<%BANNER%>
The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03066
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 12/17/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03066

Full Text








PUREBBQ
iGOODNESS iovi' it..

HIGH 77F
LOW 65F

MOSTLY

$ SUNNY


The


Tribune


chance


Former health minister says

he would take top job if

opportunity presents itself


N By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
IF THE opportunity emerges
for him-to be prime minister of the
Bahamas, Dr Bernard Nottage has
declared that he would "grab it like
(he) has grabbed nothing before."
Dr Nottage acknowledged his
desire for the top job if the
_ opportunity presents itself while
on the radio talk show Jones and
Company on Love 97 yesterday.
"I am a team player. I want to
see the country advance. When you.
look at the leadership of political
organizations and leadership of
countries, there has to be more to it
than personal ambition," he said.
"Ultimately, the objective is not
so much that I be leader, but that
the country advance and take
advantage of every opportunity it
has to advance."
Dr Nottage said during the inter-
view that he believes he has a role
to play in this process of national
development, while also taking on
the criticism by some that he may
now be too old to become prime
minister.
"They say I'm old now, and in
many ways I am. And there are
some people who have a problem
with age, and a problem even with
experience," he said.
"But I agree with Godfrey, I
think that the more important
thing is ideas, and an ability to turn
ideas into policy, into action. And
I believe that I have that, too."
Dr Nottage also lamented the
FNM government's abandonment
of the National Health Insurance
(NHI) scheme introduced by his
government while on the show.
The need for the programme still
exists, he explained, as "Bahamians
continue to die because they can't
get access to health care."
The former health minister


rejected the suggestion thai
PLP was slow to implement
while in office, when the quest
was posed to him by the sh
host Wendall Jones.
Dr Nottage explained tha
process of implementation t
time. After the conceptual and
sultative phases of NHI, he ar
that legislation is then requ
followed by regulations and fa
ties.
"My personal timetable was
we would be able to introduce
2008," said Dr Nottage.
Reflecting on the last camp
the PLP MP argued that a p
dential style campaign domino
the process, and "that was a
take." With the economic sue
of the PLP, there was "no nee
concentrate on personalities.
argued.
"Unfortunately, though, in
country that's what it seem
have come down to," he ad
accepting the criticism that his
ty was on the defensive during
campaign. '


LAMMIDAY
PING

- EHe FUAi RTERSn

-Her orIre


* Croff



* Framed Pictures
SIeAir rypers
f ibe /ci/ftwere
SfCeemI/C /fiwe
* dewelrp y ues
* Frireaces
&ed mNed are/


House


* Ps,
* Seeters
* l/cye/ls/T7deieus
*oteW/e 5/ed.s,
* Serblees
* Cart
* Electroeic ys
* ftes
* Arts iCrefts
Ssleeks
SPuintles
SCritbs
SWelIers
" Comptefrs
Setl/ fifurmes
" Stuffed Aimals
" Uhby Clthes
" Car Seete/Cmisers
" Gift gaskets
SDhp Acceesseres
* Plcpe,,
Red much morel


t the
NHI
stion
ow's
t the
akes
con-
gued
ired,
acili-


Sisters of Punch boss

hit back at lawsuit

Affidavit filed accusing their brother
of 'squeezing' terminally ill father


AN EXPLOSIVE affidavit filed
s that by the sisters of Punch publisher
it in Ivan Johnson hits back at a lawsuit
against them, accusing their broth-
aign, er of "squeezing" his terminally ill
iresi- father Basil Johnson before his
iated death to mortgage property to
mis- secure loans for himself.
access These claims are part of a
ed to defence and counterclaim filed in
," he the Supreme Court by Felicity and
Janet Johnson against a suit by
a our Punch Publications, of which it is
is to claimed Ivan is majority share-
Ided, holder.
s par- The suit by Punch Publications
g the seeks to have the company declared
the "proprietary beneficial inter-
est" of the $1.1million property The
Punch is located on in Oakes Field,
or to have the sisters pay the com-
pany the cost of the investment plus
interest. This would amount to
more than $1.7 million.
Both parties acknowledge that
Basil left the property to his four
children, Felicity, Janet, Ivan and
Jill. However, Punch Publications
has made the move to acquire the
property, or seek compensation,
based on the investment it has
made in the location over the years.
While rejecting the claim of
ownership by Punch Publicationg
as "totally imaginary" and "false",
the affidavit claims that Basil issued
a warning to the initial investor in
The Punch, Dr Jonathan Rodgers,
SEE page 12


THE ownership group of
Punch Publications broke up due
to the "selfishness" and "total
megalomania" of publisher Ivan
Johnson, it has been claimed._
This revelation comes from
an affidavit filed in the Supreme
Court by Felicity and Janet John-
son, sisters of Ivan, in an ongoing
dispute over ownership of the
property The Punch sits on in
Oakes Field.
Punch Publications of which
it is claimed Ivan Johnson is
majority owner has sued Janet
and Felicity, seeking control of
the property, or compensation
for the investment made plus
interest, amounting to more than
$1.7 million. However, the land,
which houses Warboys House,
was left to the four children of
the late Basil Johnson Janet,
Felicity, Ivan and Jill.
In the document the sisters
claim that Dr Jonathan Rodgers
was the principal initial financier
of The Punch's start-up opera-
tions, with attorney Samuel E
Campbell and businessman Vin-
SEE page 12


A MALE driver lost his life
in another gruesome traffic
accident over the weekend,
police said, pushing the
nation's traffic fatality count
to a record 50 deaths for the
year.
Shane Rolle, 31, of St Vin-
cent Road, died when he lost
control of his vehicle late Sat-
urday night and skidded into a
utility pole, police said.
The wreckage was so severe
that firemen were called to
free the trapped victim from
the wreck using jaws-of-life
equipment.
Emergency, medical techni-
cians also responded but it
was too late as Rolle was pro-
nounced dead on the scene,
Asst Supt Walter Evans said.
Rolle was reportedly trav-
elling west on St Vincent
Road shortly after 11pm when
he "lost control" of his 2003
Cadillac CTS, hitting a utility
pole on the south side of the
street.
Authorities have not said if
negligent driving or speeding
were factors in the accident.
Last week, three persons
died in two separate traffic
accidents in only 24 hours. On
December 10, a male driver
of a white 1995 Toyota Corol-
la was travelling west on Ade-
laide Road with three passen-
gers when his car crashed into
a concrete wall. The driver
sustained injuries while the
two rear seat passengers died
in hospital.
The night before Omar'
Smith, a 21-year-old defence
force officer, was killed when
his blue 2000 Yamaha 1100
motor-cycle collided with a
white 1996 Nissan Maxima.
Smith and his 19-year-old
female passenger were flung
from the motorcycle. Smith
died at the scene while his
companion was taken to hos-
pital where she was listed in
serious condition.


Four arrests in

connection with

separate armed
robberies
* By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net
FOUR males were arrested over
the weekend in connection with two
separate armed robberies in New
Providence, police revealed.
One suspect, a 15-year-old Bain
Town youth, is in police custody in
relation to the armed robbery of
four young males.
Asst Supt Walter Evans said
shortly after llpm on Friday four
juveniles were accosted by three
men armed with knives while walk-
ing in Thompson Boulevard.
The victims were leaving a func-
tion in the area when the men
robbed them of cash, a cellphone
and watch.
A police patrol passing the area
at the time was alerted. As officers
approached, the three assailants fled
the scene. But police were able to
apprehend a 15-year-old suspect.
Police are seeking the two
remaining suspects.
Authorities also arrested three
males on Saturday night in connec-
tion with the armed robbery of a
taxi-driver.
ASP Evans said the driver was
assisting passengers in Nassau Street
around 8pm Saturday. On returning
SEE page 12

Victims of
the Sea Hauler
tragedy plan

demonstration

VICTIMS of the Sea Hauler
tragedy are planning a pre-Christ-
mas demonstration to embarrass
the government into addressing
their compensation claims.
They claim Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham has reneged on
pre-election promises to take their
claims seriously, declaring they have
now run out of patience and want
to see action.
One of them, Sophia Antonio,
said they were "fed up" with the
FNM government because it was
now adopting the same posture as
the PLP.
"This government made promis-
es to us on national television, but it
now seems Mr Ingraham used us as
part of his re-election strategy.
"We need the Bahamas to know
that we are not going to take it any-
more. We are going to do every-
thing within our power to get this
matter resolved."
SEE page 12


Get MORE than just points this holiday season with your RBC VISA or RBC MasterCard! For every 3 purchases
you make during December your name will be automatically entered to win the value of what you buy!*
Say "NO" to unused miles and blackout dates and say "YES" to RBC Credit Cards and get exceptional value
all the time! 8(i w A ( ,, ;. S 3o,'< tt hiesa. ssi Uest Migwav. D iifr U&aw amrdi Ial~,wt
f ur,(!urr',-e< air er,,r l I'C II z1h re, -..St,"trA iru f'ws i ri lBBC arIiiciart &Ww
11r~prir'i~s' i~<'jh.iiiiihi~it,iie~at(K~iniltnRW


"Special conditions apply. Credit card account must be current and
within specified limit. Maximum reward up to USD$1,500 per
winner + an additional $500.


W li Wltt(Ia


" A.. A.. . .. .. "


WAKE UP!


ANY TIME..ANY PLACE, WE'RE NO.1


BAHAMAS EDITION


: I
I


* POwe rws



* l fes.

F"/ sun
Sedfel Meicse



AbmiAM SWues
-rwetle a e/
tUMI~
t MMItIMae


RBC
COAOaUewi


P







I LOCAL NEWS IA


Beer naming contest


BEFORE the doors even
opened at the Bahamian Brew-
ery and Beverage Co, they
launched one of the largest
"chances to win" by naming the
beers to be brewed locally.
On September 1st, 2006, Jim-
my Sands launched the brewery's
first competition and asked local
residents to find a name for the
beer that he intended to brew in
Grand Bahama.
Sands planned to choose two
lucky winners, who could win
$3,1 i f per name should their
entry be chosen.
Two months later and with
nearly 1.900 entries, giving the
brewery 3,798 names to consid-
er, the most exciting competition


in Grand Bahama finished.
Bahamian Brewery & Beverage
Company announced that they
had chosen SANDS, as the first of
two names from their "Name
those Beers" competition.
Eleven contestants had entered
this winning name, but instead of
$272 each, the brewery increased
the winning prize to $5,500
instead of the advertised $3,000,
and each winner was rewarded
with $500.
Bahamian Brewery and Bev-
erage Company choose the sec-
ond name in 2007, HIGH ROCK.
This time there were only two
winners and they were two very
lucky ladies equally sharing the
$3,000 prize.


MT4LAT

MAoN
Tel: 393-4043


Open tonight
- until 10p.m.,


PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham speaks at the opening
m of the plant at Queen's Highway on Grand Bahama. ,


PM: $ 15m ,brewery




is good shot in the




arm for Freeport


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT The open-
ing of the $15 million Bahami-
an Brewery and Beverage
Company is "a good shot in
the arm" for Freeport, said
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham.
"I understand that the brew-


Of EEBRAT1oN


CEO: Company is '100%

Bahamian owned and staffed'


ery presently employs some
50 Bahamians directly and
that a similar number are indi-
rectly employed as a result of
the brewery's activities. This is
a good shot in the arm for
Freeport for jobs are needed
here in this city," he said on
Thursday.
James Sands, president and
CEO of Bahamian Brewery,
said the brewery is 100 per
cent Bahamian owned and
staffed.
He said that Sands Beer will
be brewed at the plant in
Freeport. He also noted that
there are plans to brew other
beers in the future.
Many attended the opening
held at the plant on Queen's
Highway, including executives
of the Grand Bahama Port*
Authority such as Sir Jack
Hayward, Lady Henrietta St
George and Port Authority
CEO Sir Albert Miller and
president Albert Gray. They
were also taken on a tour of
the 40,000 sq ft brewery.


Mr Ingraham noted that the
concessions available under
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment, together with the first-
rate port and transhipment
facilities available in Freeport,
convinced Mr Sands that
Freeport was the best location
for this investment.
He believes that spin-off
business and employment
opportunities will be created
in Freeport from the new
domestic and foreign invest-
ments that are coming on
stream.
"Earlier today, I had the
opportunity to take part in the
ground-breaking ceremony
for Phase V of the Freeport
Container Transhipment Port.
"I want to use this occasion
to remind Grand Bahamians
of opportunities coming on
line in the economy, opportu-
nities we should prepare our-
selves to take advantage of.
"I believe that spin-off busi-
ness and employment oppor-
tunities for Bahamians, made


possible as a result of large-
scale Bahamian and foreign
investments in our economy,
ought not to be minimised or
missed by us," he said.
The brewery comprises
some 40,000 sq ft and is situ-
ated on 20 acres on Queen's
Highway near the Air and Sea
Business Centre.
The state-of-the-art brew-
ing equipment hails from a
well-respected brewtech from
Hamburg, Germany, which
built the actual brewing appa-
ratus.
Mr Ingraham expects that
there will be training of a
Bahamian brewmaster and
other staff.
"I was pleased to learn that
rfiuch of this project is
Bahamian. The building was
designed by Burton Miller.
And, the contractor for the
job was another Bahamian
enterprise, Frecon.
"I congratulate all involved
in this new venture and look
forward to following your
progress as you move from
strength to strength. Let me
also use this occasion to
extend very best wishes to all
for a very happy Christmas
and a prosperous New Year,"
he said.


-Ford


SS2379%w,0


-, ~ t
v:~ :~' *


The completely redesigned Ford Focus beings you a rested exterior and an all-new interior for 2008 It connects improved
driving dynams with all the test American technology anyone could ask for, Ifs serious fun,


t


-., . . I II- M I . ..I . ...... ...IN : R -111 11 ... ...11?1. . ... . . .. .. .. . . ....1


PAGE 2, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3


LOCALN


Never leave keys in the
ignition or your engine running
no matter how short the dis-
tance or time away from your
vehicle.
Always make sure that
your car doors are locked and
your valuables secured in the
trunk.


Report calls for greater protection




for 'whistle blowers' in Bahamas


* In brief


Family is held

up and robbed

at their home
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A family was
held up and robbed by an
armed intruder in their home
at Eight Mile Rock early Sat-
urday morning.
Asst Supt Loretta Mackey,
press liaison officer, said police
received a call of a burglary
and armed robbery around
2.34am at Bartlette Hill, EMR.
When police arrived at the
scene, the victim told officers
that a man gained entry to her
house through a northern door
and held her family at bay with
a knife. The culprit robbed
them of cash and fled the
scene.
Police are investigating.
ASP Mackey advised resi-
dents to be vigilant during the
Christmas holidays when crime
is more prevalent.
She said residents should
make sure their homes are
securely locked before retiring
to bed.
Businesses, she said, should
follow these
safety tips:
Always have at least two
clerks working at night.
Vary your banking rou-
tine, carrying the cash in differ-
ent ways not making the
deposit bag too obvious.
Vary the times and routes
that you use to go to the bank.
Make deposits as often as
possible.
Watch for suspicious per-
sons outside the business,
especially in the parked cars.
Be alert for "customers"
who seem to be loitering or
glancing around the store
while appearing to shop or
browse through a magazine.
If you see someone who is
acting suspiciously inside or
outside the store, call police
and have them checked out.
Two persons should be on
hand at opening and closing
times.
Be sure to check the
office, back rooms and rest
rooms to make sure no one is
hiding inside.
Keep side and back doors
locked after 5pm and have
employees use the main
entrance where possible.
Practise good cash control
and keep a minimum amount
in cash registers and make reg-
ular drops in the safe.
Don't keep large bills
under the cash drawer. If you
don't have a safe put the cash
in a secure place until you
make your deposit at the bank.
Keep your front door and
windows clear of signs and
posters to allow good two-way
visibility. Employees can see
suspicious persons outside and
passers-by and
the police can see inside.
FIRE SAFETY TIPS
Ensure Christmas tree
lights are not left on during the
night for the entire holiday
season. This can be enticing to
burglars and it is also a fire
hazard.
Do not overload electrical
outlets with Christmas lights
and other electrical cords.
Do not overload exten-
sion cords or run them under
rugs.
Replace any electrical
cord that is cracked or frayed.
Install smoke detector and
ensure that batteries are prop-
erly charged.
Never leave food cooking
unattended for long periods of
time.
Keep cooking areas clear
of combustibles and wear
clothes with short, roll-up or
tight fitting sleeves when you
cook. Turn pot handles inward
on the stove to avoid acciden-
tal spills which can cause seri-
ous
burns.
SAFETY TIPS FOR
MOTORISTS
SPEED KILLS! Remem-
ber to obey the street signs and
speed limit at all times.
DO NOT get behind the
wheel of a vehicle while under
the influence of drugs, alcohol
or medication.


DEFEATED PLP parlia-
mentarian Keod Smith has
reportedly set his sights on his
party's chairmanship and plans
to formally announce his can-
didacy, Tribune sources
revealed yesterday.
Mr Smith has been advised
by high-ranking PLPs not to
submit himself as candidate for
the Mount Moriah constituency
after his massive defeat in the
polls during the last general
election. Instead he has report-
edly been counselled to go after
the party chairmanship.
"He has gotten advice from
officials in the party not to run
against Tommy in Mount Mori-
ah again," a source said.
"The partly wants someone
with more political pull and
financial resources to run in
Mount Moriah. Someone who
has a better chance at beating
(Tommy Tumquest) in the next
election," the source added.
Attempts to contact Mr
Smith for comment were unsuc-
cessful up to press time yester-
day.
In May, 2007, the controver-
sial lawyer lost his seat in the
constituency to the Minister of
National Security and Immi-
gration by a large margin of
1,636 to 2,142 votes respective-
ly.
In 2002, Mr Smith
beat out the former leader of
the FNM by 1,836 to 1,718
votes.
Recently, the party's current
chairman Raynard Rigby for-
mally announced that he would
not seek the position again after
holding the post for five years.
Several PLPs have declared
their interest in the position,
including Glenys Hanna-Mar-
tin, Paulette Zonicle and for-
mer BDM leader Omar
Archer.
Mical MP Alfred Gray and
attorney Fayne Thompson are
reportedly planning to join the
fray as well.


eruption as current provisions
are "inadequate", it has been
claimed.
In a report released last
week, said to be an evalua-
tion of the degree to which
the Bahamas is fulfilling the
provisions of the Inter-
American Convention
Against Corruption, which it
ratified in March, 2000, a
committee of experts out-
lined nine recommendations
as to how the Bahamas could
better satisfy requirements
of the convention in this
regard.
The report said the
Bahamas had "no formal leg-
islative regime in place for
the protection of public ser-
vants and private citizens
who, in good faith, report
acts of corruption.
"Though citizens can
report acts of corruption to
the Corruption Unit within
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, the mechanism in
place is inadequate for pro-
moting the purposes of the
convention," said the com-
mittee.
In light of this, the report
stated that the Bahamas


should "adopt a comprehen-
sive legal and regulatory
framework that provides
protection" for such individ-
uals, "including protection of
their identities, in accordance
with its constitution and the
basic principles of its domes-
tic legal system."
In meeting this recom-
mendation, the report goes
on to detail numerous spe-..,,
cific proposals that the
Bahamas should consider
implementing.
These include expanding
"existing. mechanisms for
reporting (corruption), such
as anonymous reporting or
protection of identity report-
ing, that guarantee the per-
sonal security and the confi-
dentiality" of those provid-
ing the information.
The Bahamas should
implement measures "to pro-
tect not only the physical
integrity of whistleblowers
and their families, but also
to provide protection in the
workplace, especially when
the person is a public official
and the acts of corruption
involve his superior or co-
workers," said the report.


" ,'-* "






* I ." ,









.<
,.




4'' ,




Surpr. W9929-21
^^*iflI 'l1


2008

"1EW YEARS

DECORATIONS
Hats, Noise Makers

in STOCK

Ei n, r'=* n


I PHUNE:r Q322215


Furthermore, in case of
threats being issued against
those who report corrupt
activities, the Bahamas
should ensure that the public
is aware of "the appropriate
authorities to process pro-
tection requests and the bod-
ies responsible for providing
it."
It emphasises that there
should, be a. "simplified
whistleblower protection
application process" and that
provisions should be made
for "administrative and crim-
inal sanctions for the failure
to observe the rules and/or
duties relating to protec-
tion."
The report notes that the
Bahamas has adopted some
measures aimed at criminal-
ising acts of corruption as
provided for in the conven-
tion, but claims that the
country could go further.


SELLER
ON BAHAMAS
GIVE BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
DUPUCH PUBLICATIONS


t-4I


Ilboedon
kAM ka Apptyl


ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS


NEW 1:15 345 WA


6:15 8:30 110:35


I AM LEGEND NEW 1:05 3:40 WA 6:05 8:20 10:55
PERFECT HOLIDAY NEW 1:10 3:35 WA t10 8:35 10:50
THE GOLDEN COMPASS B 1:00 3:25 WA 6o00 8:25 10:45
AWAKE T 1:15 340 WA 6:15 8:40 1I055
THISCHRISTMAS T 1100 3:30 WA 6.00 8:25 10:50
ENCHANTED B 1:05 3:40 WA 6:05 8:30 10:40
HITMAN C 1:20 3:5 WA :0 8:40 10:55
THE MIST T 1:00 3:30 WA 6.00 8:20 10:45
BEOWULF C 1:0 335 WA 6:00 8:25 10:45
BEE MOVIE A 1:10 3:5 WA 6:10 8:30 10:35



JSE YOUR E-CARD TO RESERVE TICKETS 649 GALLEIACINEASCOM
ALVINANDTHECHIPMUNKS NEW 1:00 3:30 N/A 6.00 8:25 10:30
IAM LEGEND NEW 1:30 3:50 NWA 6:20 8:30 10:40
PERFECT HOLIDAY NEW 1:10 3:40 WA 6:10 8:40 10:45
AWAKE T A NIA NIA WNA WA 10:35
THISCHRISMAS T 1,00 3:35 WA 6:00 8:25 10:45
ENCHANTED B 1:20 3:45 WA 6:05 8:30 N/A
HIT MAN C 1:10 34 0 A 6151 83 10:35


Workers Party wants Deputy PM

and Fred Mitchell to 'exercise

restraint in their war of words'
* By TANEKA THOMPSON ,,
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunenmedia.net
THE Workers Party is appeal-
ing to Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and former Min-
ister of Forcign Affairs Fred
Mitchell to "exercise restraint in
their war of words" regarding the
Bahamas' embassy in Beijing, Chi-
na.
In a press release sent to The
Tribune yesterday. Rodney Mon-
cur, party leader, said both min-
isters "have caused irreparable.
damage" to the reputation of
Philip Miller, charge d' affairs at
the embassy.
Mr Moncur labelled Minister
Symonette's comments during his
verbal skirmish with Fred Mitchell
last week as "irresponsible" and
"deliberate".
"Mr S ymnonette should know or should have been briefed that
the tenor in which hlie sought to introduce the current subject mat-
ters on the Embassv in China during parliamentary debate can
only adversely affect the reputation of the nation as a whole in the
diplomatic corridor of the world.
"Furthali. Mr Svmonette would have known that his comments
would cause Mi Miller to suffer injury in his current position and
thus impact adversely the conduct of the affairs of our country in
China," Mr Moncur argued.
Due to the rate of information exchange in the digital age. Mr
Moncur contended that every diplomat in China would have been
aware that the government was "probing costs related to setting up
the embassy and housing its chief diplomatic officer.
"We know for a fact that the housing for the charge is situated
in a diplomatic compound in Beijing where more than 24 other
ambassadors and diplomats reside. The Bahamas' accoutrements
and conditions are very much on par with those of the other resi-
dences and the same applies to the embassy."
The Workers Party also lambasted Mr Mitchell for
"pressuring Mr Symonette to do what (he) could not get done in five
years.
"HLere is a man who had five unbroken years as Minister of
Foreign Affairs in the Christie administration and in that time-
frame he could not, nor did he, allow the embassy in China to
establish a consular section where visas could be issued out of The
Bahamas embassy," the party said.


