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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03033
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 11/9/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:03033

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The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


BAHAMAS EDITION


Dame Joan Sawyer hits

out at 'finger pointing'

over violent crime rise


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
BLAMING the increase in
violent crime in the country on
the judicial system is "stupidi-
ty", Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer said yester-
day during an appeal hearing.
Dealing with the case of
Frederick Francis who was
convicted of killing two Austri-
an tourists in Bimini in 2005 -
Dame Joan sharply criticised
the Bahamian attitude of
"pointing fingers" and blaming
easy targets, such as the courts,
for serious and complex social
problems.
The Court of Appeal presi-
dent yesterday took the oppor-
tunity to particularly hit out at


Bahamians who are blaming the
judicial system for the high
number of criminals walking the
SEE page eight


Foodstore employees

subdue armed robber

EMPLOYEES of a John Chea Number Two foodstore
attacked and subdued an armed robber who entered the store
on Wednesday evening.
According to police, two masked men, one of them armed
with a hand gun, had entered the store, located on Wulff Road,
shortly before 6pm.
They approached a cashier and demanded cash but when
other employees became aware of the criminals they attacked
the gunman, ultimately keeping him under control until police
arrived to make the arrest.
The weapon was a black .9mm handgun with four live rounds
of ammunition, according to assistant Police Superintendent
Walter Evans.
SEE page eight


CLAUDE Gray,
31, was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court
yesterday afternoon
charged with the mur-
der of Theophilus
McKenzie.
Gray was escorted
under heavy police
guard to his hearing
in front of Magistrate
Carolita Bethel, as
more than twenty
people stood at Bank
Lane to watch.
Family members
who stood outside the
court urged Gray to
"hold his head up" as
they were "praying"
for him, while also
reminding the
accused that "God
loves you."
When in court,
Magistrate Bethel
read the charges to
the accused.
On November 6th
SEE page eight


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Claim that man
'in jail' reported
to have voted
in Pinewood
* By PAUL G
TURNQUEST and
BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporters
pturnquest@
tribunemedia.net
bdean@tribunemedia.net
A MAN who is "in jail" is
reported to have voted in the
Pinewood constituency, as tes-
timony in Election Court con-
tinued yesterday.
According to 45-year-old
Patrice Cleare, an assistant in
the PLP Pinewood con-
stituency office, her investiga-
tions into persons who voted
in the constituency deter-
mined that one individual,
Patrick Armbrister, was
alleged to have been incarcer-
ated.
Ms Cleare, who began her
testimony yesterday hi front
of Senior Justice Anita Allen
and Justice Jon Isaacs, said
that she was hired by former
Pinewood MP Allyson May-
nard-Gibson to find persons
who did not live in the con-
stituency, but voted in the
May 2nd general elections.
Ms Cleare's testimony
began yesterday with her
informing the court that she,
with a team of others combed
the Pinewood area and dis-
SEE page eight


Blow to Dwight and Keva Major's

battle against extradition to US


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
DWIGHT and Keva
Major's battle against extradi-
tion to the United States
received a major blow yester-
day as the Privy Council in
London denied the couple's
request to have their case
appealed.
The ruling on the Majors'
final appeal on their habeas
corpus application now clears
the way for Bahamian author-
ities to extradite the couple to
the US.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions confirmed for members
of the press yesterday that the
Judicial Commission of the
Privy Council dismissed the


Majors' petition for special
leave to appeal to the highest
court.
"(The Law Lords) did not
consider that the issues raised
were sufficient to give them
special leave to appeal. This


was their final appeal on their
habeas corpus application
which was a challenge to com-
mittal for them to be surren-
dered to the United States,"
SEE page eight


ill,


I0


~ ~ ~ I~ .~'













TROPICAL STORM NOEL: The aftennath


Ingraham: Noel flood victims have




the government's full support


I empathisee' with farmers, says Prime Minister


"I assure
those impact-
ed by the
storm that we
in govern-
ment are sen-
sitive to your
difficulties."


FARMERS and fishermen
who were severely impacted by
Tropical Storm Noel have the
government's full support,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said.*
Speaking at .the opening of
yesterday's Agribusiness Expo,
Mr Ingraham said that he
empathises with farmers for the
losses they sustained as a result
of the "terrible flooding" asso-
ciated with the storm.
"Some farmers have lost not
only their crops, but also their
livestock and supplies; and of
course they continue to lose


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income. Mr Ingraham noted
that in the central Bahamas,
particularly in Long Island and
in Exuma, the fishing sector has
also suffered "significant loss at
a critical period of the year" -
just before the start of the
grouper season.
"I assure those impacted by
the storm that we in the gov-
ernment are sensitive to your
difficulties; we will do our part
to help you to restore your-
selves to your pre-Noel condi-
tion," the prime minister said.
Mr Ingraham said he was
impressed with the quality of
the products offered at the expo
and looks forward to a day, "in
the not too distant future",
when (Je products will become
more widely available, both
locally and internationally.
"Clearly our producers and
manufacturers can (and many
do) compete in all markets, par-
ticularly in aspects of price and
quality," Mr Ingraham said.
He told those gathered that
the government is committed
to:
Promoting'effective link-
ages between the agricultural


and the tourism and retail sec-
tors in the Bahamas
Facilitating the expansion
of inter-island freight service to
accommodate produce and crop
trade between islands
Promoting the expansion of
modern and environmentally-
friendly agricultural practices
Promoting the expansion of
agricultural export
Causing the development
of modern, efficient food pro-
cessing plants
Promoting and supporting
the establishment of farmers
associations
Supporting the develop-
mept of co-operatives
Establishing a farmers cred-
it programme
The prime minister said that
some 270,000 acres of arable
land form a "natural resource
base" for the further develop-
ment of agriculture.
"We must ensure that the
future of this sector is bright-
ened.
"Toward this end, we need
to know which products can be
grown in sufficient quantities
for domestic use and export.


"Although we know that
there are some 480 registered
farmers in the country, it is
believed that there are far more
farmers, who perhaps have min-
imal holdings and do not access


the benefits that accrue with
registration.
"This further complicates our
measurement of the contribu-
tion of agriculture to our nation-
al economy," he noted.


... while PM claims agriculture and fisheries

have still to fully realise their potential


AGRICULTURE and fish-
eries in the Bahamas have not
achieved their full potential
according to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.
"We have long recognized the
potential in both agriculture and
fisheries to create a substantial
link between our domestic
economy and our principal eco-
nomic activity, tourism," he said
at the opening of the first
Bahamas Agricultural, Marine
Resources and Agribusiness
Exposition yesterday.
Mr Ingraham said this "vital


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link" has the potential to raise
the level of domestic savings
and create a more sustainable,
job-creating economic activity.
"To this we may now add the
potential for improving the
quality of our health as we
become more conscious of the
health risks associated with
mass production and highly
processed methods by which we
now satisfy our agricultural
needs. It is altogether a poten-
tial which has been too tong left
undeveloped," Mr Ingraham
said.
He said that for a variety of
reasons, successive governments
have been interested in pro-
moting and encouraging devel-
opment in the agricultural and
fisheries sectors.
These reasons, he said,
include:
a desire to ensure food
security and safety
a determination to raise
standards of living in all of the
islands
a need to create employ-
ment in agricultural and marine
sciences for unskilled farm
hands as well as for the univer-
sity trained and other Bahami-
ans
a desire to encourage Fam-
ily Island migration
a desire to create viable and
sustainable diversification of the
Bahamian national economy
"Over the years. we have
invested heavily in professional
and skills training, and have
sought to improve the level and


standard of technology avail-
able to farmers in particular,
with a view to enhancing food
production, processing, mar-
keting and sale of Bahamian
produce not always with the
successes for which we had
aimed. In many respects we
have not received value for
monies spent," Mr Ingraham
said.
He noted that the Bahamas
continues to import far too
much of its food, and that agri-
cultural and marine products
make up far too small a per-
centage of the country's exports.
"This position will not
change, believe without first-
ly, a general recognition that
agriculture can play a vital role
in our national economic well-
being particularly as a means
of combatting poverty and pro-
moting sustainable develop-
ment in our Family Islands; and
secondly, in the development
of a consensus for specific and
structured investment pro-
grammes for the further devel-
opment of these sectors of our
economy," Mr Ingraham said.
"From what I see here today,
there ought to be no doubt that
the .agribusiness sector can
become a more significant con-
tributor to our country's devel-
opment," he told those gath-
ered at the expo.
"I believe that increased and
improved food production, pro-
cessing, marketing and sales can
help us realise a vision of pros-
perity, food security, and hence


"From what I
see here today
there ought to
be no doubt
that the
agribusiness
sector can
become a
more signifi-
cant contribu
tor to our
country's
development."

sustainable development."
"I trust that this exhibition
will help to build the relation-
ships required for each produc-
er to improve his product and
thereby the state of agriculture,
fisheries and food processing
industries in the Bahamas."

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 3


L O CL6N W SI


In brief

Man charged with
manslaughter
By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
RAY Davis Jr, 18, was
charged with manslaughter yes-
terday in Magistrate's Court at
Bank Lane.
Davis, a resident of Anthrium
Avenue, was escorted to court
by officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit (CDU) under heavy
guard at 2.45pm, where Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel read the
charge to him.
By means of unlawful harm,
Davis is accused of intentional-
ly causing the death of Stephano
Stewart sometime between
November 3rd and 4th. The
accused was not required to
enter a plea, and Magistrate
Bethel explained to him that a
preliminary inquiry would be
necessary to determine if there
is sufficient evidence to establish
a prima facie case against him.
If the court deems tlat there
is enough evidence, Magistrate
Bethel continued, th. matter
would be heard in the Supreme
Court.
Bail was denieJ to the
accused who was not required
to enter a plea yesterday.
Davis was remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison uatil Novem-
ber 13 by Magistrate Bethel, at
which time his preliminary
inquiry will comnence. Davis
is represented ly lawyer Ian
Cargil.

Funeral today
for sla8 i police
corporal
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune- FReeport
Reporter
dmaycocl@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT The military
funeral 'or slain Grand
Bahama police corporal 2683
Eddison Bain will be held this
morning at Community at.
Heart Tabernacle on Coral
-. Road.
Bain'i colleagues and senior
police officials, including for-
mer ACP of Grand Bahama
EUisonare expected to attend
the service, which wjll be held
at 11an.
Corpral Bain, 28, was found
murdered near the Grand
Lucaymin Waterway on Octo-
ber 22
Two young men Edwin
Oral Bauld Jr, 24, and Wilfred
Geraid McPhee, 24 have
been charged with Bain's mur-
der, which was the ninth homi-
cide for the year on Grand
Bahama.


Court of Appeal president hits out over



inexplicable differences' in sentencing


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
THE country's justice system
is being brought into disrepute
by the "inexplicable differences"
in the sentencing of serious crim-
inals, Court of Appeal president
Dame Joan Sawyer said yester-
day.
Dame Joan made this state-
ment while hearing the case of
24-year-old Frederick Francis,
who was convicted of killing Aus-
trian tourists Barbara Frelin von
Perfall, 32, and Bernard von
Bolzano, 35, in Bimini two years
ago.
Francis had received bail for a
previous rape just nine days
before the double murder was
committed. He has since then also
been tried and sentenced for the
first rape.
The Court of Appeal's presi-
dent yesterday expressed aston-
ishment over the fact that Francis
had only been given a sentence of
life in prison for the double mur-
der as opposed to the death sen-
tence.


Dame Joan Sawyer says

administration of justice

being brought into disrepute


She indicated that stiffer penal-
ties were given to many others
who committed serious crimes
under various extenuating cir-
cumstances not present in this
case.
In February of this year,
Supreme Court Justice Stephen
Isaacs sentenced Francis to three
life sentences for the double mur-
der of the Austrians and a 14-
year prison sentence for the rape
of Ms Frelin Von Perfall.
Prior to the sentencing, Justice
Isaacs heard arguments from both
sides why Francis should receive
either the death penalty or life
imprisonment.
In his ruling on the sentence,
the judge sided with Francis'
lawyer Carlson Shurland, who
had argued in favour of giving his


Police operation causes dip

in crime in Carmichael area

* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
A NEIGHBOURHOOD watch scheme in conjunc-
tion with greater police visibility has caused a significant
dip in criminal activity in the traditionally "high crime"
Carmichael area in recent months, according to Supt
Stephen Dean of the southeastern division.
He was reporting on the success of a joint operation
carried out by his division and the nearby Carmichael
division on Wednesday night.
The initiative saw officers flood the streets in the
Baillou Hill Road and Soldier Road area making arrests
and issuing traffic citations. Supt Dean said that newly-
focused efforts in terms of gathering and acting on
intelligence in the local community are paying off for
everyone involved.
"(The two divisions) are really now taking a proactive
approach. We've been meeting with residents over
recent months who have been giving a lot of suggestions
about how we can enhance our crime fighting strate-
gies," said Supt Dean.
"We have seen crime take a dive in the Carmichael
area, particularly house break-ins," he said. "This was a
high crime area; I've seen tremendous improvement.
measured by our statistics."
On Wednesday evening, officers cited 50 persons
for traffic violations, including some for driving unin-
sured, unlicensed or behaving illegally on the increas-
ingly popular "trail bikes" rugged-looking motorcycles
on which young men are sometime seen engaging in so-
called "popping", lifting the front wheel of the bike off
the ground and driving aloAg on only the back wheel.
They also made a drug arrest and detained a for-
eign person who had allegedly overstayed his visa.
The operation lasted for two hours, from 5pm until


client life in prison because the
accused possibly had diminished
responsibility during the crime.
Yesterday, director of public
prosecutions Bernard Turner, on
behalf of the Attorney General,
argued before the Court of
Appeal that Justice Isaacs erred
in his sentencing, and due to the
nature of the crimes should have
sentenced Francis to death.
Wayne Munroe, appearing on
behalf of the appellant Francis,
in turn argued that Justice Isaacs
handed out the life sentence
because he accepted that there
was evidence which indicated
potential mitigating circum-
stances.

SEE page 8


7pm, and stoppages were made on the basis of "gener-
al profiling" informed by intelligence gathered from
within the community, said Supt Dean.
Such exercises will be continuing in the area, he said,
adding that his division and that of Supt Stephen Adder-
ley in Carmichael are "pacesetters" in this method of
policing.
"We hope that it will be duplicated right across," he
said.
Supt Dean said that the force is taking advantage of
local residents' knowledge as the "eyes and ears" of the
community, and by successfully acting on that data has
been able to instil greater trust and foster greater co-
operation between locals and the police.


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PAGE 4, FRIDAYONOVEMBER 9, 207 THE TRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS A DDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. I1. DUPUCIH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/lditor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Speaker Alvin Smith acted correctly


THE OPPOSITION'S performance in the
House of Assembly on Monday was not only
disgraceful "wutless" if you will-- but out of
character for Opposition leader Perry Christie.
Mr Christie looked quite uncomfortable as the
centrepiece of such a riotous drama, especially
with all of his pious talk of law and ordei and
abiding by the-rules.
At last the House has a strict schoolmaster in
Speaker Alvin Smith who is prepared to ignore
their antics and proceed with the people's busi-
ness with, or without them. They no longer
have a speaker who can be pushed around,
bamboozled and squeezed in and out of shape
like a piece of putty in their hands.
If they keep up their tactics obviously an
undisguised attempt to obstruct the forward
movement of the people's business - they will
soon be shouting, screaming, threatening, and
pounding desks from centre stage into irrele-
vance as an opposition party.
Their obnoxious behaviour was orchestrated
because, they claimed, Speaker Smith did not
give Mr Christie a chance to respond to what Mr
Christie felt were "unparliamentary" words
used against him and his former government
by Prime Minister Ingraham during the latter's
speech in the House on October 22 on the
amendment to the Juries Bill.
This is not true. The Speaker tried to deter-
mine if Mr Christie's complaint was that his
privilege had been breached. If so, the matter
would have been dealt with immediately. How-
ever, Mr Christie seemed more intent on read-
ing the prepared statement he had in his hand.
He never answered the question about privilege,
but rather complained about Mr Ingraham's
unparliamentary language.
If this were so then Mr Christie should have
complained as soon as Mr Ingraham made his
"unparliamentary" remarks in the House on
October 22. After the shouting match between
them ended and tempers cooled that day. Mr
Ingraham resumed his speech and slowly and
deliberately repeated what he had said earlier.
Again Mr Christie should have objected. But
again, Mr Christie did nothing. In fact he had
completely missed the opportunity to lodge a
complaint at the first available opportunity.
Two days after the October 22 heated
exchange, Mr Ingraham and Mr Christie met
privately when they spent 45 minutes discussing
a number of things, including the Juries Act. Mr
Ingraham said that at no time during that meet-
ing did he get the impression that the Opposi-
tion leader was "personally offended" by any
remarks made in the House.
So obviously, Monday's show was just that --


"No one can uproot
the'tree which
God has planted"
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
J Phone: 323-6452 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819




ODE LTA


a show to obstruct the proceedings of the
House.
The Opposition was denied nothing. They
were not treated unfairly. They were asked to let
the member for Carmichael, who was on the
floor, wind up the debate, and then Mr Christie
would be given an opportunity to address the
House.
Oh, no that was much too reasonable. They
forgot that they had lost the election. They for-
got that they were no longer in the driver's seat.
Forgetting their place in the Assembly, they
insisted on being heard immediately they
were prepared to accommodate no one.
The Speaker rightly demonstrated on Mon-
day that he was not put in the chair to play
childish tricks. As long as he was in the chair, the
debate would proceed and no further time
would be wasted.
Mr Speaker Smith was not being unfair to
anyone, rather Opposition leader Christie and
his colleagues were being petulant and unrea-
sonable. Their intent, could not be disguised.
Mr Christie also objected to Mr Ingraham's
use of the word "wutless." Mr Christie claimed
that Mr Ingraham used the word clearly to
offend him.
Mr Ingraham had told the House: "I submit,
Mr Speaker, that we will clean up the mess, we
will increase efficiency and the effectiveness of
the system. We will cause the courts to have
what they require to do their job and at the
end of our term in office we will say, God will-
ing, very proudly we did far better than those
worthless crew who were in charge before. And
I say worthless ("wutless") in the sense of say-
ing that they are not worth very much in terms
of what they did to the judicial system in the
Bahamas."
"Quite apart from it being untrue," retorted
Mr Christie, "these are personal attacks. They
are offensive and they offend the rules."
Speaker Smith ruled that these words did
not offend House rule 30(16) as they were abu-
sive to no individual member of parliament.
According to rule 30(16) "A member shall
not use offensive, abusive or insulting words
about either House of Parliament or any mem-
ber thereof."
It would be interesting to know how the
public would rate a government that watched
crime statistics for persons out on bail for mur-
der, rape and armed robbery climb rapidly -
from five in 2001, six in 2002, five in 2003,47 in
2004, 39 in 2005, 107 in 2006 and more than
200 in 2007 and did nothing about it.
Would such a government be considered
worthless or "wutless"?


