision, making it "diffi-
cult to get a hold on where the
Bahamas wants to go with its
tourism product".
Decision-making takes too
long, with no access to those
making them and too many
government ministries, agen-
cies and departments are
involved in managing different
aspects of cruise tourism.
Structure unwieldy.
Downtown Nassau is poor-
ly maintained, rundown and
needs much work, with atten-
dant concerns on crime and
visitor safety.
Bay Street merchants close
too early: no new tours have
been developed for 20 years;
and there is no nightlife,
impacting cruise ship call
times. Nassau has little to offer
in terms of guest experience,
with minimal infusion of
Bahamian culture into the
tourism product.

When it came to Bahamian
participants in the cruise
tourism sector, they told the
report's author:
There is no long-term
development plan for Nassau
as a port, the cruise terminal is
inadequate, and downtown
Nassau has been allowed to
deteriorate.
"Mismanagement", chan-
nel limitations and a lack of
port development and expan-
sion have resulted in lost busi-
ness, with ships either turned
away or forced to use other
ports of call.
Bahamian businesses have
been placed at a competitive
disadvantage by the cruise
lines' increasing use of private
islands: too many in-port
incentives provided to the
cruise lines: and cruise ship
itineraries that do not favour
Bahamian businesses.

Describing cruise terminals,
such as the Prince George's
Wharf Welcome Centre, as the
'gateway' to the Bahamas for
visiting passengers, the report
for the Ministry said Nassau
and Grand Bahama "should
boast much more impressive
welcome centres" that reflect
the type of experience tourists
wants. The Bahamas "must
take a very hard look" at its
terminals, the report warned,
given the competing facilities
offered by rivals in Panama,
Mexico. Barbados. St Maarten,
Jamaica and Puerto Rico.
Comments about the exist-
ing Prince George's Wharf
welcome centre, the report
warned, reflected the fact that
it was too small: did not allow
good passenger flow: lacked
Internet, telecommunications,
lounge and entertainment facil-
ities; there was "much too fre-
quent harassment" of visitors:
and there needed to be greater
control and management of
ground transportation
providers.





















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It's not something, you can put \ our linger on. It s
not something \you .an .m ute put into the right
wonids.
It' 1sim ply a eh linp
It',s h t 'liu'A tilit sltt is N\ ii .in \ iI'it'n 'nl IF 't iiI
\ uti 1,'ll .|s soo In ,,,- Il'I,', ,\ o, ,t ,I l \ ';lU ill
[he sh' tllii d .!\ k \ k F s\ Ini, c, I F\ Ft i d \'W [it i

It wvoiks it'-, \ ia\ iup \ oUi I ,>ul\, \\h li'F o' l I 'l tile
beat ofl 1lite dir ii line I \'i\v llin in 1 l1 \ 0111 h. st. -\ind
builds up to the emotion ain1d IrulI' thllt lodp,'tes
itself in the bac k ol V\o1ir Ihrotil nd anl is released in I
shout for yvor beloved llk0niloo ,'roulp.
In this sptciial iunkainoo suppleiiient "Thei Miiag
of Junkanoo", I7li' NassiFlN Lclii iFI'(Fn i Likes a look it
the counitrv's most (celebrahtid culture il event -- and
what makes it so special to so manv through the
eves of some of tih'e best-known Itinkanoos and his-
torinlis in the country.
Arlene Nash Ferguson shares with our readers
her deep love afflliir with the festival and tries to
put its "inexplicable" magic into words. Dr.
Nicolette Bethel provides a concise and insightful
look back at the festival and its history, and Jackson
Burnside explores the potential that Junkanoo
holds not only for those Bahamians lucky enough
to be a part of it, but for the country as a whole.
"The Magic of Junkanoo" also features a series of
articles on key elements of the parade, from pro-
files on the performers, ground-breakers and crafts-
men of Junkanoo, to a look at the ever-controversial
judging process and some of the logistics of the
parade that many never think about but are key to
pulling off what is a massive undertaking.
Consultant and innovator Roosevelt Finlayson
also looks at harnessing the motivation and excel-
lence seen in the Junkanoo shacks and taking it into
the workplace.
We also share with our readers some interesting
andi perhaps little--known Junkanoo lacts thanks
in part to junkanoo.conm.
This supplement only scratches the surface of
what's involved in the miaje'slic festival that has
captured the hearts and spirits of countless
Bahamians and tourists alike, but we hope it will
serve as a starting point for a greater appreciation
of and more engaging national discussion oni
Junkanoo and what it means to The Bahamas and
its people.
Frica Wells


THE MAGIC OF JUNKANOO
* That 'inexplicable' thing we call Junkanoo.
There's nothing quite like it

DRUMMER BOY
* Ruppapumpum wants to take his Junkanoo
drumming talent beyond

'AIN'T NOBODY GONE

TAKE IT FROM YOU'
* A short history of Bahamian Junkanoo

JUNKANOO
1 Not fnili 0 Vith the Junkal l00 lingo,, here's
a list of popular terms that will get you
through this Junkanoo season and beyond.

DANCING IN THE STREET
* How Carolyn Vogt-Evans brought choreography
to Bay Street

THESE CHANGING TIMES
* Junkanoo in The Bahamas where it's been
where it can take us

JR. JUNKANOO


DRAWING '
* Junkanooers gather at arawak cay each year to learn
who will be first out of the gate come Boxing Day and
New Year's.

MASTER OF THE BELLS
* Local cowbell- maker churns out an average of 150
pairs of bells a year

SCRAPf
Tile "essence" of Junkanoo

FESTIVAL IN THiE WORKPLACE
A new approach

MAP AND PARADE ROUTE


0 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


I I








031
THE MAC OF
JUNKANDO
THil N 'I CR lll~AI


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iii- it had always xbeen
[I, i, diat mysterious, lurk-
IIi ,itenienlt that flick-
,I -d In'eafli the surflaIce of
\ mI -isence. All year, it
floated in and out of memory
and consciousness, taunting and
teasing the hands of time to
move quickly through the dazzle
and promise of spring, past the
startling brightness of the sum-
mer. And then the weather
would turn cooler, black night
would come all too early, stealth-
ily and suddenly devouring the
daily sunlight And slowly, ever
closer, would come the fulfil-
ment of a promise made to the
heart from before time. It was the
inexplicable magic of Junkanoo.
I had been in its thrall from
childhood. Each year, dotted
with the drama of seasonal festi-
vals and traditions, moved inex-
orably toward its irrepressible
climax. Through the annual
birthday celebration to the
arrival of the Easter Bunny and
the intermittent surprise of the
Tooth Fairy, the story of child-
hood unfolded in juicy splen-
dour.
But the creme de la creme was
Christmas. Amidst the excite-
ment of the new doll and the
shiny black church shoes sur-
rounded by all the other presents
under the tree, thoughts always
inevitably turned to what would
happen that night Suddenly, on
this night as the one before it,
sleep was an ally, the gateway to
the drama that was sure to
unfold in the morning mix.

0 Bank of The Bahamas
INTER NATIONAL .


THAT 'INEXPLICABLE' THING

WE CALL JUNKANOO. THERE'S

NOTHING QUITE LIKE IT


Tlhmugh layers of sleep it
came, that inimitable sound that
inmy little being had stood on
guard for, even in sleep the
sound of a single cowbell as it
knocked against a pasted pant
leg, and the gentle swish of
paper as some ancient tradition
bearer walked up the street. It
turned me into a quivering ball
of excitement, and soon the
entire house had been awakened
to put me into that precious little
costume, and carry me to that
sea of music and colour and
movement that drew me 'out
town' like a magnet.
Across West Hill Street, down
George Street, Bay Street got
closer and closer. By now I was
skipping. At our designated
meeting place in front of Fines
Department Store, we waited
patiently. The Junkanoos, espe-
cially a man with a donkey, the
man with a banana tree over his
shoulder, the handsome Sweet
Richard, and Maureen and her
girls, mesmerized me. And final-
ly I saw Spurgeon Smith coming
with the 'Eastern Gang'. He reas-
sured my nervous aunts, and
took me into the street, and off I
went for the time of my life. And
every time we passed, the aunts
called out to ask if I was tired
yet. Fifty three years later the


RUSHING'


Arlene Nash Ferguson (front,
center) with Spurgeon
Smith's Junkonoo group on
Bay Street in 1957.


answer is still 'No!'
I did not understand the com-
pulsion or think to question it
then, but I did question it when
I found myself in Canada, and
oh so different from the people
around me. Why was I using
thie sune language differently,
and why had my mother picked
cerasee off tie fence when I had
a cold? And most of all, why
did we think it not strange to
get up out of our beds on
Christmnas night, shut down the
main street, and dance until
sunrise in costumes made from
paper, and music made from
strange instruments like
goatskin dnuns and cowbells?
Why?
And so, the search to get to the
root of this compulsion for
Junkanoo engaged, consumed
and engulfed me. It led me to a
different place and time, to a
story that I had never heard but
that my soul had always
known. I was shackled by it,
tossed on the unforgiving waves
of the great sea, and finally set
down in this land, inheritor and
protector of this rich tradition. It
was the story of a proud African
presence in The Bahamas, a


story of endless tears and heart-
wrenching tragedy. But it was a
story of triumph and conquest
also a tale of defiance and
strength that I now knew I told
when I engaged in tlis ancient
rite each year. This was the story
that drunks beI'at out, that cow-
bells rang out, that conch shells
blew out. This was the compul-
sion, the magic that gripped us
all in an unyielding embrace.
And so I came to understand
the magic of this strange thing
called Juikanoo. And instead of
abating with time, it got relent-
lessly stronger.
One memorable New Year's
Eve, a telephone call cune with
the request for an interview
with BBC personnel who were
in Nassau to cover the New
Year's Day parade. I explained
that I was finishing my costume
off, and could only spare a few
minutes, if at all, depending on
how far I got by a certain time. I
truly could not understand why
friends found my response
amazing that I would not
jump at the opportunity to be
interviewed by the BBC and
heard by millions of people
around the world. Jump at the

page. %


J









104
HE MAGK OF
JUNKANOO
TlM lSIUW"I


THE MAGIC OF JUNKANOO


(andnud hm
Spoge03 I

chance and perhaps miss going to
Bay? My response is still perfectly logi-
cal to me as logical as the principal of
a school in costume, as logical as contact
cement on the living room rug, glitter in
the shower, and removing the
Christmas turkey from the oven to dry
just-pasted pants.
And with great joy, I have come to
understand that this very same magic is
manifested in thousands of ways, in
thousands of guises, in thousands of us.
I saw that magic one day in the door-
way of a house in Grants Town a bed
being brought out into the yard. "My
mudda say da house dun fix fer
Christmas", the young man said. "She
say da only place I could bring my cos-
tume in is in my bedroom, and da room
too small for the bed and my costume,
so I takin' da bed out I ga sleep under
my costume'. And that he did, until the
big morning.
Then it showed up one day in the
guise of an emergency services vehicle,
siren blaring as it whipped through rush
hour traffic. 'I come to get my costume
paper' the driver said casually as he
jumped out, the watching neighbors try-
ing to understand what the emergency
was. And I heard it in the voice of the
wife who said, 'My husband already
used up all his vacation, his sick days
and his casual days to get his costume
ready. The only thing left for him to do
now is to call in dead.'
And stranger even, is that magic work-
ing even in sorrow. It was perhaps one
of the weirdest things I had seen in all
my years of Junkanoo. The news had
come that he had been shot on his job as
a security officer at a nightclub. Our bass
drummer. Suddenly we were numb,
cold, frozen in shock. We gathered the
next night, Thursday, for practice, not
sure what to do about the space in the
drum line that was too big, too gaping,
too unforgiving. Then slowly the music
started, and the rhythm caught, and
people began to move, and sing. And
there in the front, his family members
gathered to hug each other and rush
through their grief, their screams and
wails echoing against the drums and
bells. The sight reached into the soul
I saw that same magic once in the tears
of a man. His beloved sister had gotten
married that morning, and he was to


have been a groomsman in her wed-
ding. Except he stayed in the shack all
night to meet his deadlines, and slept
through the wedding. After making
peace with his sister, what had caused
the problem would help him to heal and
move on.
And then there was the drummer,
deeply hurt by the actions of his own
group towards him and his family, who
came to join us. Instinctively, drummers
half his age knew what could lift his
hurt and sadness, and they began to
beat until all the music joined in and he
himself had gotten lost in that secret
place where the soul is revived.
People from other countries find the
Bahamian attachment to Junkanoo
remarkable. In high school, our British
geography teacher who lived on
Elizabeth Avenue was mesmerized by
the scene unfolding under her window
each Junkanoo morning. "It's like
voodoo", she opined to her half asleep
class one January 2. "As long as the
drums are beating, people are dancing
all over the place, and once the drums
stop, everybody goes limp until they
start again". I heard that same comment
in Washington D. C. many years later
when a Junkanoo drummer started to
beat "All the Bahamians started to
move the same time", a West Indian
man chuckled. In Edmonton at the
World Games, the steel band begged the
Junkanoo group to drop back further
because they were being drowned out.
By the time the Bahamians arrived in
the city square, the entire Cariwest
Carnival parade had joined the
Junkanoo group.
And so, the mysterious magic contin-
ues to engulf and encapsulate all of us,
from era to era. The famous story is told
of the contract days, when many
Bahamians went off to work in the
United States. And when it was time for
them to come back home, it was difficult
to know who was whom. And so the lit-
mus test was to give the men a bucket
and send them to the well. The ones
who put the bucket under their arm and
started to beat on the bottom, were the
Bahamians.
This inherited, instinctive response to
the drum passes from generation to gen-
eration. "We have to fill the space", a
builder told me. His shack space had
just been increased by 50 percent, and
overnight, costumes had appeared as if
by magic "It's psychological", he said.


