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The Tribune.
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/03000
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 9/29/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_03000
System ID: UF00084249:03000

Full Text








FEASTONOI I
DonQUAB
POUIN WAEEll kMi L
HIGH 88F
LOW 75F

Partly sunny
with storms


The


Tribune


BAHAMAS EDITION


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Volume: 103 No.257 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007 ..PRICE-750


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CRUSADER

SENIOR GIRLS WIN OPENI]ER


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abbing:
,"I


Girlfriend


acquitted of


boyfriend's


manslaughter


By N ATARI O McKENZIE
A WOMAN was acquitted of
a manslaughter charge yester-
day over the stabbing death of
her boyfriend.
Sheanda Coakley, 24, wept in
the Supreme Court when the
jury forewoman announced that
the 12-woman, two-man jury
had found her not guilty of
manslaughter.
Coaklev's relatives also
squealed A ith joy when the ver-
dict was read Afterwards, Jus-
tice'Jon Isaacs told Coakley that
she was free to go.
Coakley stood trial over the
stabbing death of her boyfriend
Teran Jennings, 22. The inci-
dent occurred on July 2, 2004.
Coakley was represented by
attorney Muirio Ducille along
with Tamara Taylor. Lawyers
Vernal Collie, Allan Emmanuel
and Ambrose Brown appeared
for the prosecution.
Evidence at the trial stated
that Coakley got. into a fight
with Jennings at his home in
Yellow Elder Gardens. Coak-
ley told police that during the
incident shk had been in fear
for her life. She also told police
that Jennings had been abusive
to her many times before.


During a videotaped inter-
view Coakley said that Jennings
beat her with his fists before
retrieving a knife which he used
to beat her on the head.
Coakley told police she got
away from Jennings but the
fight resumed a short time later
and Jennings retrieved anoth-
er knife.
Coakley said they struggled
and both knives fell to the
ground. Coakley said that she
picked up one of the knives
when Jennings started beating
her again and stabbed him.
During his summation, Jus-
tice Isaacs told the jury that
manslaughter was similar to the
offence of murder but lacked
the intention to kill.
He told jurors that the law
provided for a person who is
attacked or in fear of being
attacked to use reasonable force
in defending themselves. He
reminded jurors that the bur-
den lay with the prosecution to
prove that Coakley had not act-
ed in self-defence and that the
amount of force used was
unreasonable.
He said if they found that
Coakley had acted in self-
defence they should find her
not guilty.


r 'm


By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net


FOR the second time in a week,
police have captured one of the
men on their most wanted list, as
Marvin Sears, 32, was held for
questioning in relation to the mur-
der of Markus Horton.
Reports on the capture are
sketchy, but Sears, whose last
known address was Cordeaux
Avenue, was captured after lam
yesterday outside Southern Police
Station.
Mr Horton, of West Street, was
killed on February 19 this year in
the Poinciana area of Coconut
Grove.
According to police reports at
the time, the deceased was fol-
lowed by several individuals until
he arrived at Watlings Street, near
the Red Door Package Store.
Mr Horton was reportedly shot


in the head while in the yard of
the store. Police found his body
after receiving calls from residents
who heard gunshots.
. Mr Horton was the ninth homi-
cide victim of the year, and cur-
rently the murder total stands at
55.
Shortly before midnight on
Monday police took Angelo Rah-
ming who, too, was on the most
wanted list into custody for ques-
tioning in the murder of Rev Troy
Seymour, 37, of Grand Bahama.
Rahming has subsequently been
arraigned in court in Grand
Bahama charged with the murder
of Rev Seymour.
Chief Supt Hulan Hanna did not
want to specifically comment on
operational details surrounding the
capture of these men yesterday.
However, he assured the public:
"We are acting vigilantly to ensure
that they (those on the most want-
ed list) are captured."


Vendor

breaks

h officer's

wrist


Upset about the construction of a warehouse in Twynam, resident Margo Bethel speaks to the press.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)


Resident fury over


warehouse project


By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompsonitribunemedia.net
RESIDENTS of a "quaint" historic Twynam
Avenue neighbourhood were in an uproar
again yesterday about the commercial ware-
house in the eqrly stages of construction near
several homes a the area.
As reported by The Tribune earlier in the
week, several residents of the central area off
Shirlea Road and Lancaster Street are com-
plaining about ~ proposed warehouse, claiming
the neighbourhood does not have proper zon-
ing to accommodate a building of its magnitude.
While residents were quick to admit the pres-
ence of other commercial establishments in
the area, such as a shipping company and an
electronics store, they claim these companies
"snuck into" the neighbourhood before resi-


dents could raise concerns.
"Other businesses snuck into the neigh-
bourhood, but this (warehouse) is pushing the
limit," Margo Bethel, a long-time resident com-
plained yesterday.
"We were told that the zoning would have to
be changed to (accommodate) this kind of
building. The fact that he is continuing to work
here is troubling."
When The Tribune visited the site yester-
day, three construction workers were on site
and construction was well underway on an area
bordered by three homes.
Labourers from the Water and Sewage Cor-
poration were performing routine water work
near the property's water line, when a pipe
must have burst, causing a small flood of water
SEE page 10