I


~1


I


I


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas should put
in place greater measures to
protect individuals who
"blow the whistle" on cor-
--. -iirt-, ------ -.
.-









PAGE 4, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


EDITORI 6 LETTE TO THE EDITOR'


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1- (242) -352-6608


Bahamas' need to cut global warming


THE SHOCKING United Nations report
that the Bahamas' per capital carbon diox-
ide emissions exceed that of industrialized
countries should make Bahamians not only
sit up and take note, but take action. By con-
tributing to the warming of the climate,
Bahamians are also hastening their own
extinction.
If the price of petrol continues to sky-
rocket circumstances might force many of us
to cut back on the use of our vehicles, which
produces much of these noxious fumes. Not
only would the cutback in the use of our vehi-
cles give us a healthier pocket book, but it
would also produce a healthier environment
and personal lifestyle.
And, of course, it would assist in the
world's main objective slowing down the
overheating of our planet, and possibly save,
many if not, in the case of the Bahamas -
all of our islands from eventual extinction.
Such a cutback would also relieve the Cen-
tral Bank of its present concern that increas-
ing global oil prices, "combined with the signs
of softness in the US economy" could
adversely affect the bank's prediction that
"the economy is expected to continue on a
path of stable growth during 2007, under-'
pinned by tourism-related investments, along-
side healthy private sector demand."
Although we are about to close the chap-
ter on 2007, the future for 2008 is clouded by
the same concerns.
If the Central Bank has to release more
funds for the purchase of fuel, our foreign
reserves will be seriously affected. As the
Nassau Institute pointed out last month:
"The more money we spend to import fuel,
the less we have available domestically for
consumer and commercial loans. And a con-
.traction of credit acts as a brake on the econ-
omy."
Bahamians now have to give serious
thought to how to leave their cars at home to
be used only for special occasions.
If New Providence had a well regulated;,
dependable, clean and safe bus service many
business persons could bus to a central loca-
tion downtown and walk to their offices.
Although there has been a lot of talk about
such a service, bus owners don't seem to have
the foresight to understand the benefits of
uniting in business.
They would probably make more money if
such a cooperative enterprise were properly
managed.
There is also the age-old suggestion of car
pooling for parents who drive their children


Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978


SAFE

COOL

*DOUBLE
ACTION
DEADBOLT
LOCK


BRONZE


ALSO FOR
WINDOWS


DON STAINTON
(PROTECTION) LTD.
HILLSIDE PLAZA THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219


to and from school. This could translate into
one car, instead of three taking several chil-
dren from different families to school.
However, judging from the clogging of the
roads in the early morning and when schools
come out in the afternoon, it would seem
that all of the 119,404 vehicles registered with
road traffic are on the streets.- most of them
headed in the direction of the schools. It's a
mystery how any work gets done in this
country, as it appears that the labour force is
constantly on the road, behind the wheel of a
vehicle.
A few weeks ago Associated Press report-
ed that although "America's obesity epidemic
and global warming might not have much in
common, public health experts suggest that
people can attack them both by cutting calo-
ries and carbon dioxide at the same time."
How can this be done? "Get out of your
car and walk or bike half an hour a day
instead of driving. And while you're at it. eat
less red meat.
That's how Americans can simultaneously
save the planet and their health, say doctors
and climate scientists," AP reports.
It is estimated that if all Americans
between 10 and 74 walked just half an hour a
day instead of driving, they would
cut the annual US emissions of carbon diox-
ide, the chief greenhouse gas, by 64 million
',ons.
Can anyone imagine what a contribution
the Bahamas could also make?
Another bonus would be that it would
relieve our town centre of exhaust fumes that
cover the store fronts of what was once pic-
turesque Bay Street with grimy soot.
Government also has to have a serious
study made of how those yellow sulfur fumes
curling skyward from the chimneys of BEC
can bd reduced, or eliminated. They are good
for no one's health and are possibly this coun-
try's greatest contribution to global warm-
ing.
Much of that often-quoted Checchi report,
written almost 40 years ago, still has much in
it that touches on today's problems.
"In the long-term," said Checchi on the
number and size of cars being
imported, "large autos must be seen increas-
ingly as incompatible objects in the Bahamas.
The scale of the island is small power and
high speed are inappropriate and unneces-
sary. Clear, unpolluted air is an asset... the
Bahamas should seriously consider the adop-
tion of new concepts in personal transporta-
tion."


I o,~


-I


BTVI has potential




but admission




staff frustrated us


EDITOR, The Tribune.
SOMETIMES when the
press gets a story, the writer of
the story may run the story in
the absence of all of the facts.
But if the facts are available it
would completely change the
complexion of the story.
I am relieved that finally
something is being done to
eliminate the mediocrity at
BTVI. 1 am comforted that
someone finally has the guts to
rid a potentially good institu-
tion of the "festering sore"
that could possibly contami-
nate the whole institution.
I know for sure that the
members of the staff who are
accustomed to slackness
would have their say but man-
agement should have their
way, positively, if civility is to
be experienced.
I am a student who did not
choose BTVI as my first
option. I could have pursued
a course of study at College
of the Bahamas but decided
to go the vocational route. I
investigated and discovered
that BTVI had a good pro-
gramme. I will not say what
course I am taking for obvi-
ous reasons.
I experienced, first hand,
being tortured by the admis-
sion staff while attempting to
register and get information.
Nothing could prepare me for
the lack of professional ser-
vice expected from people in
that capacity.
I made many trips to bring
the same documents that I
already had, but would not be
accepted because the staff was
either not interested or not
knowledgeable. It is clear that
maybe an attempt to sabotage
was in the works.
I witnessed students becom-
ing so frustrated that many
expressed no desire to return.
This is unacceptable to say the
least. Some admissions staff's
attitude was deplorable.
Potential students verbally
expressed their displeasure.
Students were made to go
to other departments to get
information that they did not
need for their particular cours-
es. Some of the staff was rude,
insulting, cold and calculating
in their performance or lack
thereof. From observation,
other negative staff on cam-
pus seems to be deliberately
sowing seeds of discord. The
old adage, "Birds of a feather
flock together" was prevalent.
Again it is high time some
semblance of order be put in


$650.00


18 Cube
$720.00


21 Cube
$962.00


place. I am told that staff that
have not "hit a lick" for years
is still being paid, these same
staff do not even grace the
campus with their presence,
except only to stir up trouble.
It is claimed that the staff who
are not doing their work dur-
ing normal working hours,
have been seen working over-
time. If this is true then it is
my opinion that the treasury is
being "robbed" in broad day-
light.
This too must be addressed
if this institution is to
progress. I
The powers that be must


move with haste to remove
these various stumbling blocks
that prevent forward motion,
otherwise all will be to naught.
In spite of all that I have
said, BTVI is an institution
that is on the move. I am sat-
isfied that when I have a prob-
lem, I am able to access my
Heads of Department who
immediately address my con-
cerns. So on a positive note,
this institution; with "all hands
on deck" working toward a
positive goal, will be successful
in providing for Bahamians
who prefer to be a part of a
country that is moving on up.

A STUDENT WHO
WILL NOT BE DENIED
Nassau,
December 2, 2007.


Loss of path a disservice to


Freeport Resort and area
EDITOR, The Tribune.
WE HAVE been coming to Freeport between one and three
times per year for 29 years. Our early years were at Riviera Tow-
ers and then to a number of rentals before we started coming to
Freeport Resort & Club. This year my husband and I came alone
- for the first time. Usually we have assorted friends or family, one
to four of our children and now that we only have one still at
home, their spouses and our grandchildren. In other words, I think
I can say we have been good friends of Grand Bahama Island.
We've been to Bimini and to Nassau and we always come back
here.
I think it is criminal that one of our major arteries on the island
was allowed to be closed. But that is another story. We always rent
a car no one can say we don't do our bit for the economy and
it is now impossible really to go anywhere without one. The closure
of our pathway has made it impossible for me or our family to get
to the Bazaar or what is left of it, to church or anywhere without a
car. That means that either my very unhappy husband must give up
going golfing (his daily occupation) or we sit around and work on
our sunburns. The loss of the path is a terrible disservice to not only
Freeport Resort but the other residents and condo owners/time-
share owners, etc in this area.
And the beach we drove to Xanadu the other day for brunch
and even if the area of the beach wasn't open here, it is an eyesore.
The persons who own in the interior still want to go and play in and
around the ocean. Its loss seems to be a way to drive us away or oth-
erwise injure the economy. It certainly does not encourage new vis-
itors or purchasers.
The island is cleaner and brighter than I can remember, with the
infinitely sad exception of the Bazaar. Please help us return our bit
of brightness to its former attractiveness. We own five weeks of time
share which we never have "banked" or "exchanged" in the past.
If the path isn't opened and the golf privileges restored, that is the
way we will go though. The Ruby and the Emerald were the big sell-
ers for my husband when we bought our units. Now that we don't
have those privileges, he is agitating to go elsewhere.
Our letter is late because I was able to squeeze some time from
work in October and we went to Mexico for a while to stay with
family and didn't open but urgent mail when we returned. We
are here now and are reminded of what we have lost here.
MARY HANNATTY PAYNE
Nassau,
November 30, 2007.






PRE-0WNED

CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!

NOW IN

STOCK
'99 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA
'03 SUZUKI BALENO
'04 SUZUKI IGNIS
'95 TOYOTA AVALON
'98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
'00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
'00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
'01 HYUNDAI COUPE f
'04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
Very low mileage, very clean
'06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Very clean
'06 HYUNDAI TUSCON GLS


QUALITY'' 0
# 1 AUTO DEALER IN T BM1 AMAS.
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 325-3079
S., I .' ., A.rc., o S l. ei.Aoio .le I(Fiop. 'IO lomlo r. dl a .dl s Q, rl" an.' 6'.'
or Aboco Motor Motll Don MocKay Blvd, 367-2916


Usedlowhours.
4148eCube.

C all 24441/37-43


CANNOT .
APPLI -IANESBYFIGDAR
EVEN IN othfah IT.c C.


----I







TI-I RR N ODY EEBR1,20,PG


d U it d St t h ld a Joint Dru Task Force Meeting on r-


Bases for Family


Islands to combat


drug trafficking


* By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information
Services
PLANS for the establish-
ment of Forward Operating
Bases (FOBs) in Inagua,
Grand Bahama and the Exu-
ma chains are ongoing, as the
country moves ahead in the
fight against drug trafficking
and immigration smuggling.
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Brent Symonette announced
this at the Bahamas/United
States Joint Drug Task Force
Meeting on Friday at the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs.
"The government of The
Bahamas remains fully con-
mitted to the total elimination
of the illicit drug trade, which
has had such a negative
impact on our society, and we
continue to show this in a tan-
gible way," Mr Symonette told
the meeting attended by offi-
cials from the Urnited States
government, Turks and Caicos
Islands and The Bahamas.
Such meetings have been
held for the past 20 years, a
collaborative mission to meet
and review the success of the
joint anti-drug efforts, identi-
fy challenges and agree on
strategies moving forward in
the fight.
Among those attending
were United States Ambas-
sador to The Bahamas Ned
Siegel; Commissioner of
Police Edward Hall of the
Royal Turks and Caicos
Police Force; Alonzo Mal-
colm, Deputy Director of
Immigration of the Turks and
Caicos Islands and Elma
Campbell, Minister of State
for Immigration, Bahamas.
"These meetings speak well
to the mutual respect, trust
and dedication to purpose that
exist between us, both at the
operational and policy levels.
They also give clear indication
of our understanding that no
one country can counter such
a grave threat to national
security and stability on it
own," Mr Symonette said.
He added: "Sadly, however,
the mere fact that we have had
to continue to meet and to
strategise for the past 20 years
starkly brings home the fact
that the enemy against whom


we fight has not given up its
efforts to find ways of flooding
our cities and communities
with their poison."
Reports from the Inter-
American Drug Abuse Con-
trol Commission (CICAD)
indicate that production of
cocaine, marijuana and syn-
thetic drugs continues unabat-
ed.
"We therefore cannot, in
any way, lose our resolve nor
reduce our efforts to combat
illicit drug trafficking," Mr
Symonette said.
He then pointed out that
The Bahamas Government
remains committed to the
drug fight, as it has increased
budget funding to all law
enforcement agencies, partic-
ularly the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.
In August two small craft
were purchased, which are
attached to the Nassau Har-
bour Unit. Six additional ves-
sels are in various stages of
construction and are expect-
ed to be completed and fully
integrated into the fleet by
next year.


Mr Symonette thanked the
US government for pledging
four go-fast vessels, under the
Enduring Friendship Pro-
gramme. These vessels are to
arrive shortly and are expect-
ed to "greatly enhance" the
operational capability of the
RBDF.
He also noted that the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force and
other law enforcement agen-
cies of the respective countries
continue to provide "yeoman
service" as they seek ways to
combat illegal drug traffick-
ing and associated ills.
Another aspect that is also
of most concern is the illicit
traffic in arms. Mr Symonette
said. This matter ,.as taken
up in a CARICOM-United
States Seminar on Combating
Illicit Trafficking in Arms,
held in Nassau last week.
"Collaboration, inclusive of
sharing of intelligence and the
rapid development of assets
as required, has been the for-
mula for much of the success
that we have enjoyed. This co-
operation must continue," Mr
Symonette said.


I rHL DmnIIVlrO allU UIleACU UL LSO IInU e U I I I.II IU i Y d FI LX ivIvaLiey I11 i I Ig J] *L LIIU i.iII.jLI U I ,
eign Affairs, Goodman's Bay Corporate Centre. Pictured are representatives from The Bahamas, the
United States and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

I A, 4II


mU ww

2008 EDITION

BAHAMAS1

HANDBOOK


ALL THE BAHAMAS
IN ONE BOOK

656 pages
formative articles, full-colour
L illustrations and maps


~.* EXCITING FEATURES
HISTORY
* FAMILY ISLANDS
BUSINESS

FREEPORT/LUCAYA
GOVERNMENT
INFORMATIVE
BLUE PAGES

LOOK FOR YOUR NAME 39
People mentioned K 9 5
from all walks of life

AN ETIENNE DUPUCH JR PUBLICATION
Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications, PO Box N-7513, Nassau, The Bahamas (242) 323-5665


sosea SteP h
Rosetta St. Ph: 325-3336


BED BATH & HOME



.r-




4 ,, ..








GIFT & BRIDAL REGISTRY
Harbour Bay Shopping Centre -
,f/ Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448 .


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE












.S. SALUTING SYLVESTER


HAVING A BLAST: The Royal Bahamas Police Force Band honoured Sylvester George Chief Superintendant of Police Director of the Band from 1991-
2008 as he retired from the band.


Police Force
band honours
Chief Supt.
of Police,
Director
of Music
The Royal Bahamas Police
Force Band honoured retir-
ing Sylvester George, Chief
Superintendent of Police,
Director of Music, during the
annual Christmas Beat
Retreat.
The event, under the direc-
tion of Inspector Andrew
Hunter, took place yesterday
afternoon at Rawson Square.
The programme featured a
Christmas fanfare and a selec-
tion of festive favourites,
including While Shepherds
Watched Their Flocks, Hark
The Herald Angels Sing,
Angels We Have Heard on
High, Go Tell It To The
Mountain, Rocking Round
The Christmas Tree, Jingle
Bells and Valeries, Once in
Royal David's City, Candy
Man Song and Silver Bells.
There was also a rendition of
Abide with me.


Congrats to Cally Gibson!


Have your own carpet but need someone to install it?
Look no further. Hire a Professional Technician, who has
over fifteen years experience and specializes in staircases.
Heavenly Carpeting
Paul Bethel
President
Tel:.436-25U .
For this thing the Lord thy God shall bless thee in all thy works, and in all that
thou puttest thine hand unto "Deut. 15:10"


SHOWING RASS: The beat retreat
provided some festive cheer in Nas-
sau.

PHOTOS:
Felipe
Major/
Tribune Staff


The winning name is

ChOcocarIalicious!





Ii' I i
St arnean Il Rd

Str angr "W the


Fine Spanish and Italian

Footwear for Men!


JT7 gR. Sweeting's





FOR MEN
Marathon Mall 393-6113


PAGE 6, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE





THE TIBUNEMONDY, DEEMBER17,C007,NAGES


/' '-w- .
e:


rI~
iN
ii
I. * S g.** g*g. ** 66 .6


GEORGE


NOTABLE PERFORMANCE: A musician shows some cheek during the
annual Christmas Beat Retreat.


G S


SOUND OF CHRISTMAS: Festive
fun comes to Rawson Square.
6*1OF11WF


WE'VE MADE IT EASY FOR YOU
TO



GE TA


WITH NEW LOW PRICES AND
ZERO DOWN FINANCING*


NoW
Mac 0


1ith


0
DOW
FIAN IG


w
CoC


windows 4
mpatible4
11"


m S
Tel22.96.10IladTadrs.uldBingAUTHORIZE 9. .D DE A E R
^^^B~s^^^^^^^^ B~fi^Ea^ r^pu^^blicsericeemloyes. allfordtails. IB


I*1 '


Starting at:
$849


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


VALUABLE
GIFT
FOR 4t
EVERYONE
FOR CHILD,
HUSBAND, WIFE
BOSS, SECRETARY
^W BUSINESS
ASSOCIATES
ALL
NEW!
2008
EDITION

$39.95
BAHAMAS
HANDBOOK
AVAILABLE AT BOOKSTORES
& NEWSSTANDS EVERYWHERE
DUPUCH PUBLICATIONS





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


LOANW


SPFI1TAGE


2008 MODELS NOW IN STOCK


: "" ORS
. I' J '.


Courtesy call paid on Prime- Minister
ABOVE: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham (right) greets Archbishop Patrick Pinder during a courtesy call at
the Cabinet Office on Friday, December 14, 2007.
BELOW: Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham (centre) and Father Kendrick Forbes pose during the courtesy call.
irk, _


. .- I '"- ...l
"Christmas" "Wrap It Up" "Sale"
"$1,000 Dollars Cash Back or $2,000
Extra Discount All 2008's Models"


SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED
Thompson Blvd. Oaks Field
Phone 242-326-6377
fax: 242-326-6315


ON THE SPOT FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH
COMMONWEALTH BANK
INSURANCE AVAILABLE WITH ADVANTAGE
INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS TD.


ANGELA CLEAR
Presents


"HISTORY OF ToURISM

IN THE BAHAMAS

.*A Global Perspective


The most
complete
documentation
of Bahamian
Tourism ever
written.


"History ofTouiisrn A Global Perspective"
traces the history cf Tourism from the arrival
of the first visitor in 1492 up to the beginning
of the 21st century Presented against tdie
background of world tourism and regional
trends. it highlights the marketing and product
initiatives ot outstanding visionaries who have
led the industry since the establishment of the
Bahamas Development Board and the Ministry
of Tourism. It also discusses the outlook
and challenges faring the region in the next
decade as well a the socio-economic impact
of tourism on the local community.

Its simply a must read
for all Bahamians.
Get your copy today!


~i s~


Bassett


.. .... .... .... . ..,,,,





Drawing Saturday,
December 22nd
Live Remote By More FM
9am Ipm
,, '.4 ,.



th, Terrace Centreville
Tel: 322-8862/3* E-mail: info@robertsfurnitureco.com





-~----












Bahamas' declining



tourism product


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

DECLINING tourist
numbers indicate that
the Bahamas' tourism product
is mediocre and significantly
falling behind.
Gone are the days when pro-
motional packages featuring the
sun, sand and the sea would
attract visitors in droves and sus-
tain the high standard of living
that Bahamians have become
accustomed to.
With implementation of the
Western Hemisphere Travel Ini-
tiative, in January, which
requires all Americans return-
ing to the US to present a pass-
port, the Bahamas no longer has
an advantage over other coun-
tries where Americans have long
had to travel with passports.
These days, every rock -
from Mexico to Tahiti can
boast of sun, sand and sea, but
they also recognize that the sus-
tainability and profitability of
their tourism industry can only
continue if they provide quality
service, reasonable prices and a
wide variety of tourist-related
activities.
Of late, local tour operators
and visitors have complained
about the lack of meaningful
activities, other than the beach
or the casinos, that's available
to tourists.
The government, and
Bahamians at large, must recog-
nise that tourism is a multi-
dimensional phenomenon that
calls for much more than a hand-
ful of sand, a tan and a dip in
the sea.
Why hasn't more attention
been given to developing the
heritage tourism sector, high-
lighting the country's historic
and cultural attractions? Why
hasn't greater appreciation been
given to Bahamian music, dance,
art and craft?
Although 80 per cent of visi-
tors to the Bahamas come from
the US, a Ministry of Tourism
official claimed that of all the
countries that a major UK tour
operator (First Cloice) sends
visitors, the Bahamas consis-
tently ranks near the bottom for
(European) visitor satisfaction.
This is cause for concern as it
shows that guests aren't satisfied
with their experiences after hav-
ing paid steep vacation prices.
In recent months, Caribbean
Travel and Life magazine polled
its readers to select their
favourite Caribbean cruise ports
and discovered that only eight
per cent named the Bahamas as
their favourite port of call.
In recent times, Royal
Caribbean Cruise Lines decid-
ed to redeploy three of its vessels
to other destinations because the
newer ships (which replaced the
previous vessels) were unable to
navigate into Nassau's harbour
or any other Bahamian harbour.
Royal Caribbean's decision
will lead to a loss of some
166,765 cruise visitors per annum
and about $9.338 million in visi-


L OUNG MANISVIE


tor spending.
Total tourist arrivals to the
Bahamas slumped by alarming
double-digit numbers this year,
statistically revealing that this
nation's competitive advantage
in its key industry was being
rapidly eroded. The Bahamas
suffered one of the Caribbean's
highest percentage declines in
stopover tourist arrivals during
the first quarter of this year!
Adding to the gloomy out-
look currently facing the coun-
try's leading industry are reports
that the Bahamas has even
dropped off the list of this year's
list of the top 15 countries where
Americans would choose to
vacation "if money were no
object."
Although tourism is the back-
bone of our economy and
accounts for 90 per cent of our
nation's revenue, downtown
Nassau and Prince George
Wharf are squalid sites, in need
of urgent transformation. The
amount of garbage strewn about
and the unkempt, grubby side-
walks and storefronts make
downtown Bay Street a loath-
some monstrosity that can hard-
ly qualify as a tourist attraction.
The internationally promot-
ed straw market/flea market is
also weakening our tourism
product, as it has become noth-
ing more than a filthy, con-
demned structure where illegal
aliens profit and counterfeit mer-
chandise is sold unabatedly.
Even more, our declining
tourist product is further com-
pounded by the deteriorating
pigsty that currently serves as
our country's primary entrance
point and which must be the
worst international airport in this
hemisphere the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport! Not
only should this shabby, third-
rate facility be torn down, but
staff should also be efficiently
trained or promptly dismissed.
To improve the tourist prod-
uct, services must be improved at
restaurants, the mandatory 15
per cent gratuity must be
dropped (so that workers can
earn it), sales persons in tourist
areas must be trained to give
quality service and public
restrooms must be consistently
cleaned. While in Europe this
summer, the restrooms were not
only cleaned and properly ser-
viced, but I was also required to
pay 50 euro cents as a main-
tenance fee for usage. Maybe
we should adopt similar policies!
High prices, poor attitudes
and dreadful service, a lack of
attractions, an ineffective judi-
cial system, the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative (WHTI)
and the upsurge in violent crime,
among other factors, have all put
a damper on the Bahamas' num-
ber one industry.
The Ministry of Tourism
should also commit more funds
to its marketing campaign, par-


I loved you and lost you, your
memories will forever last.

From your loving daughters,
Barbara, Betty and Marjorie
(deceased); sons, Ellison &
Raphael; grandchildren. Tern'.
Theresa, Sean, Bill & Janice

Dean and Beth and Celeste, Ashley
andAstrid and great grands.
t' ,.' ... .


ticularly since the Bahamas is
now competing with destinations
such as Cancun, which is bene-
fiting from a $30 million mar-
keting blitz.
Without Atlantis, what would
our economy really look like?
Visitors want more value for
their dollars, so we must imme-
diately upgrade our tourism
product or face a further decline
in tourist arrivals and a possible
economic recession. The present
government should also seek to
diversify the economy, encour-
aging agricultural production,
manufacturing and services,
research and development pro-
jects and so on.

THE NATIONAL
ADVISORY COUNCIL
ON CRIME IS A
WASTE OF TIME!

T he newly-formed
National Advisory
Council On Crime is a stalling
tactic for a lack of answers and a
colossal waste of time and
resources. As violent crime con-
tinues to spiral out of control,
yet another committee is formed
to produce another elaborate
report of our country's woes,
repeating what average Bahami-
ans already know.
This year, a United Nations
report revealed that the rate of
murders, rapes and violent
assaults in the Bahamas ranged
from twice to 160 times the
world average. Isn't that enough
for National Security Minister
Tommy Turnquest to realise that
our nation is facing a crime cri-
sis? With the murder count
about to eclipse 80, how much
more does this seemingly hap-
less minister need to see before
realising that the nation is "sail-
ing up dire straits"?


The 2007

Mercedes-Benz.

C-Class is a 4-do or,


Mercedes-Benz




Model

YearmEnd

Sale


5-pdssnger luxury

sedan filled with elegance.The powerful

C-Class S a prestigious high performance

vehicle that's stylish, comfortable and

remarkably safe.