Once you see that space you must fill it
with costumes. He cannot explain
beyond that
And so, in these neighbourhood head-
quarters that we call Junkanoo shacks,
the magic goes on. "I gat all da gang-
sters in dere pasting", a shack leader
said one day outside of his shack "As
long as I keep dem busy, I keep dem out
of trouble." A profound statement, wor-
thy of further reflection.
A wonderful day indeed when we are
able to harness this magic, this strength,
into a formatted program for nation
building. "The children in the school
marching band all want to play
Junkanoo", a principal commented to
me. I gently explained that that was
why they had joined the band in the
first place to learn to play an instru-
ment for Junkanoo! At a primary school,
the Junior Junkanoo coordinator
revealed that every single boy honored
at a special Outstanding Boys Assembly
was in her Junkanoo group. "They
know that if they misbehave I will take
their drums from them," she said. That
said it all.
And so, in a few days, we will once
more engage in this ancient, magical
rite, this inexplicable thing that we call
Junkanoo. Once again, night will fall on
a Christmas day, and all over this island,
doors will open in back yards to reveal
startling artistry, as crude shacks all over
the island give up their secret treasures.
Through narrow streets and alleys laden
with memories of yore, the tradition
bearers will come with shouts of excite-
ment and glee to that oldest of all streets,
the great Bay, to keep their date with
destiny. Once again our hearts will leap
when that commanding whistle blows
and we hear that old familiar cry to
"Line up!" We will run to dress our-
selves in our legacy, bequeathed by
proud ancestors who forged new expe-
riences from old memories, and left it all
within us.
Bay Street will stretch ahead, alive
with lights, people, and history. We will
tread the same path as Josh, and Sweet
Richard, Spurgeon and Daddy Huyler,
Maureen and Becky. It will be a time to
tell our own story, add our own chapter
to this ongoing drama called Junkanoo.
Feel the magic
There is nothing like it

* Please send arsrenits to
arlene@jwikmavooantraLwcon


KA-UK, KA-UK


A beller sturts his stuff on Bay
Street, wowing the excited crowds
with the traditional instrument.



File Photo


"DID YOU






JUNKANOO GROUP LEADERS

AND DESIGNERS START TO

PREPARE FOR JUNKANOO AT

LEAST SIX MONTHS IN

ADVANCE FOR THE PARADE.



I Bank of The Bahamas
I INTERNATIONAL








THE MAGIC OF


RUPPAPUMPUM WANTS TO TAKE HIS

JUNKANOO DRUMMING TALENT BEYOND


Reuben Deleveoux, oko
A MASTER OF Ruppopumpum, ak "the
best drummer" in
THE DRUM Junknaoo performs in full'
Sby Donld Knowlscos e
Photo by Donald Knowles


By THEA RUTHERFORD
Guardian National Com(rspondont
thiean.asgujard.l"onm

\ r\ dniiu happens under the
Ing .dim. 'id tree on Quintine
*-h -. P.. litics, the Bible, music
-- Raliianhan music and
Junkanoo are debated. Food is
eaten, savored. Hard, glossy
domino rectangles are slammed
down, clanking against the
smnxiith surface of a table that
takes shelter, with its Vocupants,
.under the tnie's boughs.
They call this tre of life the
House of Parliament. It's where a
young man with a rhythm in his
head that just won't go awaV and
hands thick with callouses and
soul gets nourishment. The tree
roots extend beyond the soil, tak-
ing the form of men twice his age
who sit around eating and talk-
ing, patting the drummer on the
back with words of endorsement.
"What happened to him is he
took it to another level," says
Hesketch Dean of the young man
his friend Reuben Deleveaux.
"Coming out of Jukanmoo, just
rushing on Bay Street wasn't suf
ficient to him. And by him just
going off and listening to different
sounds now he's producing
unique sounds which are indige-
nous to The Bahamas. Some of
them were lost."
Reuben Deleveaux, aka
Ruppapumpum, aka the best
drummer in Junkanoo, is 29 ("1
don't really like to tell people my
age," he admits) and medium
height. He has gold teeth that
glint whenever he smiles, which
is often enough, and an internal
lock-box of drumbeats that echo
the spirit of his ancestors.
Deleveaux has mastered all of
the Junkanoo instruments. He
first learned to play the drums in
his father's band as a child. There


he learned the team spirit that
directs the way he leads his sec-
tion as head drummer for One
Family.
"Everybody wants to be the
best but what makes you the best
is being a team player," he says.
"I might be the best drummer but
I'm not the best drnuner in my
group because there is no 'I' in
team. I am about team playing."
The drums, conch shell, bugle,
wheel hub, bass, tog horn, har-
monica and cow bells star in
Deleveaux's album "The StvretLs
Sounds' of The Bahamas." The
album, released in 2005, is a his-
torical journey of sound that takes
listeners from the sunlit, sand
strewn shores of the islands to the
Gold Coast of Africa on its
rhythms. Deleveaux is still strug-
gling to get the album sold en
masse.
"If government because his
CD is strictly Bahamian, rake n
scrape and different music if
government could even just buy
it and ... take the CD and give it to
each tourist who comes here...
that means his CD could sell even
if they sell it for $5 ... then
Bah.nian music will Ibe exposed
like the reggae what we adopt,"
says Dean.
Junkanoo first sculpted
Deleveaux, unleashed his unpar-
alleled talent on the drums, back
in high school. It was a clandes-
tine high at first. Deleveaux's par-
ents were staunch church-goers
who did not necessarily want
their son to participate in
Junkanoo in the beginning. "My
parents are proud to see the level
I took it to. They might not have
been for Junkanoo, but they start-
ed to appreciate it after they saw
my life change tremendously."
Deleveaux beat his way through
the ranks, and began traveling the
world with Junkanoo contingents


in unforgettable cultural
exchanges that highlighted the
sounds of The Bahamas for those
a world away. Later he made
drumming a career. But his
involvement in Junkanoo and his
solo drnmuning are things that
Deleveaux prefers to discuss on
separate tracks.
"The solo part of the Junkanoo
drumming is something totally
different from you rushing with a
Junkanoo contingent," he says. "I
am in Junkanoo and I am enter-
taining that's two different
things."
Already known for what he can
do in Junkanoo, Deleveaux the
drum soloist is a struggling artist
with a satchel of dreams, trying to
wrestle the helix of his Junkanoo
drumming and his solo drum-
ming apart. He's successful three
nights a week, when he performs
at native shows: Da Island Club
on Tuesday and Thursdays.
Chez Willie on Fridays.
"Drumming is the heartbeat of
The Bahamas," says Deleveaux.
Drumming was the highly
evolved hobby that became a
career for Deleveaux when he
realized that he could no longer
fit it into slots of his life. He
worked at the Humnane Society
for a few years after high school
- he loves animals. And for a
few nights of the week he learned
the native show that Mitzi
Chipman and others performed
at the Radisson.
"Eventually I learned the show
and I started performing. [Mitzi]
told me that she believed if I kept
up with it ... I'll go far. So I just
continued to practice and get bet-
ter and start learning hwv to
entertain. What it is about enter-
taining the crowd, the whole
thing is interaction, giving the
people something to see."
Leaving the Humane Society
wasn't an easy decision. But
Deleveaux did it, moving on to
nurture his career as a drum
soloist. Dean, his friend, thinks
Deleveaux really began to see the


possibilities of his drumming
after entering and winning more
than one Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture drumming
competition in the mid to late
1990s. But Deleveaux wanted
more than just bragging rights
and a fistful of cash. He wanted
the opportunity to take his craft
to another level.
"When you are the best show
appreciation," he says. "And if it
isn't going to be a cash prize, let it
be some kind of scholarship fund
to go off to Cuba or go some-
where where percussion is
taught. And I come back and I
could share what I learned with
somebody else."
Now exposure is all Deleveaux
talks about. As a Junkanooer, he
has traveled as far as Ghana and
Japan, but as a drummer, there's
so much more that the husband
and father of two would like to
do to share his talent with the
world.
For now exposure begins at
home every time Deleveaux dons
his feathered headdress and cov-
ers his face, arms and chest with
slashes of white paint; when he
takes the stage at Da Island Club,
running on with his drum in
hand, after a lengthy introduction
from co-owner and headliner
Freddie Munnings Jr.
Deleveaux brings the simmer-
ing, cocktail-sipping crowd to a
boil, telling them to dap their
hands to the rhythm of the beat
To follow him.
They try, clapping furiously as
the tempo of Deleveaux's rhythm
increases with the speed of an
accelerating race car. He uses the
flats of his hands, the tips of his
fingers, his elbows, as he knocks
infectious sound out of the sur-
face of his drum. His hands flut-
ter faster and faster, until they
become humming bird wings,
flitting so rapidly they appear to
be four different hands on each
arm. Then the rhythm slows, giv-
ing the audience a sliver of a
chance to catch on.


P- Bnk o1r :lATlitdan
I INTERNATIONAL






I
THE MAGIC OF








'Ain'take it


A SHORT HISTORY OF


BAHAMAN JUNKANOO

n T'hi Bahamas, Christmas is
Lolebi,i ted with church, parties,
giZts, te and, of course,
Junkanoo. Between midnight
and noon on December 26 and
January 1 every year, the streets
of Nassau play host to the most
spectacular Christmas festival of
its kind in the world.
Like Carnival, the festival of
Junkanoo is a street parade of
majestic proportions. Following
the irresistible rhythm of
goatskin drums, cowbells, whis-
tles and horns, participants rush
attired in fantastic costumes of
cardboard, fringed crepe paper,
and various decorative elements,
from rhinestones to studs to
feathers.
The origins of the parade are
shrouded in mystery. Though
there is little doubt that they are
West African, their meaning and
genesis have been obscured by
time. Even the name is difficult
to trace. Although popular leg-
end claims that Juwkanoo is
named after John Canoe, an
African save resistance inspired
his fellows, there is little support
for that facL However, evidence
does indicate the existence of a
sixteenth-century Ghanaian
slave trader by the name of John
Konny. Other origins of the
name have as much credibility,
particularly the suggestion that
Junkanoo is connected with the


kono festivals of West Africa,
where stilt dancers and masked
performers helped celebrate the
end of the agricultural year.
The name "Junkanoo" itself
suggests links with the various
John Canoe festivals throughout
the New World. John Canoe, or
variations of it, has been prac-
ticed in places as diverse as
North Carolina, Jamaica, St.
Vincent and Belize, and
Christmas masquerades bearing
similarities to Bahamian
Junkanoo are lound from
Bermuda to Colombia.
Like those festivals, Junkanxoo
has its roots in slavery, originat-
ing in the three-day holiday
given to the slaves in the
English-speaking colonies.
Unlike many other John Canoe
celebrations, though, which
tended to die out after
Emancipation, the Bahamian
parade has assumed mythic pro-
portions, influencing ever),
aspect of contemporary society.
Though we know relatively lit-
tle of the slaves' celebrations,
evidence suggests that Junkanoo
(or John Canoe) was held even
then. As early as 1801, a John
Canoe "king" was crowned in
Nassau. Unlike Jamaica, howev-
er, where the John Canoe cele-
brations were a major activity
during slavery, resembling New
Orleans Mardi Gras with accom-
panying balls and parties and
major parades, the Bahamian
festival was small and sporadic,
and it did not die out after
Emancipation. On the contrary.
Bahamian Junkanoo appeared to