The cost of





employee and




consumer theft


EDITOR, The Tribune.
IF OUR employers were to
advise how much inventory
or merchandise is lost to
employee and consumer theft,
I honestly suggest the public
would be shocked.
Is $300 million a low figure?
I really doubt it because of
facts substantiated in the mar-
ket from the food store sector
very clearly indicate that that
is low.
Why do our people think
they can help themselves with
a divine right seemingly to
merchandise without paying,
but when they have taken a
very short air trip to Florida
they will not dare tief?
There is no doubt that our
retail costs, direct the cost of
living of The Bahamas, is
inflated by at least 18-22 per
cent simply because of
employee and customer theft
and the cost to prosecute.
. From time to time the ques-
tion as to the possible posi-
tive use of the polygraph test
has been raised and I suggest
under controlled provisions
supported by Statute Law and
solely carried out by the
police under certain circum-
stances polygraph testing
should be allowed as much as
fingerprinting and other tests
such as DNA are allowed.
Certainly I do not accept
that a polygraph should be
required for pre-employment
- the employer has the right
to ask for a police criminal
record and that should cer-
tainly suffice, however when
an employee is suspected to
be stealing through their
employment subject .to cer-
tain requirements the employ-
er should be able to require
the police to carry out a poly-
graph on that employee or
customer.
I certainly suggest that a
polygraph will be of great
assistance to the police and
would most certainly give
them at least some advantage
over the restrictive 24 hours
for holding a suspect and
would totally eliminate the
allegations of police beating
or physical inducement and
there is enough scientific
proof that polygraph tests, ful-
filled by trained persons are
valid and accepted by courts
around the world.
If through this system we
could reduce a part of the


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whopping 300 plus million
dollars a year employee and
consumer theft and lower our
living costs, I say why are we
waiting? If the 300 million
dollars is accurate, that is over
$937.00 per resident, man and
child.
There is an horrific amount
of employee theft through
various methods the simple
misuse of the employer's facil-'
ities, copying or fax machines,


telephones, etc, that would
economically improve the
business or cost of delivery of
services from a government
department.
We have to do something,
because the rising costs of
food every time we visit the
stores is unexplainable
firstly and very questionable
second..
There is no reason why
Nassau's food prices are more
than 100 per cent of the retail
prices of Florida.
DESIREE MORRIS (Mrs)
Nassau:
Octobei25, 2007.


Tropical



Storm Noel

EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE approach of Tropical Storm Noel to the City of Nassau
in the island of New Providence in The Bahamas on the morn-
ing of November 1, 2007 seemingly was very unusual and what
occurred was as follows:-
The wind had been blowing about 20 to 25 miles pe: hour from
the east when it shifted to the southeast. At about 11.30 am it
became calm and there was an overcast sky with very little rain
and extremely warm. I thought it was the centre and expected
strong winds would occur say 40 to 50 miles per hour once it had
passed, but this did not happen. Finally the sky began to hard-
en and clear somewhat in the south and west and the wind
came back from the east and southeast about 20 mph.
The centre was extremely close to us according to the advisory
at 2.00 pm latitude 25.00 north and longitude 77.4 west(we are
lat. 25.00 north and long. 77.5 west).
I did telephone a friend at Spanish Wells during tle calm
and informed him of the condition and he said it was towing
there about 20 to 25 mph from the east.
He telephoned me about two hours later and saidit was
blowing about 50 to 60 mph and heavy rainfall. Subsequently on
the evening of November 1, 2007, I called him and was inbrmed
that the aforesaid lasted two hours and they had about 14.00
inches of rain. We had 6.13 inches of rain in Blair Estates where
I live.'
This was an unusual storm, but thank God Nassau onl3 expe-.
rienced winds of approximately 30 to 40 mph and we got off very
lightly with very little damage.
DAVID N. KEMP
Nassau,
November 2, 2007.


Share your news
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award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
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Tel: 322-1 103
Monday Friday


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007













TROPICAL STORM NOEL


Government 'proactively investigating'


* FLORIDA
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Win 4 Evening: 0-7-2-0


* In brief


Long Island

residents,

appreciate

Minister's

visit Bowe
DEPUTY administrator
for Long Island Rodrick
Bowe said residents
appreciate that Minister
of State for Works and
Utilities Phenton
Neymour and his
delegation came to their
island.
He said the gesture
showed that the govern-
ment is concerned about
the welfare of the people.
"That's the kind of min-
ister we want," Mr Bowe
said.
S"We wantone who is
about the people's busi-
pness, who is a people's
person."
Water and Sewerage
representative on Long
Island Silas added: "It
'shows us that the govern-
ment is concerned about
the island and it makes us
feel like we are impor-
'tant."'


Cat Island's water needs, says Minister


DEVIL'S POINT, CAT ISLAND: Minister of State for Public Utilities Phenton Neymour (right) listens to assistant general manager of the Water and Sewerage Corporation Robert Deal
(centre) near Devil's Point, Cat Island, on November 7. Also pictured is Cat Island administrator Charles King. Pictured right, the delegation view first-hand the flooding.


NEW BIGHT, Cht Island The government is
"proactively investigating and addressing" the water
needs of Cat Island residents in wake of flooding caused
by Tropical Storm Noel, Minister of State for Public
Utilities Phenton Neymour said.
"We decided that we were going to make this trip to
put together an action plan to address these problems
so that the residents themselves can have adequate
supplies of water, particularly during adverse weather,"
said Mr Neymour.
He led a delegation to Cat Island and Long Island.
Undersecretary at the Ministry of Public Works and
Transport Calvin Balfour, assistant general manager at
the Water and Sewerage Department Robert Deal and
consultant Dr Richard Cant made up the delegation.
They inspected areas affected by the storm and
observed flooded roads in the south of the island.
A reported four feet of flood water filled the well


*Neymour leads delegation

to see flood-affected areas

fields between New Bight and Deans, which were flood-
ed during the delegation's visit.
"One of the problems on Cat Island, not unknown to
us, is that whenever there are heavy rains the well
fields, it floods, and we have to rely on bottled water
being supply to Cat Island," Mr Neymour said.
"We have identified in Cat Island that more needs to
be done," he noted.
"Cat Island is limited by the fact that it only has four
reasonable areas for the supply of potable water."
In an effort to alleviate the situation, Mr Neymour
said they are examining the possibility of making use of
land that escaped the flooding.


"What we have identified is an area near the well field
where we plan to install some storage tanks because
during hurricane season, during the adverse weather, it
is important that we build up an inventory (of potable
water) before the storms hit," Mr Neymour said.
"We were successful in doing that in New Provi-
dence and other islands; but not yet in Cat Island."
Mr Neymour said the second phase of their action
plan will include looking into the establishment of a well
field. in northern Cat Island.
He pointed out that this would assist the efficiency of
the Water and Sewerage Corporation.
"We just brought in a new tanker truck to Cat Island
which is used to transport water," he added.
"It (a possible northern well field) would mean less
travel time for the truck and therefore, it would mean
the supply of more water to the residents."


China dismisses reports of Olympics Bibles ban as 'rumours'


China has rebuked reports
that it would ban foreign ath-
letes from bringing Bibles to the
Olympic village during the Bei-
jing Olympic Games next year,,
dismissing them as "sheer
rumours".
Earlier this week, Bahamians
were urged to boycott the
games in the wake of claims
that the Bible was listed among
"forbidden" objects in the ath-
letes' village.
"We have taken note of the
reports and checked with the
relevant authorities.
"The ,facts prove that the
reports are sheer rumours,"


Foreign Ministry spokesman
Liu Jianchao told a press con-
ference.
"The Chinese government
has never ever issued such a
rule, nor any such statement,"
Liu said.
"China's religious affairs
authorities and the Beijing
.Olympic organising committee
have not and could not issue
a rule banning the Bible in the
Olympic village."
China has always respected
and protected the religious free-
dom of foreigners living in Chi-
na in line with laws and regula-
tions, he said.


According to the Provisions
on the Administration of Reli-
gious Activities of Aliens With-
in the Territory of the People's
Republic of China, foreigners
are allowed to bring in religious
publications, audio-video mate-
rials or other objects for per-
sonal use, Liu said.
"We are suspicious of the ulti-
mate motivations of those who
spread such rumours. They
should be responsible, and not
do things that are not benefi-
cial for themselves and under-
mine mutual understanding
between China and the.world,".
he added.


On Tuesday, Peter T Carey,
manager of BAIC's business
services department, called for
the Bahamas to stand up for its
Christian principles by with-
drawing from the Games.
"I am not a fundamentalist
Christian, but I think this is
something that goes against the
rights of people," Mr Carey told
The Tribune after hearing the
rumours.
"I am calling for the Bahamas
to boycott the Olympics.
"As a small nation, we should
exercise our Christian princi-
ples and stand firm for our
beliefs."


The Games, due to open in
August next year, are expected
to one of the best Olympics
ever.
The Bahamas, with several
star athletes, including the phe-
nomenal high-jumper Donald
Thomas, is expected to feature
prominently on track and field.


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


I


a ,,- ,,,,.._ \ -.,'.. ....










PAE ,FRDYNOEBE 00 HETIBN


With the Bahamas so far recording 63 homicides this year, and criminals realising

cases can become snagged in the courts, isn't it time for an overhaul of the justice system?



Our judicial system is a mess


* By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmaiii.unm

T HE Bahamas'
judicial system is
an archaic mess
that has been
neglected to the point that
case backlogs have led to
vicious criminals roaming our
streets and salivating at the
chance to prey, yet again, on
another ill-fated victim.
Crime is ravaging our society,
as the criminal element is
wreaking havoc at nearly
every corner of our small
island nation.
Criminals are daily terrorizing
our frightened society, leaving
Bahamians to live as prisoners
in their own homes, caged
behind burglar bars and dead-
locks. In fact, Bahamians are
so fearful for their safety that
even landlords advertising in
the classified are including
security bars in their market-


"As the Yuletide.season
approaches, the criminal ele-
ment will undoubtedly be out
in force. Since armed rob-
beries and other offences are
expected to increase, Bahami-
ans must be vigilant and wary
of their surroundings."


ing approach to entice poten-
tial tenants.
The criminal justice system
has been mismanaged and
neglected, for far too long, by
self-serving politicians.
Frankly, it is refreshing that
the newly elected government


has kicked off their gover-
nance by choosing to fashion
and implement policies that
encourage the overhaul of our
sluggish, molasses-like justice
system.
At present, the Bahamas has
staggeringly recorded 63


homicides for the year. Even
more, the Bahamas holds the
ignominious designation as
having the highest per capital
murder rate in this region -
higher than Jamaica! Alarm-
ingly, the Bahamas is also
among the world's top 10 in
reported rapes per capital!
This is a travesty and we could
only imagine the actual num-
ber of rapes that are not
reported and therefore not
added to the national statis-
tics.

In recent times, lawlessness
has become the order of
the day as criminals realize
that with the right attorney,
their cases would be stifled in
our higgledy-piggledy court
system and that they could be
granted bail to roam, without
restraint, in a matter of hours
or days.
Our judicial system is in a
state of crisis. It is unaccept-
able that cases are incessantly
deferred and, when started,


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are continuously delayed.
Today, more than 200 individ-
uals accused of murders, rapes
and armed robberies, are out
on bail. I was awestruck to dis-
cover that of this number, 114
persons were charged with
murder. Police statistics com-
piled from 2001 to September
this year has revealed., a signifi-
cant increase in the number of
persons that have been grant-
ed bail. In 2001, five people
were on bail for murder, rape
and armed robbery; six per-
sons were on bail in 2002; five
in 2003; 47 in 2004; 39 in 2005;
107 in 2006 and more than 200
in 20Q7. Well blow me down!
From these statistics, is there
any wonder why crime has
skyrocketed?
Just this week, a 15-year-old
high school student was shot
dead as he attempted to bur-
glarize a food store. Sadly, the
idea of a teenager creeping
through an attic to commit a
robbery is indicative of the
* ominous state of our society,
as even children are corrupted
into now thinking that crime
pays.
Thus far, persons on bail have
been accused of committing 22
of this year's murders, numer-
ous armed robberies and vari-
ous other crimes.
Suspected criminals must be
speedily bought to trial, and if
convicted, promptly removed
from our streets because many
persons on bail are hardened,
career criminals who are
intent on being societal men-
aces.
Three days ago, I spoke to a
reformed criminal.
Twenty years ago, he served
time at Her Majesty's Prison
for a drug offenceand.,has .
since become a successful ,
businessman.
In addressing the surge in vio-
lent crime in our society, he
referred to our courts as a
"disgraceful theatre where
only the connected get jus-
tice."
He also said that these days,
many youngsters would not
have a problem doing a stint
or two at Her Majesty's prison
because "they now see it as a
hotel, where they don't have
to pay rent, they eat three
meals a day and there is no
capital punishment."
This interviewee also said:


"It is tragic that bail is given
to suspected murderers while
innocent families suffer the
heart wrenching blow of see-
ing the person that may have
killed their loved one out
practically scot-free." I could-
n't agree more!
This year, I was involved in a
traffic accident. Although the
police seemingly botched the
investigation and were duped
by the persons that struck me,
I have tried my utmost to
track down these individuals. I
am aware that while suing.
these persons would be my
only recourse at recouping my
money, I will have to wait for
a court date and, even with
the court ruling in my favour,
I am not guaranteed repay-
ment.
The price of justice in this
country is high, prolonged and
simply Third World!

As the Yuletide season
approaches, the crim-
inal element will undoubtedly
be out in full force. Since
armed robberies and other
offences are expected to
increase, Bahamians must be
vigilant and wary of their sur-
roundings.
An effective judicial system is
also essential to our economy
as investors pursuing business
ventures here must be confi-
dent that the justice system is
functional.
To curb crime, the socializa-
tion of the nation's youth must
become a priority, the illegal
immigration crisis must be
confronted and curtailed, legal
status must be granted to
immigrants (and their off-
spring) that qualify, our edu-
cational system must &ie
improved an there must be
more opportunities for mean-
ingful employment.
In order to fix the nation's
defunct judicial system and in
turn alleviate the log jam it
faces, more judges local or
foreign must be appointed to.
the bench, better court rooms
must be constructed and com-
petent court staff (eg clerks,
stenographers) must be hired.
If the judicial process is not
expedited, our country will
become an anarchic state -
sailing up a creek to absolute
chaos, without a paddle!


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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TIBUN FRIDY, NVEMBE 9,C007,NAGES


0 In brief

Trinidad's

PM vows to

diversify

fuel-driven

economy

and bridge

racial divide

PORT-OF-SPAIN,
Trinidad
PRIME Minister
Patrick Manning was
sworn in Wednesday for a
new term leading Trinidad
and Tobago, ushering in a
government he said would
bridge racial divides and
diversify the Caribbean
country's thriving oil- and
gas-driven economy,
according to Associated
Press.
Manning, who brought
his black-dominated Peo-
ple's National Movement
back to power in Monday
elections, took the oath of
office before an audience
of supporters, politicians,
and diplomats in a central
Port-of-Spain square.
Steel drums pulsed and
choirs sang spirituals.
The 61-year-old Man-
ning, who is black,
pledged to bring unity to
the country, where the 1.3
million inhabitants remain
deeply divided in politics.
Those of African descent
largely cheered Manning's
win while many of East
Indian origin backed the
main opposition party.
"The rivalries of the
election campaign have
been intense, but the fam-
ily of Trinidad and Toba-
go remains intact. We
have to put aside our divi-
sions," Manning told the
crowd of mostly black
supporters wearing crim-
son flowers that are the
symbol of the ruling party.
The prime minister's
term runs five years,
although Manning was
first appointed to the post
in 2001, then won elec-
tions in 2002. He took the
oath in the city square
instead of the traditional
government office setting,
a move he said indicated
his aim of bringing the
government closer to the
people.
Manning, a trained
geologist, vowed to spur
manufacturing and other
non-energy ventures to
further diversify the coun-
try's strong economy.
Trinidad and Tobago
relies on vast oil and nat-
ural gas deposits for 25
percent of its gross
domestic product. The
two-island nation is the
leading supplier of liquid
natural gas to the United
States.

Gunmen spray

bullets at Halian
S TV-radio stalon,


injuring bystander

* PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti
GUNMEN fired automat-
ic weapons on a TV and
radio station in Haiti's capi-
tal, injuring a street vendor,
police said Wednesday,
according to Associated
Press.
Radio-Tele Ginen's Port-
au-Prince building was rid-
dled with bullets as journal-
ists delivered a newscast ear-
ly Tuesday evening, Haitian
police spokesman Frantz
Lerebours said.
Rounds ricocheted off a
jeep belonging to the station
and hit a nearby street ven-
dor, station owner Jean
Lucien Borges said. The ven-
dor was being treated at a
local hospital.
No one was injured inside
the station, which kept
broadcasting throughout the
attack. "We thought it was
just regular shooting,"
Borges said.
The private station, which
beams a broad array of tele-
vision and radio coverage
across the festive Caribbean
country, is not aligned with
any political party. No arrests
have been made.


COLLEGE OF BAHAMAS ANNUAL CAREER AND JOB FAIR



Hundreds of job-



hungry students



get career advice


HIGH school and college stu-
dents from throughout New
Providence flocked to the Col-
lege of the Bahamas' annual
Career and Job Fair this year.
Taking advantage of the
opportunity, the hundreds of
young people attending the
event took time out to get
career advice from professionals
in fields such as banking,
accounting, medicine and envi-
ronmental science.
They also heard lectures from
various professionals on topics
such as excellence in customer
service, appearance on the job,
attitude and character building.
The COB Careers and Job
Fair is an annual event and
opportunity for employers to
conduct first line interviews with
potential employees and an
opportunity for students to
explore employment options.
The Career and Job Fair,
held on Wednesday, not only
catered to school and current
COB students, but also to grad-
uates who are seeking employ-
ment or a career change.
Students were encouraged to
bring well-prepared copies of
their resumes as a means of net-
working with employers.
The Careers and Placement
Office of the College of the


"We were
pleased to see
how many
students took
advantage of
the opportuni-
ty 99


Bahamas was responsible for
organising and planning the
event and deemed it a thorough
success.
Norma Turnquest, co-ordi-
nator for the event said, "We
were pleased to see how so
many students took advantage
of the opportunity. We also
thank the many businesses and
companies who came out to
speak to the young people."
Presenters at the event were
Dave Burrows, Dwight Bur-
rows, Tymeka Griffin, Anne
Lightbourn, lonie Diggiss,
Philip Gray. Tim Hauber, Mar-
ilyn Zonicle, Philip Simon,
Sonya Arthur and Linda Rus-
sell.


Senior manager of Scotia Ser-
vice for Scotiabank Dwight
Burrows said, "I think this is a
super idea and I commend
COB for having planned this."
"Events like this add to the
young people's overall prepa-
ration and it is good when they
can sit and listen to the advice
and recommendations of
mature professionals," he
added.
Companies that participat-
ed in the Career and Job Fair 07
were:
Bahamas Ferries
Bahamas First General
Insurance
Caribbean Bottling Com-
pany
Commonwealth Bank
D C Technology
Deloitte
The Department of Labour
Ernst & Young
Family Guardian
First Caribbean Bank
Harborside Resort
Heaven Sent Pharmacy
Lucayan Tropical Produce
Royal Bank of Canada
Scotiabank
National Museum of the
Bahamas
Water and Sewage Corpo-.
ration
Pricewaterhousecoopers.