Eaclu,~ a akithorzed DivaJpr In The BRhamhns f~or Mercdes-BArz


TYREFLEX STAR MOTORS


Tel: 325-4961


* Fax: 323-4W67 Walf" Road


h


rour car.



our trust.


Our responsibility

Brake Service Suspension & Alignment Exhaust
Oil, Lude & Filter "GOODYEAR TYRES"


*American & Imported Cars Light Trucks Vans & SUV's
* Complete Inspection & Estimates Before we start the work


2 LOCATIONS TO SERVICE YOU

MACKEY ST. & ROOSEVELT AVENUE EAST ST. & SOLDIER RD
Tel: 393-6651 or 393-6693 Tel: 356-2940 or 356-2941


BOpen: Monday Saturday





~Fax 326-4865 P. O. Box SS-6766 Nassau, Bahamas
AUTO SYSTEM EXPERTS


4" Midas is a business based on service, quality and reliability.
Factory scheduled maintenance Is car card.
Midas services your car fully. Our system takes the guesswork
out of auto care for every car model out there.


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 9






PAGE 10. V1 MONDIA 1l 1 ; :'OO


THE TRIBUNE


Soutl




joint v

M By SIR RONALD SANl'f-ns

l Ih t ,, I C ' 'I .'' '
/.)tt '. ', u i


between lI (I : il'i ni n
nity M Ll l (.'0 l1111110 l 1 ,1 '^
(CARKiM) Nil lit' \O NO'Ow Ii
tion of Southeaslu it \ i NIlnhn
(ASEAN) vw s laisdIil IC.'L'III ll \
the IndonLI1K, !:I Anl; Guyana andli Sliiiil;III': Sil'II III


.11 ii


.1


aires: A not impossible dream


II I I i 1 I
i \ ii 0 li

, 1 i ll i, I IIWO'
, ,, : I Ih ii i Ii L l'l
L, I I I Cllt S
.. ) I w ,tt c


itI i, i1 t ill l l\ 1 II[i ] ';l l
1 \ l t I ) M ll L
IIn n t o l ii U' -


ll\ I I ill 11 (,III I 11I2 i I ISl i-


WORLD VIEW


lion, or more than half, of the
entire CARICOM population.
Haiti is also their poorest mem-
ber with a per capital income of
$480. And, the Bahamas the
richest member of their Commu-
nity, in terms of per capital


/ k


i .. -o

DUIN


NASSA GLAS COMANY'

ART GALLERY-


income estimated at $14,800- is
not a member of their common
market.
By contrast, the 10 members
of ASEAN have a population of
about 500 million, a combined
gross domestic product of almost
$700 billion, and a total trade of
about $850 billion.
For sure, ASEAN has poor
members as well, the poorest
being Cambodia with a per capi-
ta income of $480, and Lao Peo-
ples Democratic Republic with
$500. But at the top end of the
scale, Brunei Darussalam and
Singapore are rated highly. Sin-
gapore's per capital income is
$30,000 and Brunei Darussalam
is known to be higher.
The geographical distance
between the two regions and the
bare income figures appear to be
an argument against a trade and
investment relationship, but nei-
ther are insurmountable difficul-
ties.
There is good reason in the
global international economy for
regions in the South to cooperate
with each other in negotiations
with the regions of the North,
such as the EU and North Amer-
ica, in setting trade and invest-
ment rules.
Until recently, the rule making
in the World Trade Organization
has been dominated by the EU,
the US, and Japan. In the last
five years some large developing
nations have been allowed into
the discourse because of their
huge populations and consequent
increasing economic clout as sub-
stantial markets.
These countries China,
India, Brazil and South Africa -
while they share some of the
trade and investment concerns
of other developing countries,
and it is vitally important to work
closely with them, also have their
own agenda, one that often over-
looks the peculiar economic con-


* SIR Ronald Sanders


cerns of smaller states.
Apart from trade and invest-
ment, an ASEAN-CARICOM
joint Commission could include
in its work, issues that are cur-
rent and pressing in global affairs.
Immediately, such a Commission
could consider: Fighting
HIV/Aids, tourism, countering
terrorism and drug trafficking,
and environmental challenges
such as sustainable harvesting of
forests.
The sharing of knowledge and
experience, followed by practi-
cal cooperation and training in
these issue-areas, including
agreed programmes of joint
action in international fora, could
be of enormous benefit to both
regions.
If such cooperation resulted
in the two developing-country
regions proposing plans of action
to the global community rather
than simply being pushed to
implement initiatives by devel-
oped-country agencies, such as
the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development,
progress would be made.
With regard to trade, the
expansion of the Panama Canal
could prove to be a boost to trade
between the two regions which
could use each other as centres
for entering nearby markets.
As an example, companies
from ASEAN countries could
utilize CARICOM countries as
a base for establishing compa-


nies that could access markets in
the US and Canada.
Countries such as Jamaica,
which is already serving as a
regional hub for shipping, could
also become a hub for moving
ASEAN products into countries
in Latin America.
For their part, Caribbean
manufacturers and agro-indus-
trial producers could invest in
facilities in ASEAN countries to
penetrate markets in India, Chi-
na and Japan.
The possibilities for joint ven-
ture companies in both regions
by enterprising business people
are considerable and it could
include industrialisation in fish-
eries and agriculture to help take
Caribbean fishermen and farmers
to a new level of production.
Thailand, one of the ASEAN
countries, has enormous experi-
ence in aqua-culture, fish and
shrimp farming from which the
Caribbean could benefit and
which could open opportunities
for private business people.
In the exploitation of forestry
resources, ASEAN countries
Indonesia and Malaysia are
already playing a role albeit in
the private sector and with che-
quered results in Guyana and
Suriname, two CARICOM coun-
tries.
Part of the role of an
ASEAN-CARICOM joint Com-
mission could be to establish
rules of engagement and best
practices not only to govern the
operations of private companies,
but also to develop joint strate-
gies for sustainable management
of forests that they could adopt
themselves and advance together
in the international community,
The ASEAN and CARICOM
regions may be geographically
distant, but modern transporta-
tion and communication have
shrunk the distances, and they
have the opportunity now to
cooperate with each other direct-
ly in "trade, investment and tech-
nical and scientific information
that would help to improve -the
place of their countries in the
global economy.
It's not an impossible dream,
Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com


, ,.


Chris


TEL riti!.


TELDi


'ore Hours
'" 5.00 pm

ii )I00 pm
((II ,tim-,2 00 pill


:-394-4111


East Asia and the Caribbean


--


\ I


1.51







THE TIBUNEMONDA, DEEMBER17, 207, PGE 1


Geriatric hospital, SRC to receive upgrades


* By Matt Maura
Bahamas Information
Services

EXPANSION and renova-
tion of the Geriatric Hospital
and completion of a new
Child and Adolescent Com-
plex at Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre will go a long way
in the government's quest to
meet challenges facing the
facility, according to Minister
of Health and Social Devel-
opment Dr Hubert Minnis.
The renovations to the Geri-
atric Hospital, Dr Minnis said,
will result in the expansion of
the west and north wings and
the facilitation of new bath-
room facilities, patient lockers
and storage areas.
It will further result in cen-
tral air-conditioning for the
wards, a new visitors' area and
a staff lounge, complete with
bathrooms.
"Needless to say, this will go
a long way in our continued
quest to provide an uplifting
environment for both staff and
clients alike," Dr Minnis said.
The minister said the mea-
sures are part of the ministry's
overall plan to upgrade the
physical plant at SRC, which
he said continues to be
"stretched to its limit in an
attempt to accommodate our
patient load."
"Of concern is the increased
number of juvenile referrals
from the judicial system," Dr
Minnis said.
"The Child and Adolescent
Unit has the capacity to house
24 persons, but at times has
been made to house up to 40
persons.
"This situation magnifies the
need for the completion and
occupation of the new Child
and Adolescent Complex as it
is only through the expansion
of our facility and the acquisi-
tion of the requisite staff, that
we will be able to meet the
challenges posed by this sector
of our population.
"In light of this and other
challenges that the govern-
ment is aware of, it is our
intent to look at what needs
to be done to redevelop the
Sandilands Rehabilitation
Centre as well as the services


we offer to the Bahamian peo-
ple," hle added. Dr Minnis said
healthcare officials are con-
stantly faced with the chal-
lenges associated with the pro-
vision of optimal healthcare.
iHe said some of these
include the provision of basic
services as well as evaluations
of acutely ill inmates at Her
Majesty's Prison "on a weekly
basis."
He said the facility will
utilise a team of mental health
professionals to deliver a more
consistent service to the prison
".as this is desperately need-
ed."
Dr Minnis said it is their fur-
ther hope that mental health
services will be provided for
the Family Islands "as this
remains an area of concern as
the residents in these islands
do not have ready access to
professional care."
"It is our belief that the
more populated islands of
Abaco, Exuma, Eleuthera and
Andros are in urgent need of
regular visits from a team of
mental health professionals,"
he said.
"It would be a major step
forward if the additional man-
power were to be put in place
to accommodate regular quar-
terly visits to these islands."
Dr Minnis said, despite
these challenges, the govern-
ment continues to allocate the
available resources to ensure
that all aspects of healthcare
receive adequate attention.
"Over this past year, offi-
cials at the Centre focused
their attention on ensuring that
all patients under their care
are provided equal access to
our services," he said.
"This has meant re-evaluat-
ing our approach to problems,
such as substance abuse, fol-
low-up clinics, staff develop-
ment and the increasing the
number of Creole-speaking
members of our patient popu-
lation."
Dr Minnis encouraged staff
and administrators to continue
to build on what they have
accomplished, adding that it
takes a "special breed" of per-
son to cater to the needs of a
"very special sector of our
community."


"Being the country's only
residential facility that pro-
vides the specialised attention
needed to rehabilitate and
reintegrate your wards into the
wider society, it takes a spe-
cial breed of person with a spe-
cial brand of caring to want to
work in this environment," he
said.
"I extend sincere gratitude
to you all for your diligence in
attaining the high level of care
provided to the citizens of The
Bahamas," Dr Minnis added.


"1%


MINISTER of Health and Social Development Dr Hubert Minnis
(left) tours a section of the Child and Adolescent Unit at the
Sandilands Rehabilitation, along with Governor General Arthur
Hanna, during the Governor General's annual visit. Nursing aux-
iliary Veronica Strachan, voted the unit's most outstanding
employee, accompanied the Governor General and Dr Minnis.


CAW.PO


I AI


A A 'A.' -


'A,
.4.
V
&?.
flit

r


'. ... .... : .









The Broken Chain



We little knew that morning that God was going to call yow r,name,




It broke our hearts to loe yoii, you did not go alone.


For part of us went with you, the day God called you home.


You left us peaceful iemnories, your love is still our guide,


And though we cannot see you, you are always at our side.


Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same,


But as God calls us one by one, the chain will link again.



Author Uniknown -



Love from all your family & friends


Jamieson George Damianos
December 27 1983 December 17 2006


'A'


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11


..1


COME

HOME.

' AGAIN
SFOR

TO
- The Christian
- Book Shop
K AND FIND
A GREAT
SELECTION OF


I ofdCadj
04F.





C/iriffna Ornm'i :-,|

, '' '"

..


&9j















Book Shop

T:322-1306/322-3237
Mon.-Sa 9.00amme 0pm
Mon.- Sar. 9.00m 5. opm '
,' ,.-






PAGE 12, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


LOALEW


FROM page one
(p TOYOTA moving forward


4Runner


The Toyota 4Runner has supreme power and style in a
tough, sophisticated form.
Features include: V6 4.0 litre engine, automatic transmission, 2WD system, A/C,
dual airbags, power windows, locks and mirrors, keyless entry, automatic
power back door window and jam protection system and CD player.


O TOYOTA

Backed by a 3-year/60,000 mile factory warranty.


C Auto Mall, Shirley Street i0 1,1S ,s.Mi c s Churcli)
Open Mon to Fri 8am 5:30pn o
SMD O T' Sat 8am 12noon (i ,g:*
MOTORS LTD T mel:397-1700
tel: 397-1700 ,
E-mail: execmotor@batelnet.bs (-
AL THORISED TO\ OTA DEALER Parts and service guaranteed
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Queens Hwy. 352-6122 Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd. 367-2916


Ownership claim Sisters


cent D'Aguilar later becoming share-
holders until a bust-up in 2002 over a
failed attempt to buy Thu' Nassau
(Guardian.
"Having been refused by the white
rnonied persons whoml he
approached for money to star up
7The Punch, Ivan turned to his long-
time friend Dr Jonathan Rodgers,
who invested $ I(X),(XX) as start-up cap-
ital for the plaintiff. Ivan had nothing
to contribute but his newspaper expe-
rience and a desire to establish and
run a tabloid newspaper," said the
document.
In 1990, according to the docu-
ment, attorney Samuel E Campbell
and businessman Vincent D'Aguilar
invested $25,000 and $75,000 respec-
tively in Punch Publications.
"The new investors became nec-
essary by reason of a cash flow prob-.
lem then being experienced by The
Punch and Dr Rodgers' unwilling-
ness to further extend himself in
Punch investments due to Ivan's
treating the company as his personal
kitty," said the affidavit.
"D'Aguilar invested out of grati-
tude to Basil for past assistance, and
Campbell did so out of friendship
towards Ivan."
Punch Publications claimed in its
filing that Ivan owned 58 per cent of
the company at this time and the
remaining shareholders 42 per cent
collectively. The sisters do not dis-
pute this. However, they reject the
suggestion that Ivan and Dr Rodgers
together invested the initial $150,(X)0
in the company. They claim that at

FROM page one

The victims suffered appalling
injuries when the Sea Hauler a
sailboat on its way to the Cat
Island regatta was in collision with
another vessel as it headed south in
darkness four years ago.
A rusting crane was shaken loose
and fell on to the deck, killing four
people and severely injuring sev-
eral others.
One man had his leg sliced off.
Another victim, who had previous-
ly held down four jobs to support
his family, was left incapacitated by
the tragedy and is now reduced to
begging outside foodstores.
An inquiry into the crash found
the government to be partly at fault
because the Sea Htauler was alleged-
Il allowed to leave dock with more
than its permitted load.
Over the weekend, activist Lin-
coln Bain and leading campaign-
ers were planning an "event" the
details are being kept secret to
highlight their plight.
When the PLP was in power, the
victims chained themselves to then
Prime Minister Perry Christie's
front gate on Cable Beach. It is
understood something bigger is
planned this time.
Ms Antonio said: "Christmas is
right around the corner and I can't


the time Ivan "had no money".
"Ivan's $50,000 of the stated
amount was not cash," they argue.
Instead the sisters claim that Ivan's
part in the investment was credited
for his newspaper experience and
personal efforts in thile launch of the
paper. The document also claims that
Ivan had to borrow money from a
friend to pay his taxes abroad prior to
his return to Nassau, an amount the
affidavit suggests he never repaid.
The break-up of the Punch Publi-
cations ownership group supposedly
occurred in 2002, according to the fil-
ing.
"Dr Rodgers, Mr D'Aguilar and
Samuel Campbell remained share-
holders in the plaintiff until 2002 after
a second attempt to buy The Nassau
Guardian initiated by Dr Rodgers
failed by reason of Ivan's selfishness
and total megalomania. He refused to
co-operate (his minority financial sta-
tus notwithstanding) unless he
became the absolute majority share-
holder," the document claims.
It continues: "Dr Rodgers,
D'Aguilar and Campbell, knowing
Ivan's lack of regard for the rights of
shareholders, refused to go further
with him. They demanded a meeting
and insisted that Ivan buy their shares
in the plaintiff. The sale and transfer
of shares was completed in ipid-
2002."
It is also claimed that, in 2006,
Ivan was seeking funding to start a
Punch newspaper in Miami. The case
is scheduled to go to trial early next
year in front of Justice John Lyons.


'Sea Hauler victims
do for my four children what I
would like to do because of the
effect this incident has had on my
life.
"It hurts my heart so much. The
prime minister promised us so
much, but he has failed to deliver."
Bus driver Stephen Rose said
that, although he is still working,
he suffers constant pain from his
injuries. "It is terrible because Mr
Ingraham said at his last rally before
the election that he was going to
do something for us.
"I have two sons to support and
I have to drive my bus seven days a
week to get by. It ain't easy. We
are Bahamians and we are mis-
treated worse in our own country
than some foreigners. We deserve
to be compensated, but all we are
getting is a bag of air."
Contacted by The Tribune, Min-
ister of State for Finance Zhivar-
go Laing said that he could not
speak to the issue as he has not
been involved with the matter.
However. he referred The Tri-
bune to either the Minister of
Transport or Maritime Affairs, Earl
Deveaux and Dion Foulkes respec-
tively, for comment. Up to press
time yesterday, The Tribune was
unable to reach either minister.


Arrests

FROM page one

to his vehicle, a male driver of a
rented car registered as SD #492
approached him, forcibly relieving
him of a small amount of cash.
Passers-by were alerted but the
thief jumped in his vehicle and sped
off. Police were notified and Flying
Squad officers patrolling the Robin-
son Road area intercepted the car.


__


FROM page one

about his son Ivan.
The affidavit said: "Basil was
indeed happy to see that Ivan was
finally settling down to do some-
thing concrete with himself. He was
happy for Ivan. So were Ivan's sis-
ters and his friends, so much so that
Dr Rodgers invested the whole cash
start-up capital for the plaintiff,
notwithstanding Basil's previous and
personal advice to Dr Rodgers 'to
be careful about Ivan'."
The two other shareholders in
Punch Publications until mid-2002
were businessman Vincent
D'Aguilar and attorney Samuel E
Campbell, according to the affidavit,
and it would not have been the
intention of Basil to have these men
owners of his property.
"It is simply foolish to
allege...that Basil ever intended to
give Dr Jonathan Rodgers (a
wealthy man), Vincent D'Aguilar
(a wealthy man) and Samuel E
Campbell (another wealthy man)
his property, or any beneficial inter-
est therein. No reasonable interpre-
tation of the facts and the law can
lead to that conclusion."
It continues: "Ivan (the plaintiff)
never once mentioned such person-
al belief or reliance upon alleged
assurance to his sisters, nor did Basil
mention having given any such
assurance. Further, Vincent
D'Aguilar, Dr Jonathan Rodgers
and Samuel E Campbell, all deny
the plaintiff's allegations of proper-
ty interest. They state that it was
never their desire or in their con-
templation that they, via The Punch,
could or would have acquired an
interest other than landlord and ten-
ant, in Basil's property known as
Warboys House. Nor did Ivan ever
mention the same to them."
The affidavit emphasises that
Basil's property was left for his four
children equally and he "was careful
to put two sisters as joint executors
of his Will with Ivan."
In 2003, after his investors
refused to go along with an attempt
to buy The Nassau Guardian, the
document claims, Ivan is said to
have tried "to persuade" Basil to
mortgage his Carmichael Road
property "while Basil was growing
more gravely ill" to raise money to
buy the paper.
"Basil told Ivan that his proper-
ty belonged to his four children. He
told Ivan that Ivan had to talk to
his sisters, as he (Basil) was on his
way out," said the document.
Basil reportedly turned over his
affairs to Felicity in October, 2003,
after he became too ill to manage
them. Rent was paid to her by
Punch Publications until the com-
pany "wrongfully ceased paying the
same in June, 2007."
At no time did Basil mention
any "special arrangement with the
plaintiff or with Ivan regarding the
property," said the affidavit.
The sisters deny that Basil would
have assured Ivan of anything other
than a long tenancy on the property,
which the sisters claim they have
never denied Punch Publications.
After their father's death Ivan,
Felicity, Janet and Jill are said to
have had a meeting to discuss their
joint holdings acquired from their
father. At the time, Ivan is said to
have disclosed that Basil's mortgage
of Warboys House would be satis-
fied in April, 2008, and thereafter
Punch Publications would pay a
commercial rent.
"A second meeting was held in
March, 2006, at which time Ivan
reportedly presented his sisters with
a bill for $1.46 million. He also pre-
Ssented a letter from FirstCaribbean
International seeking the sisters'
concurrence in a further $500,000
incumbrance of the property to
enable Ivan to launch a Punch in
Miami," claimed the affidavit.
The sisters reportedly refused to
"knuckle under" to Ivan's dogma.
"Ivan got up and left the meeting
stating that since the sisters won't
agree, he would simply move to
acquire the whole property from
them. That is the basis of this
action," said the affidavit. "The facts
show Ivan has no honest belief in
his (the plaintiff's) case. He knows
better."
In their counter-claim, the sis-
ters make no claim of possession.
However, they now require Punch
Publications to pay a commercial
rent for the occupation of the prop-
erty, either determined by the par-
ties or the court, starting on the date
of filing of this action which was
December 11.
They also ask the court to
declare that Punch Publications "has
no proprietary interest in the prop-
erty" but that of a tenant who "is, or
maybe" entitled to a long lease.
The sisters' affidavit also claims
thai Basil had to force Ivan to allow
his sister Janet to use a part of War-
boys House as an office. Punch Pub-
lications claimed Basil supported
Ivan's initial exclusion of the said
space to his sister, declaring that the
premises were for the exclusive use
of Punch Publications.
The case is before Justice John
Lyons and is scheduled for trial ear-
ly in the new year.






THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 13


.* "':


r ~~;' ~

I
19!


V


t..^ ; ^
I ., VI ;1 i/ 5i
,*
1W ,j


t,_ .
-"..'


'.U-,L; ".'*. *'.^ i ^ -^*^ ^




.2 :* .
-^ ~ ~ *: .*'*. *^ "W. i-i' v '.,***

| ,, *.,. ....-: :,n N
k-r, .: ; ''" L "*'-. .-*- '^ .--"^ *-'"



... t 1 ; .y -; -..^.
?4fr ^4 .y : . ,-I '-. I ... ..
-S..;, ,, ,N:t,.
,j** ..- -".. .
. .. I v N
', ,- -.,: :.: r. '". 9 -"
""' : -' "Y" '" '- -" ... "",:'.' 4 .1' .: V ' :'.
,' ' '" "'' : a--"


A.y-



4.. Lot


O


'' '1
.5 , '


'.,I


'U
b. ~


1
1 ii
I I
I ii
I'
~1'
alt

'P


J .'


4v.- :


w^


poCK


, _




PAGE 1M ATn


LAN


A spectacular show from


PALMDALE
326-5556
9am-6pm
Mondagy-aturdag
Palmdale Xmas Hours
17th 19th 9am 7:30pm
20th 22nd 9am 8pm
23rd lpm-6pm
24th 9am-9pm


TOWN CENTRE MALL
356-3205
10am-7pm Monday-Thursday
10am-8pm Friday-gaturday
Town Centre mall Xmas Hours
17th 18th 10am 9pm
19th 22nd -10am 10pm
23rd Ipm 6pm
24th 10am-11pm


IMPERIAL a MAJ ESTY
CRUISE
LINE
CRUISE, SHOP & STAY PACKAGES
TO SOUTH FLORIDA!


TRAVEL IN STYLE!
Departs Nassau 5:00 pm
Arrives At Port Everglades 9:00 am
* Private Cabin Fine Dining Entertainment
* Spa & Childrens Programmes Casino


Cruise Back With 3 Pieces Of Luggage Free (551bs. Maximum Each)


CALL TRAVEL NETWORK (NASSAU) LTD.
EXCLUSIVE TICKETING AGENTS AT
327-6045


#1 Sandy Port Plaza www.yuistore.corn
Rates based on 4 persons traveling. Prices subject to change and availability. Hotel taxes, ticket and booking fees are extra.