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A police corporal suffered a
broken wrist yesterday when an
attempt to arrest a man who
was selling items to.tourists
without a licence on Woodes
Rogers Walk turned violent.
Corporal Edward Neymour,
attached to the downtown
police tourism unit, sustained
the injury when the man he was
in the process.of arresting broke
free of his handcuffs.
A struggle followed, with
both the officer and the suspect
reportedly ending up on the
ground before the latter was
ultimately subdued.
According to another officer
at the tourism unit, who spoke
on condition of anonymity, the
man had been "hawking" items
such as beaded necklaces and
bracelets to tourists in the area
without a permit.
It is now likely that he also
will be charged with resisting
arrest, disorderly conduct
and/or assaulting a police officer
in addition to his" original
alleged offence, she said.
A downtown merchant who
operates a store on the water-
front at Woodes Rogers Walk
told The-Tribune that persons
"harassing" tourists by force-
fully attempting to sell items or
services such as hair braiding to
then are endemic.
However, since the arrival of
the new mobile policing unit on
the scene around a month ago
the situation has quite drasti-
cally improved, he said.
He praised the efforts of the
officer in charge, Asst Supt
Bruce Arnette, who he said had
taken a visibly active interest in
bringing order to the area.
However, a loophole in the
process is already being exploit-
ed by persistent "hawkers" who
have realized that there is a 30
to 40 minute period in the after-
noon when officers change over
at the end of their shift and
SEE page 10


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PAGE2,,STURDY,,SPTEBER 9, 207 TE TRBUN





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___________________.________:_____, .
A i_ r j ." ." jl


By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net


One of several offices being completely redone in the Central Police Station.
This is a part of an effort by police officials to upgrade the old building.
(Photo: Brent Dean)





& Ask


To our valued customers, we are upgrading to serve you
better at Bank of The Bahamas International.


There will be an interruption in ABM and online banking services
this weekend from 5:00pm September 28th
to 9:00am October 1st, 2007.


We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
We encourage you to plan your weekend finances accordingly.


Thank you in advance for your cooperation.




I Iw NTE R N AT I 0 NA L


New Providence* Grand Bahama Andros* Inagua Exuima San Salvador
Head Office Nassau. (242) 397-3000


i1, -i i


POLICE are defending their efforts to upgrade
the Central Police Station after serious com-
plaints were made to the press by officers who
declared that they were on the verge of walking
out.
Chief Superintendent Hulan Hanna took the
media on a guided tour of the station, which came
under scrutiny after a Nassau Guardian story on
Thursday'. .
In the storyotticers alleged that chronic leaks
in" the building some from the roof and others
from pipes in the walls forced officers to splash
through flood-like conditions in order to fulfill
their duties.
Complaints were also made that at times there
is only one working toilet in a station which can
house up to one hundred prisoners who are being
processed for the courts.
"There is a problem at this facility," Mr Hanna
said. "This is an incredibly very old building. This
building and the one that houses police District
Headquarters, and they have been plagued with
problems, leakages and other problems for some
time."
Mr Hanna said that the police maintenance
team has patched up problems with the facili-
ties, when necessary, however, at this time "that
will not do anymore."
The government and Police Force have now
decided to replace the roof on the station, Mr
Hanna said, along with extensive interior work.
Following this, police maintenance workers,
assisted by prisoners, will work on the roof at
District Headquarters.
This is in addition to the extensive work that is
ongoing at the Prosecution Division.
"We have started this over the last several


key health

MINISTER of Health and itary Conference
Social Development Dr Hubert of the Regional
Minnis left Nassau yesterday which will run fro
for Washington, DC, where he to 5.
will attend two key meetings on Dr Minnis will
regional health issues. nied by Barbara I
Dr Minnis will first attend the manent secretary
16th Caucus of CARICOM istry of Health
Health Ministers on Saturday Development, Dr
and Sunday, and then take part lan, medical office
in the 27th Pan American San- ning unit of the


weeks, and it is not going to happen over night,"
Mr Hanna said.
"So again, I want to thank these officer for
labouring under the stressful conditions that they
have been labouring in.
And I want to say to them that immediate
help and immediate rehabilitation is taking place,"
Mr Hanna said, revealing to the media that work
on the station should be completed in several
weeks.
Assistant Superintendent Bruce Arnett, act-
ing officer-in-charge of Central, told the media
that the problems with roof leakage have been
alleviated since the work begun, and the Envi-
ronmental Health department has done work in
the station to remove rodents.
"There is a consistent plan in place to eradicate
all of their (working police officers) concerns.
The force has always been concerned about the
welfare of officers and we will continue to be
concerned," he said.
"I want them to understand that they have our
assurance that we will spare no effort to cause
there to be results as it relates to their working
conditions."
Along with the new roof, the tour of the facil-
ity revealed that extensive work is underway to
completely renovate among other things, offices
in Central Station, along with the construction of
a new reception area for the Prosecutions Divi-
sion.
The controversy at the station re-emphasizes
the need for the government to build new struc-
tures for police, the judiciary and a parliament, as
all the current buildings downtown are antiquat


ed.
In the case of the parliament, some senior
employees do not have an office; there is only one
restroom facility for MPs and visitors: and there
is inadequate space for members to hold proper
commeat ecings,


Minister leves for


meetings


(59th n
Committee)
om October 1
be accompa-
Burrows, per-
in the Min-
and Social
Pearl McMil-
er in the plan-
Ministry of


Health and Social Development
and Dr Calae Dorsett, medical
officer in the Department of
Public Health.
They will join Chief Medical
Officer Dr Merceline Dahl-
Regis, who is already in the US
capitol.
The CARICOM Health Min-
isters Caucus affords regional
health miniater-; The opportuni-
ty to discuss and address mat-
ters of mutual concern, in addi-
tion to issues facing their respec-
tive countries.
The S 'iitar) Conference is a
,;., significant~opportunity for Latin
i American and Caribbean Coun-
tries as decisions made during
the session will set the guide-
lines for PAHO in the region
over the next four years.
A number of key health
issues will also be addressed
during the session including:'
malaria, avian flu and pandem-
ic influenza, dengue prevention
and control in the Americas,
safe hospitals, a regional initia-
tive on disaster resilient health
facilities and a regional policy
and strategy for ensuring quali-
ty of care, including patient
safety.