WILLIE MAE PRATT CENTRE FOR GIRLS


Tour of

rehab

centre

following

upgrade
THE Willie Mae Pratt Centre
for Girls celebrated its Reha-
bilitation of Offenders Week
yesterday with a tour of its facil-
ity on Fox Hill Road.
The rehabilitative centre for
troubled girls was established
in 1961 and occupies 11.5 acres
of land in the eastern district of
New Providence.
On this property sits a main
building which houses five dor-
mitories, each capable of
accommodating eight residents
"comfortably".
Adjacent to the main building
is a smaller one which houses
the kitchen, dining room, and
a laundry room. This structure
is currently being refurbished
and has recently been renovat-
ed.
.The new refurbished build-
ing will also house a doctor's
office, a dormitory for those
waiting medical clearance, and a


The Willie Mae Pratt Centre for Girls and the Simpson Penn's School for boys facil-
ities was recently ungraded for the comfort and safety of the residents.

dormitory for new admissions. where sewing, computer stud-
In addition to this, two dor- ies, and cosmetology will be
mitories will house those requir- taught. A library and a recre-
ing a more secure environment ation room are also available
that the cottages currently in for those housed at the facility.
place. Two cottages at the northern
Also, a "quiet room" will be end of the compound will house
available for those requiring residents who are students of
"time out". the co-educational unit, and for
Three additional rooms will residents in the pre-release pro-
be used for vocational study .gramme.


ONWARD ONE LOVE SOLDIERS!


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


...


The One Love Soldiers Junkanoo group delighted delegates during the
opening ceremony of the Bahamas Dental Association Scientific Confer-
ence

Minister pledges dental

health for all Bahamians
Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis promised to make dental
health available to Bahamians throughout the country.
He was speaking at the Bahamas Dental Association's 2007
Scientific Conference, which opened at the British Colonial Hilton
on Wednesday night under the theme: "Modern dentistry: merging
an old science with emerging technology".
Dr Minnis lauded the dental profession's initiative in keeping
abreast of new procedures, diagnostic equipment and modern
technology.
This, he said, has strengthened the industry's ability to offer
quality oral health services..
Dr Minnis encouraged the country's dentists to continue suc-
cessfully integrating fundamental practices with prevailing tech-
nology, and to become proficient in its use to the advantage of
patients.
He also encouraged private practitioners to join as strategic
partners with the government in an effort to reduce oral health dis-
eases in adults and children.




LA CASITA
The Art of Island Li vi i g





















Everlyth i. mut, -









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 9, 2007


LOCALNW


Man is

charged

with murder

FROM page one


Claim that man 'in jail' reported




to have voted in Pinewood


McKenzie is charged
with, by means of unlaw-
ful harm, intentionally
causing the death of Mr
McKenzie.
The 43-year'-old
deceased was stabbed to
death in front of his res-
idence on the corner of
East and Fowler Streets,
opposite Lucky Food-
store No 3, last Tuesday.
His body was found on
his neighbour's porch to
which he staggered
before his death.
Magistrate Bethel told
the accused that the mat-
ter could not be tried in
Magistrate's Court, but
Rather in Supreme Court.
A preliminary inquiry
- will be held to determine
if there is enough evi-
dence for the case to
proceed, the magistrate
said. If it is determined
. that there is enough evi-
dence to proceed, Mag-
istrate Bethel told Gray,
the matter would
advance to supreme
* court: and if not, she
continued, he would be
released.
Bail was denied to
Gray who was represent-
ed by Ian Cargill. Magis-
trate Bethel remanded
the accused to Fox Hill
Prison until November
15 at which time his pre-
liminary inquiry will be
held at Court 11 on Nas-
sau Street.



Blow to Dwight

and Keva Major

baffttle against

extradition to US

"TROM page one

Mr Turner said.
The public prosecutions
,director explained that
Although a warrant for the
'Majors' .surrender to the
:US was signed last year, the
,Supreme Court also put a
:stay in place pending the
outcome of the case at the
SPrivy Council level.
: However, once the stay
is lifted, steps can be tak-
t en to extradite the couple.
Mr Turner indicated that
othe Majors still have other
matters before the Magis-
,trate's Courts which need
'to be resolved, but said the
:extradition would move
forward in due course.
; The couple is wanted by
:the US government to face
;drug charges relating to an
international conspiracy
involving hundreds of
pounds of cocaine and mar-
ijuana.
They have appeared in
local courts on several occa-
sions over the past several
years while fighting the
extradition.


Foodstore

employees

subdue robber

SFROM page one

The gunman's accom-
policee managed to flee on
foot before officers
arrived.
Police now have a 33-
year-old man in custody
for questioning in connec-
tion with the incident.
SThree hours later on the
S-same evening, a 25-year-
old woman reported her
car stolen after she had left
t running with a juvenile
inside.
; The incident is reported
;. to have taken place after
the woman left her car to
visit someone on Prince
Charles Drive.
SThe girl left in the run-


ing car a green 2000
oyota Corolla was
forced out of the vehicle
py a gunman who then
pped away from the scene.


FROM page one

covered in most cases that persons
were either not at home, at work or
off the island.
Some homes, she said, were sim-
ply vacant at the time. Also, she said,
after the 266 names of persons who
reportedly were not entitled to vote
in the constituency was printed in the
local dailies, many were not "too will-
ing" to come forward and give infor-
mation.
Ms Cleare said that in her search
on July 25th for one alleged voter,


Patrick Armbrister, she met a man
who identified himself as Keith
Major. Mr Major, she said, informed
her that the Patrick Armbrister that
he knows who lives in that area, "was
in jail".
Searching the register, Ms Cleare
said that she found another Patrick
Armbrister, the father of the first
Armbrister, who lived on North
Brazilita Street. Mr Armbrister
senior, said that his son lived with his
mother on North Sequoia Street, Ms
Cleare said.
Additionally, the court heard that a
Nikeya Deandra Cleare, whom the


witness reports she knows personally,
had not lived in the constituency for
at least two years.
Ms Cleare told the court that
Nikeya is married to her nephew, but
the pair have been separated for
more than two years. Nikeya, who
reportedly gave the address of her
parent's home on the voter's registry,
now lives in Misty Gardens, and has
been there now for more than a year,
Ms Cleare said.
Ms Cleare also told the court of
instances where she met and spoke
with voters who allegedly live out-
side of the Pinewood constituency


Dame Joan Sawyer


hits out at



pointing'


'finger



over


violent crime rise


FROM page one

country's streets.
"(Apparently) the increase in
crime is due to the break down
of the judicial system. Our judi-
cial system apparently bears
these people's children, houses
them, raises them, educates
them and then sends them out
to do crime, that's the stupidity
of what they're saying," she
said.
Dame Joan said that it is time
for people to stop blaming the
judicial system and take respon-
sibility for their children and
how they turn out.
"Parents have to be account-
able for how they bring up their
c* " .They brgy iem into
theworld, they,are responsible


..WH-I _
Laa
B-- -- -


....... .-.,

,iU |


for how they behave, they are
responsible until the children
are able to take responsibility
for themselves," she said.
The Court of Appeal presi-
dent said she and her colleagues
only come into the picture when
an individual commits a crime,
and not before then.
"We can't go out and be the
police and be the lawyer and
prosecutors and everything else,
we are judges," she said.
"I refuse to be charged with
the responsibility of other peo-
ple's children, I have enough of
problems within my own life, I
deal with the crime when it
comes before me nothing
more, nothing less."
Up to September 2007, there
-were over 114 people out on
bail, who were charged with


$650 .00


18 Cube

$720 .00


21 Cube

$962 .00


murder, Minister of National
Security Tommy Turnquest told
parliament two weeks ago.
With statistics like these,
members of the government
and the public have been calling
for an improvement of the
country's judicial system in
order to speed up the process of
justice.
As a first step in the direc-
tion of updating the judicial sys-
tem, government last month
introduced an amendment to
the Juries Act, which seeks to
reduce the number of jurors
from 12 to nine in all criminal
matters in the Supreme Court
except in capital offences.


boundaries, but voted in the con-
stituency.
Ms Cleare said she saw and spoke
with Adrian Miller on August 27th
-at a residence north of Sapodilla Blvd
and west of Baygeranium Ave. Mr
Miller acknowledged his identity and
address, according to Ms Cleare.
And, she told the court that he lives
within the Bamboo Town con-
stituency, rather than Pinewood.
Yesterday's testimony by Ms
Cleare covered more than 20 voters.
The case has been adjourned to Mon-
day at 10am when she is expected to
continue her testimony.


Court of Appeal

president hits out


FROM page three

The possible mitigating cir-
cumstances which the judge
recognized, Mr Munroe said,
included the fact that Francis
had previously been diagnosed
with a conduct disorder. This
diagnosis was made four years
before the double murder
when Francis was 17 years old.
Mr Munroe said that Justice
Isaacs made the decision that
during the sentencing stage the
prosecution had failed to dis-
prove that Francis possibly had
diminished responsibility in this
case.
Dame Joan, however, point-
ed out that this was impossible
for the prosecution to disprove
as there was no evidence on
record that Francis did indeed
have diminished responsibili-
ty.
Dame Joan said that the psy-
chiatrist who testified during
the murder trial determined
that Francis is fond of general
knowledge, can recall a lot of
basic facts about his country,
can name all the present and
past prime ministers and dis-
played average calculating
skills. She said that the psychi-


atrist also determined that
Francis' thoughts were "free
flowing and logical" and that
he understood the nature of his
convictions and the possible
consequences.
Dame Joan further said that
using Francis' long history of
criminal acts as mitigating fac-
tors in order to give him a
more lenient punishment is
sending the wrong message to
Bahamian society.
"(It is saying). it is okay to
do it when you have a bad
record for breaking the law and
you will get treated better than
the persons who had no previ-
ous record for breaking the
law, who had no previous expe-
rience of prison.
"That cannot be right. That
is not making the sentence fit
the crime, that is not any of the
things that the Privy Council
said in Trono Davis and'For-
rester Bowe,'" she said.
In the cases of Davis and
Bowe, Privy Council last year
ruled the mandatory death sen-
tence in the Bahamas is uncon-
stitutional.
The Justices of Appeal yes-
terday adjourned the Francis
case and will give a ruling at a
later date.


-~






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SBrazil an alternative energy model for US, Crist says


PICTURED (L-R) are: former Links national president Gladys Vaughn, Links safe house chairperson and past
chapter president Sharon Wilson, southern area director Mary Currie, former southern area director Margaret
Johnpon, president of the Nassau Chapter, Veronica Duncanson, and protocol chair Patrice McDonald.


Links branches out


to celebrate retiring


of safe house loan


* SAO PAULO, Brazil
BRAZIL'S extensive produc-
(ion of (ethanol shows the United
States that it can also ramp up
use ol the alternative fuel and
reduce its dependence on for-
eign oil, Florida Gov. Charlie
Crist said Thursday according
to AsAociated IPress.
Crist said his five-day trade
mission to Brazil left him
impressed by how ethanol dis-


tilled at vast sugarcane planta-
tions is available at virtually all
gas stations and is used by most
drivers in the country of nearly
190 million people.
"When you see it in person
and it's everywhere, it warms my
heart to see that we -can get
there. I know we can do it in
Florida and throughout Ameri-
ca," Crist said in a telephone
interview from Rio de Janeiro
as he wrapped up a five-day


trade mission to Latin America's
largest nation.
Crist, who is headed to
Argentina and Chile, said he sees
increased use of ethanol in fuel-
hungry Florida and the United
States as a national security issue
because of some oil exporters'
political hostility toward the U.S.
The Florida governor also said
Brazil has demonstrated that it
could become the world's undis-
puted ethanol superpower.


Trim-a-Tree


Department

is now open!


LINKS southern area direc-
tor Mary Currie planted a
Poincianna Tree to commem-
orate the retiring of a loan for
the construction for the organ-
isation's millionn safe house
for women in crisis.
She was assisted by past
national president Gladys
Vaughn and past southern
area director, Margaret John-
son.
The safe house, the first of
its kind in the Bahamas, pro-
vides shelter for two cate-
gories of women those who
are in immediate crisis and
who may or may not be
accompanied by children; and
those who are required by the
age to leave institutions of
child care but who in need of
long term shelter.
For the first group, the
length of the programme is six
months. For the second, the
." "


safe house provides a sup-
portive environment in which
they can work towards becom-
ing productive citizens. The
maximum length of stay is two
years
"The philosophy behind the
safe house is one of empow-
erment, and its purpose goes
beyond basic housing needs,"
said the organizers in a state-
ment.
"It responds to two cate-
gories of females in Bahamian
society and provides for the
first time in the Bahamas an
organised and sustained holis-
tic programme that addresses
the needs of these persons."
The safe house was official-
ly opened on October 17, 2003
by the former prime minister
Perry Christie and over the
past four years; with the assis-
tance of public and private cit-
izens, the Nassau Chapter of


the Links Inc has able to suc-
cessfully complete the facili-
ty, and retire the bank loan
associated with it.
As the named corporate
sponsor, British American
Financial has contributed
$100,000 to the effort.
The tree planting ceremo-
ny included remarks by Links
president Veronica Duncan-
son, president of British
American Financial Chester
Cooper, safe house board
member Dr Sandra Dean Pat-
terson and Links southern
area director Mary Currie.
Archbishop Drexel Gomez
offered prayers for the organ-
isation and its work, and Pas-
tor Jason Graham prayed for
the safe house and its occu-
pants.
Sharon Wilson, chairman of
the safe house, gave the vote
of thanks.


Nov 9th-17th, 20(


Everything


P'2


r. ,
i '^a


yChristmas

Shop early for fabulous bargains!

Kelly1 House&

,Ma at Ma marathon
Mon.day-Friday 9:00an-8:OOpm
Tel: 242 3934002 aa OOam-9OOpm
Sj n ).j dosed
I Fax: (242) 3934096 www.kellysbahamas.om
.. Except on red tagged and net items


SLwqotq t. &BSL..A&asI

Ph: (242) 394-2378 Fax: (242) 393-2427
Village Road, next to Master Technicians Ltd.


ace


this Saturday ONLY, November 10th


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE


PAGF 10 FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 9. 2007


CHAPTER TEN
"Tetched in the Head"


June 25-26, 1828. Outside of Shawneetown,
Illinois.

THE STORY SO FAR: Headed for Ken-
tucky, the Damron children pay for a room in a
boardinghouse. But when Jesse finds a coffin in
the parlor, she wonders if it's safe to stay.

"Who died?" I ask. My voice squeaks like a
rusty hinge.
George laughs. "Nobody. Mr. Cottland built
it for himself. He's crazy; tetchedd in the head,'
as my mama says. Keeps that whisky jug in case
he gets thirsty on the way to heaven."
"Whew," I say. "That is crazy." I wipe my
hands on my dress. This place is even spookier
than I thought.
I don't tell the others what I've seen, but I'm
testy all through dinner. I can't get Moses alone:
he's too busy eating second portions of roast
pork and turnips. And when Mr. Cottland sug-
gests we all have a bath, Moses agrees before I
can protest. "Saturday is bath night at our house,
too," he adds. "Right, Jess?"
Our house. Moses talks as if Mama and Papa
were still alive! Is he pretending we're not
orphans? I keep an eye on that closed parlor
door while we help George and Mr. Cottland
draw and heat the water.
Louisa and I have the first bath in the tin tub.
When my sister strips off her clothes, her ribs
look as bumpy as Mama's old washboard. She
smells like curdled milk. We haven't had a bath
since we left Illinois.
"Don't stare at me!" she complains.
"I'm not. Turn around and I'll scrub your
back." For a minute I'm furious with Mama for
leaving me. Mama would know how to make our
sack of cornmeal last, how to cook soups and
stews to help the little ones grow right. I'm not
even twelve! How will I feed everyone?
When I climb into the tub, wearing nothing but
Papa's ring on its leather strap, it's Louisa's turn
to stare. "You have bumps on your chest," she
says.
"Go away," I snap.
Her eyes fill. "I want Mama," she says.
"So do I." I pull her into a slippery hug.
I bathe and dry off as fast as I can. My dress
feels shabby when I button it, and my feet still
look dirty. I try to comb the snarls from Louisa's
hair, but she yelps like the puppy. "You don't do
it right!" she wails.
I give up. I'll never be able to do things the


way Mama did.
Moses and Solomon bathe next. When it's
Mr. Cottland's turn, I hurry everyone out to the
barn. "We're leaving," I tell them.
"But it's dark," Louisa whines. "I want to
sleep here."
Moses pulls me aside. "What are you talking
about? We paid good money to stay."
"Listen." I keep my voice low so the little
ones won't hear me. "Mr. Cottland keeps an
empty coffin,in his parlor. What if he puts one of
us in there?"
Moses moves so fast, you'd think another pan-
ther was after us. In a few minutes we've bun-
dled Louisa and Solomon into the wagon, set
the mule in her traces, and saddled Pearl. "Why
are we leaving?" Solomon whispers.
"Hush," I tell him. "Do you want to be bound
out, like George?"
Moses and I walk the animals slowly across the
yard. Every squeak of the wheels makes my
heart thump. As Moses opens the gate, we hear
footsteps in the yard. I freeze, but it's George.
He pops out of the shadows, a bundle under his
arm. "Take me with you," he begs.
"We can't," I whisper.
Solomon tugs my arm. "Why not? George is
nice."
"Of course he is." I lean close to George.
"We're headed for Kentucky," I tell him.
"A slave state?" George drops his bundle on
the ground. "I thought y'all were better than


that." He melts back into the dark without say-
ing good-bye.
I want to explain, but Moses grabs my arm.
"Get in," he says. "He might tell the old man."
I climb into the wagon and turn Sadie toward
the rising moon. George's words make my
cheeks burn, but what else can we do'? We
promised Papa we'd find our way home.
It's not so easy. The next night, long after
we've crossed the Ohio River into Kentucky,
Moses discovers the money is missing from his
left boot. Even worse, I've left Papa's letter on
Mr. Cottland's puncheon floor.
"How could you?" Moses shouts. "That letter
was the most important thing Papa gave us!"
"What about the money!" I cry. "How could
you leave your boots where crazy Mr. Cottland
could find them?"
"What was I supposed to do?" Moses's voice
breaks. "Take them into the tub with me?" We
both laugh, even though it's not funny. Moses
sighs. "At least he only robbed one boot-and 1
.have some money in my pocket." He jingles his
coins. "We were both spooked by that coffin."
"I sure was. Thank goodness Mr. Cottland
didn't chase after us."
Moses counts out the rest of our money.
"Twenty-nine dollars-plus two Spanish piasters.
We have to make it last. I'll try to shoot more
game."
"We could always sell the silver stock on
Grandpa's gun."