Atlantis Invites you to join
our Dynamic
FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM
Apply now to be a
Flair Mixologist/Model
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
Experience bottle juggling and show routines
as well as modern bartender practices
Master of mixology
Major international night club experience
Previous runway or print modeling experience
il;
* Must be able to model provocative cutting edge
designer apparel
* Must be able to relocate 6 months at a time
If you meet the requirements apply online today at
Swwwatan sp jobs.com
and explore a world of fantastic opportunities

ATLANTIS
PARADISE ISLAND


PAGE 14, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


CLrilmar~a~j~ess











Junior Junkanoo on Bay St


Spirit announces

on-stop service

between Fort

Lauderdale and

Grand Bahama
SPIRIT Airlines has
announced a daily non-stop jet
service between Fort Lauderdale
S and Grand Bahama Island, begin-
ning December 13, 2007. Service
is via Freeport International Air-
port.
Grand Bahama Island is Spir-
it's 25th destination in the'
Bahamas, Caribbean and Latin
American region, and the 40th
destination overall.
SIn addition to non-stop service
irm Fort Lauderdale, Spirit will
-so offer connecting service to
stand Bahama Island from its
wmestic network. Spirit serves
ilH routes with a fleet of Airbus
aircraft, the youngest in the
Americas.
"We are pleased to offer our
customers more low fare options
for travel to one of the most pre-
ftred islands in the Caribbean,"
S'id Michael Pewther, Senior
directorr of Sales for Spirit Air-
.lines. Customers have come to
prefer Spirit for our legendary
Sa-low fares, clean new planes,
time service, and friendly staff.
we're looking forward to taking
Btvelers to enjoy all of the won-
ddrful vacation options that
Candy Bahama Island has to


0.7 magnitude

quake rocks

northern Chile

SANTIAGO, Chile
A STRONG earthquake
shook northern Chile early
Sunday in the same region
where a temblor killed at
least two people last month,
but authorities reported no
new deaths or serious dam-
age, according to Associated
Press.
The U.S. Geological Survey
said the magnitude-6.7 quake
at 5:09 a.m. (3:09 a.m. EST)
was centered 80 miles north-
northeast of the port city of
Antofagasta.
Electric power and tele-
phone services were cut in
several cities, but "we can say
that there are no victims,"
said Hernan Vargas, director
of the government's Emer-
gency Bureau in the Antofa-
gasta region. "In the city of
Tocopilla, seven people were
attended at a hospital, mainly
for panic attacks."
Tocopilla was the most seri-
ously damaged city in the
magnitude 7.7 quake that
struck the same area on Nov.
14. killing two people.
Vargas said Sunday's
tremor was fi aftershock of
the November quake.
On Saturday afternoon, a
magnitude-5.8 quake rattled
central Chile, causing alarm
in the capital, Santiago, but
no injuries or damage.


ROLEX


OYSTER PERPETUAL
SUMJMARINER DATE
ROLEX.COM


OFFICIAL ROLEX RETAILER BAHAMAS SINCE 1955
284 Bay Street, Nassau (242) 302-2800
Crystal Court at Atlantis (242) 363-3956
* Marsh Harbour, Abaco Harbour Island Emerald Bay, Exuma
Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama Bimini Bay, Bimini


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 15






PAGE 16, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE




$150,000 boost



for COB's Study



Abroad Programmen


THE College of The
Bahamas Study Abroad Pro-
gramme received a huge boost
last week in the form of a
$150,000 gift from Santander
Bank and Trust Limited.
The gift was presented to
College president Janyne
Hodder by Jose Gonzalez De
Castejon, Santander Bank's
managing director, at a recep-
tion at Goodman's Bay Cor-
porate Centre the bank's
headquarters.
To be called the Santander
Bahamas Spanish Language
Fund, it will provide $30,000
annually until 2012 towards
student study abroad experi-
ences in Spanish-speaking
countries.
. The gift, which comes to
The College during Santander
Bank and Trust Ltd's 150th
anniversary celebrations, is the
first to create a fund for stu-
dent study abroad awards held
by the college.

Commitment
"The bank is extremely
active in its support of higher
education," said Sr Gonzalez
De Castejon. "Our social com-
mitment finds its expression
in the Santander Universities
Global Division, whose activ-
ities form the backbone of the
bank's social action and
enable it to maintain a stable
alliance with the academic
world in Spain, Portugal, Latin
America, Russia, the United
Kingdom and now The
Bahamas."
President Hodder thanked
the Santander board of direc-
tors for their generous gift and
remarked: "Santander's sup-
port for our internationalisa-
tion strategy is timely. We
commend your leadership in


2006 Santander Bank has
channelled more than 400 mi}
lion euros in sponsorship tq
academic research and thij
development of projects to.
support higher education.
More importantly, there are
now 600 academic institutions
--- Jreceiving support from Sani-
tander Bank for the develop'
Sent of initiatives and'
research projects."'I
S: He went on to pledge San-
tander's commitment to fosg'-
tering and maintaining its relAL'
tionship with the College 6f
The Bahamas.
Recognising the importance
of students studying other lan-.
guages because knowledge of
a foreign language will no
*longer be a requirement but;
a necessity, Sr Castejon said
that he foresaw COB students
participating in building a bet- making a tremendous impact
ter Bahamas with this study in the business community
abroad support for our stu- of The Bahamas and'
dents. the financial serviced
As such opportunities industry.
expand, we can truly say Speaking on behalf tf
'Come to The College/Uni- future beneficiaries of thi'
versity of The Bahamas and fund, Sophia Fox-Lightbourr,
see the world.'" a Spanish education major af
She added that by becom- the college, said she had ben-
ing a corporate sponsor San- efited greatly from the studk1
lander had recognized the abroad programme in 200'2
importance of higher educa- and she had found the expert
tion. ence to be valuable, in that i
She also stated that a uni added another dimension to
versity cannot thrive on public her appreciation and under
funds alone but it needs pri- standing of the Spanish cul-,
vate donors to help it build ture and language.
excellent programmes and The college already has suc-,
provide excellent opportuni- cess stories resulting from:
ties for excellent students. study abroad programmes.
She concluded her remarks Recently, Patrick Thompson,
by saying that she envisaged a math major, was part of an!
Santander becoming a trail- exchange involving the Uni-'
blazer in promoting the mes- versity of Rhode Island where
sage that the College of The he spent his final semester!
Bahamas is a cause to be sup- before graduating in summer'
ported. 2007.
Sr Gonzalez de Castejon He todk fve courses and
added: "Bemteen 1996 andJ. gainedlfi ...


1i one piece of hand luggage

* ,t should always have.


t,


F.,,


/ .Pilot's Watch Chrono-Automatic, Ref. 3717: Seventy
. ... years' experience of designing pilots watches, shine through
in a watch as functional as a cockpit instrument. The soft-iron
inner case protects the chronograph movement against even
strong magnetic fields. The coated sapphire glass is
,prrni.II, secured against sudden drops in pressure. Afterall, a
S-,chflol should intervene when the captain is distracted. IWC. Engineered for men.
.i. h .i' '.' choograph movement I Self-winding I Soft-iron inner case for protection against
',.i: He lds '- Antireflective sapphire glass, secured in case of sudden drops in
pressure I Water-resistant to 60 m I Stainless steel


,'.) / ihOI. O(),.pitii; The Old Straw Market Nassau, Bahamas Tel. 242-32.8-5007 Fax 242-328-5008
Emnail: manager @quainturnd(utyfroe.coMi
Www.iwc.colin


Atlantis invites -ou to join
our yn ic m

FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM

Apply now to be a

VIP Server / I

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
Experience in the operations of high end
interactive night clubs
Sales and marketing experience
International modeling experience either
runway or print
Excellent communication skills

Must be able and willing to wear provocative
designer clothing with a cutting edge flair
Must be able to relocate 6 months at a time
'.
If you meet the requirements apply online today at

www.at slan, 1 -.-. .S c
and explore a world of fantastic opportunities

ATLANTIS
IPAIRADISE IISLAINID.


----`~




- .'. I.. . 4 . I .I I . .


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 17


Untold stories revealed in new Bahamas handbook


The 2008 Bahamas Hand-
book, published by Etienne
Dupuch Jr Publications, is fresh
off the press arid now in stores.
At 656 pages, the Handbook is
filled with insightful features on
The Bahamas, beautiful colour
photographs and rich illustra-
tlins that bring the stories to
li(e.
Follow a chapter in the life of
British industrialist and playboy,
Sir Victor Sassoon, who, after
fyising his empire to Chinese
communists in 1949, chose The
Bahamas as the place to rebuild
his fortune and eventually settle
down with his American wife.
. r Norman Solomon, a Bahami-
an with true grit and determi-
nation, recounts his days in a
story never-beore told as a busi-
nessman, politician, crime fight-
qy and Hollywood hobnobber.
Read about Irow Solomon
helped bring down notorious
drug lord Carlos Lehder and
hpw he has devoted his life to
tPe betterment of his country.
After Britain abolished the
slave trade in the 1830s, her. war-
Alips rescued many thousands
rf Africans who were being
itansported to the New World.
About 6,000 of these would-
liave-beenslaves landed in The
Bahamas, where they left a
defining mark on today's
Bahamian culture.
Y These are just samples of
that to expect in the 2008
Handbook, a carefully
researched reference guide and
essential reading for those liv-
ing or doing business in The
.lahamas. It's also simply ia fun
rjfad.
"It's a book for anyone who
-ants to live, work, play or
vest in the country," says pub-
lisher Etienne Dupuch Jr. "Our
f6aders include business lead-
ers, academics, historians,
trsearchers and government
officials. I am proud to say that
we are also read by the younger


THE BAHAMIAN Rolles are descen-
dants from the slaves British
Empire Loyalist Denys Rolle,
brought to The Bahamas from
Savannah, Georgia.

generation-young families and
students at home and abroad."
For 48 years, Etienne Dupuch
Jr Publications. has educated,
enlightened and entertained
readers with the most authori-
tative book on The Bahamas
available anywhere. The 2008
edition of the Handbook, now
available in bookstores, contin-'
ues this proud publishing tradi-
tion.
While you can read about the
future of financial services in
today's increasingly complex
investment environment, you
can also discover The Bahamas'
storied past and present-day
achievements in its economy,
government and people.
Did you know that:
*More than 30,000 Americans
identify themselves as being of
Bahamian ancestry? Find out
how Bahamians have influenced
American business and culture,
and how Bahamian-Americans
stay connected with their island
roots.
The College of The
Bahamas is on track to become
a full university by 2010? Read
how COB president Janyne
Hodder is determined to trans-
form the post-secondary insti-


.YNE HODDER, president of the College of the Bahamas. Her goal is for
B to attain university status by 2010.


BALDWIN


Homeowners will add a touch of elegance and distinction to their
residences with images locking and general hardware products by Baldwin.
Baldwin Locks are highly durable and strong, providing maximum
security that will last for generations.


*FINE BUILDERS HARDWARE & PLUMBING*
Established 1951
Dowdeswell Street Tel: 322-1103


NORMAN SOLOMON, a Bahamian
with grit and determination, is pic-
tured with his wife Katherine. He
helped bring down notorious drug
lord Carlos Lehder.
tutign within thenext few years.
*Many places in The
Bahamas were named by the
natives, explorers and pirates
who discovered them in years
long past?
*Freeport in Grand Bahama
is becoming a popular berth for
many of the world's megay-
achts?
Discover why The Bahamas'
second city is an attractive place
for the rich and famous.
These are just a few of the
compelling features you will see
within the pages of the 2008
Bahamas Handbook, which also
includes sections on the history
of The Bahamas, the Out
Islands, Grand Bahama, busi-
ness and real estate. A Year in
Review section takes a look at
the events that made national
headlines in 2007. You'll also
find a comprehensive guide to
government departments,
embassies, honourary consuls,
international organizations and
the popular up-to-date Blue
Pages, which covers all the
essential facts you need to know
about The Bahamas-from A to
Z.
For more information please
contact Etienne Dupuch Jr Pub-
lications Ltd at 242-323-5665.


MECHANIC I (AC) I
The Grand Bahama Power Company. Limited invites qualified candidates to apply for the position of
Mechanic I (Air-Conditioning) in its Generation Department.
This position installs and perforhis major repairs and maintains a preventative maintenance program
on all Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems and related equipment. The
incumbent performs the necessary tests and trouble shooting to correctly repair HVAC systems and
related equipment and will also be expected to assist in the daily duties of the electrical department
when required. This position reports to the Generation Maintenance Supervisor.

The successful candidate will be expected to:
* Perform root cause analysis of equipment failures.
* Read electrical diagrams and schematics pertaining to HVAC and related systems.
* Repair and install HVAC units.
* Assist in electrical repairs and minor mechanical repairs.
* Initiate purchase orders and write reports and procedures.
* Maintain documentation of1 mainteriance performed, technical documentation, drawings and
equipmn ent manuals.
Determine the root cause failures of HVAC systems and related equipment.
Assist in lob planning and the securing of tools and materials.
Perform and keep records of preventative maintenance on HVAC systems.

Minimum Requirements
High School Diploma and BGCSE or GCE '0' level passes in Mathematics, English Language
and Sciience Grade C cor above.
Minimum of tree (3) years experience working as an Air-Conditioning Mechanic.
Possess pi'oof of training or certification as an HVAC mechanic.
Should be famtiar with electrical installation.
Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:


GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY


sa


e


SELECT HANDBAGS

AND ACCESSORIES

















EST, 1941


i )' i' '* I I I I t .Im -.,, 0'L 7


-IL L I






PAGE 8, MODAY, ECEMER 17 2007THE TIBUN


Kelly's House and

Home continues

Christmas charity

giving tradition


KELLY'S House and Home
began their traditional Christ-
mas donations charity pro-
gramme with $500 donations to
each of five worthy local chari-
ties.
For several years, Kelly's has
donated over $5000 at this time
of year, with monies raised as a
joint effort between the com-
pany and it's customers.
Instead of wrapping Christmas
gifts Kellv's provides customers
with the necessary wrapping


paper and bows the nominal
donation of $ 1.50.
Kelly's matches these dona-
tions and the total is donated
to selected charities.
Among the first group select-
ed for the donations this year
were:- The Bahamas Associa-
tion for retired persons, The
Hopedale Centre, The Crisis
Centre, The Elizabeth Estates
Children's Home and the
Cancer Society of the
Bahamas.


_, ,EL L V f ,r P"







CRISIS CENTRE RECEIVES KELLY'S CHRISTMAS DONATION: Ms.
Novalette Fox, centre thanked Kelly's for their donation of $500 and
promised "The funds are most welcome and will be put to good use. Pre-
senting the $500 cheque were Katrina Humes, Human Resources assistant
left, and Caroline Major, head of Kelly's baby department.


r o c ..at .s an



a-



resources, at Kelly's, and Gift wrapper, Carlissa Sands.


BILNEY LANE CHILDREN'S HOME RECEIVES CHRISTMAS DONATION "- ...;- ---
FROM KELLY'S: Smiling staff members of Kelly's Home Centre, Deborah KELLY'S HOME CENTRE DONATES TO PRISON OFFICERS DEPENDENTS
McKenzie, Cleomi Johnson, Tiffany Wilson and Denise Cox, surround Ms. FUND: Raymond Julien, Assistant superintendent of H.M. Prison, with over
Janet Brown, administrator of the Bilney Lane Children's Home, as she 42 years in the prison service, receives a donation from Kelly's store man-
received a Christmas donation of $500 to help the children's home provide ager Darnley Sealey, right and Joe Farrington left, as part of Kelly's Home
Christmas cheer for their young residents. Centre Traditional Christmas Charity donations programme.


I O'BRIEN


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
are pleased to announce that

PATRICK EUGENE SMITH
has joined the firm with effect from 12 November 2007 in the capacity of
Director of Finance & Administration.
Mr. Smith is a qualified and experienced Certified Public Accountant (CPA) as
well as a Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) and will receive an MBA Degree in
February 2008 from Nova Southeastern University.
In addition to his early experience in the field of public accounting and auditing
at (then) Price Waterhouse, Mr. Smith has developed extensive managerial
and leadership skills while employed in executive positions at The National
Insurance Board, Lennox Paton, and most recently as a Partner of Grant
Thornton (Bahamas) Accountants and Management Consultants.
Mr. Smith will be responsible for the Firm's overall financial and administrative
management.
Glinton I Sweeting I O'Brien is a full service law firm that provides both legal
and corporate management services to a broad range of local and international
clients. The Firm is confident that the addition of Mr. Smith to its team will
strengthen its overall ability to deliver efficient and value-added services to its
growing clientele.


Christ Church Cathedral


(Cc&-edd


December 23rd, 2007 January 6th, 2008
6:00 p.m. Sunday December 23rd, 2007
"Come To Bethlehem To See The King"
A Service of Nine Lessons & Carols
By The Men and Boys Choir

The Eve of The Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ
Monday December 24th, 2007
10:30 p.m. "Sounds of Christmas"
A Christmas Eve Concert
Presented by:
Christ Church Cathedral Chorale & Youth Choir


11.-4.5 p in Christmas Eve Sung Eucharist
Christmas Day
T"uc'duotl Dcemlbr 25th. 2007
7. tO a.in Sung Eucharist
10 Io. ,. in Sung Eucharist
Alondriu De i. niber .31st, 2007
The Eve of the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus
New Year's Eve
II I .) p in
This Service leads into the First Muss of The New Year, 2008 H.


I


KELLY'S STAFF
MAKES PRESENTA-
TION TO THE ST.
VINCENT DEPAUL
SOCIETY: As part of
the traditional Kelly's
Home Centre Christ-
mas giving pro-
gramme, Kelly's staff
members Ruthlyn
Timothy, Eldica Git-
tens, Linda Carey and
Elsie Knowles, recent-
ly made a donation of
$500 to Ms. Linda
Carey (second from
the right), President
of the St. Vincent De
Paul Society.


We the family of the late

SSylvia Pratt

extend our sincere thanks
and gratitude to those who
supported us with various
S., acts of kindness during
our bereavement.

May we always find
comfort in the
beautiful memories of our
dearly departed.

The Family.


I.


f.


SAHAlAI /UPPLY AIR COADITIOnNG LTD.
II'C -393-6215 s F- F .VICE ~iNSrTALLATION


Shir I.vy S. & M~ M,,y I -I .inic. rit'.o to Harbour Bay Shopping Cenre


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning /
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


The Partners and Staff of:


GLINTON I SWEETING


6 ,.'0 p m .Sundi.it in tlo.itu 6ih 200,!5
Service of Light
Presented by The Men & Boys Choir


I


PAGE 18, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


o /, a


6'ewvce,,







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 19


Pope warns against seeking

happiness in drugs or any

other 'artificial paradises'


P7j


/ .4



BLESSING: Pope Benedict XVI blesses the faithful during his visit to the church of St. Mary of the rosary in
Rome, yesterday.


Ia


b. .M~..


anpin Motors Ltd.


* ROME
Pope Benedict XVI warned
yesterday against seeking hap-
piness in drugs or other "arti-
ficial paradises'' and the self-
centered quest for "pleasure
at all costs," according to the
Associated Press.
Instead, the pope held up
Mother Teresa the Roman
Catholic nun who devoted her
life to serving the poor in India
and elsewhere as an exam-


pie. "Every day, she lived next
to misery, human degradation
and death," the pope told
thousands of faithful gathered
in St. Peter's Square. "Yet, she
offered the smile of God to
everybody."
The pope, speaking during
the traditional Sunday noon
Angelus prayer, said real hap-
piness cannot be found in cul-
tures "that put individual hap-
piness in the place of God, a
mentality that has its emblem-


atic effect in the quest for plea-
sure at all costs, in the spread
of the use of drugs as an
escape, a shelter in artificial
paradises, which turn out to be
completely illusory."
In an annual tradition, chil.
dren came to St. Peter's Square
bearing Nativity figures of
baby Jesus for the pontiff to
bless. Earlier yesterday, Bene-
dict consecrated a new church
on the outskirts of Rome,
blessing the parish's children.


Outsmart TH


excessba


* Save Big $$ on unlimited number of
bags or boxes from Florida to
The Bahamas

* Same Day Service 7 days a week

* Or Shop and Ship today, Relax and Fly
tomorrow

* We use Dedicated Cargo Aircraft

* Convenient Drop-Off Location minutes
from the Airport
(Miami and Fort Lauderdale)

* Collect Baggage From Our Secure Area
in Customs Hall & Claim Exemption


e*:cessbaggage

Miami I Fort Lauderdale


Miami: Tel. (305) 871-0571
Toll Free: 1 (877) Sexcess
Nassau: Tel. (242) 377-6593 (305) 407-9049
Office Hours: 9:00 8:00 PM Daily
Including Weekends and Holidays


We Also Provide:
Free US Mailing Addresses Florida Pick-up Services Available Daily Courier & Air Freight Servi I I I I I I I I I I I ] I I I I I IIII I III I mpIII a iU


;i~hri


MUM ,


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 19


J.








PAGE 20, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


L O C AL6N E WS'I


CLIMATE


CHANGE


CONFE


After weeks of talks, UN adopts global


* BALI, Indonesia
Two weeks of international cli-
mate talks marked by bitter dis-
agreements and angry accusa-
tions culminated Saturday in a
last-minute U.S. compromise and
an agreement to adopt a blue-


print for fighting global warming
by 2009, according to the Associ-
ated Press.
Now comes the hard part.
Delegates from nearly 190
nations must fix goals for indus-
trialized nations to cut their
greenhouse gas emissions while


helping developing countries cut
their own emissions and adapt to
rising temperatures.
Negotiators also will consider
ways to encourage developing
countries to protect their rapidly
dwindling forests which absorb
carbon dioxide.


Much of today's furniture is not
solid wood. Instead it is made up
of materials such as particleboard,
MDF (medium density fiberboard],
and other. processed woods.

Furniture made with pretend wood
is already finished in order to hide .:,
craftsmanship and/or wood flaws. .*
It can never be refinished or
repaired and buckles when exposed '
to small amounts of water. These
characteristics make it a poor value. .




We chose



REAL WOOD
QUALITY
ReaL Wood furniture purchased
today can be used for a lifetime.


VALUE
Real Wood furniture is shock-
resi stant and very durable
generally outlasting synthetic
materials.

OPTIONS
Ready-to-finish furniture gives
cou a wide range of options to
meet all your furniture needs.
Don t settle for particleboard or
a colour you don't want when you
can have real wood furniture for
le_- Your choice of finishes is
limited only by your imagination.


"This is the beginning, not the
end," U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon told The Associ-
ated Press following the con-
tentious climate conference,
which stretched into an extra day.
"We will have to engage in more
complex, long and difficult nego-
tiations."
Those gathering on the resort
island of Bali were charged with
launching negotiations to replace
the Kyoto Protocol, which
expires in 2012. What they decide
in the next two years will help
determine how much the world
warms in the decades to come.
In a series of pivotal reports
this year, a U.N. network of cli-
mate and other scientists warned
of severe consequences from
rising seas, droughts, severe
weather, species extinction and
other effects without sharp
cutbacks in emissions of the
industrial, transportation and
agricultural gases blamed for
global warming.
To avoid the worst, the Nobel
Prize-winning Interg vernmen-
tal Panel on Climate Change said,
emissions should be reduced by
25 percent to 40 percent below
1990 levels by 2020. Greenhouse
and other heat-trapping gases
should be reduced at least by half
by 2050, they added.
Despite an aggressive EU-led
campaign to include specific emis-
sions reduction targets for indus-
trial nations using the figures


AN ENVIRONMENTAL activist and a Pacific Islander pose for a photo
on Kuta Beach after the end of the U.N. Climate Conference Saturday
Dec. 15, 2007 in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia. A U.N. climate conference
adopted a plan to negotiate a new global warming pact by 2009 after
the United States suddenly reversed its opposition Saturday to changes
proposed by developing nations.


and time table above the final
roadmap has none.
The guidelines were eliminated
after the U.S., joined by Japan
and others, argued that targets
should come at the end of the
two-year negotiations, not the
start.
But it was a separate issue that
precipitated a riveting, final-hour
floor fight.
India sought to amend the doc-
ument to strengthen require-
ments for richer nations to help
poorer with technology to limit
emissions and adapt to climate
change's impacts.
The head of the U.S. delega-
tion, Undersecretary of State


HEAD of the U.S. delegation Undersecretary of State Paula Dobrian-
sky, right, and James Connaughton, chairman of the White House
council on environmental quality confer during the U.N. Climate
Change Conference on Saturday in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. The
U.N. climate conference adopted a plan to negotiate a new global
warming pact by 2009 after the United States suddenly reversed its
opposition Saturday to changes proposed by developing nations.