.MAIN SECTION
'bic News..........P... 1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
Editorial/Letters. .................................... P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 32 PAGES

SPORTS SECTIONS
Sports ...........................................P1,2,3,4,5
C om ics.......................................................,P6
tC m "m i .................................... I .......... ....P 7
'W eather...................................................P....


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE









THE TIBUN SATRDAYSEPTMBER29,C207,NAGES


THE government is in
the process of developing a
national strategy for the
prevention of money laun-
dering and terrorism
financing.
Financial Intelligence
Unit. (FIU) director
Anthony Johnson revealed
this in an address to the
Bahamas Association of
Chartered Accountants.
"Given the prominence
of financial services to the
domestic economy, cou-
pled with global competi-
tion, the Bahamas can ill-
afford to rest on its laurels
and simply be contented
to mark time," Mr John-
son said.
The FIU director
emphasised that the pro-
posed development of a
national anti-money laun-
dering and counter-terror-
ism financing (AML/CFT)
strategy "is a first for the
Bahamas" and is in keep-
ing with an emerging trend
in the global community.
"As a first step, the pro-
ject is predicated on thet
gathering of vital informa-
tion including statistical
data and case studies from
all possible sources includ-
ing regulatory agencies,
law enforcement, other
uniform branches of gov-
ernment, industry bodies,
etc," Mr Johnson said.
He said that as a small
nation, competing globally,
"the costs associated with
not complying with global
standards no doubt may
well exceed the related
benefits."
"This means that in the
local context all stake-
holders (that is, law
enforcement, supervisors,
regulators, policy makers
and industry practitioners)
will have an important role
to play in the ongoing
observance of and mainte-
nance of high standards,"
he added.
With regards to the pro-
posed National Strategy on
the Prevention of Money
Laundering and Terrorism
Financing, a set of tem-
plates have been designed
and circulated to both the
public and private sector.
The information will be
collated by the Financial
Intelligence Unit into a
formal report, which will
be submitted to the gov-
ernment.
In addition, it is antici-
pated that the report will
provide all relevant parties
with a set of measurable
goals and outcomes and
will highlight areas in both
public and private sectors,
which may need attention
- particularly for training
purposes.
Mr Johnson said that
what should be evident
from the design of the tem-
plates is that each user is
required to do the follow-
ing:
Identify the money
laundering "risks and vul-
nerabilities" in the
Bahamas and assess each
area, including designated
non-financial businesses
and professions, according
to the associated level of
risk
Identify "training
needs," if any, to pre-
vent/eliminate money
laundering and terrorism
financing for each of those
areas deemed to be medi-
um to high risk
Formulate/recommend
five "national goals" to be


pursued based upon risks,
vulnerabilities and train-
ing needs identified
Develop an "action
plan" based on national
goals and priority areas


Pottery Classes
New Providence Community Centre
Blake Road
Ph#: 525-7857, 327-1660
Starting Saturday, 13 October
Wednesday, 17 October


ZNS staff 'unconcerned"




on possible redundancies


STAFF at ZNS are reportedly "uncon-
cerned" about job cuts that are expected
to take place at the country's national
radio and television station, The Tri-
bune has learned.
Reportedly, many ZNS staff are still
"in the dark" about the number of lay-
offs that can be expected at the Broad-


casting Corporation.
Officials at the Bahamas Communi-
cations and Public Officers Union
(BCPOU) have met with its members
at ZNS. However, the extent of lay-offs
is unclear as staff have yet to be briefed
on the matter.
Allegedly, some staff say that if they


are to be fired, they only want a "good
package" and will leave quietly.
"The general attitude is nobody
cares," one source commented. .
The job cuts possibly as many as 100
- could include managers who have
reportedly been identified as "ineffec-
tive" at their posts.


However, the promise of veteran jour-
nalists Jerome Sawyer and Jessica
Robertson being brought to the corpo-
ration is .being welcomed by most staff.
Mr Sawyer will reportedly serve as
vice-president of news and current
affairs, and Ms Robertson as news direc-
tor.


Minister urges pre-school education focus


Minister of Education Carl
Bethel is calling for more focus
on education before the prima-
ry school level.
THE first seven years of a
child life is "absolutely critical"
to the formation of the charac-
ter, capabilities and attitudes,
Mr Bethel said.
"The thinking has changed
because so much is happening
in the life of a child, even before
they ever enter primary school,"


Mr Bethel said. "The impor-
tance of preschool education
has come to the forefront."
Mr Bethel was speaking at a
town meeting on the Early
Childhood Care Act 2004, at
the Stephen Dillett Primary
School. The event was a part of
the series of town meetings on
the proposed standards and reg-
ulations that will govern the
provisions of early childhood
care.