BAI

THI


These ph
19060s-
snapshot
before the
and cloth
become a
at today's


strengthen during the 1800s. In the
1830s, the Nassau Christmas
IK parades had Liken on a European
cast. The Royal Militia Band
N appeared to be the major source of
the marching at that time, with
otos from the contemporary writers making ref-
980s provide a ewnce to the sound of the fife and
of980s provide the drum. But between 1807 and
of Junkonoo
3 feathers, glitter 1860, large numbers of Africans
that hove were captured by British ships
common sight from Spanish, Portuguese and
parade. American slavers, and many of
them were settled in The Bahamas.
By 1849, their influence was evi-
Tribune File Photos dent: the dancing of the "John
Canoes" on Bay Street preceded
the sacrifice of several oxen in the
Market. By the end of the nine-
teenth century, the unique sound of
Bahamian Junkanoo its locus on
the drum and the cowlell, and its
fundamentally rhythmic character
Iad exvn solidified, thanks in
large part to these Liberated
Africans.
A survey of Bahamian social his-
tory finds parallels in the develop-
ment of Junkanoo. During the
1850s, at a time when the
Government was encouraging the
settlement of Inagua, two charac-
ters appeared in Junkanoo parades
who have not since returned to
Nassau. Neptune and Amphitrite,
the King and Queen of the Sea,
were part of the ritual given to
sailors who were cnxssing the
Tropic of Cancer for the first time
and sea journeys from Nassau
to Inagua required the c xssing of
that tropic. And although Neptune
and Amphitrite disappeared firm
Nassau thereafter, they remained
part of the Christmas parades in
the Southern Bahamas until well
Sf into the twentieth century.


The economic hardship of the late
nineteenth and early twentieth cen-
tury made itself obvious in the
Junkanoo parades of the era. In
1890, a "Masked Army" accompa-
nied by a band marched to
Government House to ask about
employment prospects. At the
same time, the parade became an
outlet for the frustrations of the
black Bahamian laborers of the city.
As is not uncommon among the
oppressed, the poor of Nassau
turned against one another. Gangs
from various neighborhoods
marched to Bay Street to settle
scores, and cowbells, whips and
sticks they carried were put to
good use.
One remarkable element of the
early twentieth century was the
place of melody in Junkanoo.
Every year, junkanoos would com-
pose new songs which would
make their appearance during the
annual parades. The songs that sur-
vive tell us plenty about the times
in which they are written. "Mama,
Bake the Johnny Cake" and "Spare
Me Another Year, 0 Lord" were
composed during the poverty of
the first two decades of the twenti-
eth century, while "Neely, Your
Rum So Sweet" was the product of
the Prohibition years. And "Do A
Nanny", whose chorus is all that
survives these days, told the story
of the burning of tie Hotel
Colonial in 1922, and began thus:
"The Hotel bum down to the
ground,/ No more dancing in this
town,/ Eh, ell, do a' nanny do".
In 1919, the U.S. Congress banned
liquor. Overnight, fortunes were
made in The Bahamas from boot-
legging. Tourism and land devel-
opment increased as rich

1 Bank of The Bahamas
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Americans fled their dry home-
land, and the shape of the modern
Bahamas may be traced to this
time. Wealth profited the Junkanoo
parades: the 1920s saw the adop-
tion of fringed colored paper as
decoration of Junkanoo costumes,
and the incorporation of ready-
made instruments in the parade.
Money enabled the development
the art of costume construction as
well, and the rudimentary and
frightening disguises of earlier
years gave way to spectacular
headdresses and giant hats. For the
first time, prizes were offered, and
the parade, previously reviled as
"pagan" and violent, gained the
support of the community at large.
By contrast, the parades of the
1930s and early 1940s were violent
and dangerous. The repeal of
Prohibition in 1932 led to a world-
wide depression, and a decade of
hurricanes brought hard times
back with a vengeance. The fancy
costumes were replaced with
sponge and newspaper as well as
figures of fear, and the cowbells
and whips reappeared as weapons.
During the 1930s, Junkanoo also
became a symbol of solidarity for
underprivileged black workers
against the ruling white merchant
minority. Labor riots were sweep-
ing through the West Indies. In The
Bahamas, although no major riot
occurred until 1942, Bahamian
workers expressed their frustration
twice every year in Junkanoo. One
is reminded of the words of
"Rushing Through the Crowd":
"Iron, iron, iron can't stop us now,"
and "Ain't nobody/Gone take it
from you." Junkanoo has also been
linked with the Burma Road Riots
of June 1942. Popular legend has it


that Junkanoo music accompanied
the protesters as they marched to
Bay Street, although historians
have not found solid evidence to
support that claim. What is true is
that one more Junkanoo song -
perhaps the last of its kind for
another half a century describes
the action taken that day- "Burma
Road declare war on the Conchy
Joe .../Come on boys, let's go
uptown/Turn that Conchy Joe
upside down/...Do, nigger, don't
"- lick nobody." Not surprisingly,
Junkanowwas banned from Bay
Street in the Christmas season of
1942. It was a ban that would last
for five years.
The development of tourism after
World War Two and the accompa-
nying prosperity of The Bahamas
brought Junkanoo back to Bay. In
1947, Parliament voted to allow
Junkanoo to return to the city for
the first time since the riots, and on
New Year's Day 1948, Junkanoo
took place. The active promotion of
the festival as a tourist attraction
began. The voluntary Masquerade
Committee, formed during the
1920s to encourage the organiza-
tion of the parade, was revitalized
and given greater responsibilities to
control the festival. At the same
time, young men from lower-mid-
dle-class backgrounds, among
them Winston "Gus" Cooper,
Doyle Burrows, Percy "Vola"
Francis, Brian "Boldie" Gibson, rec-
ognizing the artistic potential of the
parades, joined Junkanoo groups
and began the active reorganiza-
tion of the parades. Until that time
participation, costumes were car-
ried by individuals, and music was
made by groups. The major inno-
vation of the beginning of the 1960s


was a marriage of the two. Once
that step had been taken, the
foundation of modern Junkanoo
had been laid.
Although Junkanoo is tradition-
ally regarded as an Afro-
Bahamian celebration, white or
near-white Bahamians have been
notable performers for almost 200
years. From the participation of
the military bands in the 1830s to
the wry observations made by
magistrate Leslie Powles about
the "white young gentlemen"
who were active participants in
the parades of the 1880s, "white"
Bahamians took part in
Junkanoo. Any history of modern
Junkanoo that ignores the contri-
butions to costume development
made by men such as Philip
Kemp, George Halkitis and A. B.
Malcolm is incomplete; and mod-
em Junkanoo dance steps owe
plenty to the movements of
"Sweet" Richard Dean, an indi-
vidual performer from Long
Island. From the 1940s to the
1990s, too, the Westerners, popu-
larly known as the "white" scrap
group, made regular appearances
in the parades, its fair-skinned
members committed to keeping


scrap alive.
By the beginning of the 1970s,
Junkanoo had become more of a
street performance than a war.
The fierceness of the competition
had not disappeared, however;
instead, it had become a war of
art and performance. In 1973, the
source of most of the street vio-
lence the rushing of groups up
and down on Bay Street, fighting
their way through one another,
was eliminated, and the modem
practice of cirding two or more
city blocks was introduced. The
development of the various
aspects of the festival the art,
the music, the dance and the
overall spectacle began in
earnest, led by those groups
whose names dominated the
parades of the Sixties, Seventies,
Eighties and Nineties. the
Valley Boys, the Mighty Vikings,
the Saxons Superstars, the Music
Makers, Roots, and One Family
The last 25 years of Junkanoo's
development have brought an
increased focus on the organiza-
tion and administration of the
parade, and a recognition of the
festival's place in the national
imagination. In 1982, the


071
THEMAGICOF
JUNANOO

Masquerade Committee was
reconstituted as the National
Junkanoo Committee, its members
appointed by Cabinet Part of its
mandate was to make the festival
into a national celebration, and the
past quarter century has seen the
establishment or revitalization of
Junkanoo parades on every major
Family Island. Perhaps the most
important achievement of the
Committee was the establishment
of the Junior Junkanoo parade in
1987, in conjunction with the JLA
During the 1990s, this Committee's
actions were monitored more and
more closely by the Junkanoo par-
ticipants themselves through vari-
ous Junkanoo organizations,
among the Junkanoo Leaders'
Association, the Junkanoo
Development Association, and,
most recently, the Junkanoo
Corporation New Providence, for-
mally incorporated in 2005.
Today, Junkanoo finds itself in a
state of flux. The fathers of the
modern parade are nearing the
ends of their careers as Junkanoos
leaders, the festival has taken on
national proportions, and the gov-
ernment and the Junkanoo com-
munity are struggling to find the
most appropriate way of adminis-
tering the parades to ensure their
continued development The cost
of Junkanoo has skyrocketed, and
no reliable method of cost recovery
has yet been found. Within the
parades themselves, rapid changes
have taken place, among them the
widespread incorporation of
women, the centrality of melody,
and thanks to' the innovation of
the scrap group Sting the rein-
troduction of the Junkanoo song.
Contention remains central, with
the main controversies surround-
ing the outcome of each parade,
and the collection of revenue from
the parades themselves. But the
future is bright Junkanoo stands
poised to become a globally-recog-
nized festival, the ultimate symbol
of the Bahamian nation.

Dr. Nicolete Bethelis the director
of Culture in fthe Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports and
Culture.


- Bank of The-Bahama- ---
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THE MAGIC OF


Not familiar with the Junkanoo lingo, here's a list of popular terms that will get
you through this Junkanoo season and beyond.


A Junkanoo group's music
section, which traditionally
consists of bellers, drummers,
and the brass section.



Persons in the Junkanoo
group who ring cowbells.



The name given to the
December 26th public holiday,
which was synonymous with
the boxing and exchanging of
gifts that would normally occur
on this day by the slaves.



The outer shell, taken from a
sea mollusk scientifically
known as strombus gigas.
These shells, when blown into,
make a very unique horn-like
sound and have traditionally
been used as musical instru-
ments in the Junkanoo
parade.





A part of the Front Line of a
Junkanoo group, this collec-
tion of dancers, usually
women, parade in lines, wear
similar costumes, and perform
choreographed dance rou-
tines.


Flat, galvanized tin or cast iron
bells usually played in pairs.
They are joined at the end by
a cord or chain, with one held
being individually held in each
hand, and shaken or struck
together.



A light, colored paper material
imported from Europe that is
"fringed" and used to finish
Junkanoo costumes. There
are about 30 different colors
used in Junkanoo costumes.



Also called "Naked dancers"
are a part of the Front Line of
a Junkanoo group. These
dancers wear smaller, unique-
ly designed costumes that are
easier to dance with, and
dance "freely" toward the front
of the group.



The cutting of the edges of the
crepe paper with barber's
shears to make a short cut
which gives the costumes a
slight ruffled appearance.



The section of the group that
lines up directly behind the
group banner, and consists of
a variety of "Free" dancers
and choreographed dancers.


Very large costumes that usu-
ally appear at the end of the
groups and can weigh over
300 pounds each.



The act of applying the fringed
crepe paper to the cardboard
costumes with glue one strip
at a time



Makeshift buildings construct-
ed by Junkanoo groups, where
Junkanoo costumes are built,
pasted and stored by group
members leading up to the
Junkanoo parade.



A Junkanoo dance introduced
during the 1950s, which ush-
ered in a new era in the devel-
opment of Junkanoo dance
choreography, and spurred dif-
ferent versions of the dance
over time.



A recently incorporated part of
the music section, this is a set
drum made from fiberglass
and plastic.