Paula J. Dobriansky objected,
setting off loud, long boos in the
hall.
Next, delegate after delegate
took aim at the United States,
with South Africa saying Dobri-
ansky's intervention was "most
unwelcome and without any
basis," and Uganda saying "We
would like to beg them" to relent.
Then the delegate from Papua
New Guinea leaned into his
microphone.
"We seek your leadership,"
Kevin Conrad told the Ameri-
cans. "But if fo ome reason you
are not willing TO lead, leave it to
the rest of us. Please get out of
the way."
The U.N. climate conference
exploded with applause, the U.S.
delegation backed down, and the
way was cleared Saturday for
adoption of the "Bali Roadmap."
When talks begin, the focus
again will fall on the United
States, the only major industrial
country that did not accept
Kyoto. That pact requires 37
industrial nations to reduce
greenhouse gases by a relatively
modest 5 percent on average in
the next five years.
A turning point may come a
year down the road following the
U.S. election of a new president,
who many environmentalists
hope will support deeper, manda-
tory emissions cuts in contrast to
President Bush, who favors only
voluntary approaches to reining
in greenhouse gases.
The exemption of developing
nations from the Kyoto Proto-
col's mandatory caps has also
long been a key complaint of
American opponents to the U.N.
climate treaty process.
White House press secretary
Dana Perino said the U.S. wel-
comed the positive steps outlined
in the roadmap but had "serious
concerns" about the different
responsibilities that will be shoul-
dered by developed and devel-
oping nations.
"The problem of climate
change cannot be adequately
addressed through commitments
for emissions cuts by developed
countries alone," Perino said.
"Negotiations must clearly dif-
ferentiate among developing
countries in terms of the size of
their economies, their level of
emissions and level of energy uti-
lization, and sufficiently link the
character or extent of responsi-
bility to such factors," Perino said.
The comment seemed aimed
squarely at China, a developing
nation with an economy that is
soon expected to zoom past Ger-
many's to become the world's
third biggest, after the United
States and Japan.
China also now generates a
large share of the world's green-
house gases, with some experts
saying it has already overtaken
the United States as the world's
No. 1 emitter.
The Bali plan does ask for
more from the developing world.
giving negotiators the task of con-
sidering "mitigation actions" -
voluntary actions to slow emis-
sions growth for poorer coun-
tries, including such fast-growing
economies as China's and India's.
For industrial nations, the Bali
plan instructs negotiators to con-
sider mitigation "commitments,"
mandatory caps as in the Kyoto
deal. But the lack at U.S. insis-
tence of ambitious numerical
guidelines troubled many envi-
ronmentalists.
"The people of the world want-
ed more. They wanted binding
targets," said Marcelo Furtado
of Greenpeace Brazil.
Climate policy analyst Eliot
Diringer, of Washington's Pew
center, looked on the positive
side.
"It puts no one on the hook
right now for emissions reduc-
tions," he said. "What's impor-
tant, though, is that it lets no one
off the hook either."
Associated Press Writers Joseph
Colenan, Michael Casey. Chris
Brumnitt and Zakki Hakin con-
tributed to this report.


.9.I
TEL W ir
3 2546 MADE ..


thle



CENTER
4L









Treadmills From $829.00








Ellipticals From $699.00,


The finest home and lite commercial

cardio equipment.












Benches From $249.00 '







Bikes From $269.00






Built, Delivered, and Warranteed











RENCE


warming blueprint


Set of simple numbers will help

shape 2 years of post-Bali debate


EBALI, Indonesia
Behind the millions of words at the Bali climate
conference, in documents, speeches and slick
brochures, lay a set of simple numbers: 2 and 445
and "25 to 40."
That's 2 degrees Celsius, 445 parts per million
of carbon dioxide, and a 25-to-40-percent reduc-
tion in global-warming gases a formula, some say,
to save the planet from climate change's severest
consequences.
In the end, at U.S. insistence, none of those num-
bers appeared in the U.N. conference's key final
document. But in the coming two years of crucial cli-
mate negotiations, as authorized at Bali, those sim-
ple numbers are sure to become chips in the high-
stakes diplomatic, political and economic bargaining
of almost 190 nations involved.
Saturday's decision ending the two-week meeting
capped a year in which a U.N. network of climate
scientists delivered troubling news: Global warming
is a fact. very likely attributable to manmade emis-
sions: warming seas are rising faster all the time:
impacts are already felt, from species extinctions to
eriatic weather.
Things could get much, much worse if the world
doesn't sharply reduce emissions of carbon dioxide
and a handful of other industrial, transportation
and agricultural gases blamed for global warming,
the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel
od Climate Change said in its series of reports.
'oThe IPCC noted that the atmosphere has already
warmed by an average 0.7 degrees Celsius (1 degree
Fahrenheit) compared with the early 19th century,
aiid that with an additional 1.3 degrees, totaling 2
degrees Celsius (3.4 degrees Fahrenheit), serious
effects would ensue: regional water shortages: crop
failures; widespread loss of coral reefs; more deaths
from heat waves; more severe storms.
To keep the cumulative rise to 2 degrees Cel-
sius, the panel concluded, heat-trapping greenhouse
gases in the atmosphere should be kept below 445
parts per million in carbon dioxide or its equivalent
in other gases. The concentration is now estimated
at below 400, after subtracting offsetting heat-shield-
ing effects.
,Early in the Bali conference, more than 200 sci-
entists, many of them U.N. report authors, made a
rdre foray into politics and diplomacy with a petition
calling on the U.N. climate treaty nations to adopt,
asa minimumm requirement," those 2-degree and
445-pp ceilings.
-The European..Unidh A d many other nations
had already done so, endorsing the goal of reducing
industrial nations' greenhouse gas emissions by 25
to-40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, a formula


UN SECRETARY General Ban Ki-moon speaks
with the Associated Press on the sidelines of the
U.N. Climate Conference Saturday Dec. 15, 2007
in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia.
the IPCC suggests to keep temperatures rising no
more than 2 degrees Celsius.
That goal was also inscribed into the early drafts
of the Bali final document, which envisioned con-
tributions, too, from such fast-developing poorer
nations as China and India, in the form of voluntary
programs to rein in emissions growth.
"This process has to be driven by the science,"
said environmentalist Matthias Duwe, of Europe's
Climate Action Network. "There are no questions
any more about the sheer scale of the challenge
we are facing."
But the numbers were rejected by the United
States, and dropped from the Bali document.
"The European approach is focused exclusively
on the science, but we also have to analyze the
actual technological pathways it takes to get to a par-
ticular objective," Jim Connaughton, White House
environmental chief, told reporters here. "We can be
very ambitious, but cuts that deep, that fast, are
simply beyond reach."
Alone among major industrial nations, the Unit-
ed States rejects the relatively modest cuts of the
1997 Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012. The task
the rest of the world has now taken on, with the
upcoming "Bali Roadmap" negotiations, is to try to
bring the Americans into a new, post-2012 regime of
deep and mandatory reductions in greenhouse emis-
sions. Many look beyond the Bush administration
and toward a new negotiating partner, chosen in
next November's U.S. presidential election, a pres-
ident many expect to be a Democrat.
They were encouraged by the words last week of
a key Democratic environmentalist, Sen. John Ker-
ry, discussing the upcoming climate negotiations
with The Associated Press.


Experience a new world of quality, 36 mpg HWY.
#1 safety rating, easy shift with careful attention to detail.
The 2007 TIIDA -Available on sedan or hatchback at Sanpin Motors Ltd.


TIIDA


Let Multi Discount Furniture & Rooms -To-Go be

your One-Stop Shopping this Christmas. Check

out all the incredible prices and selection.


SANPI MOT RS LIITED T.24-326B 377B .242-26-615 CMil~ MONWELTH BANKl!
E.1ssuii iIS. S EA L D
INSRACEBRKES AENS TD


7pc Queen Bedroom--$1,336.72 '
King Bedroom--$1,374.46
Chest---$362.50
Armoire--$562.62


7pc. Rooms-To-Go Living Room---
$2499.00

3pc Microfiber Living Room
available in three exciting colors:
$949.00
Mocha
Mint
Paparika

3pc Leather Living Room available
in three exciting colors: $999.00
Dark Brown
Burgundy

5pc. Bed-in-a-
Box---$632.37

Recliner
starting at
$299


Bean Bags
starting at
$66.44


Ab.,


, naturalized
lot


T g.R.R Sweeting's

h^


~4I~


A "


*


Madeira Shopping Plaza 328-0703 Marathon Mall 393-6113 RND Plaza, Freeport 351-3274

.. _ .. .._ ................ _......... .... ........ .. _.. ........ ..... ... .... ........ .....


WIkA m


r- "-sawammomir- A A


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007 PAGE 21


~i~9L;I


1


6 P










CHRISTMAS IN CHINA


A MAN walks
past Christ-
mas decora-
tion on sale
at a gift shop
Friday Dec.
14, 2007 in
Shanghai,
China.
Christmas is
gaining pop-
ularity in the
Communist
country.


,tUeeting's Iloniat
mlfortuarg Anb (Trematerium
84 Blue Hill Road P.O. Box N-8161 Tel: 325-7867
Fax: 325-7867


MR JEROME
EDWARD
WATSON, 63
a resident of Bimini and
formerly of Mortimer's,
South End, Long Island,
will be held at St.
Stephen's Anglican Church on Wednesday 19th
December, 2007 at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will
be Rev'd Father Colin Humes Rector and
Interment will follow in the Public Cemetery,
Bimini.
Left to cherish his memory are his four brothers,
Frederick Dean, Cedric, Edgar and Samuel
Watson; five sisters, Maltina Kelly, Rowena
Miller, Geneva Munroe, Evelyn Watson-Major
and Alma Watson; uncle, Thomas Watson Sr.;
three aunts, Lorraine and Lucy Watson and
Jeanette Dean, and a host of other relatives
and friends including, Frank, Brendon, Harold,
Solomon, Warren, Basil, Bruce, Falcon, Thomas,
Earnest, Fred, Wayne, Dennis, Angela, William
and Agatha Watson, Ernest Cartwright, Wendolyn
Dean, Diana and Clarice Cartwright, Sandy
Carroll, Geraldine Major, Marjorie Cartwright,
Althea Sands, Sarah Miller, Valerie McDonald,
Stephanie Cartwright, Valance, Vivian, Elton
and Cyril Turnquest, Rudolph Pratt, Margaret
Major, Felicity Walker, Joseph Mortimer,
Rosalyn Brown, Averon Roberts (god-son), Frank
Hinsey, George Weech, Harold Saunders, Charlie
Rolle, Gregg Roberts, Stanley Pinder, Trevor
Roberts, Bqatrice Thompson, Merle Roberts,
Freda Rolle, Portia Stuart, Merlene Saunders,
Corrine Brown, Lisa Bethel, Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Cooney, The Rt. Rev Bishop Laish Z. Boyd and
the entire Bimini community and families.
The body will repose. at the Church in Bimini
from 5.00pm on Tuesday until service time.


SHOPPERS look at Christmas decorations including a Santa Clause
doll on sale at a gift shop Friday Dec. 14, 2007 ,in Shanghai, China. Christ-
mas, while not traditionally celebrated, is gaining popularity in the Com-
munist country with retailers capitalizing on the holiday spirit to boost their
end of year sales.
LEFT
A SHOP clerk arranges Christmas decorations at toy store Monday, Dec.
10, 2007 in Shanghai, China. China may be Santa's global workshop, but
when it comes to buying playthings for their own children, families that can
afford to tend to buy well-known, better quality foreign brands.

AP Photos: Eugene Hoshiko


Local Media House has a
vacancy for a Broadcast
Journalist / News Reporter
The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:
* Minimum of 2 years experience
* Must have a good understanding of news
gathering & production
* Must be an enthusiastic self starter
* The ability and willingness to learn
* Must have own transportation

Please submit resumes to:
The News Director
Island FM
P.O. Box N-1807
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 356-4515
E-mail: reporter@islandfmonline.com


HOLIDAY SALE ON OW!!!

* IMflCIliNG iltilEt* FREE [lY-i-W li WE EXPORT TO i ISlflDS 3 Month Lawy uaiable
U '&I Ill



l C 1:1 I ,B ^PI iRi


A WOMAN walks past Santa Claus dolls on sale at a gift shop Friday, Dec.
14, 2007 in Shanghai, China.


(; P-oNTAOGj
MOTORS LIMITED
Will Be

CLOSING
at 12 noon
On Wednesday December 19th
For Our Staff Party.
Holiday Hours:
l l.OPEN: 24th December from 9:00am 1:00pm
CLOSED: 25th and 26th December
OPEN: 27th 30th December
OPEN: 31st December 9:00an 1:00pm
Wc wish our valued customers a
Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year


TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLIES
PRE-CHRISTMAS
STOREWIDE

25% DISCOUNT
(EXCEPT SALE ITEMS)


SALE
STDEC. 17- 21
All Cassettes : $2
Selection Of C.D's: $5
All Children Videos: $5
L r Gift & Award Bibles: $5
'L e Selection of Children's Bible &
Other D.V.D's: $8.50 and up
Special Gaither Videos: $10
2 STUDY BIBLES, REFERENCE BOOKS
CHILDREN'S BIBLES, C.D'S, CASSETTES & VIDEOS
Evangelistic Temple, Collins Avenue at 4th Terrace West
Hours: 9:00-5:00 P.M., MONDAY-FRIDAY
Phone: 322-8304
........ ......... .. .......... ...............i............i


PAGE 22, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRBUNE MONDAYDECEMBER17,2007,PAGLOCALNE2S3


Reported tornado demolishes Y


jail building in Pasco County A I, i < ., z. ,


* LAND 0' LAKES, Florida

An apparent tornado demol-
ished a jail building and over-
turned several vehicles early
yesterday, authorities said,
according to the Associated
Press.
No injuries were reported.
The National Weather Service
said the storm was reported
about 5:15 a.m. in southern Pas-
co County, just north of Tampa.
One of two minimuni-securi-
ty annex buildings at the Pasco
County Jail in Land 0' Lakes
was destroyed, sheriff's
spokesman Doug Tobin said,
but all of the inmates had been
evacuated moments earlier into
the main jail.


"A few seconds after shutting
the door," Tobin said, "is when
that structure basically col-
lapsed."
The destroyed building was
a temporary structure to ease
overcrowding. Tobin said it
housed about 125 female
inmates.
A county Web site describes
it as a "tensioned-membrane
structure that is designed to
withstand 110-mile-per-hour
winds."
A second annex, housing
about 100 male inmates, was
free. of any serious damage,
Tobin said.
The main prison building,
which holds about 950 inmates,
sustained roof damage.


A cold front that moved east
into the Tampa Bay area com-
bined with the remnants of
Tropical Storm Olga to gener-
ate strong thunderstorms from
the Tampa Bay area north to
around Brooksville in Hernan-
do County before dawn Sun-
day, said Paul Close, a meteo-
rologist with the National
Weather Service in Ruskin. The
tornado was spawned from the
heavy storms.
A weather service meteorol-
ogist was working in Pasco
County on Sunday to try to
determine the path and the
strength of the apparent torna-
do, Close said.


Taiwan gives relief aid to Dominican Republic


N TAIPEI

Taiwan has donated 500,000 dollars to the
DominicanRepublic as relief aid and to help mod-
ernize foreign ministry equipment, the Central
News Agency said Saturday.
The donation was made by Foreign Minister
James Huang who is visiting Taiwan's Latin
American allies to consolidate ties, CNA said.
Huang arrived in the DominicanRepublic from
Panama, the first stop of his trip. He inspected
areas hit by tropical storm Olga and announced a
300,000-dollar donation for reconstruction. Olga
has killed 22 people and force evacuation of
35,000 people.
Last month Taiwan donated 225,000 US dollar
to the DominicanRepublic after tropical storm
Noel killed at least 89,people, left 42 missing and


caused millions of dollars in damages. Later on
Friday, Huang met with the DominicanRepublic's
Vice President Rafael Albuquerque and visited
the foreign ministry, where he, on behalf of the
Taiwan government, donated 200,000 US dollars
to help modernize foreign ministry's equipment.
The DominicanRepublic and Panama are
among Taiwan's 24 diplomatic allies half of
them in Latin America.
China, which sees Taiwan as its breakaway
province, is urging Taiwan's allies to drop Taipei
and recognize Beijing.
Taiwan stepped up efforts to safeguard ties
with Latin American allies after Costa Rica
dumped Taipei to recognize Beijing in June, to
benefit from China's surging economic and polit-
ical power.


S- .




'Quiznsi7S


Berard Rd. Rouabout (Dri

Major Credit Cards Accepled (Not Al
...' -. . '' "


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE






PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


*- At the Holiday Season, our thoughts turn gratefully to those who have made
our progress possible It is in this spirit we say...


Thank you and best wishes for th

Season's


OFFICE HOURS:
December 24
9am 12noon
December 25-26
Closed


te Holidays and Happy New Year.

greetings
S December 28 30
9am 4:30pm
December 31
9am 12noon
January 1 Closed
Re-open Jan. 2


AT CONFIDENCE WE CARE AND WE SERVE
Confidence Insurance Brokers & Agents Ltd.


Shirley St. (2nd floor The Standard House)
Phone: 323-6920 Fax: 325-8486


Exclusive agent of Bahamas First General Insurance Co. Ltd.


BIW~


-------------


LOCALNEWS


S,1/AI m l '1


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007





THE TRIBUNE


CX~isr
n. Adesire, longing,
or strong inclination for
a specific thing.


-Burton Wallace
Chamber of Commerce's
Entrepreneur of The Year 2007


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 25




.
:"/


O










I^A


Basilio Christie
Architect


CWhatt are 'Y)U wishing for this Christmnas?

243 Bay Street 1 [242] 322.1851


[DT DIAMONDS&
INTERNATIONAL
[242] 323.1171


D ]i DIAMONDS
'f1INTERNATIONAL
WATCH & DESIGN
[242] 325.3837


T[ TANZANITE'
INTERNATIONAL
[242] 322.8389


'""





PAGE 26, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


Ladles' Courtenay
Bermuda Shorts


UPC# 80W-.1533-47BLK
OLV,COBBKHA,NVYW


Pretty Home Bath Rug
$ 99
S4U 2x3


- Trent DVD Player 2 Ch Ultra Slim
$qq99
, 9, UPCf 40-DV03351
Washer. i Assorted
-*


Frigidaire Refrigerator
18cu.ft Almond White
SLQQ99
[] U GUP'f GLIT1831nDQ


A 1


A


RsSwreu~


w14


R-. ... Avani
SV9or 20" Flat CRfr $
$17 99 2(
"UPC CFTMVM
K : *" :"* ifiMummmmm............


THE'T


I I urw cZ4


46





MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 27


3UNE


S_


/Ib
Item# 3E


LSILOkq
RuOLhfM


UPC# 1116116070


$ 56ZAssorted


Dole Fruit Juices Kra Amergan


Assorted


$ 3916slc.
l12oz.
ITEEP619680
1SoDri
Hand Towel

9 1092
S|Single Roll
ITEM# 7331025865


tr, r
L I A


The Perfect gift.
For anyone.
Anytime.


Open Mon-Thum 8am-9pm
Fr & Sat 7am 10pm &
Sun 7am 12 noon
Old Trail Road
fc42l334041
Credt Cards Accepted


Prices are valid hi Produoes shown may vary from
____g acaaj jmuarl product in stock
SNMmu Location ONLYIGood while supp last
Sale ends Wednesday, December 26th, 2007


UP# har953S
Assorted




THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


/~~~~>


The Santa Claus

Christmas Committee

The Tribune


- $10,000

- $8,000

- $6,000

- $4,O00

- $2,000

-$0


I , ,s l i.uan h a ,l.an 'Leaig.,, I,


The Tribune, Guardian and 100 Jamz
seek your help in giving the joy of Christmas to
hundreds of underprivileged children.
Please donate to our program and to the children.
Please drop of Cheques to The Tribune or mail to:









THE T R I B U N E




UB"^''* Si^ ,(gD --^


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


Premier Board slammed




by majority shareholder


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Board of BISX-list-
ed Premier Real Estate
Investment Corporation
has .come under fire
from the majority share-
holder, which has threatened to force
the removal of all directors and
accused them of undermining the
company's value by selling-off prop-
erty assets.
The joint official liquidators for
Mosaic Composite, a Bahamian-
domiciled investment vehicle, which
holds 50.8 per cent of Premier's


* Chief investor threatens EGM to force removal of BISX-listed firm's directors if
they persist in ex-Coca-Cola property sale to Franklyn Wilson's Sunshine Group
* Joint liquidators of scandal-plagued investment fund view current course with
'alarm', as keen to preserve value of top recovery source for investors
* Sunshine sale raises undervalue concerns


shares, have warned the Board that
plans to sell ont of Premier's assets,
the former JFK drive warehouse for
Caribbean Bottling, the Bahamian
Coca-Cola franchise, should not go
through unless they gave prior


approval.
Mosaic's joint liquidators, Bahami-
an accountant Clifford Culmer of
BDO Mann Judd, and Canadian Ray-
mond Massi, warned that if they did
not first approve the JFK Drive ware-


house sale, they "reserve the right to
take such further action against the
Board as they my be advised, includ-
ing without limitation, replacing the
Board in an Extraordinary General
Meeting (EGM)".


They said they "view with alarm"
any attempt to dispose of Premier's
real estate holdings, which include

See BOARD, page 8,9


Port shareholders

'breached fiduciary

duties' with disposals

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE disposal of stakes in the Grand Bahama Port Author-
ity's (GBPA) 'productive assets', without first obtaining
licensee consent and complying with the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, "constituted breaches of trust and of fiduciary
duty" by its two shareholders, an attorney has argued.
In his arguments filed with the Supreme Court to support
the application by the Freeport Property Owners and
Licensees Association,
Maurice Glinton said the
sale of stakes in the Grand See GBPA, page 11



Resort set to start sales

within next six months


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE developers of the Cape
Eleuthera Resort and Yacht
Club are expecting to start res-
idential sales within six
months, its managing director
told The Tribune:
David Green said that once
property sales began, the com-
pany's employees, numbering
30 currently, should increase.
"Right now we have season-
al employees, but that should
pick up with the home sales,"
Mr Green said.
The developer is now pro-
moting and marketing the
marina, which has slips avail-
able, as well as the 19 two-bed-
room, villas that are being
operated as a hotel. The gro-
cery store and dock house are
also operational.
Mr Green said the project
was working to relaunch a pop-


ular restaurant on Cape
Eleuthera in the 1970s, the
Bull Dolphin, which should be
opened for business autumn
2008. The Bull Dolphin will
join the assorted restaurants
and Tikki Bars planned to dot
the property, he added.
Included in the project's
Heads of Agreement were a
number of community pro-
jects, such as the school that
enables students to do scien-
tific research, as well as the
Cape Eleuthera Institute,
which has attracted scientists
from around the world to
address conservation and
renewable energy- including
the use of recycled cooking
grease as a form of diesel oil
and solar power.
Other projects, such as a
reverse osmosis plant and park
playground, which are included
in the Heads of Agreement,
are either in the works or
under construction, Mr Green
said.

.. ., a


Sell renewable energy

to BEC, report urges


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
PRIVATE companies
should lead the development
of renewable energy in the
Bahamas by constructing their
own utility-size generation
plants to supply the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation (BEC)
and Grand Bahama Power


Company with power, a con-
sultants' report recommending
this as a way to reduce risk for
the nation's two main power
suppliers and lower their debts.
A report on renewable ener-
gy sources in the Bahamas,
submitted by US-based con-

See BEC, page 6


Port receivers 'wrongly procured'


* By NEIL HARTNELL ,
Tribune Business Editor
THERE
was "a mis-
carriage of
jurisdiction"
in the
appointment
of a receiver
for the Grand
Bahama Port
Authority
(GBPA), a
group of its
licensees have
argued, alleging that because
it has governmental responsi-
bilities for Freeport's develop-
ment and administration, the


Nassau


winding-up provisions of the
1992 Companies Act do not
apply to it.
In his skeleton arguments on
the need to discharge the
GBPA's court-appointed
receivers, Clifford and Myles
Culmer of BDO Mann Judd,
Maurice Glinton, lead attor-
ney for the Freeport Property
Owners and Licensees Asso-
ciation, alleged that the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
conferred statutory 'specified
rights and obligations' of a gov-
ernmental, development
nature on the GBPA.
Mr Glinton added that, as a
result, "as a company it is not
susceptible to ordinary wind-


* Exuma


ing-up processes under the
Companies Act 1992".
He alleged that the court-
appointed receivership,
obtained in a hearing where
only one side was present -
from ex-Justice Jeannie
Thompson by attorneys repre-
senting the late Edward St
George's estate, was "wrongly
procured".
Of the impact on GBPA
licensees and Freeport from
the ownership dispute and sub-
sequent receivership, Mr Glin-
ton alleged: "The undisputed
fact of which the court is enti-

See PORT, page 7


*Freeport


* Cayman


Life and Health Insurance Mortgage Lending Retirement Planning


~il ll -l .ega .. ,- .-
THUE DAVIS FAMILY one family with many needs. For
NEl DAVIS FAAMILY a solid financial foundation and
customized advice, their choice is
Colinalmperial.


Colinalmperial.
lA Confidence For Life l -.


242.356.8300
I nfo@ColinaImperial. com


S


*Abaco


,I


C1 ntiit'l l-Ile Fovl'it


.:'. ;














More and more airlines offering flat-bed seats to



business and first class international passengers


NEW YORK (AP) In
some ways, Andy Abramson's


morning routine is typical: He
shaves, brushes his teeth and


COOK

NEEDED FOR

KINGSWAY CAFETERIA

FOR JANUARY, 2008.

Kingsway Academy is seeking the serivces
of a cook to prepare meals in the Cafeteria
as of January, 2008. Interested applicants
should collect applications from the Busi-
ness office on Bernard Road from 8:00 4:
00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Successful applicants must:
Be participating, committed born-again
Christian
Have a minimum of at least five (5)
years experience in food handling and
preparation.
Have a valid Health Certificate
Have a genuine love for children and
young people, etc.