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Work: 326-1296
Home: 356-5431


Mr Bethel said that the need
for wider consultation and fur-
ther advice on the 2004 act
made it necessary to have such
meetings with the public and
private sector partners.
"There are 'still, in the act,
some defects that we hope now,
in very short order, to correct by
way of amending the legislation,
which we will, in short order,
move through parliament and
will pass and bring into law, at
that point" he said.
"At that point, we will.have a
further series of intense consul-
tations, with private sector part-


ners, in the provision of
preschool education," the min-
ister said.
In the mid-1990s, Mr Bethel
said, his ministry added a
preschool component to many
public primary schools.
"That is because, since the
mid-1990s, the government has
appreciated the fact that we
could not only rely on the pri-
vate sector to provide preschool
education to the broad majority
of young Bahamians," Mr
Bethel said.
However the government, as


in all things, cannot do it alone,
he said, as there are hundreds of
unregistered preschool facilities
throughout the Bahamas, rang-
ing from informal facilities to
elderly persons to structured
buildings.
There is a need to bring a
standard of order, safety and
educational levels to all of these
facilities, he said.
"And the ministry, as is
shown here tonight, will con-
tinue to dialogue and work with
private sector daycare or child-
care providers."


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THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 3


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. ... ...... 1 1 .. ..... .. . .... . .









PAGE 4, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


EDIT I*AULETTES TO*THEEDTOR


An update on
NEW BRAUNFELS, Texas All was quiet
inside the walls of the American ambassador's
residence in Bujumbura, Burundi, as I lay in
bed, shrouded by mosquito netting.
As a 4-year-old living in Central Africa in
1994, I had known security all my life. Through
the gauze I peered out at the clear night sky.
Then the thud of grenades broke the silence,
followed by machine-gun fire.
While I remained secure, Burundians were
not. Years later, I realized that these were the
sounds of genocide and that the killing was not
confined to the small, remote country where my
father was ambassador.
Only a few miles away and a few months ear-
lier, an extensive war had raged in neighboring
Rwanda. Tutsis and moderate Hutus fled from a
Hutu army, militia and their own neighbours,
who, aiming to destroy all "cockroaches," killed
800,000 countrymen in three months.
Hundreds fleeing genocidal attackers sought
shelter in Hotel Mille Collines. where manager
Paul Rusesabagina protected them from death.
His story is now familiar from the 2004 Oscar-
nominated movie "Hotel Rwanda" and his auto-
biography, "An Ordinary Man."
Thirteen years after living as an uncompre-
hending.witness to genocide in Burundi and
Rwanda, I recently met this modest hero in, of all
places, Laredo, Texas.
Although my father and he had talked yV telC-
phone, they met in person because both had
come to Laredo to console a friend- a Rwan-
dan emigre to Texas who had lost a family mem-
ber. For us, the funeral meant a drive for.the
Rusesabaginas, a 10,000-mile round trip
Tatiana Rusesabagina entered our hotel lobby
on the arm of her husband, elegant in a dark
suit and fashionable, red-striped tic, both smiling
warmly.
Once seated, as wine was served, the former
hotel manager tested the cork, twirled the glass,
sniffed the bouquet and began speaking at
length, softly.
Paul, Tatiana and their family had remained in
Rwanda following the victory of Paul Kagame
and his rebel Rwandan Patriotic Front over the
Rwandan genocidal government forces in 1994.
As a Hutu who had saved 1,268 lives, mostly
Tutsi, Rusesabagina had remained to help build
a society where accountability and reconcilia-
tion would replace revenge and ethnic rivalries.
But he found the tables had turned: Instead of
Hutus killing Tutsis, Tutsis now killed Hutus --
while the new Kagame-led Tutsi government
looked the other way.
In 1996, a member of the military intelligence
drew a pistol, threatening Rusesabagina, whose
outspokenness had made him a target for elim-


'Hotel Rwanda'
nation. The family fled immediately, receiving
asylum in Belgium. There the man who later
emerged as the hero of "Hotel Rwanda" became
a Brussels taxi driver.
In 2004, however, the fame of "Hotel Rwan-
da" provided a platform to protest the new injus-
tice in Rwanda. Rusesabagina's list of offences is
long, his outrage strong. In recent meetings with
U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and
other Congress members, he made the following
claims:
Paul Kagame, after 10 years as dictator, was
"elected" president with 95 per cent of the vote
in rigged elections.
90 per cent of government officials, including
teachers, today are Tutsi, though they consti-
tute only 15 per cent of the population.
The silent suppression is maintained by a
sinister intelligence agency that brings charges,
engages in kidnapping and is responsible for
thousands of "disappearances."
Rusesabagina's criticism and international
celebrity have come at a price. Kagame fre-
quently censures him as corrupt and greedy and
a liar.
While driving in, Brussels recently, a sedan
with five Africans sought to run him off the road.
His apartment was ransacked, but no items
stolen. Obviously, Rusesabagina's fame has been
no detence against intimidation.
1 listened in sadness during our lunch. I only
know the names of two Rwandans: Paul Kagame,
w ho led the armed forces to end the genocide,
and Paul Rusesabagina, who, unarmed, coura-
geously saved more than 1,000 lives.
Unfortunately, Kagame and the extraordinary
"Ordinary Man" are now on opposite sides.
I doubt that Rusesabagina, who risked his life
for those of a different ethnicity in 1994, is mak-
ing false charges against the new government
when he says today, "We have only changed the
dancers, but the music remains the same."
To avoid the tragedy of another genocide,
Rusesabagina and many human rights groups
favour creating a Truth and Reconciliation Com-
mission, as South Africa did after the apartheid
era. Although Kagame opposes this (perhaps
fearing international scrutiny), such a commission
could offer an opportunity for both account-
ability and relieving the grief pent up for more
than a decade.
Perhaps then the genocidal grenades and
machine guns that I heard as a 4-year-old in
Burundi would at last be silenced in Central
Africa.
(* This article is by Sarah Krueger, a 17-year-
old senior at New Braunfels High School. She
lived in Burundi in 1994-1995 2007).