* Source: junkanoo.com


I INTERNATIONAL











HOW CAROLYN VOGT-EVANS

BROUGHT CHOREOGRAPHY

DANCING IN THE STREETTO BAY STREET


By THEA RUTHERFORD school and dancers, she was invited to
Guardian National Correspondent lend her expertise to the group by Paul
thea@nasguard.com Knowles. Evans choreographed for the
group for about two years and four
A ru talking' "bout long hours. I mean parades before Roots, the group she
Long, long. Practicing' in one tiny, and Knowles would be among the
little apartment'til the middle of founding members of, broke off from
I the night That time, they did get the Valley
off work and come straight to practice, "I approached Carolyn as to whether
you know. or not she wanted to incorporate her
You talking' 'bout tired. Pushin' your- dance group with [the Valley] because
self way beyond what the people dem that would give us a whole new level
expect'cause you gatta win Ain't no of performance," remembers Knowles.
second place ... and third, you must be "It started on a New Year's morning,
jokin'. on the fourth time when we brought
You talking' 'bout setting' your eye on women to the road ... Carolyn obvi-
somethin' and never really takin' it off, ously was the front-runner for choreog-
'bout focusing' so hard on the goal your raphy on Bay Street ... She put the
head hurt, 'cause in your world com- whole thing together for us in a differ-
mitment is a verb a vigorous one ent way."
and it always has been. And dance, When Roots formed in December of
dance is everything when you prac- 1991, there was no looking back for
ticin' and performing' 'cause there was a Evans and the female choreographed
right way to do it A way to be remem- dance section that Knowles had inad-
bered. vertently dubbed "Showtime."
"I gave everything to my country," "We just looked at ... the girls lining
says Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-Evans, up and I just said it's going to be a
when she talks about her years of show time this morning, and we just
devotion to developing dance in the ever since then called it Showtime,"
country through her school the Carolyn says Knowles.
Vogt School of Dance, of fighting for Evans took the military discipline she
respect for musicians and entertainers, applied to herself to the perfection of
of bringing "ballet to Bay Street" the dance on and off Bay Street There
That's what they said. "At first the were rules: Decorum was paramount
thing about us was, 'take that ballet off Style was necessary Practice was unre-
of Bay Street' They used to shout that lenting. Her dancers followed suit
out," Evans remembers. Nothing new "We put in long hours of rehearsal,"
comes without criticism. But in the late says Karin Pinder, a student and friend
1980s and early 1990s, Evans institu- of Evans' since the 1970s. Pinder now
tionalized choreographed dancing in leads Showtime for Roots, a position
Junkanoo. bequeathed to her by Evans.
And she did it her way "We'd start and it would always be in
"In the group itself there were ques- her house. We used to push all of her
tions as to whether or not I was going furniture aside she used to have this
the right way because we wanted to be little small apartment and we'd
like everybody else with the bump come to rehearsal. She'd call rehearsal
grind to the ground. We never did that around maybe 5,6 o'clock after work
Roots women were always at a differ- and 1, 2 in the morning we're still there.
ent level The way we looked, the way But that's what it took and that's why
we performed, the way we acted, no one beat us."
Always ladies in Junkanoo," Evans With Evans' choreography in
says. "It still exists." Junkanoo came the introduction of eye-
Evans began choreographing a catching costume details. Then eventu-
female dance section for the Valley ally, there came competition, as other
Boys. Known for her work with her groups adopted choreography to add


QUEEN OF THE
DANCE


Magistrate Carolyn Vogt-
Evans introduced choreo-
graphed dancing to
Junkanoo in the late '80s
and early '90s. A co-
founder of Roots and former
leader of its Showlime sec-
tion, Evans now calls herself
a cultural advocate.



EDWARD RUSSELL III
masm.7mm


to their appeal.
"Our style of decorating, fm sure you
would have heard this over and over, we
came with the stones and the glitter, and
if you can recall, the first time Roots
came out it looked like a whole section of
lights were coming where we were so
bright," she remembers. "And here
again, in order to be competitive the
other groups had to adopt that because it
was so fantastic."
For years Evans choreographed for the
group, taught her students and had her
dancers perform at major events as if
time had no boundaries. She was a secre-
tary-general and trustee for the Bahamas
Musicians and Entertainers Union, a
union she had been involved in since
graduating from high school, and later
became Vice Chairman of the PLP,
where she prioritized enhancing the sta-
tus of musicians and entertainers.
Few people knew her as a lawyer dur-
ing her multi-faceted involvement, but
Evans says the law was always her
"thing." She studied business adminis-
tration and law in college. And she
returned to balance all of her passions.
"I had to step back from dance and dithe
politics and everything else in order to
make sure that I completed my degree,"
she says. "That's just me; rm very full of
energy"
When Evans met her husband, things
not so much changed in her life, as shift-
ed. She applied her diehard commitment
to the unfolding prospect of forming a
family of her own.
"I remember when she came to me ...
and she said 'I have met someone," says
Pinder. "This was when she met Mr.
Evans. 'I have met someone, I need to
devote all my time right now to him. I
don't have time right now for him and
Junkanoo, and right now I need to
devote my time to him.' And that's
when she said I need you to carry on
with Showtime until such time that I can
see if I could come back.. definitely her
family comes first"
But Roots women still remember
Evans.
"Everything still stems from Carolyn. A
lot of things we do, a lot of things we say
when we have our meetings, we still


remember some of the things she taught
us," says Pinder. "Discipline is key
Discipline is the most important thing.
Nothing can be done unless discipline is
the forefront Time management, she
taught us to manage our time properly,
have proper meetings. One person can't
do it all."
Evans, now a wife and mother of two
small children, calls herself a cultural
advocate. She talks about giving of her-
self to her husband, her son and her
daughter now; the way her mother gave
of herself to her and her brother. She
talks about training her daughter, a
daughter who she says will have choices.
"All of my life's learning and all of my
teachings rve focused on my children,"
says Evans. "First of all my time is now
my children's time and I make sure to set
good examples; things I would have
tried to teach other people's children rm
now trying to teach my children."
The examples spill from her relation-
ship with God, which Evans says she is
no longer reluctant to talk about
"On top of all of that I am not so guard-
ed and embarrassed about talking about
my Savior. I used to be embarrassed.
Dancing and God, it seemed like it didn't
mix. Now we have liturgical dance
everywhere. That's something, hey? rm
now more prepared to openly talk about
my commitment to Christ"
Developing culture, watching the arts
of the country grow, advocating respect
for the work of musicians and entertain-
ers, her love for Junkanoo are things that
will never leave Evans, though her
efforts transform chameleon-like to
adapt to her most important role in life
now.
"Me being all of those things I trans-
ferred into being a good wife and moth-
er," she says. "And in addition to open-
ing my own law practice at that time and
also then coming on the bench. And so
all of these things that I tried to teach
people, all that rve given to my country
rm real emotional about this all
that I would have given to my country
and wanted for my country is now
focused on my children. It's not about
me anymore and where I stopped and
whether or not I will continue."


I Bank of The Bahamas
I INTERNATIONAL


' I1


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THE MAGIC OF
JUNKANOO
ritw 6 A "i6Ul.M M


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THE AVERAGE JUNKANOO
COSTUME REQUIRES
APPROXIMATELY THREE TO
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COLORED CREPE PAPER.


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Promotion expires December 20th, 2007
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Branch and purchase a Visa Gift Card for your loved
one this Christmas and enter to
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6;_L ~erer~c~ ~Or~u ,


r










THE MAGIC OF

[iE ESSBAU WlAIlAM


These changing


JUNKNAOO IN THE BAHAMAS

WHERE IT'S BEEN AND WHERE

IT CAN TAKE US


By JACKSON BURNSIDE

"By the year 2020,
more visitors will come to
The Bahamas attracted by
our Heritage, Culture, and
our Arts, rather than our
'Sun, Sand, and Sea'.".

T his audacious pre-
diction by
Doong'alik Studios
Art Gallery will take oWIt'
than the efforts of the Fine
Arts community. Indeed ii
will take more than thet
efforts of the National
Festival of Junkanoo, from
which Doongalik gets its
name. Junkanoo, however
is a fountainhead of artistic
disciplines which many
believe has the potential to
play a major part in devel-
oping the human capital of
our nation.
The majority of
Junkanoos who drive
today's spectacular
parades are in their 20s
and refer to the 1990s as
"the good old days". Most
of them who participate in


this mammoth production
tell me, with pride, that
they remember times,
"before thie Internet".
Before there was Internet,
there were even older delays
when most people had no
television, electricity, cell
phones or crimlle.
In "lthe good old idays" of
the parents and igriandpa] ,
ents of thIsel mllodernl di]\
Jilnkal noI s mosi l o od! <, '-
parade leatirt's did ;nol
even exist. For '\,lmph',
women, with f1 f \. ca-
tions, were noIt d lloeVLd to
participate in Ilt0he major
completingg) groups.
Choreographed Dancers,
which are no1w a1n estab-
lished category of tilhe com-
petition did not even exist
until the 1980s.
We take so much for
granted with regard to this
constantly evolving nation-
al cultural phenomenon. I
remember, in the mid-
1970s, when I personally
began to take Junkanoo
seriously as a world class
Art form. At that time most


of todav's heroes, who
have contributed muiich to
Junkanoo for 40 or 50 years
or more, did not think of
themselves as "Artists".
For a few years, in the
mid '70s, I worked as a
Judge with recognized
Bahamian Artists like
Clement Bethel, Brent
Malone, George "God-
Bless" Moxey, and the like.
These men, and others like
them, were acadelt'ictadlly
trained artists and were their
only poisons as t,r as most
ltnkainoos Ntere t onc rned,
who could beI' II'l\ n tlt'
1,1!1( ",artist" So much ha& ,
clialicd. [i 'i xr 'erh te n
tidly- e hen ni'l [
3.b,1l ion',n held 1hhl t io
the myth that "wie ha ve no
culture E ('in todaY soml/
still say, "\Ve hive no cul-
ture except fnkanoo".
Fortunately most of ius
now know that Culltuire is
simply EVERYTHING that
we do that makes us spte-
cial, and that ctiltire is so
much more than Junkanoo.
The modern Culture of
the Bahamas including
Jlunkanoo, is "mixed right
up" with Tourisml. The
Tourism industry has
emerged over the past two
generations as the princi-
pal engine of our economy.


Over the years, revenue
from tourism and related
services has provided the
means for many Bahamian
families to afford more
material goods and
increased educational
opportunities for their fam-
ilies.
There was a time when
Tourism was seasonal and
men worked trades as
masons, carpenters and
seamen in order to make a
living. Exchange then was
more by barter of skill
rather than cash. This same
i\orklorce be ante tihe
esoirt emploct ees as lthe
indull tr'\ t'rew. Allttracted
!'1 lobls ,nd IolitN\, 1work-
eT; u', i\'lp the stubistlence
IllttstI I i oii the til l
tIslntd to n llti to
Nasiii. The wssiltlait Ne\w
Providence comitmunities
bet'amie the nalt rl ti centers
of( c lmpetig "luinkanoo
gangs" that spurred on the
development of the then
"primitive" lolk celebra-
tion into a world famous
spectator event.
Shortly after the Second
World War, Tourism began
to boom. The Tourist sea-
son, which previously was
restricted to "winter
months", extended
throughout the entire year.
Exclusive resort develop-


THINKII
AHEAD


Artist, architect and
junkanoo, Jockson
on Bay Street 'Jun
morning' with the
Family group. Burn
believes that the c
most celebrated cu
event has great por
that has yet to be


board boxes. These boxes,
oG once discarded, became the
basic raw material for
modern Junkanoo produc-
tion.
In 1980 cardboard was
Burnside free. The heavy hard
kanoo "fridge box" was the mate-
One rial of choice for the "flat
side back" lead costumes. Glue
country's was still primarily flour
Itural paste. The frame of the cos-
tential tumes were strips of wood
topped. discarded by the carpenter
or cabinet maker's shop,
and decorations were a
basic three to tour color
File Photo scheme of crepe paper.
As late as NlSOt lunkanoo
homes was still a part time acti\ i-
tiniulltcd IV held almost e\clusivel


lmenlls ol second
resulled which s


the deelopmeiil oi the
c';shtuction industry.
CralfSltisnn who ordinarily
exchan1"ged se \ ics !or
goods, fish and lrm pIlo-
duice I oil a trust basis now\-
worked at jobs which
could earn them "cash
monev".
New money meant new'
stores and i higher stan-
dard of living. New
lifestyles meant new and
greater consumption of
goods that did not exist
before the tourists came.
One such need was the
annual Christmas replace-
ment of furniture that
arrived in Nassau in card-


at lChllrtmas. Costume
design, production and
parade pc'scntation still
took place in November
and December. Tunkanoo,
before the mid-19 -iis was a
relatively simple street
party of cretpe paper, rags
and bush dominated by
music and revelr'y.
Costumes for the parade,
ais the legendary Dr. OFFFF
stated were literally "junk-
anew". Anything that glit-
tered, or moved, could
quality as Junkanoo mate-
rial, especially if it had
been discarded, cost noth-
ing,, and could become
something "new".