Moses shakes his head. "No yet. Papa would
never forgive us. We'll just have to be extra care-
ful. And no more staying with strangers, espe-
cially without the letter."
I wave my hand around the dark clearing.
"No one will bother us here." Giant oaks tower
over us, and the woods are full of spooky sounds:
branches snapping, coyotes yipping, and an owl
hooting.
Moses grips the rifle. "I don't like this place."
He leans close to me. "I'm scared, Jesse. What
if we never make it to Grandma's?"
Now it's my turn to pretend I'm brave. "Don't
talk that way! Of course we will." But I'm just
as worried as he is. I remember what Moses
said: We haven't heard from Grandma in
months. What if she's gone, too?
(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright 2007 Liza Ketchum
Illustrations copyright 2007 C. B. Mordan
Reprinted by permission of
Breakfast Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com


This Breakfast Serials story is





sponsored by lTT C


~~- ~~----``~~~-~


I


-ARTS


~g*BL i ;










THE TRIBUNE


-hi ,. ... ...... 2007, PAGE 11


Chavez meets with representative






of Colombia's largest guerrilla group



0 CARACAS, Venezuela
PRESIDENT HUGO
CHAVEZ met with a repre-
sentative of Colombia's s
largest guerrilla group -
Thursday, saying he and .
Luciano Marin Arango held
their first talks aimed at
negotiating a swap of rebel- F
held hostages for jailed
guerrillas, according to
Associated Press. iWho says you can't have it all?
"We are here trying to put "
the pieces to together" for When it comes to your GE appliances, Geoffrey
an agreement, Chavez told Jones specializes in providing exactly what you want.
state television as Marin
Arangd, better known by his The inspiring GE Monogram Series Combines form
nodn de u t:Of Ivan Mar- ,;. ," ., .:
nom de guex t ivan Mar- and function to produce beautiful, state-of-the-art,
quez, stood next to him on
the steps of Venezuela's quality appliances.
presidential palace. a t
Marquez said a future Come in today and let us puttogether a GE appliance
meeting between Chavez. order that will best suit'the look, style.and function of
meeting between Chavez -. .,"
and Revolutionary Armed your ideal home.
Forces of Colombia com-
mander MI.iiinuiel Marulanda
possibly in Colombia's El
Yari region was needed"
to overcome obstacles to a"ME
prisoner swap, which could.-.
include three Americans VENEZUELA'S President Hugo Chavez, center, speaks with the media as he is is flanked by Ivan Marquez, : -
and French-Colombian citi- representative of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, or FARC, left, and Colombian Senator Piedad Cordoba,
zen Ingrid Betancourt.
zen Ingrid Betancourt. right, after a meeting at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2007.
El Yari, where Marulanda
is thought to be hiding out, -
is located in the jungle -A4
province of Vichada near
Colombia's borders with .
Venezuela and Brazil.d.4
Marquez said he thought a
Chavez-Marulanda meeting
in E1 Yari could remove the
main obstacles to a swap 5
involving about 50 hostages .
and as many as 500 jailed
rebels.
Colombian Peace Com- .
missioner Luis Carlos *'
Restrepo has said that 4 ,
Colombia's government has ,v
not authorized a meeting
between Chavez and FARC : ".- -!
leaders on Colombiah soil.
Hostages held by the,
FARC includekthree U.S. .
defense c .. i, h. -whose '-
plane crashed in the Colom-
bian jungle in 2003 andX
Betancourt, a former "
Colombian presidential can
didate who haI been a cap-
ti ye tor morie than five .,,
years,.} ,:
The government of .
French President Nicolas .
Sarkozy, which backs.
Chavez's negotiation .
efforts, has urged the FARC
to provide mediators with J
proof that Betancourt is
alive. Chavez said he hopes
to bring such evidence to I :L.-1
French officials during an .... ..
upcoming trip to Paris. """" 0-
Colombia's U.S.-allied .
government in September
authorized Chavez to bro- ..- --
ker a deal with the leftist -
rebels. A. '






,ShareP'. :








from people who are
making news in their g
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning. .
for improvements in the .'Rosetta & Montgomery Streets
area or have won an 322-2188/9
Award.
If"so, call us on 322 1986
and share your stoe.






PAGE 12, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE,


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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


SECTION -


FAMILY (I CAR.Di AN!
INSiLR.NCE COMP\MN LIMITED


business@tribuneinedia.net


Accounting

firms urged

to contract

senior workers


Baker's Bay Club opponents



seek new 'stop work' order


By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
ACCOUNTING firms
were yesterday encouraged
to contract their senior staff as
a way to retain them, a for-
mer PLP Senator saying dif-
ficulties experienced in retain-
ing experienced accountants
were creating a tremendous
need for more Bahamians in
the profession/
Philip Galanis, managing
partner of Galanis and Co,
told a seminar at the
Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA)
week that Bahamian account-
ing firms often found it hard
to keep their more qualified
staff because they are aggres-
sively recruited by companies
for posts such as chief finan-
cial officer and financial con-
troller.
This staff turnover rate, Mr
Galanis suggested, had
prompted many firms to indi-
cate an unwillingness to invest
in extensive training of their
employees, since they were
leaving as soon as a better
offer came along.
He said this was often why
some Bahamian accounting
firms sought to employ expa-
triates, as their terms of
employment were more
defined. They were eligible
for employment over a spe-
cific timeframe, during which
it was very difficult for them
to move.to another compa-
ny, and were earning a spe-
cific salary.
Therefore, Mr Galanis sug-
gested that if accounting firms
were to enter into contractu-
al agreements with their
senior Bahamian staff, it
might mitigate some of the
retention challenges.
"There are a plethora of
opportunities not being filled
by Bahamians," he added.
Mr Galanis said that most
audit clients dislike frequent
turnovers of accounting staff
that they may have built rela-
tionships with.
SEE page 4B


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
OPPONENTS of the $175
million Baker's Bay Golf &
Ocean Club development have
filed a summons seeking a court
injunction to prevent the devel-
opers from continuing work on
the project until their second
judicial review application is
heard, marking the latest salvo
in a long-running legal battle
that shows no sign of ending.
Fred Smith, a partner in Cal-
lender's & Co and attorney for
the Save Guana Cay Reef Asso-
ciation, confirmed yesterday to
The Tribune that the Associa-
tion had filed the injunction


Guana Cay Association's attorney

threatens third judicial review

proceeding against Hope Town

District council over permits

given Discovery Land Company


application with the Supreme
Court in a bid to prevent Dis-
covery Land Company and its
subsidiaries from proceeding
with their work.
The injunction application
asks the Supreme Court to


* Chamber president says his
business's propane costs have
almost doubled since New Year, with
Superwash spending $130,000 on gas
and $60,000 on BEC per month
* Warns cost of living and demand for
wage rises set to increase, with hotels
warily watching effect on air fares

* ByNEIL HARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor
PRICES and the cost of living in the Bahamas.
will have to increase as a result of spiralling glob-
al oil and energy costs, the Bahamas Chamber or
Commerce's president warned yesterday, as the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation's (BEC) fuel
surcharge moves through the $0.13 per kilowatt
hour mark.
With BEC's basic rate set at $0.17 per kilowatt
hour, the fuel surcharge is moving slowly but
inevitably towards matching that mark, raising
production costs for many Bahamian businesses to
levels where they have no choice but to pass at
least a fraction of those costs on to consumers if
they are to remain profitable.
With the price per barrel of crude oil, as mea-
sured by the NYMEX and Brent indexes, closing


make an order to prevent
Passerine at Abaco, Passerine
at Abaco Holdings, Baker's Bay
Ltd, Baker's Bay HOA Ltd,
Baker's Bay Marina Ltd and
Baker's Bay Foundation Ltd
"from.proceeding with or con-


yesterday at $96.37 and $93.24 respectively, just
shy of the psychologically-important $100 thresh-
old, Chamber president Dionisio D'Aguilar
warned that BEC's higher electricity costs a
SEE page 9B


tinuing to undertake the works
contemplated by the permits
and approvals purportedly
granted".
The application asks for the
restraining order to be made on
the grounds that the develop-
ers had not obtained "the nec-
essary'permits and approvals"
from the correct government
agency.
The Association's application


also seeks a court order to pre-
vent the Discovery Land Com-
pany affiliates from working on
the Treasury and Crown Land
that forms part of the develop-
ment site, and wants a further
order.to prevent the Govern-
ment, its departments and agen-
cies from issuing or renewing
permits and approvals to the
developers.
The crux of the second appli-
cation for judicial review is that
the permits and approvals
granted to Discovery Land
Company for the Baker's Bay
project were not issued through
the correct government agen-
cies and processes.
The Association is seeking
the court orders to prevent any
more work being carried out on
Guana Cay until the second
judicial review application is
heard on its substantive merits.
Mr Smith told The Tribune:
"We have filed an application
for an interlocutory injunction

SEE page 4B


COB chief wants funding

based on student numbers

Eyes tuition fee increase

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
THE College of he Bahamas (COB) needs to move from a flat
government grant model to an admission grant model based on stu-
dent enrollment numbers, its president said yesterday, as this
would ensure its finances keeps pace with admissions and it can
develop programmes in the sciences fields.
Janyne Hodder said she had asked the Government to consider
changing the way it supports COB to ensure the institution can
effectively address the needs of students.
She said that as COB moves towards university status, and as the
Bahamas develops, it wasessential the college could offer relevant
and diverse degrees that adequately meet the economy's needs.
"When you have a flat grant system, then what happens is that
you are diverting your tertiary funds to the social sciences, with pro-
grames such as law and history, which are the cheapest to run." Mrs
Hodder said.
"But what happens then is that you do not grow the technical pro-
grammes, such as chemistry engineering or science-based, which are
SEE page 4B


Act changes and


new regulations


for bank audits


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas is proposing to amend
the Banks and Trust Compa-
nies Regulation Act 2000 to
"bring it into line" with inter-
national standards when it
comes to external auditors and
their examinations of its bank
and trust company licensees,
with a new set of regulations
also planned.
Apart from amending the
existing Act, the Central Bank
is also seeking consultation on
the Banks and Trust Compa-
nies (Auditors) (Facts and Mat-
ters of Material Significance)
Regulations 2007, as it moves
to establish a regulatory frame-
work for auditors of its bank
and trust company licensees
that is "in line with compara-
ble provisions that have been
in place in many countries
around the world for some
time".
The Act amendments include
what is described in some quar-
ters as a 'whistleblower protec-
tion' clause, protecting the
external auditors Bahamian
accountants from liability if
they disclose information on
Bahamas-based banks and trust
companies that they audit to the
Central Bank.
Aiming to enhance co-opera-
tion between the Central
Bank's banking supervisors and
external auditors, the amend-
ments to the existing Act will
"expand" auditor access to a
banking licensee's books and


Proposals include
safeguards for
'whistleblowers'

accounts. As proposed, it will
also give the external auditors
the right to receive information
and explanations from the audit
client as it considers necessary
to perform its function.
The Central Bank said the
Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act 2000 amend-
ments will also "impose obliga-
tions" on auditors or former
auditors to notify the Inspector
of Banks and Trust Companies
if they plan to resign before
their term as auditor expires, or
not seek reappointment.
Other amendments include
notifying the regulator if they
plan "to include a modification
on the licensee's financial state-
ment", and if the auditor uncov-
ers an issue during an audit that
"is of material significance" to
the Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies performing
his/her duties.
The amendments propose a
$25,000 fine for auditors who
fail to comply with the require-
ment for communicating with
the Inspector of Banks and
Trust Companies.
The Banks and Trust Com-
panies (Auditors) (Facts and
Matters of Material Signifi-

SEE page 4B


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Affiliates the right way to boost traffic


F YOU have your own
website and are getting
regular traffic to it, or are sell-
ing a product online, then
affiliate marketing is an amaz-
ing way to generate income
for yourself. It is estimated
that nearly 55 per cent of
online marketers have some
sort of an affiliate pro-
gramme, capable of making
them and their affiliates mon-
*' ey.
Affiliate marketing is where
there is a business partnership
between a vendor who has a
product for sale, and an affil-
iate, who'has a website or
newsletter through which they
promote that product to their
own list of customers in
exchange for a commission.


SBusiness
SSense


So, effectively what hap-
pens is that the affiliate moves
the customer, not the prod-
uct. He sends the customer,
through either a link or a ban-
ner from his own website to
the vendor's site, or to the
vendors merchant's product
order page, in the hope that
this customer will buy the
product. Whenhe or she buys
the product, the affiliate gets a
percentage of the commission.
There are many products
that are sold this way from
music, toys, magazines, jew-


Legal Notice
NOTICE


MONTEZUM INVESTMENTS LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MONTEZUM INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






Julius Bar

Julius Baer Group, the leading dedicated Wealth Management is seeking candidates for the
position of:
H. EADOIPITALIAN DESK' ,

CORE RESPONSIBILITIES:
Set up and lead a team of relationship managers with focus on Italian speaking
European Countries (Italy and Switzerland)
Acquisition of new clients
Client retention and servicing of existing client relationships
Frequent business trips to Europe
Promote Nassau as financial centre and JB Nassau as booking centre for offshore
clients.
REQUIRED SKILLS:
Excellent verbal and written communication skill
PC literate with strong Excel, Word, PowerPoint (ability to learn newapplications
quickly)
A commitment to service excellence
EXPERIENCE:
Minimum 10 years experience in Swiss banking or related field
EDUCATION:
A Bachelor's degree with concentration in Economic, Business Administration or
equivalent.
FOREIGN LANGUAGES:
The ability to speak a third language would be an asset
We offer a very competitive compensation and benefits package, a stimulating work
environment and the opportunity to make a significant contribution to our business while
expanding your career.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume by October 31', 2007 to the
attention of:


IIBY HAND
Personal & Confidential
Human Resources
Ocean Centre, Montague Foreshore
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N4890B
Nassau, Bahamas


Personal & Confidential
Human resources
P.O, Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas


ellery, software and eBooks
to insurance. I recently went
on a website that promoted
child Internet safety, and on
the homepage they had a ban-
ner for a book they were pro-
moting. When I clicked on the
banner I was taken to the sec-
tion in amazon.com where I
could buy the book. Had I
bought the book, the website
owner would have gotten a
commission from Amazon for
driving me to their site a
classic example of an affiliate
partnership.
The advantages of affiliate
programmes are:
The affiliate can poten-
tially earn a high income 24/7
The affiliate can choose
whatever product they wish
to represent, ideally one that
is relevant to their website
content and appeals to their
audience
The affiliate can learn a
lot from vendors, who often
tell them their secret online
marketing techniques to help
promote their product. The
vendor will get more traffic
from the visitors that come
from the affiliates, and that
helps the vendor's search
engine rankings.

There are two ways the
affiliate gets paid. He can
either be paid by the Pay Per
Lead (PPL) method, where
the affiliate gets paid a com-
mission for every lead that it
sends to the vendor's website,
or by the Pay Per Conversion
(PPC) method, where the
affiliate gets paid a commis-
sion for every referral that
buys the vendor's product. It
is normally more rewarding
to be paid in the PPC method,
as the potential for earning
revenue is higher.
Many vendors offer one or
two-tier affiliate programmes.
If the vendor has a one-tier
programme, you only get paid
for your own referrals that
convert to a sale. In a two-tier
system, you can also sign up


other affiliates to promote the
same product, and when they
* send traffic to the vendor's
site and it converts into a sale,
you get a percentage of that
commission as well.

"Affiliate marketing
is where there
is a business
partnership between
a vendor who has a
product for sale, and
an affiliate, who
has a website or
newsletter through
which they promote
that product to their
own list of customers
in exchange for a
commission."

You need to also consider
the sales tracking system at
the heart of affiliate pro-
grammes. This is whMltracks
the sale and ensures your
commission is paid. There are
two different systems. There
is the In House Affiliate Pro-
gramme, where the vendor
has his own specialised soft-
ware on his own server which
tracks the sales. There is the
Affiliate Network, where the
vendor outsources his affili-
ate programme and sales
tracking to a third party such
as www.CommissionJunc-
tion.com or www.ClickX-
Change.com. The vendor pays
the network an annual com-
mission, and a percentage
commission for every prod-
uct sold. Affiliate networks
have a good reputation for
being fair and making sure
affiliates get paid.
Both tracking systems store
'cookies' on the visitor's com-
puter to identify them. So,
when the affiliate sends a vis-
itor and they don't purchase
at first, but come back later


rF>


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and purchase, the affiliate will
still get their commission. The
expiration time for 'cookies'
varies, so check the terms
carefully. If you go the in-
house way, make sure you
check the vendor's affiliate
programme is bona fide.
Both tracking systems use
affiliate codes. When the affil-
iate signs up to a vendor's
programme, he downloads his
unique affiliate code and
imbeds them into his links and
banners that drive the visitor
to the vendor's site. This
allows the vendor to link the
visitor to the affiliate, and
makes sure the affiliate gets
paid in the event of a pur-
chase. Read Affiliatelnsider
by Gordon Penza, which is
the definitive resource on the
steps you need to take to
becoming an affiliate:
The first step is to Decide
on your Product. Decide
which product would be rele-
vant to your website and your
visitors. The more relevant it
is, the more likely it will gen-
erate sales. And test the prod-
uct, so you don't sell some-
thing of low quality.
The second step is to Check
Affiliate Networks. When you
have found the right product
to promote, sign up to a ven-
dor's affiliate programme and
get your affiliate code.
The third step is to Promote
the Vendor's Product. You
can do this in several ways.
You can insert the vendor's
banners and text links (with
your tracking code) into your
e-mail mailings that you make
to your customers, advising
them of this special offer. You
can insert the banner or text
links into newsletters, or put
them on your website pages
- anywhere where your visi-


tors or subscribers can see
them. The other way of pro-
moting the vendor's products
is by advertising them in
search engines such as Yahoo
and Google, with the hope
that when people see your ad,
they will click on it and order
the product.
Remember, with affiliate
marketing, if you don't pro-
mote the product and don't
drive traffic to the vendor's
site, you won't get an income.
Your hard work, persistence
and determination is what it
will take to become success-
ful.
Whether you become a
vendor and sell your product
through affiliates, or become
an affiliate to promote a ven-
dor's product, affiliate mar-
keting is here to stay. Don't
be an antipreneur and make
the rnistake of missing this
glorious opportunity. Take
advantage of it if you have
your own website. So, in order
to avoid the trap of
antipreneurship, make sure
that you spend sufficient time
on this area, as it will pay
large dividends for your
future business success.

NB: Adapted from his
eBook The 10 Deadly Sins of
Antipreneurship, available at
www.antipreneurship.com
Mark draws on 20 years of
top level business, marketing
and communications experi-
ence in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operat-
ing officer of www.ezpze-
mail.com, currently lives in
Nassau, and can be contact-
ed at:
markalexpalmer@mac.com

Mark Palmer.
All rights reserved


THE CHEESESTEAK GRILLE

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY,.
"'': Fhill Time/ Part.TiAme
Positions Available

Must Have Pleasant Personality
Must Be Team Player
Must Be Customer Service Oriented
Prior fast food restaurant experience

Email us at:
rushbevans@hotmnail.com
or apply in person at The Cheesesteak Grille
in the food court at The Mall At Marathon.





Camperdown Riding Club

proudly presents their

Annual Horse Show














November 10 & 11, 2007
9:00 am 3:00 pm
Consession Stand available:
Hamburgers/Hotdogs/Snacks/Sweets

Please come out and support us!
Admission is FREE!
sit


II illlll~llr


KING'S
REAL ESTATE
King's Real Estate Company Limited is a Bahamian Real
Estate and Development Company. We are currently
looking for applicants for the below positions:

CIVIL ENGINEER
Bachelor Degree or higher in the field of Civil
Engineering.
3-5 years experience in Civil Engineering and
Construction related fields.
Registered with the Bahamas Professional Engineers'
Board.
Experience in the design of Subdivisions, Roads,
Airports, Drainage and Water & Sewerage Systems.
Ability to use engineering software such as Auto
CAD 2004.
* Proficient in implementing site quality assurance
measures and overseeing site supervision.
* Hardworking and able to handle a number of projects
simultaneously.

REAL ESTATE AGENT
* 3 5 years experience in the Real Estate Industry.
* Licensed with the Bahamas Real Estate Association.
* Motivated.

King's Real Estate is a team orientated company and
potential employees should be capable of adapting to
this philosophy.