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MA GISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCII, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(lon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


EDITOR, The Tribune
THERE has been a lot of
controversy in the media recent-
ly about whether they should
put the police back into the
schools for protection. Person-
ally I feel that the true answer
to not only protecting the chil-
dren but also the teachers in the
schools is to put the right to dis-
cipline back into the school's
hands.
The biggest problem I see is
the lack of respect from the stu-
dents towards the authority fig-
ures in the schools and this
stems mainly from the fact that
the students are aware that the
teachers and the administration
have no rights to discipline them
and so they feel that they can
get away with whatever behav-
iour they wish to adopt.
Back in the days when I was
growing up, I would have been
scared to act disrespectfully
towards an adult because of the
consequences I would have to
face. God forbid I got punished
at school, I would pray that no
one called my mother because
that would have meant receiv-
ing her wrath as well. These
days if a teacher tries to disci-
pline a child at school they fear
repercussions from the parent.
Parents, you have a responsi-
bility to your children to allow
them to learn that their actions
will have consequences. If they
misbehave, they will be pun-
ished accordingly. Teachers, you
have a responsibility to these
children to discipline but not
abuse the children in your care.
Parents, you also have a
responsibility to teach your chil-
dren right from wrong by exam-
ple. Respect the rules and laws
and you will find you raise chil-
dren who will also respect the
rules and laws.
When leaving Sunland School


yard today there was a car
blocking the flow of traffic
because she (the driver) wanted
to turn out of the gate to the
right, but the sign on the gate
clearly states left turn only. This
is sometimes inconvenient but it
is for the purpose of allowing
for smooth traffic flow. What
this woman was teaching her
child is that it is all right to dis-
obey rules if it is more conve-
nient to do so. Rules are not for
convenience. We do not pick
which ones we obey and which
ones we do not obey. This sends
conflicting messages to your
children. It's a matter of respect.
I beg your patience as I
preach here about another
point of respect and children
that concerns me.
Friday, September 14th, I was
driving along Coral Road near
to St Jude's keeping a keen eye
out for my brother's dog that
had been missing from the day
before. I saw Tika running
along the sidewalk with a little
boy of about seven to nine years
of age running behind her
throwing rocks at her. Now
please let me give you some
insight into Tika. She is a pot
cake that was abused as a pup-
py and therefore has always
been a bit timid, but very sweet
by nature.
I was appalled to see this little
boy taking such delight in chas-
ing this dog and throwing rocks
at her. What is this child being
taught at home? What kind of
values could this child be taught
to have a heart so cold as to
throw rocks at a dog for no rea-
son?
I pulled over quickly to run


across the street with every
intention of giving this young
man a good smack across his
head so that he could see and
feel what that dog was experi-
encing at his hands, but he hit
the dog in the head and she
darted out into the street only
to be rolled over by a car. I
froze, horrified to see this sweet
dog rolling under a car. But
then I was even more amazed
by the driver of the vehicle who
never even stopped. Now I
know what kind of parent could
have raised such a child throw-
ing the rock; the same kind that
would drive over a dog and nev-
er even stopped.
Luckily that dog is all right,
just traumatized. But what
about our society? Will we be
all right? Children learn what
they live, teach them respect,
they will be respectful. Teach
them compassion and they will
be compassionate. Teach them
love and they will be loving.
Teach them hatred and they will
hate.
We are failing our children
and we are failing our society.
We are raising a generation of
children without the basics that
they need to become leaders in
society: men and women with
strong moral fibre who we will
be proud to look up to one day.
Men and woman we will be
proud to call our leaders.
There are many types of fam-
ilies these days, single mothers
raising their children, single
fathers, grandparents, aunts and
uncles, even traditional family
units, but whoever is raising the
children, we must all band
together and remember it
really does take a village to raise
a child, especially today.
Denise deGregory
Nassau
September 2007


Security decision leaves


COB student insecure


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that SAMUEL ORELIEN of
P.O.BOX 4929, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of SEPTEMBER
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, PO.Box N 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





BISP revival
51F hUh IREI MINISTRIES


~vWaI


t abbrli$- I week revival
HHooli.esChurch

Wok revival






S lSerke 7:30 pm,
Peiiuion New Free Community Holiness Church


EDITOR, The Tribune.
Please publish this open letter
to the "Powers that be" at The
College of The Bahamas
(COB):
I am a part-time student at
COB. For over a year, I have
arrived to my evening classes
shortly after work which is after
5pm. Because I am a female, I
would park my vehicle as close
to where my class is as possi-
ble.
For this semester and up to
this evening, I would park near
to the C block where my class is
being held. The C block is
closed to Poinciana Drive. As I
entered the main entrance, a
slim-built security guard
stopped me and asked me if I
were a student or faculty. Being
honest, I said that I am a stu-
dent. He then told me that I
was not allowed to go further
and I am to park by the T block,
which is on Tucker Road.
Giving the nature of crime
nowadays, the fact that there
have been robberies occurring


on the campus and alleged rape
incidents, I thought this idea
was very asinine. I then asked
him who the order came from
and was told that the Director
of Security for the campus, Mr
Francis, gave the order.
Mr Francis, I understand your
need to keep order as best as
you can, but can you honestly
tell me that this makes much
sense especially for evening
classes? Most of the daily fac-
ulty and administrative staff
have gone for the day so the
issue of designated parking
spaces is not an issue. In addi-
tion, COB has poor lighting and
one would feel as if one is walk-
ing in an alley.
As Director of Security,.your
first priority is safety for all on
the campus. So, why don't I feel
safe anymore?

S MOSS
COB
(part-time)
student
Nassau,
September, 2007.