I oo 1


0 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL













THESE CHANGING TIMES


< ontiu1 rn
0 page I

ing, and could become some-
thing "new".
In 1980 a leading group would
spend no more than f$4,000 to
$5,000 on a Boxing Day Parade,
and $2,000 to $3,000 on New
Years. This was the "big time".
Production was tight. One hun-
dred young men, from the same
community, worked together
towards a common goal for two
months. The groups were consid-
erably smaller, and everyone was
as familiar as family
There was a job to be done. The
cry in all camps was "Ain' long
now". The spirit was indescrib-
able get in, get your costume,
and get out For most partici-
pants, "getting out", that is cut-
ting and building a costume, was
one day's work even for what
was then a large dancer. The
Junkanoo season was condensed
into roughly 40 days of intense
collaboration with focused ener-
gy on the annihilation of the
competition.
Before 1984 the traditional start
to the "season" was Guy Fawkes
Night in November. The parade
would showcase as many as 20
relatively flat lead costumes.
Each costume was carried the
whole parade by one man. None
of those costumes took more
than one week to build, with
three or four being built at a time.
Young men worked together in
informal assembly lines, and
accomplished much in an atmos-
phere of more fun than work.
Today, September is a very late
start Most of the materials and
methods of construction of the
costumes have changed. The
research and development of
themes and the resulting design
have also become considerably
more sophisticated, complex,
and expensive. The sizes of
groups have multiplied.
Management of these large
organizations required the
power and authority, held by
one or two individuals in the


past, to be delegated to "steer-
ing teams" and sub-committees
responsible for separate areas in
each organization. The end of
one season to the beginning of
another is now seamless. Now
Junkanoo requires active partici-
pation from January to January.
Twenty years ago all of the
sponsors of Junkanoo groups
were local businesses or individ-
uals. Today, with one exception,
all of dithe major sponsors are
leading international resort prop-
erties. A leading "A-Class"
group spends in excess of
$100,000 for a season. It is no
surprise then that groups must
have multiple sponsors.
Junkanoo is no longer a part-
time "fun and games" activity.
For most participants, "Junkanoo
is a very serious thing" demand-
ing enormous personal sacrifice.
The level of commitment
required generates constant ten-
sion and struggle with other
responsibilities. For most
Junkanoos this is still a volunteer
activity, but it becomes more
intense with each passing year.
In the past, most men were the
traditional providers for the fam-
ily and were self-sufficient fisher-
men or farmers. Many were
landowners themselves or were
directly connected to ancestors
on Family Islands who were
landowners. This connection to
the land and the sea made each
man important and gave him a
sense of dignity, which did not
depend on his part-time tourist
income. He was therefore an
important contributing member
of his community.
In the new urban monetary
economy of New Providence the
nation's capital, most Junkanoos
(regardless of their occupation)
have drifted into a dependency.
on the service industry. Money
- not land, knowledge of the
sea, or trade has become the
prevailing yardstick of social
importance. In the recent past,
Junkanoo was "the great equal-
izer". Materials were "free". The
importance of a Junkanoo was
directly related to his dedication


to the production of the parade
and his skill in design, decora-
tion, music and performance.
Expressions of excellence on
parade gave the Junkanoo group
and the individual Junkanoo a
status of distinction in each com-
munity.
Today, very little is free. The
competition between groups has
driven the standard of presenta-
tion to unprecedented levels.
New industrial materials are
required for even the most basic
costumes. Influenced by major
festivals in other countries, par-
ticularly Trinidad, Junkano )
artists have added aluminum
rods, glass beads, glitter and
feathers, which have become sta-
ples of the Junkanoo theater.
Junkanoo has become extremely
expensive. "You have to spend
to look good" is what the serious
Junkanoo artist says. The aver-
age cowbeller now could easily
spend anywhere from $500 to
$1,000 on decorations for his or
her costume.
The builders of these costumes
are being stressed by the ever-
increasing demands on their vol-
unteer time and energy. A num-
ber of designers in each group
have for some time questioned
this level of contribution, and
are, as a consequence, offering
their skills for hire. Already,
many pasters who decorate the
cardboard sculpture with crepe
paper have evolved into "con-
tractors", and are hired to paste
costumes for persons wishing to
"rush" who either do not have
the time or the skill to paste
those elaborate show pieces.
Money more than passion
drives the production, and the
group or individual's ability to
pay determines the measure-
ment of success of the event.
Winning the prize "on Bay" has
become the paramount focus,
and the celebration of the com-
munity has become a by-product
rather than the primary focus.
With few exceptions, the fun and
games of spontaneous scrap
groups have all but left the
parade.


Clearly, the case exists for the
urgent development of both the
social and economic potential of
this rapidly expanding phenom-
enon. Without discipline,
Junkanoo will evolve like
' T, ." ". Junkanoo must contin-
ue to ensure that each citizen has
the inalienable right to be a par-
ticipant, not just as a spectator in
the celebration of the Bahamian
national spirit. At the same time
Junkanoo must be harnessed as
an instrument of economic
development with links to edu-
cation and appropriate indus-
tries.
This is a critical crossroad in
the development of this rich cul-
tural resource. Junkanoos them-
selves have formed the
Junkanoo Corporation of New
Providence, (JCNP), and in part-
nership with the Ministry of
Culture and the National
Junkanoo Committee (NJC),
have committed to take respon-
sibility for the future of this cul-
tural force. The management
and operations of Junkanoo are
now in the hands of several
agencies led by Junkanoos them-
selves.
The tradition of sacrifice and
unselfish contribution to the
community must remain an
important hallmark of this
essential cultural expression.
The emphasis placed on cooper-
ation and mutual assistance in
the traditional Junkanoo value
system could form the basis of
new cooperative organizations.
Such organizations, in which
each individual feels that he or
she is an important contributor,
could then partner with appro-
priate sponsors, in the spirit of
mutual respect, to develop
unlimited productions for both
social and economic benefits.
Junkanoo must continue to be a
spectacular parade that is avail-
able to all. At the same time it
must be recognized as the eco-
nomic and kxcial tool it continues
to be for the advancement of all
Bahamians. Strategies toward this
purpose must include the devel-
opment of the Arts, which foster


national self-awareness and pride
based upon the history and
achievements of the diverse
Bahamian population.
Popular culture must become an
instrument for the restoration of
all positive values of our ancestral
heritage. The celebration of the
traditions and values of our fore-
fathers guarantees the preserva-
tion of national identity and dig-
nity.
The constant search for
improvement of the celebration
must lead to a culture of scientific
inquiry for the development of
philosophy and technology
appropriate to the needs of our
communities. This research, and
resultant product development,
must become an integral part of
education from Primary School
through to the School of Design
and Art of the University of The
Bahamas. In fact, Culture must
become fully integrated with all
disciplines as we continuously
prepare generations to compete
globally.
In the context of a global econo-
my, artistic and industrial prod-
ucts that express the creativity of
the indigenous population are
essential. The development of
Cultural Research Institutions,
and National Design Centers as
market places for first class
Bahamian products, will guaran-
tee the self-awareness of our peo-
ple, and our ability to participate
in the world society and economy
with dignity.
What we now refer to as "Shacks"
could evolve into coumnunity meet-
ing places dedicated to the social and
economic transomnnation of people
through the Arts Such centers will
challenge tie aorepted thinking that
only a few "have culture", and shift
the national focus of Junkanoo
organizations to become living insti-
tutes for the expressions of dreams
of the future. The growing focus on
knowledge and new thinking, cou-
pled with visionary strategies, will
ensure the brand "The Bahamas" is
synonymous with Creative
Leadership and Excellence by the
year 2020. This is a tough challenge,
but our future depends on it

Baink ofThe tinmBaam
SI- INTERNATIONAL


IE
TIE MAGIC OF






THEMAGICOF


DID YOU
?U ARIO? ?


THE VERY LARGE COSTUMES
THAT ARE BUILT MAINLY
FROM CARDBOARD AND
FRINGED CREPE PAPER WERE
INTRODUCED IN THE 1970'S.


C THE VIKINGS JUNKANOO GROUP
BEGAN THE USE OF CHICKEN
COOP WIRE, WHICH ALLOWED
FOR SOME MOVEMENT OF
JUNKANOO COSTUMES. AN
I N T L R N A T 1 0 N A L


'=-C- --- -r II I I~I I -- I1L~ ~ I II











hE MAGIC OF
iLM r4 ItJKllfi'iJJ


Today, there are
many groups
that make up the
various cate-
gories of
Junkanoo com-
petition in
addition to the
major players
which include
the Valley Boys,
Saxons
Superstars,
Roots, One
Family and the
Music Makers. In
total,
thousands of
Bahamians par-
ticipate in this
rich
cultural
celebration each
year for the
grand prize, and
other smaller
prizes.
Here are some
interesting facts
on some of the
big boys of
Junkanoo.


JUNKANOO


- Chairman (2000 Present) Darren Bastian;
vice-chairman Rory Saunders; chairman,
Finance Team, Silbert Ferguson; secretary,
Arlene Nash Ferguson; chairman,
Community Outreach Cheryl Ford, manager,
Silbert Ferguson; chief Marshal, Arnold Bain
- One Family broke away from the Saxons
Superstars in early 1993. They rushed for tho
first time as a group in the 1993 Boxing Day
Parade. One Family's leadership consists of
a steering committee whose chair person
changes annually. This eliminates the associ-
ation of the group with one dominant leader
One Family's aim is to be more involved with
the community.
The name One Family goes beyond the
Junkanoo parades and promotes the spirit of
family and those family values that have
been the hallmark of Bahamian culture.

WINS
* New Year's 1996: African Spirits Rejoice
* Boxing Day 1999: Hello, Hello, Africa:
Cradle of Civilization
* Boxing Day 2002: Love Thy Neighbour:
Celebrate the spirit of America
* New Year's 2003: The Great Home Going



* Chairman, Leslie Johnson; deputy chair-
man, Clinton Paul; treasurer, Mark Bastian
* Roots Junkanoo Group, founded in 1991, is
the realism of an ideal dreamt up by four
young men who decided to break away from
the well-established Valley Boys.
Leslie Johnson, Kevin "Dribbs" Rahming,
Anthony "Chinese" Smith and Wendell "Guts"
Francis persuaded three other icons in the
field, Paul "Diamond" Knowles, Peter "Gold"
Turnquest and Quentin "Barabbas"
Woodside, to form a new organization.
At its inception meeting "Dribbs" a costume
builder, came up with the new entity its name
and identity, "ROOTS".
ROOTS Junkanoo Group is a non-profit
organization established to further the devel-
opment of the country's indigenous art form,
examine ways to improve upon the market-
ing of Junkanoo and our culture to get it on
par with other international festivals and
parades, to improve relations with other asso-
ciations of like aims and network a commis-
sion to properly facilitate the festival and to
expand the horizons of the Junkanoo world,
and expose as many Bahamians and others
to the joys, skills and artistic embodiment of
the parades.


WINS
* 1992 New Year's Day: 1492 The Americas
before Columbus
* 1995 New Year's Day: The Creation Our
God Reigns
* 2006 Boxing Day: Arabian Nights


* Leader Winston Gus" Cooper
* In 1958, a visionary in the form of Winston
"Gus" Cooper formed a Junkanoo group
along wth friends from the Centerville area of
new Providence. all mere teenagers at the
time. Gwen Fountain. mother of one of the
members was employed with Malcolm's
Garage and obtained sponsorship for the
small group in the amount of 15 pounds for
the Boxing Day parade The group "Valley
Boys" named as there was "a valley'
between three hills, Centerville, Hawkins and
Sears Addition hills. Today, the Valley Boys is
one of the largest and most recognized
groups to rush on Bay Street.