For further information please contact the
following:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Telephone: 324-6269 or 324-6887

Deadline for applications Friday, Decem-
ber 28, 2007


a

C


combs his hair before slipping
on some nice slacks and a shirt
for a meeting with a client.
* But what's not typical about
Abramson's routine is that he
isn't doing any of this in his
Del Mar, California home.
He's preparing for a day of
meetings aboard one of sever-
al commercial airlines that
promises to provide all the
comforts of home, including a
good night's sleep.
Call it the evolution of first
class, or a return to the days
when flying was glamorous,i
but an increasing number of
airlines are offering flat-bed
seats to business and/or first
class international passengers.
Unlike lie-flat seats, which
are angled, flat-bed seats
recline to a full 180 degrees.
The bed dimensions vary
depending on the airline: Vir-
gin Atlantic's seat length is
about two metres; British Air-
ways is 1.8 metres in business
class and just under two metres
in first class.
"I'm six-foot-tall, and I feel
comfortable in it," said
Abramson, who is CEO of an
international marketing com-
pany. "I'm able to sleep flat
out without having to curl my
toes or bend my knees. When-
ever I take a West Coast Lon-
don flight, I usually spend half
to two-thirds of the flight
asleep, more than I get at
home. It sure makes it easier if
you have to get off the plane
and you want to be function-
al."
Of course, a bed on an air-
plane is not a new idea. In the
1930s, Pan Am's Clippers,
which took off from the water,
had berths that folded down
into beds. Post-Second World
War, the airline's Boeing 377
Stratocruisers offered sleeper
seats. In the '80s, Japan Air-
lines and Philippine Airlines
had spiral staircases leading to
an upper deck of curtained off
beds aboard their 747s. Even-
tually the beds were eliminat-
ed.


But because of deregulation
and increased competition, the
economics of the airline indus-
try changed, said Dan Petree,
dean of the College of Busi-
ness at Embry-Riddle Aero-
nautical University. It became
much more difficult to allocate
spending space on beds over
seats, he said.
"I think now we're seeing
attempts by airlines to differ-
entiate their brands, to try to
create additional value in terms
of the service they provide
their customers," he said.."I
think that's one of the reasons
we' are seeing this tendency to
pay attention to the relatively
high-margin business flier."
British Airways was the first
in 1996 to put in flat-bed seats
for first class passengers, and in
2000 for British Airways' busi-
ness class, called Club World.
Other airlines followed, includ-
ing South African Airways,
Virgin Atlantic, Air Canada,
Cathay Pacific and Singapore
Airlines. (Several other airlines
have the angled lie-flat seats).
US carriers, set back because
of financial troubles, are try-
ing to catch up.
United Airlines became the
first US carrier last month to
offer flat-bed seats in interna-
tional business cabins. Delta is
planning to begin introducing
flat-bed seats in business class
starting next year. And Amer-
ican is continuing to replace
some of its business-class seats
with angled lie-flat seats.
"The challenge for the air-
line is that when you are com-
pletely flat, you are taking up
more space on the plane and
can't fit as many of these on
the plane," said Matt Daimler,
founder of SeatGuru.com.
"Lie-flat (angled) seats allow
them to get a good number of
seats on the plane and still
offer more comfort."
The perks of airborne beds
go beyond peaceful sleep. Sin-
gapore Airlines' new Airbus
A380 has suites with double
beds, sliding doors, wardrobes
and window blinds. Virgin
Atlantic offers its Upper Class,
or business class, passengers
ground transportation, in-flight
massages, and a clubhouse at
the airport where they can
shower, dine and check e-mail.
"The private suites we seeing
from airlines like Singapore
are essentially condos in the
clouds," said Robert Buckman,
director of airline distribution
strategies for Amadeus North
America. "The sleeping


A SINGAPORE AIRLINES air stewardess adjusts the private suite of
the First Class section in the Airbus A380 jetliner which had just land-
ed in Singapore's Changi International Airport in this October 17,


2007 file photo in Singapore.
arrangements and other
amenities go well beyond the
lie-flat seating option, but so
does the price. These private
suites are designed to attract
a certain type of luxury or very
VIP traveller looking for a very
exclusive travel experience."
Fuelling the demand for lie-
flat beds is competition
between the airlines for pre-
mium passengers, more valu-
able to an airline than coach
passengers. First class/business
class international tickets can
cost thousands of dollars more.
Over the years, sitting up
front became a place for a per-
son with lots of miles who
wanted more leg room and
free alcohol, said George Hof-
fer, economics professor at
Virginia Commonwealth Uni-
versity. So it became hard for
passengers and companies to
spend thousands of .dollars
without feeling like they were
getting a lot more for their
money.
"I liken the sleeper com-
partments to in essence trying
to recreate what used to be
called Pullman class service,
ultra-first class service," he
said. "'Give them more space
and hopefully charge them a
premium price such that it


more than covers the extra
space we have given them."'
A good night's sleep on an
overnight flight can make the
difference in how well business
executives function the next
day, said Buckman. But he said
vacationers are taking advan-
tage of the beds as well. While
there is no hanky-panky
allowed, even with double-bed
suites, "that honeymoon to
Hong Kong is definitely more
enjoyable and less stressful -
for the happy couple if they
can get there and back a little
easier and more comfortably,"
Buckman said.
For coach passengers who
may complain of fitful sleep,
German airline Lufthansa is
considering an all sleeper-seat
economy cabin with triple
bunk beds.
Abramson said airplane
beds have made his life much
easier. "You don't have to
worry about the person next
to you chatting your ear off,"
he said.
"You don't have to'worry
about being crushed in the
seat. It's not a hotel bed, but
considering where you are and
what you are doing, it's a very
comfortable way to fly if you
can afford to fly that way."


A SINGLE BED aboard the firt production Airbus A380 superjumbo jet bearing the colours of Singapore
Airlines during the delivery ceremony in Colomiers, near Toulouse, southern France is shown in this Octo-
ber 15, 2007 file photo.


AUSTRALIANS Tony and Julie Elwood share a romantic moment on their double bed in the exclusive suite
aboard the Singapore Airlines Airbus A380 in this October 25, 2007 file photo. An increasing number of
airlines are offering flat-bed seats to business and/or first class international passengers.


SScotiabank*







Scotiabank Caribbean Treasury Limited Scotia Capital


Associate


Scotia Capital is the global Investment & Corporate Banking
division of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Presently, we are seeking
to engage an Associate, to be based in our Nassau Office with
the Scotiabank Caribbean Treasury Limited, a wholly-owned
subsidiary of The Bank of Nova Scotia.


The role will ultimately support the existing team in all aspects
of the investment, structuring and trading of derivatives,
structured products and alternative assets. Considerable
training will be provided, however, the ideal candidate will have
a highly quantitative background and advanced exposure to
complex derivative products. The ability to work effectively in a
fast-paced and high pressure environment is a necessity.


Qualifications such as a CFA designation or graduate level
financial degree are desired but not required. Relevant job
experience will also be highly regarded.


All interested applicants should forward a copy of their CV to
scotiabank.bs(&)scotiabank.com on orbefore December28,2007.


wmmmlm


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3B


Contractors back




report's contracts





transparency fears


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE Bahamian Contractors
Association (BCA) has fully
endorsed the findings of an
Organisation of American
States (OAS) report on the
lack of transparency in the ten-
dering process for Bahamas
government contracts.
The BCA's president,
Stephen Wrinkle, told Tribune
Business that the Association
has been working closely with
the Ministry of Works to
ensure that an accurate and
thorough database of con-
tractors qualified for the spec-
ified scope of government
works was completed. This was
something the review con-
ducted by the OAS MEISIC
committee recommended in its
report.
Mr Wrinkle said that imple-
menting a rotational pool of
qualified and licensed contrac-
tors would go a long way in
ensuring that the same con-
tractors do not always get the
job, making it fair for all.
He added that Works Min-
ister Earl Deveaux has asked
the industry to submit its com-
ments and ideas to the min-
istry regarding the proposed
amendments to the draft Con-
tractors Bill by December 31,
2007, prior to it being submit-
ted to Cabinet.
"I don't know how long it
will be between going to cabi-
net and making, it,to Parlia-
ment, but we are very hopeful
and it is something that the
minister is pushing," Mr Wrin-
kle said.
He added that one of the


major things the Association
wishes to see established is a
skills certification for all
Bahamian construction work-
ers.
"There needs to be measures
put in place so that you know
whether a contractor is quali-
fied to do the work" he added.
"You do not want to have a
contractor who has only built
houses to win the contract for a
Baha Mar, and at the same
time you do not want some-
one who is only qualified to
build dog houses to build your
new home."
Mr Wrinkle said this was


another essential part of ensur-
ing that industry standards are
set. He explained that the
Bahamas Technical and Voca-
tional Institute (BTVI), the
organisation that will ulti-
mately be responsible for the
certification, the BCA and the
ministry are actively working
on this.
Another key area, he said,
was the BCA's request that
developers post performance
bonds. Given the amount of
construction that will take
place in the Bahamas during
2008, Mr Wrinkle said it was
essential that proper regula-
tions were established and
enforced.
The OAS committee report
said the Bahamian government
needed to create a centralised
contractors database, some-
thing it said should be com-
pulsory for all government
departments, as it would foster
principles of openness, equity
and efficiency,
It urged the Government to
put in place a specific mecha-
nism allowing for complaints
and dispute resolution at the
administration level, as well as
a written procedure on how
government entities should
receive and respond to chal-
lenges and complaints.


~Ii
b i Ini


Having trouble making international calls?



Switch to IndiGO!

the better telephone company


v.t..








i


*~ **a* *: -*


The year ends and you begin.

C'elMeh I atv t IIIhl > ', .,r % it 1I, ir r I. I ,n, I. I,, >-i I-' l I s 1 ,.-1
The \eW.c tiri (;rani BhI It l.rIil I ), I i ,r.I R.i I .i il
ring in 2c.O' L th' ahl i nir ii '..I



1.--111 i Nknls ,Irr ] lI.I I Ii rII.I. IIr IIIr,,,I II


,,t.o_ intl 2 a.m .. and a c h.3 n |a >u.iri t i ..rit [,dnt tNliihltE
IpN ar fro m mlx tent from the Nl atrix\ rBanl. .,tjl'vm (CimLu 1).


. O t. orp t r ltd. ic i re.ervuliun. plej.e
0eriion code NYE\'[V vhn [Ie.laing











I 1h I sTh li'is it( liu i t Ih I- l.'"

1 THEWESTIN

|GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND
1OUR LUCAYA
S., RESORT





STA OOD PREFERRED GUEST
P ea s Include room, taxes, SIrvce charjEiS, rH Oarl me;3, 3nd Ito iCket lto Ihe Nw' Year's Eve
I pen bar from 8 p m t 12arm arid cash bar Iror, 12am Lo 3m Camp Lucaya opon until
1 rI, for kids ages 3 to 12 will-, ford and games Irol n,:cluded rn pacrago pncel Overnight package
'- llle to local residents only-, does not appi to U S. guests. 2007 Siarwood Hotels & Resorts
*. .llw~Id All RighAts Reserved.


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


i BUSINESS I


Urgently seeking Director Of Human Resources
5-10 years experience, salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications.

Write to: P.O. Box CB.12707
Nassau, Bahamas


k RTER)













Hotel room revenues


increase slightly in


'07


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
HOTEL room revenues


increased in May 2007 by 1.8
per cent, and by 8.2 per cent in
June, compared to the same
time last year, statistics
released by the Ministry of


Tourism show.
In May, room revenues
totalled $33.667 million as
compared to $33.057 million
collected in 2006. Hotel room


Idear ad Visiting ofessor atiThe
The B mas 199 and facilitated ,
shne e f the Herbarium.',
i t ork The amamas,.
ting bio a
yo 0Baha I Pn. _
? ~ Y M;}t -


revenues hit $37,534 million in
June compared to $34.709 mil-
lion for that month in 2006..
Room revenue year-to-date
figures for the period ending
2007 revealed a slight increase
of 0.3 per cent, the increase
going from $225.604 million in
2006 to the $226.377 generated
this year.
Room rates have also
increased this year, up from
the average daily room rates
of $163.88 charged last year to
$179.18 in May. For June, aver-
age daily room rates increased
by 15.4 per cent rising from $
167.93 to $193.72. This con-


tribute to a year-to-date 10.3
per cent increase, with aver-
age daily room rates up to $
198.11 from $179.65.
Average Room Rates
increased in Nassau/Paradise
Island by 10.7 per cent year-
to-date for June, rising from
$187.46 to $207.56. Notably,
June saw an increase of 18 per
cent, going from,$176.02 to
$207.68.
On Grand Bahama, room
rates increased by 6 per cent
- going from $139.08 to
$147.42. The amnily Islands saw\
increases for the year to .June
of 5.5 per cent, up to an aver-


age $229.84 from $217.78
Further statistics indicated
that available room nights
declined this year, not surpris-
ing given that several proper-
ties were undergoing renova-
tions.
Year-to-June statistics said
that available room nights
declined by 1.6 per cent from
1,649,872 rooms in 2006 to
1,623.611 this year. There was
a 2.6 per cent decline in Nas-
sau/Paradise Island and a 4.7
decline in the Family Islands.
Grand Bahama, however, saw
an increase in available rooms
of 2.4 per cent.


Greek

firm joins

race for

BORCO

A Greek company, Aegean
Marine Petroleum Network
Company, is said to have
emerged as the top bidder for
the Bahamas Oil Refining Com-
pany (BORCO) International
Limited, international media
reports have suggested.
First Reserve, the US private
equity firm that is the largest
player of its kind in the energy
industry was previously said to
have been leading the race, but
there are now reports that
Aegean's head has gone to
Venezuela personally in a bid
to close the deal with PDVSA,
the Venezuelan state-owned oil
company that owns BORCO.
PDVSA executives have con-
firmed that no deal has been
.sealed vet. i


"Becoming the Employer of Choice in The Bahamasi"


Algernon S.P.B. Allen. Sr.
and Barry A. Sawyer. Partners of
Allen. Allen & Co., announce the
entry of Algernon Allen, Jr. into
the law firm as an Associate, ef-
fective the 1st of November, 2007.
Algernon Allen. Jr. is a
former Head Boy and graduate of
St.Andrews School, Nassau and
a sixth form graduate of Millfield
School, Somerset England. He ob-
tained a BSC(Hons) degree in Bio-
chemistry from Kingston University,
Kingston, England in 1998. He then
worked in the financial sector in the
City of London at Commerzbank o
Securities from 1999-2000 and on
Wall Street. New York. U.S.A. as a
European Equity Sales Associate at
Commerzbank Capital Markets from 2000-2003.
Mr. Allen. Jr. then pursued and obtained an Honours Bach-
elor of Law degree with Business Finance from the University of Buck-
ingham. Buckingham, England, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Profes-
sional Legal Skills from the Inns of Court Schx)l of Law in London.
He was called to the English Bar by Grays Inn on the 12th of October,
2007, and was admitted to The lahamas Bar on the 26th of October. 2007.
Mr. Allen, a Masters swimmer, has represented The Bahamas in
swimming at the Carifta Gamies, Caribbean Island Swinmming Champion-
ships (C.I.S.C), Central American and Caibbean Swimming Champion-
ships (C.C.CAN) and the Pan American Games,. ie is also an avid reader.
The partners take great pleasure in welcoming this talented. highly
educated and personable Associate into the general practice of the firm which
includes Civil and Family Litigation; Comitnercial. corporatee and Financial
Services: Real Property and Conveyancin_: ,'Willbs and Probates: Labour
Laws; Trusts and Industrial Properties: and a limited Criminal Law P practice
Allen, Allen & Co. is located at Allen I louse. Dowdeswell Street in the
City Nassau and maL be contacted at:

telephone: 325-4178/325-5582

e-mail: aliealluenaatI2J el Ld
Fax: 322-6313
P.O.Box N- 10205
Nassau, The Balamas


TECHNOLOGY
COMPANY LIMITED
STORE OPENING a CLOSING HOURS
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
December 10th., to 14th Open 9am ti 6pi ,
Mon Fri
December 15th. Open I0am t1 4pmn
Saturday
December 17th to 21st Open 9am to ,apani
Mon Fri
SDecember 22nd Open loam to 6pm
Saturday
eDcember 24th Open 9am to 7pm i
Mon Christmas Eve
Clod for Christma-jolidays reopen
for business Dec 27th 31st
lse anuarys 1. 2'008
JANUARY 2& 3'2008 FOR INIVENiTORV' ILL
)PEN FOR RUt1,VESS US '4 l'.S tOFJa, .t o


?Baktr'!5 3Bap
GOLF &6 OCEAN CLUB
Great Guana Cay, Abaco
The Bahamas


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
You are invited to apply for the following position currently available.


Assistant Marketing Manager


Key Requirements
* A demonstrated track record of sales to high net worth clients
* Extensive experience maintaining strong long term customer
relationships with significant add-on/repeat business
* A strong existing network with high net worth clients in the U.S.A.,
Europe and The Bahamas
* Ability to develop and implement marketing campaigns to high net
worth clients
Qualifications
* Bachelor's degree in Sales, Marketing or related subject; professional
certifications
* Minimum five (5) years experience in high net worth real estate
promotions
* Must be proficient in C2C software, ACT, Power Point, Microsoft Word,
Excel and Asset Manager
* Must be innovative, demonstrate strong leadership and customer
relations skills
* Must have excellent written and verbal communication skills


The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work in a growing
and dynamic organization and must be a self-starter, team player, work
at the highest standards of performance, and meet deadlines.
If you are progressive and prepared to advance your career, submit
your resume to the attention of the Director of HR & Training,
hr(c)bakersbayclub.com or by fax at 242-367-0804.


__


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


THE TRIBUNE







THE TIBUN MONAY, ECEMER 1, 207,IPGESS


Cash resigns as


Doctors


chief financial officer


DOCTORS Hospital's chief
financial officer, Darron Cash,
has resigned his position with
effect from December 31,2007.
Mr. Cash, who has served as
chief financial officer since May
2001, will be replaced by existing
vice-president for corporate
finance, Joanne Lowe, as interim
Chief Financial Officer.
"Mr. Cash's strong leadership
has been a vital component in
the demonstrated growth and
success of Doctors Hospital.
Darron has helped prepare Doc-
tors Hospital to meet future
challenges with his insight, expe-
rience, integrity, and personality.
I know I speak for all of the
Board when I say it has truly
been an honour to know and
work with Darron, and we wish
him the best of success for his
future endeavours," said Charles
Sealy II, Doctors Hospital's chief


executive. Doctors Hospital has
begun a search for a permanent
chief financial officer. Until the
permanent position is transi-
tioned in, Mrs Lowe is expected
to fill the role for the next three
months, beginning on January
1, 2008.
As a Doctors Hospital Vice
President, Mrs Lowe has a long
history of leadership and expe-
rience, bringing over 17 years of
extensive knowledge in finan-
cial healthcare management and
a high level of financial acumen.
Mrs. Lowe is a Certified Gen-
eral Accountant and has served
as vice-president for corporate
finance for over a decade. She is
also a member of the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accoun-
tants (BICA). "The work that
we have done at Doctors Hos-
pital is only the beginning of the
transformation of this organiaa-


tion," Mrs Lowe said. "With our
return to fiscal stability, we have
the foundation in place to ensure
that Doctors Hospital will


remain at the cutting edge, and
continue to provide the latest
technologies and clinical inno-
vations along with our compe-


tent medical staff. Together, with
the Associates, leadership team,
* our Board of Directors and the
community that we serve, we


can work to ensure that the
patients of Doctors Hospital
have the quality care they need,
right here at home."


Vacancy Announcement No: SGP- 2007/ 0001
Deadline For Application: 21 December 2007


Position Title
Duty Station

Grade Level


Duration
Post Number:
Organizational Unit


National Coordinator
Nassau, BAHAMAS
'An attractive compensation package based on qualifications and
experience
One Year, with the possibility of renewal


GEF-SGP


The Global Environment Facility (GEF), established in 1991, helps developing countries fund
projects and programs that protect the global environment. GEF grants support projects related to
biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent
organic pollutants. The Small Grants Programme (SGP) embodies the very essence of sustainable
development. SGP channels financial and technical support directly to NGOs and CBOs for
activities that conserve and restore the environment http://sqp.undp.or.. GEF is establishing the
SGP in The Bahamas.


DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.


-: _-' ,... ."J ...."4


Effective management of the GEF-SGP (Global Environment Facility Small Grants
Programme) local team, the SGP programme and its portfolio -- from programme strategy to
individual project concept and design to technical support to SGP grantees, monitoring and
evaluation -- to ensure compliance with the overall approved global SGP Strategic
Framework, the SGP Operational Guidelines, the SGP annual work programme, the
national environmental and sustainable development priorities, as well as the annual
delivery of the national SGP targets.

Building strategic partnerships with development partners, such as donors, foundations,
private sector and civil society, to promote SGP and mobilize resources.

Contribution to GEF-SGP's efforts to develop effective national, regional and global
networks for technical support and knowledge management, within the GEF SGP and with
external institution, including academia.

The Terms of Reference (TOR) may be viewed at www.iobs.undp.orgq.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Advanced university degree in environmental.economics, Business Administration or related
field
At least 5 years of relevant experience in development work, which should include
programme management preferably with an extended specialized experience in any of the
GEF-SGP focal areas.
Excellent analytical and writing skills
Excellent people management and interpersonal skills
Ability to communicate effectively
Good negotiation and problem-solving skills
Proficiency in word-processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database applications
Fluency in English




TO APPLY:
Send applications including UNDP/ GEF-SGP National Coordinator
a 5 10 page writing Bahamas Environment Science and Technology (BEST) Commission
sample to: Office of the Prime Minister
Nassau Court, P.O. Box CB-10980
Nassau, The Bahamas
via e-mail to registrv.im@undp.orq or online at www.iobs.undp.org
This vacancy is open to qualified male and female nationals of the Bahamas.
We thank you for your application but only short listed candidates will be contacted


NOTICE

PUBLIC WORKERS'
CO-OPERATIVE CREDIT
UNION LIMITED

WILL CLOSED ON: DECEMBER 24, 2007 AT
1:00 P.M.

AND

RE-OPEN: JANUARY 2ND, 2008 AT
9:00 A.M.


j ly-15
<"twar^ty


i~ee14s


Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the
Royal Island resort and residential project at North Eleuthera
invites suitably qualified individuals to apply for the
following positions with the company:
Spa Manager
* Must have at least 5 years experience in all aspects of
spa therapies.
* Experience with and knowledge of local spa and beauty
products.
* A commitment to service at the highest level.
Yoga Instructor/Fitness Club Instructor
* Must have experience in fitness club industry.
* Qualified yoga instructor.
* Experience in the tourism field a plus.
Sous Chef
* Must be able to prepare 5 star French cuisines in an
island atmosphere.
* Must have experience in a 4 or 5 star small boutique
restaurant environment.
* Commitment to service at highest level
A la Carte Waiter
* Must have at least 5 years experience as a waiter in a
fine dining atmosphere or highly regarded restaurant
* Knowledge of French inspired cuisine a plus.
* Commitment to service at highest level.
Bartender
* Must have 5 years experience in a 4 or 5 star hotel or
cocktail bar.
* Must have extensive knowledge of cocktails and wine
varieties.
* Experience in dealing with high level clientele.
All positions require successful applicants to reside at
North Eleuthera.
Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to:
Harcourt Management Services Ltd.
P.O. Box N-1991
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@gomezcorp.com
Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted.


I


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


~1~h~


jewo60a








PAG BUSMNDYIDCEBEN7,207SH TIBN


BEC, from page 1


BMTTAS Maritime Institute
Registration going on now for 2nd Quarter!
Mon-Fri 9am-5pm/Saturdays 1 lam-3pm

Courses Offered

Associates Degree (AMT)
Marine Transportation (18) Months
Associates Degree (AME)
Marine Engineering (18) Months
Cruise Hospitality/Basic Safety Training (6 weeks)
Captain A & B License Course (16 weeks)

Registered Before Dec. 21st, 2007 available
20% discount on tuition fees!

Classes Start January 7th, 2008
Evening Classes Available

For information please call:
328-7967/328-7968


ASAN. pRtCHARD


I I LTD.

OPEN
Saturday Dec.22, 2007
7:30am 4:30pm

CLOSED
Monday 24th,
Tuesday 25th,
Wednesday 26th


OPEN
Monday Dec. 31st
7:30am-4:30pm

CLOSED

Tuesday Jan. 1st, 2008 -





CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited
is presently considering applications for a

I.T. SPECIALIST (Senior Globus System Developer)
Credit Suisse Private Banking is one of the world's premier private banks. It is setting new standards that
go beyond traditional banking services. Our dedicated and highly qualified staff provides our clientele
with comprehensive solutions in individual investment counseling and professional portfolio
management. Our total commitment is always to our clients and we focus without compromise on their
financial well-being and their personal values.