Discipline,






not police,






the solution






for schools


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


PUBLIC NOTICE
TENDER FOR SECURITY GUARD SERVICES

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Ltd
is seeking the services of a Professional Security
Services Company to .Provide Security Guard
Services to its Business Units, located on the island
of New Providence (Nassau).

Interested Firms may collect a Proposal Package/
Document from the Receptionist Desk at First
Caribbean International Bank, Located on East West
Highway, the Solomon's Complex, During the hours
of 9:00am 3:00pm Tuesday through Thursday,
October 2 5, 2007, and Monday October 8 through
Wednesday, October 10, 2007.


documentation must be placed in a sealed envelope
and submitted to FirstCaribbean International bank
by 4:00pm on Tuesday, November 6, 2007. Envelope
should be marked "Proposal for Security Guard
Services" and delivered to the attention of:

The Manager of Sourcing & Supply Management
FIRSTCARIBBEAN INTERNATIONAL BANK
SOLOMON'S EAST WEST HIGHWAY
NASSAU, N.P. BAHAMAS


PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ANDERSON ROMONO
LEWIS of Bahama Beach, Deadman's Reef, P.O. Box E-46180,
Grand Bahama Intend to change my name to ROLAND
ROMONO PINDER. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this notice.


All completed


Proposals and supporting










THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 5


LOCALN


By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.n
et
"I vex (because) so many
men in this country are
allowed to neglect their legit-
imate and illegitimate chil-
dren totally without effective
legal recourse. Improvements
are required in
the Family
Court System
and Social Ser-
vices to make
"deadbeat"
dads more
responsible.
Mothers and t
grandmothers
need help
from the sys-
tem.
If no action ki.
(is taken) our
social ills will
continue to
escalate. I .
challenge the
Christian
Council to
investigate and lobby for
changes."
J Davis
"I'm vexed because you
quit the Miami Herald and
went with USA Today. I'm
an avid crossword puzzler and
the Herald puzzle was a good
one. Since USA Today has
been attached to The Tribune
there has only been two puz-


zles printed in two separate
issues. And what's up with
NO comic strips?"
Unhappy in Coral Har-
bour
"I vex the bathrooms at the
domestic and international
sections of our airport need
upgrading and maintenance
of standards. It is a disgrace to
know we are a world class
destination
and we cannot
replace tiles,
paint, and
formica and
maintain bro-
ken equipment
in our airport
bathrooms,"
J Bain.
"I'm happy
that the prime
in minister,
f. deputy prime
minister, gov-
ernor general,
and all the cab-
\ v inet ministers
will have to
register with
the Ministry of Labour to
seek employment. Consider-
ing the advantages given to
some foreign applicants, we
might have had a foreign
prime minister, so I am happy
they are going to have to go
through the process that some
Bahamians got to go through
to get employed in the coun-
try,"
a concerned citizen


Immigrants held

FREEPORT A group of suspected illegal Haitian immigrants
were apprehended by police and immigration officials on Thursday
afternoon at an apartment complex in the South Bahamia area.
According to Chief Supt Basil Rahming, officials acting on infor-
mation went around 12.55pm to Dragon's Plaza on Churchill Dri-
ve, where a number of suspected illegal immigrants were alleged-
ly "hiding out" at the two story complex.
During a search of four apartments, officers arrested 10 Haitian
nationals six men and four women suspected of bring in breach
of the Immigration Act after they reportedly failed to produce
any documents authorising them to be in the Bahamas.
The immigrants were taken totCentral Police Station, where
they are being detained until arrangementsiare made to have them
flown to New Providence for processing at the Carmichael Road
Detention Centre.


Government is urged to



address judge shortage


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Freeport
lawyer Fred Smith is calling on
the FNM government to imme-
diately address the shortage of
judges and magistrates in the
judicial system.
He stressed that there is an
urgent and critical need for
"expanded and efficient" judi-
cial services in both New Prov-
idence and Freeport.


and I want to know why in the
last six months since the FNM
has been in power, nothing has
been done to better the judicial
system in the northern region,"
said Mr Smith.
"It is high time that my FNM
colleagues and this FNM gov-
ernment, which owes its very
existence as the government to
Grand Bahama, do something
for the people of Grand
Bahama," he said.
He said that Attorney Gen-
eral Claire Hepburn is not to


w.






A'~


Fred Smith


Mr Smith said the judicial sys-
tem in Freeport has completely
"collapsed, and is severely
impacting law firms, and attor-
neys who are finding it extreme-
ly difficult to represent their
clients". Justice Peter Maynard,
the only sitting justice in the
Supreme Court in Freeport, is
expected to return to New Prov-
idence on Friday.
Although there are two
Supreme Courts in Freeport,
only one judge has been dealing
with civil and criminal matters.
The magistrate's courts are also
short of magistrates, he said.
Mr Smith said that clients and
lawyers are becoming very frus-
trated because they cannot get
dates set for hearings and tri-
als.
"We have FNM cabinet
members from Grand Bahama.


blame for the state of the judi-
cial system as judicial appoint-
ments are not the responsibility
of the Attorney General's
Office.
"Constitutionally, she ought
to have nothing to do with the
administration of justice. It must
be a question of funding and
why it is that we cannot attract a
dozen good reputable appoint-
ments to the Supreme Court
bench we need that not only
for Freeport, but Nassau.
Mr Smith believes that in



Ioti]iiln tro
T !,pial Exemi/top


addition to better salaries and
perks for judges, the govern-
ment needs to amend the law
to increase the allowable num-
ber of judges.
"If we don't do this very
soon, there will be a complete
collapse not only in the north-
ern region, but also in Nassau.
"The few judges in Nassau
are overburdened with work
and everybody in the legal pro-
fession is constantly struggling
to get dates and appearances,"
he said.
Mr Smith said because the
Bahamas is promoting itself as
an investment location, and has
a growing population and econ-


omy, the need for expanded and
efficient judicial services is crit-
ical. He noted that Justice John
Lyons has been pointing this
out repeatedly in his judgments,
but nobody seems to be taking
any notice.
"The FNM government
needs to wake up and quickly
deal with this situation that is
one of the main platforms in
which they were elected.
"If the rule of law breaks
down the Bahamas will descend
into violence and chaos, and so
for protection against that and
respect for rule of law, we need
an effective and efficient judicial
system," he said.