All interested candidates should e-mail there resumes to:
kingsley@kingsrealty.com


Dr.Colin Bullard MD FRCP
Emergency Medicine Specialist
Fellow ofThe Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada
Dr.Chinyere Carey-Bullard MD CCEP
SGraduate of The University of Western Ontario Family Medical &
^, Skin Care Specialist
(,Canadian Board Certified Family Physicians
SSe Habla Espazolal


pur; a
A. 4' 4
: ** *** * ^ *l *:< * ** **i * * *o
N'121 ~


---- --- II ---


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


r,














THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 3B


Bahamas must exploit


270k arable acres


THE Bahamas must exploit
its 270,000 acres of arable land
to build an agriculture industry,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said yesterday, adding that
while there were 480 registered
farmers in this nation, many
more were not and failing to
access the benefits of this sta-
tus.
Speaking at the opening of
the first Bahamas Agricultural,
Marine Resources and Agribusi-
ness Exposition, Mr Ingraham
said the Government was com-
mitted to establishing a Farmers


Credit Programme, and sup-
porting linkages between agri-
culture and tourism.
He said: "Some 270,000 acres
of arable land form a natural
resource base for the further
development of agriculture. We
must ensure that the future of
this sector is brightened.
"The Bahamas continues to
import far too much of its food.
And agricultural and marine
products form far too small a
percentage of our exports.
"This position will not change,
I believe, without firstly, a gen-


COB shortlists Dean

of Business applicants

By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE College of the Bahamas (COB) is down to a "short short"
list of applicants for the new Dean of Business post, a position
where the incumbent will be charged with setting a new course for
the institution over the next two years.
COB's president, Janyne Hodder, said the college was in the final
rounds of interviewing potential candidates after a long process.
She added that COB's plans include the start of Master Degree
programmes in Accounting and Management, both likely to start
next year. The Dean's Advisory Council is also expected to be in
place by next year.
Further, Mrs Hodder said COB was in the final stages of nego-
tiating financing for two major infrastructural projects, a $20 mil-
lion furnishing and creation of a library, and an $8 million campus
S enhancement on Grand Bahama.
She said the drawings are completed, and the contractors ready
to move forward.
As COB moves towards university status, Mrs Hodder said it was
looking at ensuring there was excellence in everything they do.
Over the next 10 years, COB hopes to double the current enroll-
ment of about 10,000 students.
Dr Hodder said COB was currently on a drive to redesign their
registration process, so it was scientifically accurate.
She explained that the college had hired a consultant to look at
the registration process.
It was discovered that the problem was not the inability to han-
dle the registration of long lines of students, but rather that there
was no scientific data in place to ensure there were adequate
course offerings to meet demand
Once this was completed, Mrs Hodder said, the process should
be able to go more smoothly.
COB was also completing an extensive inventory of all of their
buildings, something which had never been done before.
In an effort to retain more students for the entire Bachelor
degree programme, Dr Hodder said COB may request the Union
of Tertiary Educators of the Bahamas (UTEB) COB'S faculty
union to consider accommodating more students in core classes so
that it was financially feasible to offer small high level courses at the
400 level.


eral recognition that agriculture
can play a vital role in our
national economic wellbeing -
particularly as a means of com-
bating poverty, and promoting
sustainable development in our
Family Islands and secondly, in
the development of a consen-
sus for specific and structured
investment programmes for the
further development of these
sectors of our economy."
He added: "I am certain that
few of you will disagree with the
assertion that agriculture and
fisheries have not achieved full
potential in our country.
"We have long recognized the
potential in both agriculture and
fisheries to create a substantial
link between our domestic econ-
omy and our principal econom-
ic activity, tourism. This vital
link has the potential to raise
our level of domestic savings, to
improve our balance of pay-
ments and to create a more sus-
tainable, job-creating economic
activity.
"Over the years, we have
invested heavily in professional
and skills training, and have
sought to improve the level and
standard of technology available
to farmers in particular, with a
view to enhancing food produc-
tion, processing, marketing and
sale of Bahamian produce not
always with the successes for
which we had aimed. In many
respects we have not received
value for monies spent.
"For a variety of reasons suc-
cessive Governments have been
interested in promoting and
encouraging development in the
agricultural and fisheries sec-
tors: a desire to ensure food
security for the nation, a need to
ensure food safety; a determi-
nation to raise standards of liv-
ing in all of our islands; a need
to create employment in agri-
cultural and marine sciences for
unskilled farm hands as well as
for university trained and other
Bahamians; a means of discour-
aging Family Island migration
to the capital thereby ensuring
the economic viability of Fami-
ly Island communities, and final-
ly, providing for the viable
and sustainable diversification
of the Bahamian national econ-
omy."


Join the Leading Environmental Conservation
Organization in The Bahamas

The Bahamas National Trust invites qualified and interested persons to
apply for the following positions:

Director of Development

Context
The Bahamas National Trust needs an individual who will manage donor relations
and a multifaceted fundraising strategy aimed at engaging a broad range of corpo-
rate, foundation and individual donors and prospects.

Primary Responsibilities:
The Director of Development reports to the Executive Director and coordinates
the BNT's fundraising, membership programmes, and strategic development
activities to achieve sustainable financial goals for the organization. Further, the
individual will develop and manage a major donor programme and annual giving
programme for the Trust. The Individual will be charged with the creation of a
"strong Development Team and coordinating training for its staff.

Duties and Responsibilities:
1. To develop and implement the BNT's fundraising strategy targeting
individuals, Foundations, other NGO's and the corporate sector.
2. To design and implement a Major Donor Development Programme. Lead the
process of donor identification, prospect research, and personal cultivation,
appropriate requests for support, thanking and recognition.
3. Prepare and manage budgets for fundraising programmes.

Required Skills:
> At least a Bachelors Degree with five years work experience, ideally in the fund-
raising arena.
> Strong background in project management and programme administration.
> Warm interpersonal skills with the ability to communicate and involve people at
all levels.
> Experience in the financial sector client relationships and an understanding of
funds and foundations an asset.
> Exceptional writing and interpersonal communications skills.
> Demonstrated ability to organize time, manage diverse activities, meet deadlines
and pay attention to details.
> Good computer literacy including word processing, databases, presentations and
spreadsheets. Working knowledge of Sage fundraising software a plus.
> Willingness to work long hours to meet firm deadlines.
> Willingness to travel throughout The Bahamas and abroad.


Abaco Park Warden

Context
The national parks in Abaco face threats from invasive species. In particular-the
nesting parrots in the Abaco National Park suffer greatly from increasing numbers
of feral cats and expanding raccoons populations. It is vitally important that the
BNT has a presence on this island to ensure we fulfill the mandate and meet the
objectives of the Trust.

Primary Responsibilities:
Provide day to day and long term management and administration of all of the
Abaco Parks and act as a liaison with partners and the general public of Abaco in
all facets of park work.

Duties:
1. Serve as-the Liaison between the Abaco Parks and the BNT headquarters in
Nassau. Will be responsible for overall supervision and oversight of all activi-
ties that occur in the district.
2. Develop in collaboration with the Director of Parks applicable policies, proce-
dures, systems, and proposals to further the goals of the Abaco Parks and the
Bahamas National Trust.
3. Plan and execute activities in the approved General Management Plans,
Strategic Plans, and operating plans to achieve the goals of the Abaco Parks
4. Supervise park staff members and volunteers engaging in conservation and
maintenance activities ensuring that biodiversity in the park are not negatively
impacted by the work.
5. Lead the development and implementation of community outreach programmes,
education and public relations initiatives to promote the goals of the BNT.
6. Enforce rules and regulations of Abaco National parks laws and policies of the
Bahamas as they relate to the safety of individuals in the national parks of Abaco.
7. Assist with other tasks as assigned by the Director of Parks and Science

Required Skills:
> Bachelor's degree; or a minimum of seven years related experience and/or train-
ing in Environmental Conservation; or equivalent combination of education.
and experience
> Computer literate (Word Processing, Spreadsheet and PowerPoint)
> Familiarity with conservation issues in general and as it directly relates to Abaco
> Pleasant personality
> Willing to work under demanding conditions


Marine Park Project Coordinator

Context
It is vitally important that the marine resources of New Providence are maintained
in a healthy balance for future generations. This project will heighten the aware-
ness of marine users about sustainable use of marine resources.

Primary Responsibilities:
This job will be focused on the creation of a marine park and implementing a dive
tag program aimed at raising awareness within the dive community with regards to
sustainable use of the marine park; responsibilities for identification and outreach to
existing and potential resource user groups and other community members

Duties:
1. Develop and implement Dive Tag program to promote and encourage users of
the Marine Park.
2. Coordinate and effectively administer all activities for the South West Marine Park
3. Serve as a conduit for communication between BNT, stakeholder groups and
community members with environmental concerns or ideas for the area.
4. Write press releases and other documentation for distribution to internal and
external audiences
5. Speak publicly about BNT's environmental / sustainable initiatives.
6. Compile news and event announcements into bi-weekly report to be submitted
to direct supervisor
7. Perform administrative tasks and any other tasks that support the overall con-
servation goals and work plan for the Bahamas National Trust

Required Skills:
> Bachelor's degree; a minimum five years related experience and/or training
in Environmental Conservation; or equivalent combination of education and
experience.
> Strong interpersonal and communications skills.
> Willingness to carry-out organizational mission with little day-to-day supervision
> Proficiency with Windows, Microsoft Office.
> A strategic thinker with sound technical skills, analytical ability, good judgment


and strong operational focus.
> Ability to produce clear written documentation for reporting
> Ability to speak persuasively and confidently to large and diverse audiences.

Interested persons qualified in any of the above positions should provide a cover
letter, resume and three references by November 16, 20Q7 to:
Human Resources Manager
Bahamas National Trust
P.O. Box N-4105
Nassau, Bahamas


or E-mail: bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org


A Leading Global Distributor is Seeking a




Logistics Specialist

A client of Ronald Atkinson & Co. is a leading distributor of electronic accessory
products and they are seeking an exceptional person to serve as a Logistic
Specialist in their Nassau office. This key role will drive the international
logistics of their products through strong collaboration with purchasing,
contract manufacturers, and customers. Experience managing worldwide
product distribution is critical for success.

Responsibilities include:

Receive product orders from internal and external international
customers
Create purchase orders
Maintain records of goods on order and requested shipping dates
Monitor and check status of orders with suppliers to confirm on schedule
production
Monitor shipping notices to eliminate delays, report problems or delays
to Manager
Maintain cordial relations with suppliers and customers to ensure
cooperation when unexpected events require rush delivery of orders or
special requests
Prepare and ensure accuracy on all documents associated with
purchasing, expediting and international shipping
Ensure accuracy on invoicing with accounting
Communicate as appropriate with local Manager, Purchasing / Supply
Chain Manager, and customers in a professional manner

Requirements:

A Bachelor's degree or equivalent experience
Three to Five years of purchasing and logistics experience
Knowledge of international purchasing process
Knowledge of international shipping documentation and related
processes
Knowledge of customs compliance
Exceptional written and verbal communication skills
Strong analytical skills
An advanced understanding of Excel & Word applications
An understanding of accounting and accounting applications
Fluency in Mandarin (written and verbal) is not a requirement but is a
"plus" for this post.

This Company offers a competitive compensation package and salary will be
consummate to experience of the applicant.

Qualified and interested candidates should submit their resume with salary
history to Ronald Atkinson & Co. attention Bennet Atkinson, P.O. Box N-8326,
Augusta & Virginia Streets, Nassau, Bahamas, fax 242-326-5602, e-mail
accountants(ronatkinson.biz

"1" 1 i I I I IIII I I II II 1


iI I I I BU INESSI II











PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


Baker's Bay Club opponents


seek new 'stop work' order


FROM page one

and discovery. Now that
Freeport has a sitting judge, we
are very keen to have the inter-
locutory injunction application
heard and to move on with our
judicial review."
He described the second
judicial review as "a very sim-
ple one", namely whether the
permits and approvals given to
Discovery Land Company, as
alleged by its own attorneys in
discovery made to the Court
of Appeal as part of another
judicial review case initiated
by the Association, were given
to them by government agen-
cies who had the "lawful
authority" to do so.


"It is a matter for the court
to decide whether these per-
mits were given to the devel-
opers by the lawful authority.
It is a matter that can be heard
very quickly," Mr Smith
added.
"Whichever side loses can
appeal, and we're confident
the second case can proceed
very quickly. The Save Guana
Cay Reef Association's posi-
tion is that we are very keen to
hear the second case. We note
that the developers are work-
ing 24/7 to dredge the marina
in an effort to create the per-
ception that [the development]
is a fait accompli and there is
nothing to litigate."
Meanwhile, Mr Smith said
the Association was still await-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

TAXIDEVO LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TAXIDEVO LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on
the 6th November, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the
Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Michael Low
of co I Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393

Dated this 07th day of November, A.D. 2007


Michael Low
Liquidator







NOTICE

The Chambers of

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.

Counsel & Attorneys-at-law
is now located at

#9 Rusty Bethel Drive
(3rd Terrace East)
Nassau, Bahamas


All telephone numbers remain the same.

K.Miles Parker
(Managing Partner)


ing the Court of Appeal ver-
dict on the merits of its first
application for a judicial
review of the Baker's Bay pro-
ject.
He also threatened that the
Association would launch a
third judicial review applica-
tion relating to the Guana Cay
project, this time involving per-
mits and approvals granted to
the developers by the Hope
Town District Council.
"We understand the District
Council has recently approved
several applications for con-
struction despite our objec-
tions, and we're preparing a
third Gifana Cay case for judi-
cial review to quash the deci-
sions on those specific per-
mits," Mr Smith said.
"The district council said
they were obliged to give those
permits because the develop-
ment had been approved by
the central government in Nas-
sau. We consider it be a com-
plete abdication of their statu-
tory authority, and that mat-
ter will shortly be before the
court."
The injunction application
for a 'stop work' order is also
asking the Supreme Court to
order that the Government
and Discovery Land Compa-
ny defendants provide copies
of all documents submitted by
the developers in relation to
licence, permit, grant, exemp-
tion and approval applications.-
The Association is also seek-
ing a court order requiring the
defendants to provide copies
of all permits, licences and
approvals given to the devel-
opers, and all documents relat-
ed to the decision-making and
consultation process for these
approvals.


Act changes and new regulations Accounting firms


FROM page one

chance) Regulations 2007 set out the facts and issues defined as
being "of material significance" to the Inspector of Bank and
Trust Companies in carrying out his/her duties, and which an
external auditor may uncover during an audit.
These issues include:
Material misstatements in a bank and trust company
licensee's financial statements
Concerns about a Central Bank licensee's ability to contin-
ue as "a going concern"
Material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in a licensee's
internal controls
Major concerns about the integrity of a licensee's senior
executives
A licensee's failure to comply with prudential standards,
statutory requirements, terms and conditions of its licence, and
correct major deficiencies
Any other issues that may "materially prejudice the interests
of depositors, creditors or other clients of the licensee".


urged to contract

senior workers

FROM page one

He added that compensation
was also a major factor in staff
retainment. The expected salary
for entry level professionals in
the Bahamian accounting pro-
fession was $25,000-$28,000.
Mr Galanis said that most
firms expect their staff mem-
bers to pass their certification
exams within two years or three
attempts, while these workers
expect firms to provide train-
ing opportunities and competi-
tive salaries.


COB chief wants funding



based on student numbers


FROM page one

much more expensive to offer.
We need to convince the pub-
lic that funding in science is
the key to prosperity."
Otherwise, Mrs Hodder said
this nation will have the prob-
lem of qualified Bahamians
not returning home because
those employment areas are
not developed. An admission-
based grant system would
recognize the needs of students
based on the programmes they
are entering, she explained.
Dr Hodder said COB is now
looking at ways to determine
the actual cost of offering a
degree in each programme/
study area, which would help it


to effectively plan the best use
of funding.
She added said that while
this may not be popular with
students, they will be making
the case against low tuition
fees, as it is a form of regres-
sive taxation that benefits
those from both low and high
income backgrounds, but
decreases the level of quality
courses and studies that can be
offered.
Mrs Hodder said COB want-
ed to increase tuition fees,
while putting in place a robust
financial aid programme to
assist those students who need-
ed it.
In addition, Dr Hodder said
COB was working hard to get
the Government to provide
more funding to students who


attend college in the Bahamas,
rather than invest in higher
scholarships for those who
study abroad.
She said COB was working
to increase opportunities in a
number of vital professions,
such as engineering and allied
health industries such as phar-
macology. COB is also look-
ing at creating an agro-busi-
ness degree, she said.
Mrs Hodder said a straight
agriculture degree would be a
hard-sell among new students,
but a combination of business
and agriculture courses may be
more successful.
Mrs Hodder was speaking
on the closing day of the
'Bahamas Institute of Char-
tered Accountants (BICA)
week of events.


-,&* ,o ,^3&S-!? ^S-S^?
-/ 19 -'f
fl^ AN f?%T


fSkin Care
i -.'1 Aliiioith'nimatbrasion Clu'mn ical Peels Botox.Facial
Sclerolierap), to remove. ugly leg veins
"-",t* i h, lost imaI aeI nt cit
Blahama Spa Skin Care Prodicts
,2 : "


ALL POSITIONS WANTED
Contemporary Asian
Multi-Outlet Dining Concept


* Junior Sous Chef, line and pastry cook
with high-end cuisine experience.
* Wait/bar staff. Previous experience in high-end
dining establishments a must.
* Dining Room Supervisor/ Wine Steward with
previous high-end restaurant experience
* Extensive knowledge of Asian cuisine and
wines a definite asset.



Fax resumes to 328-8381 or e-mail to
info@shogunrevolver.com


LEGAL NOTICE


NOTICE

GEOSERVICES INTERCONTINENTAL
HOLDING INC.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000, GEOSERVICES
INTERCONTINENTAL HOLDING INC. is in
dissolution as of November 6, 2007.

Philippe Bayet of 8 Chaussee de la Muette, 75116
Paris, France is the Liquidator.


LIQUIDATOR


/
..a / -


Pricing Information As Of: O FA .
Thursday, 8 November 200 7 C F A Lm
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 1 ;9eiS-(^CH3NiM ltt 52.1> H. 2.A>. LO.A Secur.l ,. IrAe,ous Close Today's Close Charnge Daily aol EPS i Divy P, ElViedl
1I 6, :, 541 A'aco .larlsK-I6 1 59 1 59 0 00 0 094 0 000 169 0 '00 :
11.74 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.60 11.60 0.00 1.502 0.400 7.7 3.45%
9.55 7.86 Bank of Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 10,500 0.733 0.260 13.0 2.72%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.048 0.020 17.7 2.35%
3.74 1.65 Bahamas Waste 3.74 3.74 0.00 0.275 0.060 13.6 1.60%
2.62 1.20 Fidelity Bank 2.61 2.61 0.00 0.051 0.040 51.2 1.53%
11.20 9.81 Cable Bahamas 11.20 11.18 -0.02 1,200 1.030 0.240 10.9 2.15%
3.15 1.83 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 8,041 0.208 0.080 15.1 2.54%
5.52 4.03 Commonwealth Bank (Sl) 5.52 5.52 0.00 1.190 0.680 13.0 4.11%
7.22 4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 6.14 6.55 0.41 0.112 0.050 54.9 0.81%
2.70 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.25 2.25 0.00 0.284 0.020 7.9 0.89%
6.50 5.54 Famguard 6.50 6.50 0.00 810 0.804 0.240 8.1 3.69%
12.80 12.00 Finco 12.79 12.79 0.00 10,935 0.768 0.570 16.7 4.46%
14.75 13.85 FirstCaribbean 14.65 14.65 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.7 3.21%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 6.03 6.03 0.00 0.359 0.133 16.8 2.24%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.70 0.70 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.09 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
10.05 8.52 J. S. Johnson 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.991 0.590 10.1 5.87%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
.....t .'~~nw i'sliii ,s .l'. ,, i, o- -.'.a .
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.160 1.185 13.4 8.12%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0 030 0 000 N/M 0 00%
S, ,* II *'*BL6 41 00 4300 4100 4450 2 750 90 6 70.
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 14.00 1.166 1.125 13.4 7.71%
0 55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0 030 0 000 N/M 0 00%
L.-.. -1 -. L._... Fur,..j Name NA V YTD Last 12 Months Div S Yield a
1 r.1-:,., r.lari,. l Fu..rd 1 362272-
3.3829 2.9449 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.3829***
2.9382 2.4829 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.938214***
1.2741 1.1970 Colina Bond Fund 1.274052"*"
11.8192 11.2596 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.8192"**
rlA /\LL b il ii" INUI=A l uoc U2 = 1,.000 0 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-Hi I l.ghest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 wooks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity - 2 Novembla 2007
P-ivi,,s Clrose -P'revious day's welghled price for daily volume Last Price Last traded ovea-the-counter price 30 Juno 2007
l Iadny's lo-e CuIrenot day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week "* -31 October 2007
ChanrJo Chi.,goe iin closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths 31 July 2007
D ,ly Vol Nunib.. r of t olft shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends peor share paid In the lest 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 a 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 81812007
(Sl) 3-for-1 Slock Split Effective Date 7/11/2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 2A, 140-70O _.