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

+ Qualifications:
At least Five (5) years experience in installation, configuration and troubleshooting in a
banking environment
Superior knowledge of GLOBUSIT24 Banking Application in both support and
development roles
Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science or equivalent
Knowledge of AIX 5.1 5.3, UNIVERSE/JBASE, PL/SQL
Experience in working with 3lobus/T24 related migration or implementation projects.

e+ Personal Qualities:
Excellent organizational, interpersonal and communication skills
Good technical and problem solving skills and experience
Ability to work under pressure and with minimum supervision
Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and willingness to work flexible hours as overtime
Previous experience of working in a production support role in maintaining Globus/T24
system is a plus.

+ Other Duties:
Answer Helpdesk requests (provide support & troubleshoot)
Provide UNIVERSE & GLOBUS training to IT Staff
Ensure compliance to IT guidelines / directives
Ensure that "Business Contingency Planning" requirements are followed
Other duties & projects assigned by the Manager of Department

+* Benefits provided include:
Competitive salary and performance bonus
Pension Plan
Health and Life Insurance
Ongoing internal and external career development/training program
APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum requirements
need not apply.
Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O.Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

DEADLINE: 21 DECEMBER. 2007


sultants Haley & Aldrich to
the Government in August
2007, said the key question for
this nation to resolve was
whether private companies
and residents would be able to
own electricity generation
facilities that supplied the
national grid, or whether this
should remain the sole respon-
sibility of BEC and Grand
Bahama Power.
Using solar photovoltaic
technology, power producers
.in the Bahamas could range
from home suppliers to com-
mercial properties such as
resorts and warehouses, and
utility-scale generation pro-
jects, the consultants suggest-
ed. Any excess energy pro-
duced by the first two cate-
gories, they added, should be
sold to the national grid.


Coming ddwn firmly on the
side of BEC and Grand
Bahama Power contracting
with private owners of utility-
size renewable energy sources,
and purchasing electricity from
them at an agreed price, Haley
& Aldrich.said: "The benefit of
contracting with private com-
panies would be to allow BEC
and Grand Bahama Power to
outsource the generation of
renewable energy projects,
rather than incur the risk of
developing a project them-
selves.
"The utilities would not
need to raise capital and take
on additional debt; rather,
developers with their own
funds will build their own pro-
jects.
"Through a power purchase
agreement, the BEC and
Grand Bahama Power would
agree to purchase power at a
certain price from the devel-
oper, providing the developer
with a guaranteed source of
revenue for the lifetime of the
contract.
"An additional benefit is
that the price is then locked in
for the term of the contract,
and won't be influenced by
future increases in fuel or
materials prices."
Under the status quo, Haley
& Aldrich warned that "elec-
tricity costs will become a pro-
portionately larger part of the


ilchWisc


CUSTOMER

Appledoaton

ii I^ ^

J~~ffInF


DIIA CAM

DIGITAL CAMERAS
6.MP-$160.00


economy", given BEC and
Grand Bahama Power's
reliance on turbines and gen-
erators run by diesel oil or
heavy fuel oil.
Both energy sources are
highly dependent on global oil
prices for their input costs, a
factor that in turn determines
the final bill for Bahamian
business and residential con-
sumers, as this is linked to the
fuel surcharge the power com-
panies impose every month.
Haley & Aldrich noted that
electricity demand in the
Bahamas was increasing ever
year, largely due to new resort
and residential construction.
Between 1995 and 2000, elec-
tricity demand in the Bahamas
grew by 400 million kilowatt
hours to 1,715 kilowatt hours.
And between 2000 and 2002,
electricity demand jumped by
a further 170 kilowatt hours to
1,886 kilowatt hours, a cost
that accounted for $467 mil-
lion or 1/12 of the Bahamian
economy in 2002.
To stimulate renewable
energy production in the.
Bahamas, the consultants said
this nation would need to
develop a pricing structure.
While net metering was the
simplest option, as the price of
electricity being generated was
the same as the purchase price,
with residents receiving a net
monthly credit if the electrici-
ty produced exceeded what
they used, Haley & Aldrich
listed several different options.
"In many locations, the price


Established Insurance Agency invites suitably qualified individuals to apply for the
Temporary Position of Accounting Clerk
Essential Duties
1. Preparation of monthly Bank reconciliations, Insurance Company Actount Snlll f?
2. Preparation of Monthly Journal Entries
3. Customer Statement/Notice processing
, 4. Cheque/Payment Preparation
5. Maintenance of General Ledger Sub ledger schedule,-
(Fixed Assets, Misc Receivables, Accounts Payables)
6. Assisting in the prepa ration of Month-end Financial Reports
7. Liasing with external Auditors
8. Verification of Daily Cash Deposits
9. Misc. accounting assignments
Education And/Or Experience
Minimum of an Associates Degree in Accounting with at least 3 years prior experience.


All applications should be emailed (by WedrnesdaL, December
A' mention of the Chief Fiandial'OfficeY'rt
i.' ... . 1Fnace11o74@lahooom., .i. ; ...... .


19, 2007) to:
. i I ,


S. :- ,.-,
_ i f.f f VS.:


COMPUTER STORE


HP PRINTERS FROM $68.00
HP SCANNERS


SANDISK &
Z ZUNEMP3
PLAYERS
A


ILENOVO LAPTOPS
$$845.00 0
&
TOWERS
FROM $462.00


December l 7th &MTi8th
LIVE REMOTE WITH
MORE FM & LOVE 97
Come in and win in-store prizes


42" LCD TV'S
* Linksys Wireless Routers
Access Points
Wireless Adapters


*PC GAMES Loite Speaker
Hitmun Momse
Need for Speed Keyboard
hoyle Card Games Weucams
Hole Kids Games Gme( e Coirb
IP &I asmet ib .
SOFTWARE *ABl1CiroAWI"$


paid for renewable energy is
the avoided cost," they wrote.
"Utilities are required to
purchase renewable energy
from small scale facilities at
essentially the'price it would
cost the utility to generate
itself. I
"This pricing benefits the
utility by providing the lowest
cost energy to them, but does
not provide a significant incen-
tive for private operators to
develop renewable energy sys-
tems."
A better approach, Haley &
Aldrich suggested, was for the
utility companies to pay
renewable energy suppliers a
wholesale rate the rate at
which the utility sells the pow-
er itself.
In New Providence and
Grand Bahama, this wholesale
rate, the consultants' suggest-
ed, could be the basic rate of
between $0.13 to $0.25 per
kilowatt hour, or include the
fuel adjustment surcharge.
"This approach provides a
higher rate to private produc-
ers, and increases their incen-
tives to develop renewable
energy," the report said.
"A wholesale rate is less
attractive to the utility than
the avoided cost rate. Howev-
er, the higher rate reflects
some of the benefits provided
to the grid through dampened
peak deniand and the positive
benefits to system reliability
from the distribution of gen-
eration sources across the sys-
tem."


Bahamas
Business Solutions Ltd.
GI-onA. Tncwvo.Oor DOr-u-viawo Loc(v-.Iy


II 1 LI I II I ~ il i I I I Il II... . =. ...


I ,


THE TRIBUNE,


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007










BUHEES R M D M 10 P


Port receivers were





'wrongly procured'
ro. 1 ,


PORT, from page 1


tied to take judicial notice,
finds residents of Freeport,
including licensees and other
property owners, dependent
on the activities of the Port
Authority, [which is] in an
unsettled state; and its man-
agement and affairs, including
its governmental responsibili-
ties for the proper administra-
tion and development of the
Port area, [ have resembled]
that of a rudderless ship ever
since the death of Mr Edward
St. George, who principally, if
not solely, personally directed
the fortunes of the Freeport
and wider Grand Bahama
communities.
"Even after the action in
which the receiver was
appointed by the court on the
application of those personally
interested in his estate is deter-
mined or settled, the need for
appointing the Public Trustee
as custodian trustee, in .the
meantime, is absolutely essen-
tial to both the viability of the
Port Authority as a corporate
institution and for maintaining
the integrity of the Agreement
from which licensees and other
property owners derive their
protection. To put it bluntly,
such an appointment is as
imperative as it is inevitable
upon the discharge of the
court-appointed receivership."
As a result, the latest appli-
cation by the Association
sought to challenge "the pro-
priety" of the application for
the receivership, as the Order
appointing the Culmers had no
basis "in law or logic" given
-the Companies Act and
lawksbill Creek Agreement.
,-Mr Glinton argued that


there was "no cause of action
or legitimate basis for appoint-
ing receivers and managers"
for the GBPA under the Com-
panies Act.
He alleged: "The Port
Authority is clearly not a part-
nership formerly comprising
Sir Jack Hayward and Edward.
St. George as the principals,
nor is its business being oper-
ated in partnership with any-
one, except in the functional
sense of the legal relationship
involving the Government and
licensees fostered by and
through the Agreement.
"Simply put, the applicants
for the court-appointed receiv-
er in this instance had no inter-
est in the company's assets,
neither as the directors nor as
shareholders." *
He referred to evidence sub-
mitted by Chris Cafferata, one
of the St George estate's attor-
neys, who had described the
partnership dispute between
the Hayward and St George
families the. event that
sparked the receivership appli-
cation as involving the Cay-
man-domiciled holding com-
pany. for the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, Intercontinental
Diversified Corporation
(IDC), not the GBPA.
"That being so, there was no
basis for seeking a court-
appointed receiver over the
Port Authority's assets, over
which there could be no gen-
uine partnership dispute," Mr
Glinton alleged.
The receivership application
did not take into account the
impact on the Government
and licensees, the two other
'parties to the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, Mr Glinton
alleged, and had burdened the
GBPA with the fees, costs and
expenses of the receivers and
their attorneys.


Courts were reluctant to
interfere with company man-
agement through the appoint-
ment of receivers, doing so
only when there was no alter-
native, Mr Glinton alleged, and
accused the St George estate
of making "material non-dis-
closures" when applying for
the receivers to be appointed.
He claimed: "Because of this
and similar omissions on the
part of the applicants, consti-
tuting material non-disclosure
in disregard of the duty to be
full and frank, the receivership
Order was made in circum-
stances it should not have, to
the detriment of the Port
Authority's internal manage-
ment and proper corporate
governance of its affairs.
Disclosing
"By not disclosing to the
court the legal relationship
involving the Government and
licensees, fostered by and
through the Agreement, the
applicants would have, how-
ever inadvertently, misled the
court and concealed from it
information that was essential
for it to have before it if the
Judge was to properly exercise
her discretion."
Mr Glinton alleged that the
St George estate's attorneys
should have drawn the judge's
attention to rulings handed
previously by the Supreme
Court that favoured GBPA
licensees, based on the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement, and the
agreement itself.
Returning to his argument
that the Port was immune from
the Companies Act winding-
up processes, Mr Glinton
argued that if this was correct,
the protection the GBPA
enjoyed "must necessarily
extend to all its corporate and


productive assets and capaci-
ties for which the public trustee
should be appointed". *
He alleged: "If this proposi-
tion is sustained in relatiol 'to
the Port Authority, then on
principle the protection it
enjoys against such processes
must necessarily extend to all
its corporate and productive
assets and capacities for which
the Public Trustee should be
appointed.
"If the Court should hold,
after a review of the law and
the facts that the Port Author-
ity's franchise identity and
operational control in fact
embraces all its separate cor-
porate and productive assets
and capacities essential to its
ability to discharge its obliga-
tion for the 99 years that it
covenanted with the Govern-
ment under Clause 3 of the
19966 Agreement, and through
which it controlled and co-ordi-
nated its varied franchise, then
in a legal and-real sense the
Port Authority, as a corporate
institution at least as regards
its'quasi-governmental status,
is indistinguishable and insep-
arable from its various sub-
sidiary and associated compa-
nies over which it sits at the
apex.
, "It is doubtful whether any
court properly informing itself
of those provisions of the
Agreement conferring
Licensees with rights and priv-
ileges and obligations equally
with the Port Authority, hav-
ing regard also (if not particu-
larly) to the Government's
interest as a 7?% shareholder,
would have entertained an
application ex parte for
appointment of a receiver in
the absence of licensees and
the Government as noticed
parties on the hearing of. the
application."


0 -- ---- --- ---



the news, read Insight






* i Kingsway Academy


ENTRANCE


EXAMINATION

FOR SEPTEMBER 2008.


The Entrance Examination
will be held at the school on
Befiiard Road on Saturday,
January 12,2008 from 8:00 a.m. -
1:30 p.m. for students wishing to
enter grades seven through ten.


Deadline for applications will be
Thursday,January 10.Aplications
can be collected at the Business
Office from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.






For more information please
call telephone numbers
324-8811: 324-3409: or 324-6269

S* ^ .- i *.


Polymers International, Limited
SQueens Highway, P.O. Box F-42684
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Bahamas'
Office: (242) 352-3506 Facsimile: (242) 352-2779

Polymers International Limited currently is accepting applications for the
following positions. Resumes can be mailed or dropped off at the main
office on Queens Highway.



Human Resources Manager

This person will be responsible for administering all aspects of Company
human resources and functions. This person will assume responsibility for
the effective performance. of various human resource functions, including
recruiting, interviewing, hiring, payroll and for insuring corporation-wide
compliance with all related government regulations. This'person will provide
recommendations to Senior Management in establishing overall human
resource objectives, policies and plans This person will ensure that Human
Resource activities are conducted in.accordance with established Company
policies and within established procedures. This person will also assign,
direct and appraise Human Resources personnel.

This is not an entry-level position. The successful candidate will have
proven abilities in the Human Resources field with a minimum of 5 years
experience. Superior written and spoken communication skills, including
sincere and effective listening skills, are critical. A high degree of
organizational skills is essential. The candidate should possess a bachelor's
degree or higher in human .resources ot related field of study,



Information Technology Manager

The Information Technology Manager will maintain and manage all
information technology equipment and assets including file servers, network
infrastructure, software applications, and telephony systems. This person
must keep abreast of current technologies and prepare appropriate project
plans for infrastructure changes. This person will support staff and
administrative personnel IT needs.

The successful candidate will have a minimum of a Bachelor of Computer
Science or equivalent and a minimum of 5 years experience providing
network systems support. Technical certifications in Microsoft Windows
a plus. Applicants who additionally have experience in Microsoft SQL
server, Crystal Reports, and Platinum BatchMaster software preferred. This
position requires on-call availability 24/7, 12 months a year. This person
must also be able to work additional hours including weekends and must
possess travel documents for outside the Bahamas. If you have excellent
communication and organizational skills and are looking to work in a team
environment developing technology, mail or drop off your resume.


THE CODRINGTON SCHOOL
(International Programme)
St John
BB 20008
Barbados

lip




The Codrington School, which is a small but growing school, offering a progressive
education to children of many nationalities in a child-centred educational environment,
with a global dimension and an international perspective to its programmes, seeks the
services of qualified primary years and middle years teachers as from September 2008 for
the following positions. The need for teachers is fuelled by the school's rapid growth. and
its opening of its form four section, in accordance with its plan for development.

Primary years home room teachers (from early years-through junior levels), who are
committed to an approach to teaching and learning which reflects the Primary Years
Programme (PYP) curriculum model of the International Baccalaureate (IB). [One position
available from April 2008]

Middle years generalists, qualified and experienced in teaching at le ist one, preferably
two;'of the following disciples at iniddle school (forms onre througIh i-ve) level, with an
approach to learning based oh the Middle Years Programme (MYP) cur' iculum model of
the IB

English; mathematics; science especially physics/chemistry; history; geography;
French; Spanish; food and nutrition; design technology; information technology;
personal and social education; physical education (school wide); music; drama; art

The successful applicants will each hold at least an initial degree a master's degree is
preferred and a teaching qualification. Applications will be neither acknowledged nor
considered from capdidates.who do, nothold. both art academic degree and a teaching
qualification.

As the school is implementing the PYP, and preparing to implement the MYP, preference
will be given to teachers trained and/or experienced in.these approaches to learning.
However, applications are also warmly welcomed from teachers who are committed to an
inquiry-based, constructivist approach to education but who have not yet had the opportunity
of working in a PYP or an MYP school., Further information about the PYP and the MYP
may be found at the following website: ww.ib6.org

Applications, which niust besubmitted on the school's application form, available either
from thp school or from the school's web-site, should be submitted by e-mail attachment,
mail.or fax, and should reach the school by 11 January 2008 latest. Applications arriving
after this time will not be considered.

Dennison J MacKinnon
Principal
The Codrington School
St John
Barbados

Tel: (+ 1 246) 423 2570
Fax: (+ 1246) 423 3635
E-mail: principal@codrington.edu.bb

Web site: www.codrlngton.edu.bb


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8B. MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007


Premier Board slammed by


MAINTENANCE!


HANDYMAN WANTED
A, leading.retail company has an immediate
opening for a Maintenance/Handyman

Basic Requirements

1. Should have a basic working
knowledge electrical, plumbing and
general carpentry repairs.

2. Must have a clean current Police Record

S3. Must have own transportation

4. Must be a self-starter with drive and
determination

5. Must be able to work with minimum
supervision.

6. Previous experience not required but
would be an asset.

Persons meeting the above requirements should
submit their Resumes via fax to the address
below.

The positions offer career opportunities with
excellent salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902






1- EXECUTIVECHEF


Five Star establishment is
Executive Chef in Fine Dining.


seeking an
,01 -. *.


The applicant must have
Eight (8) ,years minimum experience in
Executive Sous Chef position and at least

Two (2) years in Executive Chef position.

The applicant must be fluent in Spanish and have
strong knowledge in Mexican and modem Spanish
cuisine, Traditional French base is a must, this
person should as well be able to manage large
functions and should be able to teach his fellow
staffs in the art of "Tapas", ice carving and vacuum
techniques.

The applicant must have Four Season or Ritz
Carlton experience.

All interested persons should apply by faxing
resumes only to the attention of:

The Director of Human Resources
Fax # 362-6245





HOTEL MANAGERS PENSION
FUND NOTICE



Pensioners of THE BAHAMAS
HOTEL INDUSTRY MANAGE-
MENT PENSION FUND are asked
:to call (322-8381-4) or visit the
Fund's Office in the SG Hambros
Building, West Bay Street, Nassau,
NP., .The Bahamas to obtain an end
of year voucher and to update their
pension fund records.
Please call or visit the Funds Office
by Friday 21st December 2007.
The Trustees for the Fund wish all
hotel pensioners a safe and joyous
holiday season.




Date: Monday 10th December 2007


BOARD, from 1

Freeport's First Commercial
Centre and three properties
owned by the Bahamian Coca-
Cola franchise, and questioned
whether such a course of
action was prudent for the
company and its shareholders.
The warning was contained
in a letter sent on their behalf
on December 12, 2007, by their
attorney, Michael Scott, a part-
ner in Callenders & Co, to Pre-
mier's secretary, attorney Gre-
gory Moss.
Noting that Mosaic was "the
registered holder of 550,000
shares in Premier", giving it a
majority 50.8 per cent stake,
Mr Scott referred to recent
reports that the company,
which operates as a real estate
investment trust (REIT) or
investment fund, had agreed
in principle to sell the Coca-
Cola franchise's former ware-
house to Franklyn Wilson's
Sunshine Group.
Mr Scott questioned
whether Premier's Board was
also intending to sell the two
other Caribbean Bottling prop-
erties owned by the fund, the
head office and production
plant on Thompson Boulevard,
and another distribution centre
in Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Referring to reports that Mr


Wilson had said the sales price
for the former Coca-Cola
warehouse on JFK was slightly
less than the $3 million asking
price, Mr Scott wrote: "It is
understood that the Board
intends to sell one or more of
these assets to the Sunshine
Group of Companies for a
consideration which may not
be concomitant with its or the
actual market value.
"The joint official liquida-
tors view with alarm this
course of action, which is to be
effected without consultation
with them....... In the circum-
stances, we are instructed by
the joint official liquidators to
formally notify the Board that
no such sale should take place
or be completed until such
time as the joint official liq-
uidators have been fully
informed about any proposed
transaction and approve any
such sale."
Mr Scott added: "With spe-
cific reference to the intended
sale referred to in this letter,
we inform you that the joint
official liquidators do not
approve this transaction and
propose to withhold their
approval until they are fully
satisfied that any such trans-
action is in the best interest of
the company and, for exam-
ple, is not a sale at an under-
value.


AS NATURE IN 7FtV 'oD




'OED WITH 84 TRACE' iL



p 3 0^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Blu Wa-Ta Falls Ltd has


TERMINATED




Cassandra Hanna



From our employ on Dec. 6th, 2007


She is not authorized to conduct any


Business with regard to Nautilus/
Blu Wa-Ta Falls Ltd
In any manner.



The Management
Nautilus Water/Blu Wa-Ta Falls Ltd.


"In this connection, please
provide immediately current
valuations or appraisals of the
properties the Board intends
to dispose of by way of sale to
the Sunshine Group and all
documentation, correspon-
dence or other material rele-
vant to the same."
For good effect, Mr Scott
said: "Finally, we are instruct-
ed to place the Board of Direc-
tors on notice that should the
Board effect this transaction
without the approval of the
joint official liquidators, the
joint official liquidators reserve
the right to take such further
action against the Board as
they may be advised, includ-
ing without limitation replacing
the Board in an Extraordinary
General Meeting of Premier.
"Govern yourself accord-
ingly."
As a result of all this, is
seems that Mr Wilson and
Sunshine's plans to purchase
the former Coca-Cola ware-
house and spend $4-$5 million
on transforming it into a west-
ern New Providence office for
their insurance and finance


arms, could be in jeopardy.
Caribbean Bottling was pur-
chased by an investor group
headed by former Common-
wealth Bank executive Walter
Wells. The new owners termi-
nated the warehouse lease, and
it is likely that the industrial,
purpose-built building proved
a difficult one to attract new
tenants to, hence the decision
to sell.
The reaction from Premier's
Board to Mr Scott's letter
could not be obtained before
press time. The investment
fund was set up in 2003 by its
promoter, Freeport Concrete
chairman and now-ousted
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty (GBPA) chairman, Hannes
Babak, who raised shareholder
capital for the closed-end fund
via a private placement.
Although it initially had four
directors sitting on its Board, it
is thought that just two remain
- Mr Babak and Patrick Ward,
president and chief executive
of Bahamas First, the general

SEE next page


FOR SALE

Delinquent Properties (Vacant Lots)

lot # 19, Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access)

New Providence, Bahamas

5,040 sq ft; Appraised Value = $75,600


Lot # 14 Westridge North Subdivision

New Providence, Bahamas.