ROTARY CLUB OF SOUTHEAST NASSAU
Website: www.rcsen.org/Email: rotatrysen@gmail.com







Sunday, 30th September, 2007
7:30 a.m. Shotgun
2-Man Scramble Format
Entry Fee $125.00 (includes lunch Per Person)


* 2 Beal kSramble
* TopPrtzStoteam wuih
lowest net score wins



* 7:30 am. Shotgon Start
* LougestDriv for Laltesa &Me
* Closest to the pin on al par 3
* Luncheon lnnediately foeowi
the tournament


Registraio from 0:30 a.m. at
tie soff Course.


Cable Beach Golf Club








SUMMIT INSURANCE
M For the Firre tloelnOne on Hole #9
S18ft Angler with 115 Yamaha
I from Harbour Side.
Insurance provided by: Summit Insurance


OR VARIOUS CuARmES


Sponsored by:


Ba nca del Gotta rdo
Town Centre Mall
Sports Locker
Nassau Motor Company
Caribbean Bottling Company
Deloitte& Touche
Original Swiss Sweet Shop
Premier Importers
Festival All Purpose Cleaner
Thompson's Trading Co. Ltd.
CGT Contractors Ltd
Insurance Management
Prime Bahamas
Jokers Wild
ATC Trustee (Bahamas) Ltd.
Bahamas Waste
JBR Building Supplies
RBC Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas SuperMarkets
D'Albenas Agency
Bacardi & Company Limited
FirstCaribbean International Bank


Post Boxes Etc.
FINCO
Guaranty Trust Bank Limited
True Value Wholesale Drug Co.
Executive Motors Ltd
J.S. Johnson & Company Limited
Guessie Mae Ltd
ASA H. Pritchard Ltd.
Balamas Cheque Services
Starbucks Coffee
Security & General
Bristol Wine & Spirit
Summit Insurance
Doctors Hospital
Windermere Day Spa
ETS/ Lambert Knowles
Galleria Cinemas Ltd.
Shayne's Department Store Ltd
Bahamas First General Insurance Company Ltd.


In Loving Memory of
















Wilfrod fawwyer

We the officers and members of "The Evangelistic
Group", remember our departed brother and fellow-
labourer, Wilfred Sawyer on this day of his depar-
ture, from this life to his eternal rest one year ago.

We give thanks to all those individuals and business
establishments who contributed willingly, so that
the needs of the community may be met.

The Evangelistic Group
Family and Friends


'BBritish e


F I N A N C I A L


Join Us On Denim Day! October 5th 2007.


YES
We will allow our Employees/ Students to show their support for the fight against Breast Cancer
and/or in honour of a loved one on National Denim Day by wearing jeans in exchange for a
donation per person.

NO E
Our Company/School will not participate

British American Financial encourages additional corporate sponsorship to help meet our
National Breast Cancer Awareness goals. For every dollar ($) amount donated by the
Employee(s)/Student(s), we hope that Companies/Schools will match the amounts.

Company/ School Name:

No. of Participants:

Contact Person(s):

Phone: Fax:

Email:

*** T-Shirts: Schools $5, All Others $10

SEE M L XL I 2XLE]

Indicate No. of T-Shirts


*** Pink Wrist Bands: $5 ea.

Indicate No. of Bands

Fax orders to: (242)328-8994
Please note all phone in orders must also be accompanled by a f&L
Denim Day Questions? Please call (242) 461-1000 or (242) 328-8996
or Email ccornish(ababfinancial.com or'siohnsongababfipnacial.com

Make cheques payable to: British American Financial, Re: National Breast Cancer Awareness.

Thank you for supporting the National Breast Cancer Awareness Initiative Fund,
The Bahamas Cancer Society and the Sister, Sister Cancer Support Group.

PEASE NOTE: ALL ORDERS MUST BE IN BY OCTOBER 3", 2007


o-
r 7Wh yo Vke7?9


mmm


~iacz. ~~ a












PAGE 6, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


Minister urges partnership



to combat sexual violence


THE quest to alleviate vio-
lence particularly sexual vio-
lence from society, requires a
concerted effort by a broad
range of actors, Minister of
State for Immigration, Senator
Elma Campbell said Thursday.
This, she said, could be
accomplished through the for-
mation of partnerships between
crisis centres in the Caribbean
and various governmental and
non-government agencies.
The Minister's remarks came
during her address to regional
delegates attending the 2nd
Regional Conference of Crisis
Centres in the Caribbean at the
Wyndham Nassau Resort.
"The partnership perspective
means that we cannot say leave
it to the government, albeit the
government has a responsibility
to protect its citizens, a respon-
sibility this government fully
accepts," Senator Campbell
pointed out.
"We cannot say leave it to
the police; we cannot say leave
it to the judiciary, the social
workers and healthcare profes-
sionals, the prisons or the cri-
sis centres. Partnerships would
ensure that the appropriate sup-
port structures are in place to
deal effectively with the seri-
ous, long-term, health effects of
sexual violence. These include
mental health problems and the
dangers to victims of sexually
transmitted infections such as
HIV/AIDS," Ms Campbell said.
She added that the mobilisa-


TEAM UP Elma Campbell, minister of state for immigration, addresses
the second Regional Conference of Crisis Centres in the Caribbean


tion of civil society is undoubt-
edly "an essential part" of the
partnerships required to address
sexual and other violence.