Position Available:


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE MANAGER



Job Description:
Responsible for the management of all
maintenance activities in Nassau ensuring
all preventative maintenance and heavy
equipment repairs are conducted as per com-
pany standards. Conducts on-site audits and
evaluations of port equipment, coordinates
repair activities and preventative procedures.


Education:
High school diploma or equivalent. Trade
or Technical certificate in Heavy Equipment
Maintenance.


Experience:
Five years experience in heavy equip-
ment maintenance with at least two years
in management of equipment maintenance.


Container Terminals offers a highly competi-
tive package of benefits. Salary is commen-
surate with qualifications and experience.


BUSINESS I





FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 5B


Ministry of Public Works & Transport








"Information For Effective
Private-Public Sector Interaction"
Saturday, 10th November, 2007
8:30 am-3:00 pm
Police Conference Centre, East Street North
Nassau, Bahamas
This informative seminar is for all local contractors
and will address these important topics:
The Contractors Bill
The Construction Process
Construction Finance
and Insurance
Participants in panel discussions include staff from the
Dept. of Public Works
Dept. of Physical Planning
Office of the Attorney General
Dept. of Immigration
and representatives from
The Construction Industry
The Banking Industry
The Insurance Industry

(Includes Ministry's Contractors' Manual, draft Contractors Bill and lunch.)
(Registration Fee waived for Family Island based contractors.)
Payable at the Accounts Section, 3rd Floor, Min. of Public Works & Transport Bldg., JFK Drive.
Registration Forms available at the Ministry's Info Desk or online at www.bahamas.gov.bs.
Completed Registration Forms to be returned to the Office of the Director of Public Works.
For further information contact the Director's Office at
Tel.: 1-242-302-9528 or 322-4830-9 Fax: 326-7907


THE TRIBUNE










THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


*1


From the earliest days of the
organization, Rotarians were
concerned with promoting high
ethical standards in their
professional lives. One of the
world's most widely printed and
quoted statements of business
ethics is The Four-Way Test,
which was created in 1932 by
Rotarian Herbert J. Taylor. This
24-word Test has been
translated into more than a
hundred languages and
published in thousands of ways.
It asks the following four
questions:


The Four-Way Test
"Of the things we think,
say or do
1. Is it the truth?
2. Is it fair to all
concerned?
3. Will it build goodwill
and better friendships?
4. Will it be beneficial to
all concerned?"


&,


Rules:
1. Children ages 10-16 may enter. Judging will be in two
age categories: 10 13 years and 14-16 years for a first
and second place winner in each category.
2. Write a essay answerig the following subject:
"What does the Four-Way Test mean to me." Explain
your understanding of the 4-Way Test as it relates to
your life, experiences, and/or society in general."
Your essay must include the four principles.
3. The body of the essay must not exceed 1,000 words.
Adults may assist the child in filling out the entry form.
but not in writing the letter.
4. Limit one essay per child. All entries must be received by
the Rotary Club of East Nassau before Nov 30, 2007.
5. Only essays accompanied by original entry forms clipped
from the newspaper will be accepted. Photocopy, fax,
carbon or other copies will not be accepted.
6. One winner will be chosen from each age category. The
decision of the judges Is final.
7. Winner must agree to a photo presentation which will
be published in the newspaper.
8. Mail essay and completed newspaper clipping to
The Four-Way Test Essay Competition,
Attn: Michele Rassin, The Rotary Club of East Nassau,
P.O. Box SS-6320, Nassau, Bahamas

The Tribune

xf'0 0 /f/4 0-


OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM


Child's Namee:_ _.


School:--

Addre: __

P.O. Box:____ -

Email Address:i_


Parents Name:


Parent's Signature:


Telephone contact: (H)


(w)


All entries become property of the Rotary Club of East Nassau and can be used
and reproduced for anv purpose without compensation.


Rotary Club of

EAST
NASS.AU %


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THE TRIBUNE


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 7B


HEATH BANK & TRUST LIMITED
(Formerly Barrington Bank International Limited)



BALANCE SHEET
AS OF JUNE 30,2007
(E ika In United States .doas)
2007 200M


ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents (Note 5)
Investments (Note 6)
Loans, net (Notes 7 and 11)
Accrued interest on investments
Prepaid and other assets (Note 8)
TOTAL

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY


LIABILITIES:
Collateral deposits (Notes 9 and 11)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities (Note 10)
Deferred revenue
Total liabilities

EQUITY:
Share capital (Note 12)
General reserve (Note 7)
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL


S 2,384,133
299,010
22,137,519
5,394
17,900


$ 1,305,304
2,03,256
24,479,536
13,598
14,350


S 24,843,956 S 2.351.044


$ 4,380,170
32,382
13,521
4,426,073


$S 10,466,441
68,547
17,696
10,552,684


10,000,000 10,000,000
221,419
10,196464 7.798,360
20,417,883 17,79 360
S 24.43,956 S 28,351.04


SeeO note to balance sheet.

-The balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on October 17,2007 and as signed on its
behalfby:


NOTES TO BALANCE SHEET
JUNE 30,2007
(Epwsed In United States dollars)


1. GENERAL


Heath Bank & Trust Limited formerlyy Banington Bank International Limited) (the "Bank")
was incorporated on December 21, 1999, under the laws of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. The Bank is licensed under the Banks and Thst Companies Regulations Act, 2000
to cany on banking and trust business. The parent company is Oimel Holdings Limited. The
registered office is located at Cumberland House, 27 Cumberland Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


2. ADOPTION OF NEW INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL REPORTING STANDARDS
(IFRSs) AND' INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS (lASs)

During the year, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the Internmtiaml
Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRC) have issued the following standards
and interpretations which are relevant to the Bank's operations with an effective date after th
date of this balanced sheet

ntehnaim l Ac ti Standards flAS/IFRSs) Ei


IFIS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures


IAS I Amendment Presentation of Financial Statements:
Capital Disclosures


Annual periods beginning on
or after January 1, 2007


Annual period begiig on
or after January 1,2007


The directors do not anticipate that the adoption of these standards and interpretations will
have a material impact on the balance sheet in the period of initial lapplation. Upoadoptioon
of IFRS 7, the Bank will disclose additional nation about its financial intents, their
significance and the nature and extent'of risks to which they give rise. More specifically, the
Bank will be required to disclose the fair value of its financial instruments and its risk
exposure in greater detail. There will be no effect on reported income or net assets.


3. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards as promulgated by the IASB and the interpretations issued by the IFRIC of the
IASB. This balance sheet is prepared under the historical cost convention, as modified by the
revaluation of certain financial assets and liabilities that are required to be reneasured at
estimated fair value. The preparation of the balance sheet in conformity with International
Financial Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that
affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the balance sheet. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies. These policies have been
consistently applied to the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

a. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash in hand, demand
deposits with banks and other short term highly liquid investments that are readily
convertible to a known amount of cash and are subject to an insignificant risk of changes
in value.

b. Loans Loans originated by the Bank include loans where money is provided directly to
the borrower and are recognized when cash is advanced to the borrower. They are
initially recorded at cost, which is fair value of cash originated by the Bank, including
any transaction costs. All loans pay interest only until the maturity date, when the
principal is repaid.

c. Investments Investments are recognized on a trade date basis and are classified as fair
value through profit or loss. Investments are initially measured at cost and are
subsequently remeasured at fair value based on quoted bid prices.

d. Provisions Provisions are recognized when the Bank has a present obligation as a
result of a past event, and it is probable that the Bank will be required to settle that
obligation. Provisions are measured at management's best estimate of the expenditure
required to settle the obligation at the balance sheet date, and are discounted to present
value when the effect is material.

e. Translation of foreign currencies The Bank's functional currency is United States
Dollar. At each balance sheet date, monetary items denominated in foreign currencies
are retranslated at the rates prevailing on the balance sheet date. Non-monetary items
carried at fair value that are denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the
rates prevailing on the date when the fair value was determined. Non-monetary items
that are measured in terms of historical cost in a foreign currency are not retranslated.

f. Assets under management Assets under management which are held in a fiduciary
capacity for clients are excluded from the balance sheet, other than those assets and
liabilities which relate to banking services provided by the Bank to these clients.


g. Fir .*ffmw ul ins&wments All of the Bank's financial instruments are carried
at fir value or contracted amounts which approximate fair value. Financial instruments
recorded at contracted amounts consist of cash, prepaid and other assets, accounts
payable and accrued liabilities. The value of these instruments approximates fair value,
as the instruments have short-term maturities, variable interest rates and are not
materially affected by changes in interest rates.

b. MRlhrdaf Mn Related parties include officers and directors who are related through
having authority and responsibility for directing and controlling the activities of the
Bank and companies related through common directors and/or shareholders.


4. CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION
UNCERTAINTY

Certain amounts included in or affecting the Bank's balance sheet and related disclosure must
be estimated, requiring the Bank to make assumptions with respect to values or conditions
which cannot be known with certainty at the time the balance sheet is prepared. A "critical
accounting estimate" is one which is both important to the portrayal of the Bank's financial
condition and results and requires management's most difficult, subjective or complex
judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are
inherently uncertain. The Bank evaluates such estimates on an ongoing basis, based upon
historical results and experience, consultation with experts, trends and other methods
considered reasonable in the particular circumstances, as well as the forecasts as to how these
might change in the future.

a. Imparmient The Bank has made significant investments in loans receivable and
investments. These loans and investments are tested for impairment when
circumstances indicate there may be a potential impairment. Factors considered
important which could trigger an impairment review include the following: significant
fall in market values; significant underperformance relative to historical or projected
future operating results; significant changes in the use of the assets or the strategy for the
overall business, including assets that are decided to be phased out or replaced and
assets that are damaged or taken out of use, significant negative industry or economic
trends; and significant cost overnms in the development of assets.

Estimating recoverable amounts of assets must in part be based on management
evaluations, including estimates of future performance, revenue generating capacity of
the assets, assumptions of the future market conditions and the success in marketing of
new products and services. Changes in circumstances and in management's evaluations
and assumptions may give rise to impairment losses in the relevant periods.

b. Lqd pwcew dgs, cdaslu undl gallery disease ns The Bank may be subject to
various legal proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions, the outcomes of which are
subject to significant uncertainty. The Bank evaluates, among other factors, the degree
of probability of an unfavorable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate
of the amount of loss. Unanticipated events or changes in these factors may require the
Baok to increase or decrease the amount the Bank has accrued for any matter or accrue
for a matter that has not been previously accrued because it was not considered
probable, or a reasonable estimate could not be made. However, no such legal
proceedings have been noted in the current year.

c. Vehelm e of invesaments The fair value of the unlisted investments has been estimated
using a valuation technique based on management's assumptions. Management believes
tbhe estimated fair values resulting from the valuation technique which are recorded in
the statement of assets and liabilities and the related changes in fair value are reasonable
and the most appropriate at the statement of assets and liabilities date. However, no
unlisted investments have been noted in the current year.



L. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash and cash equivalents consist of the following:


2006


Cah on hand
'" 4 -and deposits


.


S 355
2,383,778
S 2384,133


$ 702
1,804,602
$ 1,805,304


I. INVESTsENTS

Investments comprise the following:


2007
Nominal
Value of
Bonds Original Market
Bond Issue Hed cot Value
USD Treasury note 01/31/08 300,000 S 298,230 S 299010

2006


USD Treasury note 03/08/06
CAD Treasury note 10/08/06
CAD UK Sweden 12/01/08
USD FNMA 0% Strip coupon due 10/08/07
CAD Toyota Motor 12/30/08
CAD Euro Fima 01/30/09


Nominal
Value of
Bonds
Held
700,000
895,000
268,500
99,000
10,740
67,125


Original Market
cmt Value


$ 693,556
852,435
280,882
87,365
10,368
64,919


$ 697,221
889,448
282,395
92,435
10,719
66,038


$ 1,989,525 $ 2,038,256



7. LOANS, NET

The geographical distribution and utilization by economic sector are detailed as follows:


2007


Country:
Canada
Mortgages
Commercial loans
Less: allowance for loan losses


$ 4,220,147
16,300,352
(1,800,223)
18,720,276


202,957
1,500,000
1,702,957



1,714,286
1,714,286


United States
Mortgages
Commercial loans


Caribbean
Mortgages
Commercial loans


South America
Commercial loans
Less: allowance for loan losses


Analysis of loans by currency:
United States dollars (USD)
Canadian dollars (CAD)
Less: allowance for loan losses


2006



$ 195,017
20,557,969
(895,000)
19,857,986


506,303
1,500,000
2,006,303


671,295
1,943,952
2,615,247


154,634
-_ (154,634)


$22,137t519 $24,479,536


$14,143,849
9,793,893
(1,800,223)


$15,009,194
10,519,976
(1,049,634)


$22 137,519 $24,479,536


i wlx










PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


THE.RIINF


Concentration of loans is as follows:


2007
Interest Number of
rates accounts Amount

6.5%- 12% 3 $ 315,589
5%- 12% 7 14,768,426
6% 1 8,853,727
(1,800,223)
$22,137,519
2006
Interest Number of
rates accounts Amount


6.5%- 11.75%
5% 12%
6%


$ 3,550,860
13,335,106
8,643,204
(1,049,634)


$24,479,536

The following table summarizes certain information concerning non-accrual loans
outstanding:


2007


Non-accrual loans


Non-recognised interest on non-accrual loans

Interest collected on non-accrual loans


2006


$ 1,800,223 $ 2,148,000

$ 334,382 $ 200,493

$ 485,243 $ 176,782


The non-accrual loans are fully provided for.

During the year, management allocated $221,419 from retained earnings to general reserve as
a' general provision to comply with The Central Bank of Bahamas Guidelines for the
Management of Credit.


8. PREPAID AND OTHER ASSETS

Prepaid and other assets are comprised of the following:


2007


Security deposits
Staff advance


2006


$ 14,050 $ 14,350
3,850 -


$ 17,900 $ 14,350




.. COLLATERAL DEPOSITS

LoW totaling $4,380,170 (2006: $10,466,441) are secured by cash collateral from customers'
deposits. These deposits are blocked as security against the loans.

Coaa deposits anmalysd by geographical anm, baed on the domicile of tho deposit am
aufoilows


2007


The Caribbean
Canada
Europe

.; Aa v ii.-. ,


2006


$ 4,209,930 $ 4,883,974
170,240 233,042
5,349,425


$ 4380,170
i '. 2 -


$10,466,441 ,
*. *


10. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES


2007


Audit fees
Provision for staff benefits
Accounts payable other
Accounts payable clients


2006


$ 25,000 $ 15,000
5,962 1,762
1,420 8,666
43,119


$ 32,382 $ 68,547

11. BALANCES WITH RELATED PARTIES

Related parties include all entities which are related through common directors and
shareholders. All balances and transactions with shareholders, directors and entities in which
either the Bank or its shareholders have effective control or exercise significant influence over
making financial and operating decisions are shown in this balance sheet and accompanying
notes as being with related parties.


2007


Balances:
Loans

Collateral deposits


2006


$10,839,339 $10,615,728

$ 413,244 $ 572,545


12. SHARE CAPITAL


2007


Authorised, issued and fully paid:
10,000,000 shares of $1.00 each


2006


$10,000,000 $10O000000


The above issued shares were fully paid for in cash.




13. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS RISK POSITION

This section presents information about the Bank's exposure to and its management's control
of risks, in particular primary risks associated with its use of financial instruments.

Market risk is exposure to observable market variables such as interest rates, exchange
rates and equity markets.

Credit risk is the risk of loss resulting from client or counterpart default and arises on
credit exposure in all forms, including settlement risk.

*. Liquidity and funding risk is the risk that the Bank is unable to fund assets or meet
obligations at a reasonable price, or in extreme situation, at any price.

Fiduciary risk is the risk that the Bank's relationship with their clients is not properly
defined and exposes the Bank to financial liabilities for balance sheet holdings.


Market risk

Market risk is the risk of loss arising from movements in observable market variables such as
interest rates and exchange rates. Market risk arises on financial instruments which are valued
at current market prices (mark-to-market basis) and those valued at cost plus accrued interest
accrualss basis).

a. Interest rote risk Interest rate risk represents exposures the Bank has to instruments
whose values vary with the level of interest rates. These instruments include, but are not
limited to, loans, debt securities and deposits. Interest rate risk is managed by matching
deposit liabilities with deposit assets.


b. Foreign exchange risk is the risk of loss resulting from foreign currency translation.
Currency risk is managed by matching deposit liabilities with deposit assets within the
same currency whenever possible.

Exposure in foreign currency:

2007 2006
US$ US$
Canadian$ Equivalent Canadian $ Equivalent


Assets
Liabilities
Coverage (exposure)


$ 8,849,179 $ 8,305,802 $12,828,210 $11,481,248
2,520,000 2,365,272 8,583,069 7,681,847
$ 6,329,179 $ 5,940,530 $ 4,245,141 $ 3,799,401


Less than $1,000,000
$1,000,000 $5,000,000
Greater than $5,000,000
Less: allowance for loan losses







Less than $1,000,000
$1,000,000 $5,000,000
Greater than $5,000,000
Less: allowance for loan losses


Due
Without Within 3
Maturity Months


ASSETS:
Cash and cash equivalents
Loans
S-In vents -i I
Accrued interest on investments
Prepaid and other assets
Total at June 30, 2007


LIABILITIES:
Collateral deposits
Accounts payable and
accrued liabilities
Deferred revenue
Total at June 30,2007
NET LIQUIDITY


Due
Between
3-12
Months


$ $2,384,133 $
753,602
: 299,010
5,394 -


17,900 _
$ 17,900 $2,389,527


Due
Between
1 and 5
Year

$.
21,383,917


Total

S 2,384,133
22,137,519
',299,OJ

17,900


$ 1,052,612 $21,383,917 $24,843,956


$ $ 550,645 $ 3,829,525 4,380,170


32,382


32,382
13,521 13,521


$ $ 32,382 $ 550,645 $ 3,843,046
S17,900 $2,357,145 $ 501,967 $17,540,871


$ 4t426,073
$20,417,883


15. FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair value is the amount at which an asset could be exchanged or a liability settled between
knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm's length transaction. Market price is used to
determine fair value, where active markets exist, as it is the best evidence of the fair value of a
financial instrument. Market prices are not, however, available for a significant portion of the
financial assets and liabilities held by the Bank. Therefore, for financial instruments where no
market price is available, the fair values presented in the following table have been estimated
using present value or other estimation and valuation techniques based on market conditions
existing on the balance sheet date.