WINS
* 1960 Boxing Day: Scottish Highlanders
* 1962 New Year's Day: Uncle Sam
* 19b2 Boxing Day : Valley Gamblers
* 1963 New Year's Day: Valley Immortals
"The Turks"
* 1964 New Year's Day: The Crusaders
* 1964 Boxing Day: The Muskateers
* 1965 New Year's Day: Guards of Tower of
London
* 1966 New Year's Day: Japan 1400
* 1978 New Year's Day: Myths & Legends of
South Pacific
* 1967 Boxing Day: Birds & Bees
* 1969 Boxing Day: Valley Boys Sun God
* 1970 Boxing Day: Obeah Man
* 1971 Boxing Day: Wonders of Ancient
Mexico
* 1974 Boxing Day: Extracts of the Orient
* 1975 Boxing Day: Happy Africa
* 1976 New Year's Day: American Indians
* 1980 New Year's Day: Celestial Gems
* 1981 Boxing Day: A Tribute to Tourism
* 1982 New Year's Day: Protect our Wild Life
* 1983 Boxing Day Portraits of Bahamian
Nature
* 1984 New Year's Day: Marine Treasures of
the Bahamas
- 1986 New Year's Day Magnificent Coral
Reefs of The Bahamas
1986 Boxing Day: Christmas Celebration
1987 Boxing Day. In The Beginning
1989 New Year's Day: Let the Show Begin
1989 Boxing Day: The End
1990 New Year's Day: The Bahamas
Games
1990 Boxing Day: Glorious Celebration of


Freedom
* 1991 New Year's Day: Let the Show Begin
(tied for first place)
* 1992 Boxing Day: Africa 0 Africa Reflection
of our Origin
* 1993 New Year's Day: Guess Who's
Corning to Dinner: A Bahamiar Extravaganza
* 1994 New Year's Day: Glorious Wedding
Celebration
* 1994 Boxing Day: The Glory & Splendor of
the Western Frontier
* 1995 Boxing Day "Spell Bound" for the
Child in us all
* 1998 New Year's Day. 40 Glorious Years
Celebration of Success
* 2000 Boxing Day A mystical journey into
the Orient
* 2002 New Year's Day In the bush, come
with us on a mystical journey
* 2003 Boxing Day (Theme: Not available)
* 2004 New Year's Day (Theme: Not avail-
able)
* 2004 Boxing Day (Theme: Not available)



* Leader: Samuel Thompson
* The Music Makers Junkanoo group
debuted in 1976 and introduced a brand new
era in Junkanoo by expanding upon the
occasional appearance of the brass instru-
ment, and introducing an entire brass section
to their music back line. The brass section is
now a major component of all Junkanoo
groups in the parade.

WINS
1973 Boxing Day: Seven Hundred Island
1976 Boxing Day: Portraits of Bahamas
Scenes
1977 Boxing Day: Chickcharnie
1978 Boxing Day: Indians from Red Bay
1982 Boxing Day: Buy Local Bahamian



Founded in 1965
* Leader Percy "Vola" Francis. Unchallenged
as head of the Council and leader of the
Saxons. He has lead the Saxons for almost
three decades and is widely regarded as a
Bahamian folk hero.
* Administration of the Saxons is controlled by
a leadership council. Council members
include Anton "Tones" Dean, Perly Paul, Di
Philip Thompson, John Barrett, Dion Miller,
Greg Curtis, Peter Minnis, Raff Dean, Willis
"Koolaid" Bain, and Elkin Sutherland.
* For thousands of Bahamians, the Saxons
represent a culture unto themselves.
Recruiting many of their numbers from


Mason's Addition and the surrounding grass
root areas, the group exemplifies an identity
of pride and belonging.

WINS
* 1968 New Year's Day: The Crawfish
"Favorite Bahamian Seafood"
* 1970 New Year's Day: Egypt 1000 BC
* 1972 New Year's Day: Bangkok the Golden
City of Thailand
* 1972 Boxing Day: Hindu Gods & Demons
* 1974 New Year's Day: Burial of King Tut
* 1975 New Year's Day: Dynasty of the
Grand Mongul Khan
* 1977 New Year's Day: 1001 Arabian Nights
* 1979 New Year's Day: Opening of
Parliament Jubilee
* 1979 Boxing Day: 250 Years of Parliament
Proves its Better in The Bahamas
* 1980 Boxing Day: Tribute to Our Heroes
HMBS Flamingo
* 1981 New Year's Day: Guide to Casino
Gambling
* 1983 New Year's Day: "Florarama" Tribute
to Bahamian Beauty
* 1984 Boxing Day: Invasion of Arthropods
Our House & Garden Insect
* 1985 New Year's Day: Come Dine with Us
* 1985 Boxing Day: Let's Feed the Nation
* 1987 New Year's Day: The Great Bahama
Bank
* 1988 New Year's Day: Celebrate our spe-
cial occasions R.S.V.P.
* 1988 Boxing Day Saxons Let The World
Know The
* 1991 New Years Day Saxons Come
Celebrate 500 Years of History Tlie For First
Place
* 1991 Boxing Day Saxons Columbus
Discovery of the New World let History begin
1492 thru 1992
* 1993 Boxing Day: Famous Legends in Time
"Be the Best You Can Be"
* 1996 Boxing Day: The Wonders of Gods
Creation "Behold His Handiwork"
* 1997 New Year's Day: Celebrate the Spirit
of Mardi Gras "Let's Play Mas"
- 1997 Boxing Day: Our Bahamas a country
to be proud of, it just keeps getting better
- 1998 Boxing Day: See how the World
marks Our Bearing March on Bahamaland
25th Anniversary
* 1999 New Year's Day: Tribute to the Postal
Service
* 2000 New Year's Day: Oh! Give thanks for
the new millennium A celebration of a new
beginning
- 2001 New Year's Day: A Tribute to the
Postal Service
* 2001 Boxing Day: Don't Gamble with life,
life is not a game
* 2007 New Year's (Theme not available)


Bay Hill Rockers Andros
Bluff Superstars Andros
Cobras San Salvador
Conch Sound Andros
Classic Dancers Grand Bahama
Cosmetologist & Barbers Grand
Bahama
Crown Haven Group Abaco
Crownhill Eagles Andros
Dundas Town Supreme Dancers -
Abaco
East Bay Abaco


Eastern Group Abaco
Family and Friends Grand Bahama
Fox Town Group Abaco
Fun Tlime Junkanoo Grand Bahama
Granmar Goodies Eleuthera
Green Turtle Cay Slammers Abaco
Harbour Boys Grand Bahama
Johnson Superstars Eleuthera
Lowe Sound Whalers Andros
Majestic Crusaders Grand Bahama
Mastic Point Bengals Andros
Mistique Warriors Grand Bahama


Musical Youth Exumas
New Creation Eleuthera
New Generation Eleuthera Eleuthera
New Generation Long Island Long
Island
North Group Long Island
One Family Too Andros
Over the Hill Rockers Inagua
Overback Crucher Eleuthera
Plastic Bangers Eleuthera
Police Youth Grand Bahama
Rattlers San Salvador


Rock Sound Eleuthera
Rocker Hill Top Eleuthera
Rocketeers Eleuthera
Sands Real Estates Abaco
Sandy Point Group Abaco
Silly Sidewalkers Bimini
Southern Rockers Cat Island
Southern Stars Inagua
Spring City Rockers Abaco
Super Star Rockers Grand Bahama
Swingers Grand Bahama
Tarpum Bay Adventurers Eleuthera


The Elements Bimini
The Fantastics Long Island
The Maires Cat Island
Tom Toms Bimini
Unity Andros
Victory Boys Grand Bahama
Vikings Abaco
Warriors Exumas
Western Jammers Grand Bahama
Zemis Eleuthera
Zulu Dancers Eleuthera


0 Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


FAMILY



JUNKANOO
1 1: ^ .


I


''"'













JUNKANOO


STUDENTS UD

SHINE ON

BAY STREET T


By INDERIASAUNDER-w
Guardian Staff Reporter
inderia nioasgutiard. om

*r one day each year, th. lIth
Sf the nation host one '1 th i
biggest cultural events in Th.
Bahamas. On this day, th,' qp-
ture everyone's attention and \, Iu
can see them on historical Ri\
Street dancing groovin' and ru-Iun
to the sounds of Junkanc,, m LI-.
As if they were the big IN >\
indeed.
Tiny tots preschoolers and pri-
mary school children just thigh-
high to an adult, shaking cowbells
that appear to weigh more than
some of them do, blowing whistles
incessantly and knocking their
drums to a beat that has been
drilled into their very being over
the past couple of months. They
rock from side to side gazing in
awe at the masses lined up along
the parade route just to see them,
with a mixture of pride, excite-
ment and sometimes fright
Not to forget the junior high and
high school students. These groups
blaze through the route as if the
parade was the end all and be all
of their school careers, some of
them already seasoned junkanoo-
ers who rush in both the junior
and senior parades.
And it shows.
The crowd rocks from side to
side as they rush down the street
Government High, A.F. Adderley,
RM. Bailey, C.H. Reeves, H.O.
Nash and many more. Dancers in
full elaborate costumes putting
their all in "show time".
Drummers with goatskin drums


it ,i, d 'i thi IT -h uld r-d.i
. %.\ Iu -'ll -Ih lk.-n l ii, J .. i .. I ,-
pl,',, Oldr Int. n1-.' I, itlin,. I tt .1
rlfi \0 ti i, t t h.i l 1'\ li-t k1, n 'n
uld %nIll dti LIlli r u .Irn p.,.,d.
r\ r I ll% th., t ,,l1 d 11'n l- ,. n
% in l tli tI'i n .-p '., 1 .I il,..
BRih.u i.ln 1pul, lh rn ,I .1 n.. h
t.ulhluri l rTido.iin LlhIl d.,lh- I'N k h1
the- Junanoo01 Leaders A
\\.Vl.. hin the .n th, an.il J.n
,'n, nul'.llt nl \ .-r I'l.'-*- tlh.t Lth,
S ,'d 10 till-, uml .*r ,.i r.I l.- .I,-
a, t ruill) 'nid .d Ir.and .i ,.-i
country.
Back in 1987, when members of
the National Junkanoo p
Committee and representatives of
the Junkanoo Leaders Association
visited the land of Carnival and
Soca, Trinidad and Tobago, for
their annual Carnival festival, the
idea of a Junior Junkanoo parade
was planted in the minds of
Bahamians.
Percy Vola Francis, the Junior
Junkanoo coordinator in the
Department of Culture and
leader of the Saxons Junkanoo
group, said they had never
thought of involving children in
the parade until that very
moment.
"We were walking and we saw
these group of kids all working
on costumes and we asked the
[carnival officials we were with]
what that was over there and
they told us that was their kiddie
carnival they were working on,"
Francis remembered.
He said everyone from teachers
and parents were involved in
preparing the children for the fes-
tival.