11,486 sq ft

Appraised Value = $207,000




Lot # 20 Canaan Subdivision, Marshall Road

(proposed gated community with beach access)

New Providence, Bahamas

5,061 sq ft; Appraised Value = $76,000


Submit bids in writing to:


MORTGAGE DEPARTMENT

P.O. Box N-4815

Nassau, Bahamas


For further enquiries call: 461-1037


Pricing Information As Of: C F A L'
Friday, 14 December 2007

,.2**%-1lI 52.v k-Lc,..s 5iu.nt Prne..Cus Close Toaay's Close C'aange Dail, Vol EPS $ Di. $ PFE Yiela
1 .-. o,.:.:. .la.riels 1 59 1 59 0':' "-. 1,' :, 0.']) 10 1 0 00Os
1 1.74 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.65 11.65 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.8 3.43%
9.60 8.03 Bank of Bahamas 9.60 9.60 0.00 300 0.733 0.260 13.1 2.71%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.188 0.020 4.5 2.35%
3.74 1.75 Bahamas Waste 3.66 3.66 0.00 0.275 0.090 13.3 2.46%
2.65 1.22 Fidelity Bank 2.65 2.65 0.00 0.058 0.040 45.7 1.51%
12.02 999 Cable Bahamas 12.00 12.00 0.00 1.000 1.030 0,240 11.7 2.00%
3.15 1.90 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 0.031 0.040 101.6 1.27%
8.20 4.17 Commonwealth Bank (81) 8.12 8.20 0.08 3.000 0.426 0.260 19.2 3.17%
7.22 4.74 Consolidated Water BDRs 6.06 6.11 0.05 0.129 0.050 46.9 0.83%
2.60 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.28 2.28 0.00 0.316 0.020 7.2 0.88%
6.95 5.70 Famguard 6.95 6.95 0.00 0.713 0.240 9.7 3.45%
12.80 12.02 Finco 12.75 12.80 0.05 1,600 0.829 0.570 15.4 4.45%
14.75 14.15 FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.6 3.22%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 5.59 5.59 0.00 0.359 0.140 15.6 2.50%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.73 0.73 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.00 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.300 17.6 4.14%
11.00 8.60 J. S. Johnson 11.00 11.00 0.00 0.991 0.590 11.1 5.36%
inm 0n 10 00 Premier Relt Estate 1000 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
: PIdUfty Ovar-Th tdr Scwjtfaa '. ' ;..- ..
52wk-1Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/IE Ylelt
14 60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%
H.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
r 41 0F 2n RND Holdinas 0 35 0.40 0.20 -0 030 0 000 N/M 0.00%
.,,.- C la o r'.-T.rr.a *: ." :,. ;-'. -'*
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.160 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
. B .ewthItual. ine .
52wk-HI 52,.K* Lu.\ Funu d roin.i NA VYTDa, Last 12 Milths DI.' ,*old
1.3663 1.2647 Colina Money Market Fund 1.366332'
3.5388 2.9728 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.5388"*
2.9902 2.4723 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.990218*
1.2827 1.2037 Colina Bond Fund 1.282687"
11.8192 11,307 r Fidelitv Prime linmre Fund 11 8192"**
m1Sx At I S1TAR[ INL *.', r .1 FFM5 'ELL' ,, . E, ,, h ' . M
52wk-H i I ilyhos closing price In list ti2 weeks Bid $ Buyilng price of Collii n aid ril lilty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price i last 52 wouke Ask $ Silling price of Colhnnl an fidelity 30 Novomber 2007
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-tho-countor price "" 30 Jun. 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted pilot tfor dlly volunIl Weekly Vol Irnding voluli of the prlio week i"' 31 Octotiin 21007
Change Chango in closing prIco flom day to day EPS $ A company'. imported onling.s per sharo foi th linst 1.' mths "" 31 July 2007
D.}ill Vol NUililrnr oi 'I ot.i .1l .1I;l;; tii.-i d Ory NAV Net Assoet V luo
DIV :I Dividend:. pe,ir shr pn ii I iD til Inist 12 months NIM Not Monnlngful
P/E Closing prcu divided by the lals I.2 rinlith rolings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahar ns Stock Indoe Januory 1, 1994 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Spilt Effective Date 8/8/2007
lRll -i 1fnr.1 Ornl. SpflI Fi ffnirivi, Do.. 7/1 i1/2007
F-111-LD





BUSINESS
I







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 9B


majority shareholder


FROM page 8


insurer.
Of the two other original
directors, C A Smith, the for-
mer minister of tourism and
MP under the first Ingraham
administration, resigned
recently to take up the post of
Ambassador to the US in
Washington.
The other was Stephen Han-
cock, president of Cardinal
International, the former
Bahamian fund administrator,
who would have represented
Mosaic's interests, having car-
ried out accounting and admin-
istrative services.
Mr Hancock left the Board
after Cardinal International
ceased operating, its closure
coming just before the Olym-
pus Univest investment fund,
which it provided fund admin-
istration services for, went into
liquidation.
Mosaic was the main coun-
terparty for Olympus Univest
and its investments. Both com-
panies are being wound-up and
liquidated under a court-super-
vised liquidation, with the
Supreme Court in the


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Bahamas and courts in Canada
and Barbados all involved.
This is how Messrs Culmer
and Massi have come to act for
Mosaic in their capacity as liq-
uidators.
The Olympus Univest fund,
which was also domiciled in
the Bahamas, is shaping up as
one of the largest investment
scandals to hit this nation, the
fund having collapsed owing
investors some $448 million.
They are only likely to get
back 6-9 per cent of the prin-
cipal value of their investment.


Yet the Premier stake held
by Mosaic, valued by Messrs
Culmer and Massi in previous
court reports as being valued at
$7.2 million, has long been
identified as one of the best
sources for recovery available
to investors in Olympus Uni-
vest and Mosaic Composite.
This is why the joint official
liquidators are taking such a
keen interest in Premier's
property asset sales, wanting
to preserve the company's val-
ue and maximise this as much
as possible.


INSIGHT



For the stories

behind the news,

read Insight

on Monday


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH ST. VIL of FOWLER
STREET, P.O. BOX CB-12299, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of December, 2007
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.








Just Arrived From Germany

26oz. Christmas Stollen with Marzipan,

Rum or Almonds From $22.00 to $26.00


I Bank of The Bahamas
INTERNATIONAL


FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE FOR THE THREE-MONTH PERIOD ENDED
SEPTEMBER 30, 2007 WITH QUARTERLY AND YEAR OVER YEAR COMPARISON

The Bank continues to experience significant momentum in all of its major performance
indicators. In particular, we are pleased at the financial results of the first quarter of
fiscaleyear 2008 despite the challenge of having had to navigate through a period of
parsimonious system liquidity. The achievements noted herein extend the Bank's
accomplishment of securing growth and the consistent creation of shareholders' value.

The end of the quarter was the eve of the Bank's transition to its new banking platform.
The Implementation of this new platform represents another fundamental and
strategically important step to the full realization of its clearly articulated objective of
transforming from a bank to a financial institution and then on to a financial enterprise.
The Bank continues to develop financial strength, realize growth in its asset base, which
in part, will propel prospects and ignite opportunities. Public sentiments and investor
confidence continues to be solid. The latter evidenced by a rising share price currently
trading at an historical high of $9.55.

Against the background of significant systemic challenges, especially the increase in
cost of funds precipitated by a period of sustained liquidity shortages, the Bank through
the implementation of sound and disciplined strategies has been able to sustain its
growth momentum. Compared to the same period last year total asset grew by
$95.3MM or '17%; total revenue grew by 16% and shareholders' equity increased from
$89.9MM to $95.5MM an increase of 6%.

Non-interest expenses, compared to the same period last year increased. This,
however, represents planned and expected cost consistent with the Bank's strategic
transformation. The increase in this area, on a proportional basis, is expected to reduce
with the major aspects of the implementation of the new banking platform completed.
Despite this, Net Income for the period grew faster than the growth rate projected for the
country's GDP.

We recognize the outstanding support of our staff and remain grateful for the confidence
and support of our growing customer and shareholder base.


Managing Director


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF SEPTEMBER 30,2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER
30,2007 30,2006


Cmh and due fian bMnks
lveitmntIs, Loaus nd Advmac to CuiomMs, net
o0nAr Asi
TOTAL
I.mABnTrES
Deposits flon eugtome sod bouks
Bo6ds Payable
CObr Libilities
Teal Liabilities
SHARBlOLDERS' EQUITY
Sbta Crilai
Authorisd 25,000,000 preferred shaI of SB 1,000 ch*
? 7- -25,000,000 common shares ofSB I each
lmned and FullPaid 15,600,000 common dsha (2005:12,000,000)
hued Prefehoce Shwas (Redeemable By Isner)
Share Pnmshm
Tnuy Sham
Reined Bwn
Totl ShwkoMns Equity
TOTAL -

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
3 MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30,2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)

NET INTEREST AND OTHER INCOME:

Interest Income
Interest Expense
Net Interest Income
(Add)/Less Net Provision for Loan Losses
Net Interest Income after Provision for Loan Loses
Non-Interest Revenue
Income from Investments
Net Revenue
NON-INTEREST EXPENSES
NET INCOME

EARNINGS PER SHARE

BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
3 MONTHS ENDING SEPTEMBER 30,2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)


CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income
Adjustments for non-cash items


Net change in operating asmee
Net cash ued In eparating activities
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Acquisition of fixed assets
Proceeds from maturity of investments
Net cash used l Invting activities
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Imuance of Preference Shares
Dividends paid
Net cash provided by (used In) financing activities
NET INCREASE DECREASEE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
DURING THE PERIOD
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS BEGINNING OF PERIOD

END OF PERIOD


JUNE
30, 2007


S 116,408,699 S 45,514,125 S 124,629,757.
521,563,482 498,012,640 518,595,991
21584,204 20,739,043 15,036.924
5 659,55685 S 564,265,808 $ 658,26,672

S 499,414,772 S 438,307,283 S 504398,982
37,000,000 17,000,000 37,000,000
27.680,308 19.023,289 21.079,231
564,095.080 474,330,572 562,478.213




15.601,000 15,600,000 15,600,000
14,764,990 14,764,990 14,764,990
28,587,866 28,587,866 28,587,866
(237,239) (237,239)
36,507,449 31,219,619 37,068,932
95,461,305 89.935,236 95,714,549
S 0,563MS S 564,65,80 S gS!!N!,762


SEPTEMBER


$ 12,077,282
5,398,357
6,678,925
(41,061)
6,719,986
1,773,724
394,948
8,888,658
5,843,635
$ 3,045,023

S 0.20


SEPTEMBER
2007

S 3,045,023
515,500
3,560,523
(13,195,393)
(9,634,870)

(898,688)
2,500,000
1,601,312

0
(187,500)
(187,500)

(8,221,058)
124,629,757

S 116,408,699


SEPTEMBER


$ 10,568,000
4,200,482
6,367,518
342,030
6,025,488
1,381,357
435,806
7,842,651
S 4,915,296
S 2,927,355

$ 0.19


SEPTEMBER
2006

$ 2,927,355
332,128
3,259,483
(14,065,373)
(10,805,890)

(154,235)



14,764,990
(2,489,671)
12,275,319

1,315,194
44,198,930

s. 45,5!1.12


BANK OF THE BAHAMAS LIMITED
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED INTERIM CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(UNAUDITED)
3 MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 2007

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

These consolidated interim condensed financial statements are prepared in accordance
with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting. The accounting polices used in the preparation
of these consolidated interim condensed financial statements are consistent with those
used in the annual financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2007.

The consolidated interim condensed financial statements include the accounts of Bank
of The Bahamas'Limited and its wholly owned subsidiary, BOB Financial Services, Inc.


"








PAGElOB MODAYDECMBE 17 200 TH TRBUN


GN-625











SUPREME

COURT


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 1996/PRO/NPR/00050

Whereas GREGORY LAWRENCE BAKER, of the
Western District and STEPHEN LEON BAKER, of
the Southern District both of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the will annexed de
bonis non of the Real and Personal Estate of HERBERT
A. BAKER, late of, Southern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


2007/PRO/NPR/00607


PROBATE DIVISION


IN THE ESTATE OF DORIS MA Y COOPER,
domiciled and late of Thousand Acres, Bradley Road,
Bournstream, Wooton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire,
United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof,application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by E. TERRY NORTH of the Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above estate granted
to CHRISTOPHER JOHN NORTHOVER, the
Executor of the Estate, by the District Probate Registry
at Bristol in the High Court of Justice on the 14th day
of August, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAUREEN ELIZABETH
ROBERTS (a.k.a.) MAUREEN ELIZABETH
YATES, late of Rowan House, Hall Road, Wenhaston,
Halesworth, Suffolk, England in the United Kindgom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by WARREN SCOTT WARD of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate
in the above estate granted to ROBERT ANTHONY
DOLMAN and JOHN MICHAEL DYSON, the
Executors of the Estate, by the High Court of Justice,
the District Probate Registry at Winchester, on the 23rd
day of October 2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00628

IN THE ESTATE OF MYRTLE M. REIMER a.k.a.
MYRTLE REIMER, late of 238 Butte des Morts Dr.,
Menasha, Winnebago County in the State of Wisconsin
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by VANRIA M. LIGHTBOURN of
Marsh Harbour in the Island of Abaco, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to CAROL J. REIMER, the Personal


Representative of the Estate, by the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Winnebao County, on the 26th day of
March 1984.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas PAULETTE MARIE MITCHELL-GREEN
of Golden Gates NO. 2 in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration with the will annexed of the Real and
Personal Estate of WILIAM RICHARD GREEN late
of Golden Gates No.2 in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00630

Whereas LORNA ELOISE BETHUNE of Southern
Heights off Baillou Hill Road in the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of KAY VERONICA
BETHUNE late of Stapledon Gardens in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00631

Whereas GAYNELL DELORES BULLARD of No.
8 Cashier Road, Eastern Estates In the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of MICHAEL PETER BULLARD late of No. 8
Cashier Road, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00633

IN THE ESTATE OF FRIDOLIN STAHELI, late of
Fidazerstrasse 19C, CH-7019 Fidaz-Flims, in the Canton
of Graubunden, Switzerland, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SARAH L. P. KING of Love
Beach in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Probate in the above estate granted to RETO
DORA, the Executor of the Estate, by Trins District
Office, Casa Communala, on the 5th day of April 2005.


Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/npr/00634

Whereas JUDY MAE TAYLOR of White's Subdivision
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made


application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of PERRY NEWTON TAYLOR late of White's
Subdivision in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2007/PRO/npr/00635

IN THE ESTATE OF LOUISE McCULLOUGH, late
of Clifton Bay Drive, Lyford Cay in the Western District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by ANTHONY NOMIKOS
KLONARIS and PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS
both of the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorneys-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Letters Testamentary in the above estate granted to
FRANCIS C. ROONEY JR., the Executor of the
Estate, by the Surrogate's Court of the County of New
York, on the 30th day of
November 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar


2007/PRO/NPR/00639


PROBATE DIVISION


IN THE ESTATE OF LESLIE HODGSON, late of
38, East Avenue Riverview Park, Althorne in the
Chelmsford District, of the County of Essex of the
United Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER of the
Western District, New Providence, one-of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to AUDREY VERA HODGSON, the
Executrix of the Estate, by the High Court of Justice,
the District Probate Registry at Winchester on the 28th
day of November 1994.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00640

Whereas CAROLYN AZALEA BARTLETT, PAULA
LOUISE MITCHELL and ALBERTHA LOUISE
BARTLETT all of the City of Nassau in the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
WILLIAM AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS, late of
Watlings Island, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00641

Whereas CHERYL ROLLE of the Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
BETTY SAUNDERS, late of Flamingo Gardens,
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


--I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007








GN-625


Shareholders



'breached



fiduciary duties'


SUPREME

COURT



COMMONWEALTH OFTHE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION


No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00642


Whereas CARL NAIRN, JR., of the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of CARL NAIRN, SR., late of Baillou Hill Estates, Southern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00644
Whereas LILLIAN CECELIA MILLER, of No. 9 Melrose Avenue, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of EDWARD ERVIN MILLER,
late of South Beach Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


PROBATE DIVISION


S2007/PRO/NPR/00645


IN TIE ESTATE OF JOHN FOSTER MORAN, SR., lafe 6f9321 W: Outer
Di ve, Detroit, Michigan, one of the States of the United,States of America,,,
deceased.
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen days from the
date hereof, application will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of
Freeport in the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Authority for Personal
Representative in the above estate granted to JOHN F. MORAN, JR., and
RICHARD D. MORAN the Personal Representatives of the Estate, by the
Probate Court in the County of Wayne in the State of Michigan one of the States
of the United States of America on the 22nd day of August 2006.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


GBPA, from 1

Bahama Development Com-
pany (Devco), Sanitation Ser-
vices, Freeport Harbour Com-
pany, the Freeport Containei
Port and Grand Bahama Inter-
national Airport Company to
the likes of Hutchison Wham-
poa and Onyx "could not have
been done lawfully.
This was because it would
have required licensee consent
and legislation to amend the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.
so the asset sales and transfer


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making'news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


of the remaining ownership
(usually 50 per cent) from the
GBPA to its Port Group Ltd
(PGL) affiliate could be effect-
ed properly.
The GBPA's productive
assets, he alleged, were sup-
posed to be held 'in trust' by
the GBPA and its shareholders
for the benefit of licensees and
the Bahamian people.
Alleged


"continuing viability and
capacities".
This, he alleged, was critical
if the GBPA licensees were to
see their franchise "survive the
Port Authority's systematic liq-
uidation and destruction".
"Simply put, the Associa-
tion's argument is this: Sir Jack
Hayward and Mr Edward St.
George, without the Agree-
ment having been amended in
that regard, could no more per-
sonally take over lawful own-


Mr Glinton alleged: "The ership and possession of those
calculated divestiture of the corporate assets than they
Port Authority of productive could personally take over the
assets and capacities, which Port Authority's primary oblig-
appear then to have been nations and governmental
transferred to PGL as a hold- responsibilities imposed by the
ing company for the benefit of Agreement for the discharge
two shareholders at the time of which, during its continu-
controlling its Board of Direc- ance, the ownership and con-
tors, was a systematic stripping trol of the said assets are indis-
of corporate assets and capac- pensable to the Port Authori-
ities in breach of the Agree- ty," Mr Glinton alleged.
ment." "The covenants entered into
"These acts, in relation to by the Port Authority under
licensees (and persons doing clause 3 of the 1966 Agree-
business in the Port Area), ment simply may not be
constituted breaches of trust assigned or performance there-
and of fiduciary duty, not only of waived by the Government.
in that neither the two share- "The systematic divestitures
holders nor PGL benefiting of the Port Authority's own-
from such breaches constitute ership and right of exclusive
the Local Authority mentioned possession and control of its
in clause 4 of the 1960 Agree- "productive assets' by its share-
ment, but dictated by the holders, and their privatising
law....... that a trustee cannot of them in various holding
use his position or his powers companies, in addition to being
as a trustee to acquire proper- acts of bad faith also consti-
ty for his own benefit." tute the abrogation and repu-
The asset sales, Mr Glinton diatory breach of the Agree-
alleged, constituted an "unau- ment having, regard to Clause
thorized liquidation" of the 4 of the 1960 Agreement; and
GBPA, arguing that the as regards Licensees, such
SHlaV tbrl;pr-,ePk.AgrA enj',, divestitures constitute breach-
iritegriy needed to.bjre-.r, es of trust and.of.-fiduciary
;se~~%d,4rg with thorts.;, duty." ... ,


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00647
Whereas SAMANTHA MAE PRISCILLA WILLIAMS of the Western District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MAE WILLIAMS nee
MCKINNEY, late of No. 52 Old Cedar Street, Yellow Elder Gardens, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
No. 2007/PRO/NPR/00648
Whereas ZILPHA JANET WILLIAMS of No. 8 Taylor Street, Nassau Village,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate of AMBROSE
ALEXANDER WILLIAMS, late of No.8 Taylor Street, Nassau Village, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.
Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by the said Court
at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar


* Must have a
* Professional


Excellent opportunity
for you to control your
income.
K You are limited only to
your potential
S'"* Flexible hours available
Excellent commissions
and benefits





proven track record in sales
appearance a must


* Must have reliable transportation
* Ability to meet and adhere to strict deadlines
* Excellent written and communication skills.


Apply in writing to
Sales Representatives
Box PM-1
C/O The Nassau Guardian
P.O. Box N-3011
Nassau


Bahamas


.iNDEPENDENT

SALES

PERSONS


NEEDED!


I


THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007, PAGE 11B















SAs the busiest days draw




near, FedEx driver takes




Holiday rush in stride


FEDEX DRIVERS pick packages for their delivery routes from a conveyor
belt in a distribution facility in New York.


* By SAMANTHA
BOMKAMP
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -
FedEx driver Vito Randazzo
works long hours this time of
year, but the smile never seems
to stop.
Working out of one of .two
FedEx Corporation ware-
houses in Brooklyn, this day is
much like any other, but Ran-
dazzo, 48, is noticeably aware
of the ramp up to the busiest
day of the year.
Packages crowd the convey-
or belt that snakes around the
warehouse. Airplane cargo
holds loom like massive steel
igloos at the start of the belt, as
couriers stretch and chat
before the belt starts moving
and streams boxes filled with
everything from Christmas
presents to medical supplies.
The packages are scanned,
sorted and directed onto sepa-
rate belts according to their
destination.


FEDEX TRUCKS leave a distribution facility to make deliveries in New York. FedEx expects today to be
the busiest day of the year. Excluding a partnership with the US Postal Service, it expects to haul 10.4
million packages through express and ground service on that day, the last chance to ship via FedEx Ground
for Christmas delivery. The prediction represents a six per cent increase over the 9.8 million shipped on
last year's busiest day.


The drivers line up by their
trucks when the packages
arrive at their point on the belt.
Randazzo arranges his cargo
according to destination on the
route he knows by heart.
FedEx expects Monday to
be the busiest day of the year.
Excluding a partnership with
the US Postal Service, it
expects to haul 10.4 million
packages through express and
ground service on that day, the
last chance to ship via FedEx
Ground tor Christmas deliv-
ery. The prediction represents
a six per cent increase over the
9.8 million shipped on last
year's busiest day.
Analysts suggest major par-
cel carriers overall should
expect the usual holiday rush,
although revenue will be likely
be muddled by the effects of
a weak US economy and
changing consumer trends.
Jon Langenfeld, an analyst
with investment firm R W
Baird, said the overall freight
market is being dragged down
by weakness in the housing
and automotive markets, and
lower consumer spending.
Higher diesel prices are also
hurting parcel carriers this hol-
iday season, although FedEx
will be affected more than
UPS. he said. because express
services make up more of its
business.
National Retail Federation
spokesman Scott Krugman
acknowledged that while the
economy and the rise of elec-
tronic gift card purchases will
put pressure on shipping this
year, these factors should be
balanced by robust online sales
growth.
Randazzo, along with thou-
sands of other drivers across
the country, will work the two
Saturday before Christmas to
account for the increased holi-
day haul.
The 19-year veteran began
his career with the parcel car-
rier after leaving the family piz-
za business, lured by the bene-
fits and steady paycheck that
support his wife'and three chil-
dren.
Despite the habitual nature
of the job. and the amount of
knowledge he's gained over
the years, times have changed,


Randazzo said.
He now drives one of 95
hybrid trucks in FedEx's fleet,
and one of 48 in the New York
City area. His truck no longer
requires a key a wristband
with a delicate sensor opens
the doors although the exte-
rior and inner workings still
closely resemble the tradition-
al vehicles.
With his truck loaded and
organized, Randazzo starts thl
engine and heads off on his
route. While he lives in Staten
Island now, the Gravesend
neighborhood in Brooklyn was
his home for more than twenty
years, so he doesn't need a
map.
"I know these streets, these
people were my neighbors."
he said.
He leaps out of his truck and
weaves from business to busi-
ness, reflecting the four espres-
sos he downed before work.
He enters a doctor's office,
and is regaled with cheers as
if he is a long-lost relative.
"Vitooooo.....!" the recep-
tionist exclaims, as she accepts
the package and signs the
"Power Pad" a computer-
ized account of pickups and
deliveries. He responds with a
smile and some quick chitchat.
but he is out the door in a
flash, on to his next destina-
tion.
His route is as much of a cul-
tural melting pot as New York
City itself. He drives from
small family businesses to large
chains, quaint houses to afflu-
ent streets.
At one stop, he calms an
apprehensive woman who
opens her door no more than a
crack, still seemingly con-
cerned about the exceedingly
smiling face on the other side.
He begins to speak to her in
Spanish.
"Don't worry," he says.
"Package... from FedEx."
A hand extends through the
door, signs the keypad and col-
lects the package.
Randazzo said learning how
to communicate in other lan-
guages has been an important
part of his job. He was born in
Italy and came to roost in
Brooklyn when he w\as 10.
Speaking Italian to the many


relatives still in the old country
made it easier to learn enough
Spanish to communicate, he
said.
Around this time of year,
people get very generous. Ran-
dazzo said that if he's offered
gifts, it's usually a tip or a bot-
tle of wine from his regular
customers, who know of his
penchant for making his own.
He said this year. he's deliv-
' ering a lot ol iPods. and other
Apple gadgets. Computers and
othci electronics are probably
the most popular deliveries this
Christmas season. he said.
Randazzo said he's also carting
some more delicate cargo, as
the number of flower arrange-
ments he's delivering is rising
as well.
FedEx said it expects slow-
ing overall economic growth '-
and slumping US retail sales
to be buoyed by surging e-
commerce growth.
United Parcel Service Inc.,.
FedEx's chief competitor,
expects to ship 22 million pack-
ages on its peak day -
December 19. The projection
represents less than one per-
cent growth from last year's
busiest day. and marks the
smallest growth prediction in
four years. I IPS will add more
than (O.60,000 employees to help
with the seasonal rush.
DHL International GmbH
expects to ship 14.5 million
packages across the globe on
its busiest da\. December 17,
according to a company
spokesman. The company,
owned by the German-based
mail and shipping company
Deutsche Post AG, predicts
US business will account for
between 2.4 million and 2.5
million of those shipments. The
company declined to report
2000 figures.
The US Postal Service
expects nearly one billion
pieces -- including packages
and those last-minute letters
to Santa -- to be mailed on
Monday, its busiest mailing day
of the year, 1SPS expects 275
million cards and letters to be
tossed into a mailbox that day.
Wednesday is expected to be
the busiest delivery day for the
1 USPS.
Raudazzo's enthusiasm is a
plus around the hoilidavs,
where the day can extend for
12 hour stretches and the
amount of packages soars.
But he brushed off any neg-
atives.
"1 don') gel tired from work-
ing." Randazzo said. "It really
energizes me to be here. I
think I would be tired if I sat at
home."


I_ _


b adveptise in Me Tpffimno -


the #1 newspapep in choculation,
0
just call 322-1080 today!


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2007