The values derived from applying these techniques are significantly affected by the underlying
assumptions made concerning both the amounts and timing of future cash flow.

The following methods and assumptions have been used:

a. The carrying amount of liquid assets and other assets maturing within twelve months is
assumed to approximate their fair value. This assumption is applied to liquid assets and
the short term elements of all other financial assets and financial liabilities.

b. The fair value of collateral deposits with no specific maturity is assumed to be the
amount payable on demand on the balance sheet date.

c. The fair value of fixed-rate loans and mortgages is estimated by comparing market
interest rates when the loans were granted with current market rates offered on similar
loans. Changes in credit quality of loans within the portfolio are not taken into account
in determining gross fair values, as the impact of credit risk is recognized separately by
deducting the amount of provision for credit losses from both book and fair values.

The fair value of each class of financial assets and liabilities is as follow'-s:


ASSETS:
Cash and cash equivalents
Investments
Loans
Accrued Interest on
Investments
Other assets


LIABILITIES:
Collateral deposits
Accounts payable and
accrued liabilities
Deferred revenue


2007
Carrying Fair Gain/ Carrying Fair Gain/
Value Value Lss Value Value Loss


$ 2,384,133
299,010
22,137,519

5,394

$24,843,956


$ 2,384,133 $
299,010
22,137,519

5,394
17,900
$24,843,956 $ -


$ 4,380,170 $ 4,380,170 $


32,382
13,521
$ 4,426,073


32,382
13,521
S 4,426,073


S


$ 1,805,304 $ 1,805,304 $
2,038,256 2,038,256
24,479,536 24,479,536


13,598
14,350
$28,351.044


13,598
S14,350
$28,351,044


$.


$10,466,441 $10,466,441 $

68,547 68,547
17,696 17696
$10,552 684 10552,6


Where applicable, interest accrued to date on financial instruments is included, for the
purpose of the above fair value disclosure, in the carrying value of the financial
instruments.

Substantially, the Bank's commitments to extend credit are at variable rates.
Accordingly, the Bank has no significant exposure to fair value fltctuations resulting
from interest rate movements related to financial instrument '. '


Credit risk

Credit risk represents the loss which the Bank would suffer if a client or counterpart failed to
meet its contractual obligations. It is inherent in traditional banking products loans,
commitments to lend and other contingent liabilities. To ensure a consistent and unified
approach, with appropriate checks and balances, all loans are approved by the.Board of
Directors.

The Bank restricts its credit exposure to both individual counterparties and counterpart
groups by credit limits. The size of the limit depends on the assessment of their financial
strength, particularly the sustainable free cash flow to service obligations, and on the economic
environment, industry position and qualitative factors such as management strength.
Exposures against limits are measured on a continuous basis and are subject to standard
exception reporting.


Liquidiy risk

The Bank's approach to liquidity management is to ensure, as far as possible, that it will
always have sufficient liquidity to meets its liabilities when due, without compromising its
ability to respond quickly to strategic market opportunities. The Banlk's approach is based on
framework incorporating the assessment of expected cash flows and the availability of high
grade collateral which could be used to secure additional funding if required. The liquidity
position is assessed and managed under a variety of scenarios. Scenarios encompass both
normal market conditions and stressed conditions. The impact on both trading and client
businesses is considered, taking account of potential collateral with which funds might be
raised, and a possibility that a customer might seek to withdraw funds or draw down unutilized
committed credit lines.

F Iuday risk

The Bank holds accounts for clients in a fiduciary capacity. The Bank mitigates this risk by*
obtaining legal advice in drafting Fiduciary Agreements, which are signed by all clients with
fiduciary accounts.

The Bank acts as a trustee. In this, if the Bank were to fail in its fiduciary duties, it could be
exposed to potential liabilities. The Bank mitigates this risk by obtaining the Trust
Instruments and other necessary documents to ensure that it performs its duties in accordance
with the Trust Instrument.


14. MATURITY OF ASSETS AND LIABILmES

The maturity profile of assets and liabilities as of June 30, 2007 have been determined based
on the remaining period at the balance sheet date to the contractual maturity dates as follows:


THE TRIBUNE


L-














THE TRIBUNEII I II IIFR IIDA, OEME 9,20,AE9


Prices to rise due to




energy cost increase


16. COMMITMENTS

The Bank also enters into commitments to extend credit in the form of credit lines which are
available to secure the liquidity needs of the customers, but not yet drawn upon by them, the
majority of which range in the maturity from one month to five years. Irrevocable undrawn
loan commitments to customers as at the balance sheet date amounted to $898,000 (2006:
$898,000).

17. ASSETS UNDER MANAGEMENT

Total assets under administration in fiduciary capacity is $21.11 million (2006: $19.012
million).


18. COMPARATIVE FIGURES

Certain prior year's figures have been reclassified to conform with the current year's
presentation. On the balance sheet, the credit balance in other assets was moved to accounts
payable and accrued liabilities.

On the statement of income, where applicable some of the foreign exchange gain was
reallocated to unrealized gain on investments and realized gain on investments. In addition, on
the statement of cash flows the effect of foreign exchange rate change was allocated to cash
and cash equivalents.




Deloitte
Chrterea Ac unt*t
owd mnmmem C-i-lto
2nd Terrac, Centr"vet
P.O. Box N-7120
NaMau, Bahamas
Tel: + 1 (242) 302-400
Fax: +1 (242) 322-3101
tl4p//Ww.ideioWtt.comn.bs




INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT

To the Shareholders of
Heath Bank & Trust Limited (formerly Barrington Bank nltemational Limited):

We have audited the balance sheet of Heath Bank & Trust Limited (formerly Barrington Bank
International Limited) (the "Bank") as at June 30, 2007. This balance sheet is the responsibility of
the Bank's management Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet based on
our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standads on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the balance
sheet is free of.material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence
supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet. An audit also includes asessing the
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the
overall presentation of the balance sheet. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for
our opinion.
In our opinion, the balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the
Bank as at June 30,2007, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Without qualifying our opinion, we emphasize that the balance sheet does not comprise a complete
set of financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards.
Information on results of operations, cash flows and changes in equity is necessary to obtain a
coaipldtbunderstanding of te financial position, performance and changes in financiaposition of
jnfk r-', ,.:..-.-.. ;;i ,-. :J-:. i a n.':--




October 17,2007


A member ftn of
Dlotte Tuche Tbhmmtau


FROM page one

derivative of global oil prices,
since the public corporation
purchases fuel for its turbines
from the global market would
have a "ripple effect" through-
out the Bahamian economy.
One likely impact, he
explained, from the inflation-
ary impact of higher electricity
costs, higher business costs and
higher consumer prices, was
that it would likely lead to
demands for increased wages
among Bahamian workers to
maintain living standards.
The increased operating cost
base would also further impair
the Bahamian economy's inter-
national competitiveness.
Mr D'Aguilar, president of
laundromat chain Superwash,
a big consumer of electricity
and propane gas, said he him-
self was looking at increasing
prices in the New Year
because there were not effi-
ciencies in his business to
absorb the additional energy
costs.
He explained: "I'm the sec-
ond largest consumer of
propane on this island to
Atlantis. Propane on the spot
market was $0.85 per gallon in
January, and is now $1.60 per
gallon in November.
"The price has gone up by
almost 100 per cent on the spot
market, and you have to add
about $1 per gallon to the cost
of landing it here in New Prov-
idence."
As a result, Superwash's
propane costs had increased.
from $1.85 per gallon in Janu-
ary 2007 to $2.60 per gallon
this month.
Mr D'Aguilar said: "That is
a substantial increase in energy
costs. There's no doubt in my
mind that prices are going up
on January 1.
"On January 1, my prices are
Sgoingplp fan'tm fi J6eugh
efficiencies in my business to
offset such a huge increase in a
major cost component of my
business. It's a vexing issue for
businesses."


He explained that Super-
wash's monthly propane bill
was about $130,000, and BEC's
electricity accounted for anoth-
er $60,000. Between the two,
they accounted for about 30
per cent almost one third -
of Superwash's cost base, and
if their prices increased to raise
that proportion to 40 per cent,
the company had no choice but
to increase its consumer prices.
On BEC's rising fuel sur-
charge and increased electrici-
ty prices, Mr D'Aguilar said:
"Unfortunately, it's going to
affect every business that uses
power, and every business is
going to struggle with the
problem of whether to increase
or not to increase their prices.
Is this a temporary bulge [in
oil prices], or something that is
going to sustain itself over the
long-term?
"Prices are going to have to
go up, and it's going to have a
ripple effect through the econ-
omy and cause the demand for
wage increases to go up."
Mr D'Aguilar said heavy
consumers of electricity, such
as food stores, the hotels and
firms involved in manufactur-
ing would be impacted most,
saying BEC's rising prices
would "have a substantial
effect on them, no doubt about
it, and they will have to put up
their prices or increase their
volumes".
With the Bahamas too small
to have any impact on the
global oil and fuel markets, Mr
D'Aguilar said businesses
should first focus on energy
efficiency and conservation,
then look at forms of alterna-
tive energy such as wind and
solar power.
The Chamber president said:
"The Government should
encourage people to become
a lot more energy efficient, and
therefore eliminate customs
duties on all products related
to energy conservation.
"Solar and wind are the two
big ones we could take advan-
tage of. The Government
should encourage people to
utilise those two different


PERMANENT SECRETARY


a


products."
Mr D'Aguilar said that at
one point he had "looked seri-
ously" at solar power for
Superwash, but decided
against it, one reason being
that the business would have
required so many solar panels,
he would have needed more
real estate to make it work,
meaning it would not result ir.
cost savings and efficiencies.
There were also concerns
about whether the solar panels
would leak water, and could
be exposed to vandalism.
Mr D'Aguilar added that the
Government would also need
to clarify the Electricity Act
for users of alternative ener-
gy, since the current legisla-
tion prohibits consumers in
areas where BEC's power sup-
ply is available from generat-
ing their own electricity except
in the event of power outages.
This, he added, could
penalise alternative energy
users.
Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association's executive
vice-president, said there were
"some jitters" in the industry
over the impact rising global
oil prices would have on the
airline industry and the price
of airlift effectively a major
cost of accessing Bahamian
tourism into this nation if the'.
airlines imposed fuel sur-
charges on ticket prices.
In addition, while the hotels
tried to absorb as much of
BEC's costs themselves, they
often had no choice but to pass
some on to the consumer.
Mr Comito said the hotel
industry had several years ago
presented a list of products to
the Government that it
recommended should be
exempt from customs duties,
as this would encourage
greater energy efficiency by
"reducing the pay back time"
from the likes of solar and
wind power.
As a result, an "increasing
number of businesses and res-
idences" were importing solar
panels, due to the measures
subsequently put in place.


Queen .s ColIege



has an immediate vacancy for



A FEMALE TEACHER OF
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(with the ability to teach swimming)


VACANCY AS OF JANUARY 3, 2008
A TEACHER OF MODERN LANGUAGES (FRENCH)
IN THE HIGH SCHOOL

Applicants for the above mentioned posts must have a minimum of a
Bachelor's degree from a recognized University in the relevant subject
area and a Post-graduate Certificate in Education, or teacher certificate.
In the case of the Modem Languages Teacher, the ability to teach Advanced
Placement courses, a second language or a second subject would be an
asset. A certified copy of the relevant degree and teacher certificate must
accompany the application. The names and relevant contact information
of at least two professional references should also be listed. Applications
from unqualified persons and or incomplete applications will not be
processed.

The persons offered an appointment will be expected to make a commitment ,
to work in harmony with Christian principles and to support the emphases
of the Bahamas Conference of The Methodist Church of which the school
is a part.

Queen's College was established in Nassau in 1890 by the Methodist
Church and is a member of the International Association of Methodist
Schools, Colleges and Universities (IAMSCU)

The completed application together with a covering letter and a recent
photograph must be sent to:

The Principal
Queen's College
P.O. Box N 7127
Nassau, Bahamas

Or faxed to 242 393 3248 or emailed to: dlynch@qchenceforth.com


GN 609
MINISTRY OF LANDS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) ( ) REGULATIONS,2002

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for LEAD FREE GASOLINE and
DIESEL OIL sold by ESSO STANDARD OIL S. A. LIMITED and FREEPORT OIL COMPANY
LTD. will become effective on Thursday, November 8,2007.



GASOLINE SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE SELLING PRICE MAXIMUM RETAIL
PER U.S. GALLON SELLING PRICE PER
U.S. GALLON
PLACE ARTICLE MAXIMUM MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS' PRICE DISTRIBUTORS'
S PRICE S


NEW PROVIDENCE I N C L U DI N G SEA FRE I G H T

Esso Standard Oil S.A. LEAD FREE 4.07 4.07 4.51
Limited DIESEL OIL 3.76 3,76 3.95


FREEPORT I N C L U D I N G S E A F R E I G H T


FREEPORT OIL COMPANY LEAD FREE 3.92 3.92 4.36
LTD. DIESEL OIL 3.73 3,73 3.92


GRANDBAHAMA I N CLU D I NG S E A F R EI G H T
(NOT FREEP.)

Esno Standard Oil SA. LEAD FREE 3.97 4.13 4.55
Limited DIESEL OIL 3.64 3.80 3.99

ABACO, ANDROS N O T INCLUDING SEA FREI G H T
ELEUTHERA

E Stadard O SA. LEAD FREE 4.07 428 4,67
Limited DIESEL OIL 3,77 3.93 4.12


ALL OTHER FAMILY N O T INCLUDING SEA FRE I G H T
ISLAND

Em Stidard Oil S.A. LEAD FREE 4.08 4.30 4.70
Limited DIESELOIL 3.78 3.93 4.13
*


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007, PAGE 9B


,THE TRIBUNE














THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2007


COIC PG


.13


BLONDIE
WHAT WOULD YOU
LIKE FOR DESSERT
TONIGHT, HONEY?
^s^SSe^ *^SSQ


MARVIN


AER PARENTS
CHECKED HER INTO
A POSH RE.HAB
CE.ItTER OUT WEST
0


NON SEQUITUR


TIGER


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
1 The craft Iwolved in a dew r o on
piano?(5)
6 LUtle store of hats, perhaps, a he
leisure centre ()
9 Akcrftranporting freitW? (7)
10 DeanofUlliput(5)
11 UpLeng the drink, cried (5)
12 ft bm angementforus,

13 Lmhlmsho,Uheisyleatuactive(7)
15 OurimnKiKN i,

17 ShemsImm mmnUnlis(4)
18 Smoky cy? ()
19 hberton~ugdo
royal"stle(5)
20 FrenchalleninmoBm pootUy(6)
22 Wheretowearabikinlorcover
notig(4)
24 Abrzymien? (3)
25 Reor desgner?(7)
26 mallisllefrtontend(5)
27 ftRldfardi(5)
28 qyr ilMddhtwe

29 COwstpnftMyde
uqi(7)
30 Doeuagptuumft im?(5)
31 OnesholinitomllMting
wrong way (5)


Yetsrdy'sayptc solutions
AaM05 3, RIh 8, PI-4o 10, Ruler 11, Go.O 12, A-aron
13, Shorty 15, Pis 18, MA-p 19, Be-nign 21, M-a-GI
cal 22, Own 28, Fred 24, M-EN-tors 26, Grades 29, >oe
31, Hoted (hoI 32, Co.*4ud 34, Nnon 35, Mug 36,
L-o4.-IC 37, -N.G.-y Q 8, SOUL-S -
DOWN 1, MN t 2, Dooman4,Aay5, PR.pel 6,
H-Unan 7, Bebing 9, Leo 12, Aline 14,Tag 16, Wkns
17, ride (Deri) 19, B n 20,Tough 21, Medal 23,
Free-man 24, M.0-Co.2S, O.ih 27, Ro4or 28, Dnis
30, P-gg-y 32,Cool 33, Run


SIoDennis


North dealer.
Neither side vulne
NOI
46
TKJ4
4 K J8
+K Q
WEST
4J9 832
VA1092
+1064
46
SOL
*AQ
VQ8(
*AQ
4974
The bidding:
North East
1 Pass
3Y Pass
Opening lead ti
Notrump contri
ture a race between
declarer for the
tricks. That is q
leader so often st
suit.
The defenders,
ing lead, thus g
declarer in the race
This advantage is
the fact that the
more high cards, b
have enough high
enough suit, the tei
often make the d
the success and fai
The battle is of
because of the tin


MEt AND IlID-MANEREw
CAI lN DLtKrS INTO A
NEARBY& CLOSET AND
TRAtSIOr1S MMS. Io...


ELL


The Timing Factor
the declarer may have a choice of
rable. which of two suits to establish, and if
RTH he chooses the wrong one, he may
lose the race.
4 3 Today's hand features just such a
8 situation. South got a spade lead and
J 5 2 won East's king. with the ace. He
EAST played a club to the jack, and East,
4 K 754 took his ace and returned a spade.
V 7 5 The ten lost to the jack, and a spade
S9 5 2 continuation established West's suit.
*A 10 8 3 Declarer now could cash only
YTH eight tricks. When he later led a
10 heart. West grabbed the ace and
6 cashed two spades to defeat the con-
73 tract one trick.
SActually, the contract was a cer-
tainty from the outset with correct
South West play. South should have attacked
2 NT Pass hearts before he touched the clubs.
3 NT At trick two,, he should enter
three of spades. dummy with a diamond and lead a
acts generally fea- low heart toward his hand. If East
the defenders and has the ace, he cannot afford to play
establishment of it because that would give South his
why the opening ninth trick (three hearts, four dia-
arts with his long monds and two spades). East would
i therefore have to play low, allowing
having the open- declarer to win with the queen. South
get the jump on can then force out the ace of clubs to
to build up tricks, assure nine tricks.
usually offset by If West has the ace of hearts (the
declaring side has actual situation), the queen would
ut if the defenders lose, but West could not make a dam-
cards and a long- aging spade return since declarer's
mpo they gain will Q-10 would be in full command of
difference between the suit. Regardless of what West
lure of a contract. returned, South would have ample
ten touch-and-go time to tackle the clubs and make at
ming factor. Also, least four notrump.


TARGE


lp

w


01


A




P


E

K

Rm


In
uses
words In
the main
body of
Cbmber*
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).