20TH ANNUAL JR.
JUNKANOO PARADE


Fourteen pre-schools, primary, junior and
high schools competed for the top prizes
in the annual Jr. Junkanoo parade held
last Thursday on Bay St. Hundreds of
Bahamians turned out to lend their
support.
PHOTO: LETISHA HENDERSON


Judging


WHAT IT TAKES TO

PICK THE WINNER

By BIANCA SYMONETTE
Guardiian Staff Reporter
bklt I I ( I" S'LMI|L.L O I I

he festive season is upon us oneo
again and as uany Rill aians pre-
pan' to cook fl t ham and turkey
and garnish th'ir Chnristats tines,
lunknuxxio fartis remain kxked down
in the shadcks preparing to put on a da-
Aling pt'rfonaixnc for the Boxing and
New Year's Dliy parades.
But while many foxus on the prepara-
tions lhat die Junklaoxxrs go through
each year, some fail to realize tie intense
training that the judges go through. At
tie end of tie day they amre responsible
for dKiusing a winner out of tie array
of eye-popping costumes, lintrt-pumnp-
ing beats and dynarnic dance moves
displayed every year on Bay Stret.
ClIannaine Rolle, deputy diaiman of
tx parades niiLtnagement team with
nrsxonsibility for die judges, explained
to Thn Nassau Guardian what it takes
to be a parade judge.
Sli said liat from die outside looking
in it may appear to be a simple task but
to thI-o who go ithXrough th' six weeks
of training to lxnome a judge, they
know theamount of work and prepa-
ration needed to hold tlalt title.
This year the parade will be split into
five judging zones three on Bay
Street and two on Shirley Street Rolle
said that to avoid a "chaotic" situation
- when judges am not in a zone at the
time a group passes one judge is
responsible for eadch zone and ensures
that someone is ahvays stationary in
that zone.
Rolle said this year 110 would-be
judges turned out to the training passes
and of that number only 90 will be dcho-
sen tojudge boli senior parades
At the end of the day Rolle said she
looks for judges who are unbiased and
have a keen eye for the cultural celebra-
tion. The Parade Management Tham
also has a code of ethics that judges
must follow.
"This year what we want to do is to
make the parades a little
better and hands-on for


151
THE MAGIC OF

it HEKM! GHAMi


the judges. What we have been doing is
attending the various Junkanoo prac-
tices. Because when we are in training
we are confined to a room but the
sounds aren't there and so we notify the
group when we are coming so that we
can get a better idea of the sounds in the
open," Rolle explained.
"Your decision in judging Junkanoo is
going to move it fonvani or set it back-
wads. You halve tobe fair and rest tie
bias down, and be able to determine a
winner from wliat is seen on Bay
StetL"
She emphasized dat at tihe practices
they are not there to judge but to learn.
ThI perspective judges are given a
written examination which accounts for
80 percent of lie final grade, the other
20 percent is based on attendance.
Attending a practice session of a group
is considered an extra circular activity
and points are given to perspective
judges who attend.
The judges' exam was lield
December 4 and 5. During training the
judges are rxluinkl to meet vice a
week when they are taught the funda-
mentals of dit parade.
TlI judges also get a first-land judg-
ing experienv at the Joe Billy Festival,
lield on November 30 on Market Stinet
Th ere are no specific qualifications
needed to take tfl course; however;
you must be at least 18 years of age.
During the six-week training course,
the perspective judges are provided with
information on the basics of costuming,
Junkanoo music and perfomarne.
The first phase of the course involves
an introduction to instruments played
in Junkanoo; the second phase covers
the details of Junkanoo perfomrma;no
the thin phase, Junkanoo design, cos-
tuming and art; and at tie end of the
course the participants are tested and
evaluated to determine tiir eligibility
to judge the country's largest and most
celebrated cultural event
In case you arevwondenng how the
judges deteirninl tir scores it unfolds
this way: Music io worth 25 percent;
group costing accounts for 50 per-
cent of the score, perfom6 ance is 20 per-
cent and execution of theme, fiw per-
cent

I Bank of The Bahamas
I INTERNATIONAL







1-16
THE MAGIC OF
JUNKAJ0W
iB WHitAuntua


Drawing
ri:]W l 1.i


By BIANCA SYMONETTE
Guardian Staff Reporter
bianca@nasguard.com

The lineup has been set and
Junkanoeers are promising one of
| the best showdowns on Bay Street
I as the senior groups get set to show
their stuff at the Brian Gibson Boxing
Day Parade and the Anthony Carol
New Year's Day Parade.
It's an event that draws hundreds of
Junkanoo participants out of the shack
during the busiest month for many, and
down to Arawak Cay.
If you're not sure what I am talking
about, I am talking about the much-
anticipated number picking exercise
that determines the order that the
groups will hit Bay Street come Dec. 26
and Jan. 1.
It is also the time when the groups'
parade themes are revealed.
It's a known fact that secrets in The
Bahamas are a hard thing to keep, but
in Junkanoo many keep a tight lip on
which group is bringing what until the
final hour. That final hour is usually the
number picking exercise, v-'ich was


held Dec. 8 at the Fish Fry.
Scores of supporters and participants
sporting their favorite group's T-shirts
assembled at the popular Arawak Cay
to await the unveiling of group themes
and the performance order of the
parades.
After the pieces of papers with num-
bers on them were folded, placed in
envelopes and then placed in a dear raf-
fle box, a representative from each
group got the opportunity to pull that
lucky number from the box. For those
doing the picking, it's an intense
moment because if a number like one is
chosen they are usually chastised by
other group members.
In case you didn't know, Junkanoeers
hate to come out first because very
rarely a group that comes out of the
gate first ends up winning the parade.
Nevertheless, the awesome chance to
woo the crowd and judges first falls in
the hands of The Valley Boys and Roots
who will start the Boxing Day and New
Year's Day Parades, respectively
Some of the costumes you can expect
to be displayed on Bay Street on Dec. 26
will depict slavery, an array of interna-


INKANOOERS GATHER AT ARAWAK
\Y EACH YEAR TO LEARN WHO WilL
FIRST OUT OF THE GATE COME
)XING DAY AND NEW YEAR'S


tional food, African culture, ancient
Greek mythology, Las Vegas show girls
and prisoners and police officers.
The line-up and themes for the A
groups in the Brian Gibson Boxing Day
Parade are as follows:
1. The Valley Boys presents The
Bahamas Food and Cultural Festival, A
taste of The World
2 Saxons Superstars presents A
Magnificent Celebration of
Emancipation 1807-2007
3. Prodigal Sons presents Come
Celebrate Africa-Happy, Happy Africa
4. One Family Junkanoo presents
Crime: Enough is Enough
5. Music Makers presents Viva Las
Vegas
6. Roots the 2006 Boxing Day
Champions will dose off the A cate-
gory with its theme Signs of the Zodiac.

In the B division for the Boxing Day
Parade the line up and themes are as
follows:
1. Colors Entertainment presents
Colors under the Sea
2 Colors Junkanoo presents
Universal Splendor Reaching for the


Stars
3. Fancy Dancers presents What the World Needs
Now is Peace and Love
4. One Love Soldiers presents King Solomon's
Reign
5. Body of Christ presents I Will Not Share My
Glory With Another Neither My Praise With Graven
Images
6. Original Congos presents The House of
Windsor
7. Free Town Lane Warriors
8. Z-Bandits presents Old Time Junkanoo
9. Foundations presents The Amazing Nature's
Kingdom
10. Conquerors for Christ presents Palm Sunday
Celebration: The Triumphant Entry
11. Kingdom Warriors presents Onward Christian
Soldiers, declaring War Against All Evil

And for the A groups for the Tony Carol New
Years Day Parade the line and themes are:
1. Roots will be first out the gate presenting NFL
Football Alive: America's Greatest Game
2. Saxons presents The Vikings are Coming
3. Prodigal Sons presents a Journey to Freedom
4. Music Makers presents A time for Everything
Under The Sun
5. One Family presents What Time is it A Time For
Everything
6. The Valley Boys will dose of the A category
with Earth, Wind, Fire and Water The Story of
Nature and The Elements

In the B category for New Year's the groups will
line up as follows:
1. Conquerors for Christ presents Hymns of
Glorious Praise
2. One Love Soldiers presents A Vision of Peace
for Our Nation
3. Colors Entertainment presents Regatta Time
4. Colors Junkanoo presents But The Greatest of
These is Love
5. Foundation Presents Follow the Rainbow
6. Z-Bandits
7. Kingdom Warriors
8. Free Town Lane Warriors
9. The Body of Christ presents All Things Bright
and Beautiful
10. Fancy Dancers presents Historical Highlights of
the Bible
11. Original Congos

All the senior groups will be required to make two
laps on Bay and Shirley Streets; In the B category
numbers 5 to 11 will start off on Shirley Street and
their way onto Bay Street


0 Bank of The Bahamas
I, INTERNATIONAL


.11.111,11'...'' ..










Tony Bellot has been making cowbells for Junkanoo
groups all over The Bahamas and Florida :":i rtf past
ten years. Bellot developed his own equipment in his
workshop to mechanize the process and increase his
cowbell production. Photo: EDWARD RUSSELL III


Master




Of he
M :O


LGCAL




CHURNS, OUT



OF 150

PAiR S OF
.
BELLSA
mr


By THEA RUTHERFORD
Guardian National Correspondent
thea@nasguard.com


Sny Bellot is the first to admit he
f fell into the cowbell-making trade
by accident.

Ten years ago, feeling the urge to join
any Junkanoo group that would have
him on Bay Street, Bellot cut, twisted
and welded some metal until he had
what he figured was a decent pair of
cowbells. He made that first pair in
three long days of trial and error. But
he sold the bells in minutes.
"I went out to practice and some-
body wanted to buy them so I sold
them," says Bellot.
The first pair went for $120.
Bellot returned to his workshop to
make another pair for himself. After
all Bay Street was still calling him.
"Somebody wanted to buy [the cow-
bells] again. And after the third pair
then I realized that these guys needed
cowbells," he remembers.
Thus the firing up of Bellot's largely
one-man, cowbell-manufacturing
assembly line, which starts in his
workshop, a wooden shed heaped
with metal parts that opens on both
ends to reveal the grassy calm of his
mother's backyard.
From September to December Bellot
puts aside his typical burglar bar and
balcony rail-making work to make


nothing but cowbells. By this time
he's almost finished the bulk of the
average 150 pairs he cranks out each
year.
When Bellot decided to join the
ranks of the few meeting the demand
for cowbells, he knew that he'd need
a faster approach to getting the job
done.
"It was a lot of cutting and mistakes
and bending wrong and all the rest of
that, and then I realized that making
them like that wasn't going to work If
I was going to try and mass- produce
them in any kind of quantity that
method wasn't going to work So I
came into the shop and I made a ben-
der."
The bender, a thick steel apparatus
bolted to a work table, forms air-con-
ditioning duct metal sheets Bellot cuts
into the shape of the bells into three
dimensional shafts he later welds
together to form the outer-casing of
the bell. He welds nuts or washers,
depending on the size of the bell, to
the ends of steel rods to make the
strikers. Each step of the process is
done individually to expedite the
process.
"You just sit down and weld for
hours on end. Do one thing for hours
on end then you come back the next
day and do something else for hours
on end."
Bellot puts in 10 to 12 hour work-
days during the height of the season.


But the monotony is part of the reason
he doesn't fear serious competition in
the swelling trade. 'Tm not really con-
cemed about anybody damaging my
business because I can't think of any-
body who will be that committed. You
have to be committed to this. Trust
me, this isn't something you just do
on a whim."
And from monotony comes cov-
etable beauty. Bellot's steel double and
triple cowbells, as strong as they are
smooth, with gold lines running along
the welded portions and up-turned
easy-to-grip handles, sell all over the
country and to a few states in the U.S.
"The bells give a different sound,"
says Quentin "Barabbas" Woodside,
owner and proprietor of Junkanoo
World, a Junkanoo supplies store that
carries the bells. Woodside is also the
leader of Barabbas and the Tribe, the
group that took Bellot and his cow-
bells in when he first went looking for
a group to rush with.
Woodside calls the bells "some of
the best right now in the country. The
bells just come different. It's very neat
work, very beautiful."
He says that some bellers buy two
and three pairs, wanting separate bells
for practice, shows and the parades.
hIn year two of production Bellot
decided it was time to try something
new. Ever bom of necessity, the inven-
tion came to him after he felt the
effects of shaking the cowbells one


COWBELL

CRAZE


SBank of T NATIONALL
I INTEiRNATIONAL


THE PtA. 'iF



year a week after the parade was
over.
"My upper body hurt me for about
a week after from shaking the cow-
bells cause it's a lot of work, and I
wasn't in that kind of shape." Bellot
set about fashioning a machine that
would produce the most sound with
the least amount of effort.
Two months later he had built the
cowbell machine, cowbells fastened
to the upper end of a vertical bicyde
frame. The machine goes over the
head and rests on the shoulders and
stomach. The wearer "shakes" the
cowbells by turning the pedals on
the bicyde frame. Bellot still has the
original machine, which weighs 48
pounds. He made threemore which
have been used in his group.
"Everyone I made got a little
lighter and a little easier to ring and
a little easier to manage. :The next
one I make I guarantee you will be
much easier to manage."
Bellot has also tried to odify the
standard bell. He makel three sizes
of bells, the largest of which he calls
the "Super". All of his bi1As are either
doubles or triples, with 60 percent of
the market wanting the triple bell.
The bells also come with three or
four tongs or strikers, whidi cause
the darity and the volume of the
sound they produce to vary.
Bored with the usual process one
day, Bellot added a step to the stan-
dard double bell. Instead of the regu-
lar steel road striker, he created a
cylindrical tube within the bell's
shaft and inserted a free-moving
steel ball to act as the striker. It's the
only one of its kind he's made and
produces pretty much the same
sound as the standard bell.
"I don't think it could take as much
punishment as the others," says
Bellot. Besides, "I never showed it to
anybody. It's a tremendous amount
of work involved and if I was to
show anybody, they might want it,"
he chuckles.
He repairs bells as well, but
prefers to make them.
"I always tell [the belles] their
intention is to destroy the cowbells,
my intention is to try to keep them
together," says Bellot. "It's a constant
war going on there."