HOW many words of four letters
S or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making
a word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain the
centre letter and there must be
.. E w | at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.
TODAY TARGE
Good 21; very good 31; excellent
41 (or more). Solution tomorrow.
0


DOWN,
2 Rule a certain leas herff,US
style (6)
3 Do wrong to poselly the rigt
purpoe(6)
4 Aslnt heo ptftheatre? (3)
5 Wht a mre doe when she i
up~e7(5)
6 Crn as can be, certainly
not sacred (7)
7 Aljoulroney?(4)
8 Intercede to getagarment (4,2)
12 Surnameforasat-a
German one (5)
13 Saucy old dva? (5)
14 Gd endessly, perhaps, for tth
don= (5)
15 Wl-wom idre? (5)
16 HN ilaikpoi w wMth adrumn(5)
1is P p ce* ( 5)
19 DkhesitbtAM?(7)
21 Plieam igapoMdMawul (6)
22 LahoulforagMl nmros
style (6)
23 Bein amenable, 8gm I ining
out the dole (6)
25 Made, t seems, produced a remedy
roundthe medical centre (5)
26 ake a keeper of clean sheets (4)
28 Alow togohalf a miletotheendof
the street(3)


Yesterday's easy solutions
ACOSS: 3, Crave 8,Wager 10, Elder 11, Mar 12, Scarf
Absence 15, Minor 18, Too 19, Minute 21, Bitumen 22,
Epic 23, User 24, Testate 26, Killed 29, Ire 31, Ocean a
Toenal 34, Cumin 35, Sin 36, Under 37, Umlt 38,
DOWN: 1, Lambs 2, Heretic 4, Race 5, Vermn 6, Elfin7
Beret9, Gas 12, Scouted 14, Not 16, Nurse 17, Reams
Mention 20, Gedko 21, BUM 23, Utensil 24, Tenure 25,
Are 27, Ing 28, Lam 30, M1 m n32, Tkne
33, Alm


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 18 -
9




10 11-



212
1 -1.15
17 18m

19
m0-21 -- m3


ACROSS
1 Sewre(5)
6 Are(5)
9 Arodely(7)
10 Hlusa (5)
11 Grind (5)
12 Custom (5)
13 Subdu (7)
15 Consumed (3)
17 Spery
fish (4)
18 Jargon(6)
19 Ethical (5)
20 Perception (6)
22 Servant (4)
24 Lip (3)
25 Angy reply(7)
26 Pole (5)
27 Crazy (5)
28 Money,
13 Wornnam*y(5)
13, 29 Snads(7)
30 Tag (S)
2, 31 Tennis score (5)


19,


DOWN
2 Native
'Amercan (6)
3 Emuphasis (6)
4 Exclamaion (3)
5 Continental (5)
6 Funny(7)
7 ftem(4)
8 Empty(6)
12 Waingbid (5)
13 Tree (5)
14 Record (5)
15 Book ol mps (5)
16 Weeraway (5)
18 Heb (5)
19 O(drugs(7)
21 hned(6)
22 SMen(6)
23 Slanted leter (6)
25 Calls (5)
26 Quote (4)
28 Guided (3)


Id


JUDGE PARKER


FRIDAY,
NOV9
ARIES March 21/April 20
You may be feeling the urge to
splurge this week, Aries. In fact, you
could spend so much that you'll have
to look around for extra income,
which could be a blessing in disguise.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
You're affectionate and approach-
able, making this a good week for
affairs of the heart. However, not all
loves are true; you'll have to be a
little mpre discerning than usual.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
This is a festive time for you. Party
on, but don't doubt for a minute
that you'll have to pay for it down
the line. By the weekend, you'll
realize the need to find balance in
your life.
CANCER June 22/July 22
You're feeling quite the charmer
this week, and those around you
are noticing. This is one of the
best times of year for you, and
things will only get better by the
end of the week.
LEO July 23/August 23
You'll pay almost.any price to keep
the peace this week, Leo. In this
case, being a little too forgiving is
better than holding a hurtful grudge.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept22
This week, you'll Teel torn between
telling the truth and saying some-
thing nicer. It may be a good idea to
tell a little white lie to calm a love
one's fears, but just this once.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
It would appear that you're very
attached to something, and have a
terrible fear of losing it. The best
way to hold on to things you hold
dear is to handle them gently, Libra.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Past disappointments fade into the
background this week. Your confi-
dence may have suffered one or two
blows lately, but the tide has now
turned in your favor.
SAGfITARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21
You've always been among the most
outgoing, Sagittarius, but it is impor-
tant that you take time for yourself
this week to resolve something that's
been on your mind. Don't worry,
your friends will understand.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
What exactly are you after,
Capricorn? This is the question on
your mind this week. Forget about the
power and the profit. Instead, strive
to make the world a better place.
AQUARIUS- Jan 21/Feb 18
Watch your back, but don't become
so paranoid that you miss all the
wonderful people who are trying to
get your attention. You have more
friends than enemies out there.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
Most things will come easily to you
this week. Don't sweat the small
stuff. Because the waters are so calm,
you'll have plenty of time to expand
your understanding of life.


CHESS by LeonrdBarde


Xie Jun v Ketevan
Arakhamia-Grant, women's
world championship candidates,
Groningen 1997. Material is
level, but White's game looks
close to strategic defeat The c3
knight is attacked, while after 1
Nbl or 1 Ndl Black simply
captures Qxe4+ exchanging
queens with an extra pawn and
the superior position. China's
Xie Jun, who went on to win the
world title, found a subtle and
imaginative move in the
diagram which turned the tables
and led to rapid victory for
White. What happened?
LEONARD BARDEN


848(










a b c d e f g h


Chess solution 8480 1 Rh6! bxc3 2 Qh7+ K17 3
Rxf6+l when if Kxf6 4 Qg6 mate. The defence 3_Ke8
also fails to 4 Rxf8+ Kxf8 (Kd75 b3 wins a rook up) 5
Qh8+ Kf7 6 Rxg7+ Kf6 7 OQh6 mate.


*-^', 9


I ...-T TRY TO BREAK
( HER ADDICTION- 1r
-. HER PACIFIE.R


I B


l


ENDkVOWED ',III Supi4










MOMMMMMMMJ




I









THE TRIBUNE


NOVEMBER 9, 2007


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Issues Round- Washinon McLaughln Bill Moyers Journal(N) C (CC) TheVicar of D- (:40) Wakngthe
WPBT tablediscussion. Week (N) Group (N)(CC) bley The Easter Dead The Blind
(CC) Bunny rBeggar"
The Insider (N) Ghost Whisperer "Unhappy Medi- Moonlight "The Ringer" Mick inves- NUMB3RS "Primacy" An alternate-
WFOR n (CC) unm Melinda looks into the disap- tigates arson that seems to replicate reality gamer plunges to his death.
pearance of a young socialite. the night Coraline died. (N) X (CC)
Access Holly- Deal or No Deal (iTV) (N) C (CC) Friday N Lights Evidence impli- Las Vegas The casino plays host to
0 WTVJ wood (N) (CC) catesLandry;Tami's sister helps an environmentally friendly confer-
with the baby. (C) (N) ( )(N) (CC)e
Deco Drive The Next Great American Band Don't Forget the Lyricsl Woman News (N) (CC)
WSVN Two bands leave and eight perform. continues her quest. (N) ,C (CC)
(N) C (CC) ,
Jeopardyl Tour- Men in Trees Wolves descend on Women's Murder lub Lindsay (:02) 20/20 (N) (CC)
0 WPLG nament of Cham- Elmo, causing a heated fight be- and Jill become involved in the mur-
pions (N) tweenMarin and Jack. (N) (CC) der of a father-to-be. (N) (CC)
-
* * THE * GODFATHER PART III (1990, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, Talia Shire. A dignified don joins
A&E GODFATHER, his wild nephew in a Sicilian vendetta. (CC)
PART II (1974)
Peschardt's BBC World News America BBC News World Business BBC News State of the
BBCI People i Cunx- (Latenight). Report (Latenight). Planet "Is There
in. a Crisis?"
ET Allcae Keys Spe- x BOOTY CALL (1997) Jamie Foxx, Tommy Davidson. Two buddies How You Know 'Bout That: BET's
BET cial (N) (CC) hope to score during an eventful double date. (CC) Rap-K-Up Sex Quiz (CC)
Antiques Road- Air Farce Live Rick Mercer Re- Torchwood Torchwood investigates CBC News: The National (N) (CC)
CBC show (N) (CC) port(CC) deaths in a l (N) (CC)
cNBc :0O0)Kudlow& Fast Money High Net Worth TheSuze Orman ShowRoth IRA; The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
,NB_ Company (CC) student loans; ID theft. (CC) ____
CNN :00 Lou Dobbs Out in the Open Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN onght (CC)
Scrub sJ.D.'s The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Chappelle's The Sarah Sil- Comedy Central Comedy Central
COM ego gets in the With Jon Stew- port (CC) Show Music verman Program Presents Ty Bar- Presents (CC)
way. (CC) art (CC) guest Fat Joe. (CC) nett. (CC)
COURT Cops Cops in Most Shocking "Criminals Out of Forenslc Files Forensic Files Forensic Files North Mission
C U R Pittsburgh (CC) Control 2' "Headquarters" Road
The Suite Life of Hannah Mon- Wizards of Wa- * SPY KIDS 3: GAME OVER (2003, Adventure) The Suite Life of
DISN Zack&Cody tana ( (CC) very Place (N) Antonio Banderas, Cara Gugino. Aboy enters a virtu- Zack &Cody C1
"Baggage" (CC) A (CC) al-reality game to save his sister. 'PG' (CC)
DIY This Old House This Old House New Yankee New Yankee Wood Works Burt Builds a Under Construc-
Y n (CC) n (CC) Workshop (CC) Workshop (CC) Hand planes. Bandit tion
Ich Trage einen Journal: Tages- Europa Aktuell Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: Tages- Quadrig
DW Grossen Nam them ___ Depth ___ them
SThe Daily 10 (N) Dr. 90210 "Body Meets Soul" Self- Keeping Up-Kar- Klmora: Life In The Soup (N) Sunset Tan All
esteem boost. dashlans the Fab Lane _Work, No Play'
IE N NBA Shoot- NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Washington Wizards. From Verizon Center in Washing- NBA Basketball
r.ESPN around (Live) ton, D.C. (Live) (CC)
ES I Gol ESPN: NBA Basketball Denver Nuggetsat Washington Wizards. From Verizon Center in Washing- SportsCenter -
ESPNI Fuerade Juego ton, D.C. (Live) (CC) Intl. Edition
DN Daily Mass: Our The World Over Life Is Worth The Holy Rosary Defending Life Reasons for Our
EWTN Lady ,,Living Hope
FIT TV :00) Cardio Ballroom Bootcamp Women learn National Body Challenge "Girth Control" A family that likes fatty foods
Cast (CC) to do the tango. (CC) and hates exercise makes a pact. (CC)
v Fox Report- The O'Relily Factor (CC) Hannity & Colmes (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith T FoSusteren (CC)
FSNF NHL Hockey Atlanta Thrashers at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sun- Around the The FSN Final
FSNFL rise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Track: Preview Score (Live)
6:30) LPGA Golf Mitchell Company Tournament of Golf Central Ultimate Matches Classic match between Annika
GOLF Ihampions Second Round. From Mobile, Ala. (Live) Sorenstam and Karrie Webb.
GSN :00) Weakest Who Wants to Be a Millionaire n That's the Ques- Family Feud Farn Feud Chain Reaction
GSN ink n (CC) (CC) tion (CC) (CCY (CC)
AG T h (:0)Attack of X-Play"X-Play's Top 10 Games Cop 2.0 "Seat- Cops 2.0 High- Nlnja Warrior NInja Warrior
iec the Show! (N) Ever" ie/Tacoma' speed chase.
:00) Walker, Walker, Texas Ranger An escaped KANGAROO JACK (2003, Comedy) Jerry O'Connell, Anthony Ander-
HALL Texas Ranger convict wants to kill he judge who son, Estella Warren. Premiere. A kangaroo hops away with a jacket full of
War Cry" (CC) sentenced him. (CC) cash. (CC)
Buy Me 'Paul: A Place in Italy Uncharted Teri- House Hunters World's Most Relocation, Relocation "Andrea &
HGTV Suburban ache- Converted mill. story Romania. Interational Extreme Homes Ady A couple wants to cut their
lor" n (CC) (N) C (CC) (N) (C (CC) () ) Cl London commute. (N) (CC)
IK 'orris Cerullo Breakthrough JaySekulow Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day The Gospel
., (CC) day (CC) Truth
Reba Cheyenne NBA Basketball Los Angeles Cippers at Detroit Pistons. From the Palace of Auburm Hillsln Two and a Half
KTLA dooms the foot- Auburn Hills, Mich. (Live) (CC) Men A (CC)
ball team. (CC)
Still Standing Reba Van's par- Reba Reba tutors Lisa Williams: Life Among the America's Psychic Challenge
LIFE Lauren and her cents offer him a Van in history. n Dead Lisa stops a young woman "Quarterfinals: Round 1" Four psy-
boyfriend.(CC) bribe., (CC) (CC) and her aunt on the street. (N) chics compete. (N) (CC)
MSNBC :0Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- WhThey Run: WhyThey Run: MSNBC Investigates: Lockup: In-
MSNBC CG __ mann Tank Baby side Folsom
KNIK 'Ned's Declassi- Back at the Avatar: The Last El Tigre: Manny Full House George Lopez George Lopez
N fied School Barnyard (CC) AlrbSnder Rivera "Jesse's Girl"r (CC) (CC)
SNUMB3RS Friday Night Lights How Did I Get Las Vegas It's Not Easy Being News(N) 0 News
NTV n 'In security Here" (N) (CC) Green"'N) C (CC) (CC)
D CTSSetup NASCAR Racing Craftsman Truck Series -Casino Arizona 150. From Phoenix Intemation- Trackside At...
or U (Live) al.Raceway in Avondale, Ariz. (Live) (N)
S(5:00) Praise-A-Thon Bi-annual fundraising event.

Everybody ** * THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939, Fantasy) Judy Garland, Frank ** 101 DALMATIANS (1996,
TBS Loves Raymond Morgan, Ray Bolger. Atornado whisks a Kansas farm girl to a magic land. Adventure) Glenn Close, Jeff
"Ping Pong" C (CC) (DVS) Daniels, Joely Richardson. (CC)
S(00 What Not WhaNot to Wear "Desiree" Fash- Clinton Kelly Remodels His Hoe Say Yes to the Dress A dream
TLC to 0Wear "Camilla ion issues. (CC) (N) wedding dress on a budget. (N)
B." (CC)
T (00)aw & Or- **** THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939, Fantasy) Judy Garland, Frank *** THE MASK (1994, Comedy)
TNT der Cry Wolf Morgan, Ray Bolger. A tornado whisks a Kansas farm girl to a magic land. Jim Carrey. An ancient mask ani-
,a (CC) (DVS) (CC) (DVS) mates a drab bank clerk. (CC)
T Chowder Lonely Codename: Kids Grim Adven- Squirrel Boy Codename: Kids Out of Jimmy's Chowder Lonely
I UN monster. (N) Next Door tures Next Door Head "Bully' monster.
TV5 (:00)Toute une Thalassa Un magazine de la mer. (SC) Passez auvert Unevile un
TV istoire style
TWC eatherVen- Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
tures Hawaii.
(:00) Yo Amo a Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha Destilando Amor (N) La Familla P. Retro P. Luche
UNIV Juan Querend6n para salvar a la mujer que ama. (N) Luche Una re- Junior recupera
(N) *.I uni6n de clase, su memorial.
(:00) Law & Or- * THE BOURNE IDENTITY (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente, Chris Cooper. An amnesiac
USA der: Special Vic- agent is marked for death after a botched hit.
times Unit C
VH1 (:00) The Shot America's Most Smartest Model Best Week The Salt 'N Pepa I Love New York Blood oath. n
V Anatomy test. C (N) Show l
VS. Winchester Leg- Whitetail Revo- The Bucks of Best & Worsf Dangerous The Huntley Federal Experi-
v ends lutlon Tecomate (CC) Tred Bart Game (CC) Way ence
... (:00) America's *'A STIGMATA (1999, Suspense) Patricia Arquette, Gabriel Byre, WGN News at Nine (N) n (CC)
WGN Funniest Home Jonathan Pryce. A young woman is plagued by strange visions and
Videos n (CC) wounds. (CC)
Family Guy C WWE Friday Night SmackDowni (N) n (CC) CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX (CC) Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
Jeopardy! Tour- Dr. Phil Women struggling with News (N) Jeopardy! "Cel- Frasler Frasier Frasler Niles
WSB K nament of Cham- anorexia. (N) n (C) ebrity Week in and Charlotte get hosts a dinner
pions"(N) NewYork" (CC) stranded, party. n (CC)
..- (:00) Inside the *~ THE DUKES OF HAZZARD (2005, Comedy) (:45) Fred Claus: Curb Your En- Curb Your En-
HIiBO-E NFL ,n (CC) Johnny Knoxville. The Duke cousins try to foil a HBO First Look thuslasm The N thusiasm
______ ____scheme by Boss Hogg, n 'PG-13' (CC) Word" (CC) Cheryl's therapist.
(6:00) *** ** THE BREAK-UP (2006, Romance-Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel
HBO-P THAT THING Aniston, Joey Lauren Adams. Acouple end their relationship, but neither A (CC)
r YOU DO! (1996) is willing to move. A 'PG-13' (CC)


H...- (6:30)** (,:15) *% BIG DADDY (1999, Comedy) Adam Sandier, Joey Lauren Inside the NFL 1 (CC)
HBO-W SOMETHING Adams, Jon Stewart. A goofy ne'er-do-well adopts an impressionable
NEW (2006) C, youngster. 'PG-13' (CC)
* CRIMINAL (2004, Crime Drama) John C. Reil- *MIAMI VICE (2006, Crime Drama) Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Gong
H BO-S ly, Diego Luna. A con man and his protege try a corn- Li. Detectives Crockett and Tubbs take on drug lords In South Florida. C
plicated scam. ,l 'R' (CC) 'R' (CC)
S30) ATL (:15) * TURISTAS (2006, Horror) Josh Duhamel, Melissa George, SMOKIN' ACES (2007, Ac-
MAX-E 12006) Tp T.I." Olivia Wilde. Stranded travelers find danger in the Brazilian jungle. Cf 'R' tion) Ben Affleck Andy Garcia, Alicia
Hamrs. (CC) Keys. C 'R'(C6)
S(:15) GET CARTER (2000, Suspense) Sylvester **x NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM (2006, Fantasy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugl-
MOMAX Stallone. A mob enforcer is determined to solve his no, Dick Van Dyke. Museum exhibits springto life when the sun goes
brother's murder. l 'R' (CC).- down. 'PG'(CC)
**A LAST HOLIDAY (2006, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Gerard Depar- Weeds "Risk" Brotherhood "True Love Tends to
SHOW dieu, LL Cool J. TV. A terminally ill woman lives it up on vacation, A?. (ITV) A (CC) Forget 1:1-4" Tommy tries to clean
'PG-13' (CC) up a bad neighborhood.


(61)WIELIHW *1: AMERICAN GUN (2005, Drama one t r
'USLEEPING 'PG' verse group of people, (I 'R' (CC)


(:45) ** UUNCRAZY (1992, urama) Drew Barry-
more, James LeGros. A teen falls under the spell of a
dangerous prison pen pal. A 'R' (CC)


Let Cl .I-I c lie fti e
Balkmiam PL ,et and w
Ixis sidekick soI1Ce siles o, yo,, ,OL
kids's fcaces.


Brin VoCU cl ildren to tfle
A -lacppy LHo .r atfMcIDonald's in

Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30p-m duLinLg tie

Imoil\\ of NJovem.e' r 2007.




Enjoj Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.




i'm lovin' it


.1


FRIDAY EVENING


In i i I


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