I
THE MAGIC OF




BACK LINE

A Junkanoo drummer
helps bring up the rear
in this Nassau
Guardian file photo.

File Photo


DID YOU
-" ,. ', i


JUNKANOO RULES ALLOW
ONLY A MAXIMUM OF FOUR
PARTICIPANTS PER GROUP
TO BE ATTIRED IN CLOTH
COSTUMES TO PRESERVE
THE TRADITION OF BASIC
MATERIALS.


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I I I





191
ThE MAGIC OF
N J OIAN


RUSHIN' THROUGH
THE CROWD

Young and old, seasoned
and novice Junkanoos can
join a Fun Group on Bay
Street and experience the
rush.


.I \
101^


The 'essence' of


Junkanoo


By KRYSTEL ROLLE
y Guardian Staff Reporter
krystel@nasguard.com

didn't do it for the money nor
did I do it for bragging rights.
And I surely didn't do it for the
photographers lined up on
Rawson Square obviously ignoring
my poorly designed costume that I
had only finished less than an hour
before coming out.
I did it because I love to rush and
most of all I did it because I love
Junkanoo music
Ca-bom, ca-bom, ca-bom. Aye!
Ca-bom, ca-bom, ca-bom. Aye! Ca-
bom, ca-bom, ca-bom, ca-bom, ca-
bom, ca-bom, ca-bom. Aye!
That was the beat emanating
from the drums and the people
around me. It was nothing spectac-
ular but it got me moving.
I was rushing for a scrap group
and I was loving every minute of
it.
That was more than 10 years ago,


when I first stepped onto Bay
Street to rush with a group whose
name I have since forgotten. Before
that, I had always rushed with one
of the bigger Junkanoo groups.
My sisters and female cousins
were with me. We had formed a
choreographed section of sorts and
attempted as best we could to
move in unison. It was like we
were playing follow the leader. I
performed a dance and they fol-
lowed suit.
I laugh when I think about it now
because it was obvious that some
spectators in the stands were not
enjoying our performance as much
as we were, but we didn't let that
discourage us. No. We pumped
our bodies even harder, danced
with more enthusiasm, smiled
even wider and chanted even
louder.
It was also evident that some of
the people rushing with us took
more time to prepare their cos-
tumes than we did. Theirs were


FUN GROUPS PLAY AN IMPORTANT

ROLE IN JUNKANOO, PROVIDING AN

ELEMENT OF "FREE SPIRIT"


b 4The fun part
about a scrap
group is when
you reach on
Bay Street, if
your pants
ain't wet then
you ain't
serious. So you
should be fin-
ished right
before you go
out to Bay St.
That's a part of
the whole
mystic around
rushing for
Fun Groups.

CHARLES MAYNARD


done so neatly I could hardly tell it
was pasted. However, as scrappy
as we were the group still accepted
us even though we were strangers
to them. We joined their line and it
was like we were family. And that
was what it was about, accepting
persons as they were.
I think Minister of State for
Culture Charles Maynard put it
best when he said Scrap Groups,
officially called "Funr Groups", are
the essence of Junkanoo.
Said Maynard: "That free spirit,
that lack of competition is very
important to Junkanoo because it
allows somebody who may not
have time to spend and dedicate
to the shack for the competitive
groups to still be able to partici-
pate. The fun part about a scrap
group is when you reach on Bay
Street, if your pants ain't wet then
you ain't serious. So you should be
finished right before you go out to


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I Bank of The Bahamas
SI INTERNATIONAL


File Photo


Bay St That's a part of the whole
mystic around rushing for Fun
Groups."
Like me, Minister Maynard also
rushed for a scrap group. He
began when he was just 5-years-
old, in 1975. He explained that
during the 1070s scrap groups
meant that persons would just
come out there, put something
together and join the line.
"It's not organized, it's not
planned. When a group goes you
just go once you have enough peo-
ple. And all you need is two
drums and a cow bell, just go," he
said.
Maynard rushed with various
scrap groups for the first eight
years of his Junkanoo life. By the
time he became a teenager the
groups had started to organize
themselves a bit more.
"We started to design actual cos-
tumes and when I was 14 or 15 I
did something for 'Most Qualified'
and it was way beyond the scope
of what they did," he said,
explaining that he needed more
than the group could offer.
Wanting to design better and bet-
ter costumes, in 1984 Maynard left
the world of scrap groups to rush
with the Saxons.
I also joined a bigger group. But
while many persons have left
scrap groups and groups have
broken up and stopped coming
out all together, "Fun Groups" are
still alive today
And I hope that's one thing
about Junkanoo that will never
change.
Krystel Rolle rushes with the
Roots Jfrkanoo group





EMAGICOF
II-E MAGIC OF


0DID YOU



THE BAHAMAS
DEVELOPMENT BOARD
COMMERCIALIZED
JUNKANOO IN THE
1920'S TO ATTRACT
MORE TOURISM AND
MADE THE PARADE
MORE COMPETITIVE BY
OFFERING PRIZES.


INT a Ni of TI BaIhaaL
I INTER NATIONAL


DO THE
JUNKANOO
Thousands of
Bahamians and tourists
flock to Bay Street
every year to revel in
The Bahamas' most
celebrated cultural
event.


File Photos





By ROOSEVELT FINLAYSON

ere is dearly a need for some new
thinking on how to get our country
beyond the mediocrity that is perva-
sive in our schools, businesses and public
service organizations. The Festival in the
Workplace is a relatively new approach to
personal and organizational transforma-
tion that is designed to address this issue
of mediocrity.
FfIW takes positive lessons from
Junkanoo and the Carnivals of Trinidad
and Brazil and its basic aim is to develop
an environment in the workplace that
stimulates and challenges people to
become their most creative, productive
and passionate selves.
FlTW was conceptualized by Roosevelt
Finlayson in 1997 and in 1999 Michael
Diggiss joined him as co-developer of
FI'W. Roosevelt and Michael define
FFl'W as "A transformation process that
serves as a catalyst for the development of
a new organizational culture that ignites
the creative spirit and passion for person-
al and organizational excellence. In such a
culture, people experience joy, meaning
and fulfillment"
FI'W has its foundation in a cultural
shift that frees people to behave on a daily
basis in a more positive and productive
way with co-workers, customers, suppli-
ers and all stakeholders that they interact
with.
The developers of FlTW see it as both a
metaphor for a new way of organizing
productive activities and as a series of fes-
tival events in an organization.

BUIlDING A PROOUCIVE COMMUNITY IN THE WOR~PACE
Michael and Roosevelt have been
engaged in a four-year study of Junkanoo
and the festivals of the region and their
main objectives have been to understand
how to harness the life-giving, creative
and transforming power of these festivals
and to develop a process of engaging
organizations to embrace FITW in a com-
prehensive manner. In their study they
have intentionally looked through the
eyes of management science, the social
sciences and the arts. At the intersection of
these three areas, important insights have
emerged which would be invisible to the
casual observer.
One of the key insights that they have
discovered is the importance of the sense
of community that exists in our Junkanoo
groups, the Carnival Mas bands of
Trinidad and the Samba Schools of BraziL
In these festival organizations many peo-
ple freely enter into deep, caring and sup-
portive relationships where they develop


211
S.. "". THE MAC OF
S* ry groups. They firmly believe that busi- jUKj(,OO
nesses, government agencies and schools f asew i,,g
can learn a lot from Junkanoo and
Carnival about how to better engage all of
their people in the creative process and
A also how to make goal setting and strate-
gic planning more visual and engaging.


mo&


. in he


N N
.a new approach
Sanew approach


lifelong friendships and become open to
changing their thinking and their way of
being. Through their roles and relation-
ships in these festival groups many peo-
ple contribute to the development of a
community that is characterized by high
levels of trust, creativity, productivity,
ongoing learning, joy, meaning and fulfill-
ment.
Roosevelt and Michael have learnt from
their study that the positive qualities of
such a community flow from the nature
of the festival group as a self organizing
social system. In this type of system struc-
ture and control emerge from within and
is not imposed from the outside as is the
case in most workplaces. The knowledge
and creativity of most members of the
community is valued, respected and uti-
lized, resulting in a collective intelligence
that produces a powerful form of synergy.
This synergy allows the festival group to
achieve higher levels of creativity, produc-
tivity and quality than most formal, struc-
tured organizations.
Most organizations are structured in
functional areas and hierarchical layers
with sharp separations between them.
The focus in these areas and throughout
the organization is on productivity and


the bottom line; relationship and commu-
nity building afm deemphasized or dis-
couraged.
The developers of FITW exlp'ct that
organizations will become significantly
more successful when they are able to
take lessons from the Festivals about how
to build sustainable, productive commu-
nities in the workplace.

UNDERSANDING THE POWER OF IHE CRTIVE PROCESS'
Another important insight that has come
from this study of Festivals is an under-
standing of how the creative process
embraces a diversity of persons in a pow-
erful, collaborative process that is height-
ened by the strong sense of identity with
a particular group and the level of com-
petitiveness. Roosevelt and Michael
began a study of the creative process in
the Trinidad Carnival in 2004 when they
"played mas" with the Trini Revelers Mas
band. During this visit they also had the
opportunity to interview several Carnival
designers, musicians and academics who
have studied Carnival for many years.
Roosevelt and Michael have also stud-
ied the creative process in the Junkanoo
Shacks and interviewed several leaders
and designers from both A and B catego-


INIEASING LOCAL AND INflAlINAOI.ATENflON:
FrIW has been attracting increasing atten-
tion locally and internationally. The for-
mer Radisson Cable Beach Resort (now
Sheraton), Uriah McPhee Primary School
and Doctors Hospital are among the local
organizations which have embraced some
elements of FrIW. Also BEC, AG Electric
and New Providence Community Church
have incorporated some components of
the arts and festivals, independent of the
FIlW concept
Regionally the CARICOM Secretariat in
Guyana was the first to introduce the
FlIW concept Also Dr. Kwame Charles,
an associate of MDR teaches a session on
FlIW in his Executive MBA programme
at the UWI Business School in Trinidad.
As a result of Kwame's sessions Jacquelyn
Cheesman, Senior Customer Loyalty
Manager with Trinidad's financial services
powerhouse RBTT has begun integrating
FrIW into her customer loyalty training
programmes.
And last year Roosevelt was recognized
by the Human Resources Management
Association of the Caribbean with their
HR Innovation Award for the develop-
ment of FITW.
Roosevelt and Michael have been invit-
ed to share the concept in Barbados,
Trinidad, Mexico, New Mexico, New
York, Washington DC, Colorado, San
Francisco, Poland, Austria and Denmark.

PART OF AN EMERGING GBA.MEMET: Roosevelt
and Michael see FIW as a part of a glob-
al movement to respond creatively to the
demands for organizations to become sig-
nificantly more productive if they are to
remain competitive and at the same time
support and encourage the holistic devel-
opment of their people. They see their
work as connecting with several new
waves impacting organizational life glob-
ally including the arts and business move-
ment, spirituality in the workplace, posi-
tive psychology and collective wisdom.
Two international Dialogues on FlIW
have been held in The Bahamas attracting
several persons from the Caribbean
Region, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, South
Africa and the USA. A third International
Dialogue is planned for next year.


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