She added that the media,
churches, community and non-
government organizations and
business leaders must all do


NEW DELHI, India Day
one of the 53rd Common-
wealth Parliamentary Asso-
ciation Conference in New
Delhi, India began yesterday.
The CPA opened with the
27th Small Countries confer-
ence.
Heading the Bahamas' del-
egation to the conference is
Minister of State for Public
Utilities Phenton Neymour.
Senator Katherine Smith,
opposition MP Picewell
Forbes, and executive officer
of the House of Assembly
David Forbes make up the
delegation.
Mr Neymour was sched-
uled to address the confer-
ence yesterday on the role of
the opposition.
The opening address came
from Vice President of India
Shri Mohammad Hanid
Ansar.
Vice President Ansari said:
"The conference has emerged
as the world's largest contin-
uing forum dedicated to the
concerns of small states."
He further indicated that
the Commonwealth Parlia-
mentary Association is the
first organisation to focus on


the specific concerns of small
states.
The Commonwealth has a
keen interest in small states
as 60 per cent of its member-
ship in the Commonwealth is
represented by small, devel-
oping states.
Delegates to the Small
States Conference focused
their attention on "consensus
government" and "issues
relating to globalisation and
its impact on small
economies".
During the sessions on
globalisation it was evident
that many small states accept
the era of globalisation, but
there remain concerns on its
impact on small economies if
not managed properly.
During Day two of the con-
ference small states are
expected to address issues
involving "regulating immi-
gration and human traffick-
ing" and "protecting the envi-
ronment to ensure sustain-
able development".
The 1st Commonwealth
Women's Parliamentary Con-
ference will also convene.
Senator Smith will represent
the Bahamas.


their part, as those partnerships
will help to further strengthen
Crisis Centres throughout the
region.


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future


Worship Time: llam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on
Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


fiLL RE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
RO. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OFTHE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
Zml Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
am CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2007
SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST
AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Charles Moss
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zin Boleomard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting
3:30PM No Service
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
EmtsirleyStmreet
11:00AM Mr. Sidney Plnder
7:00PM Rev. Gerald Richardson
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, ClhrddlAvenue
8:$AM Connections Rev. Philip Stubbs
9"3SAM Rev. Philip Stubbs
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:-AM Rev. William Higgs
7:-PM No Service


RADIO PROGRAMMED
'RENEWAL' -mi at II" Ma-. ZNS I
Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel
'METHODIST MOMENTS' m eh weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel


NASSAU REGIONAL WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP monthly
meeting will be held on Monday, October 1, 2007 at Wesley
Methodist Church, Grant's Town at 7:30 p.m.
NASSAU REGIONAL WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP will be
holding a Variety Concert on Friday, October 26, 2007 a
Epworth Hall, Shirley Street at 7:30 p.m. Proceeds in aid of
Outreach Programs.

Donation: $10.00


The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Caria Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 a.m. Confirmation Sunday/Rev. Caria Culmer
7:00 p.m. Sis. Nathalie Thompson-(T.S.)
"CasingOut Ca S uon Hm, or e cresfor s" 1 Pter5:7


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH, 2007
11:30 a.m. & 7.00 p.m. Service

Pastor Gil Maycock
of Abundant Life Bible Church
Bible Class: 9:46 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service. 10 46 a.m.
Community Outreach: 11.30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Sernice 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of eacn month)


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
#Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL -
Preaching 11am & 7:30p .EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour: I M ils
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2 PasortH Mills
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622



"-or


Worship Time: lla.m. & 7p.m.

Prayer Time: 10:15a.m. to 10:45a.m.

Church School during Worship Service
Place: Twynam Heights
offPrince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
S PO.Box SS-5631
S. l'eleptonenumber. 324-2538 ,
TelefaLx number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP LEA4J E TO SERVE



+ THE BAHAMAS. TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODIST DANS LA CARAIBE
^-_-, ET LES AMERIQUES --'l -
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose A.enue
P.O. Box EE-16379. .assau., Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2 784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 224 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
EIGHTEETH LORD'S DAY AFTER PENTECOST,
SEPTEMBER 30,2007
COLLECT:
Almighty God,
you made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless till they find
their rest in you: pour your love into our hearts and draw us to
yourself, and bring us at last to your heavenly city where we shall
see you face to face; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you, in unity of the Holy Spirit, one
God, now and for ever.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
11: 00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd
7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bro. Colin Newton
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
6:30 p.m. Sis. Constance Gibson/ Bro. Calsey Johnson
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts Jr.
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
8:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G Roberts Jr. (Holy Communion)
MONASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP (Next Service Lord's
Day, October 28, 2007)
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Circuit Women
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly after
the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday.
This we proclaim unswervingly: "My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns
of Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
"Family Vibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the
Glory" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


SUNDAY SERVICES


r.tloiI'iigQ 'A'ousrip Ser.'Ice
.un,'jO ': horo fcir Oi ages
Aijull Ejucon:ri
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SpEAlJilnl SerM,
Evornirn,3 'A.OInhip Setr\lce .


.; 30 am
9 JS5om
9 45 o m
I1 00 a nri
2 00 mrn
S30 p n-,


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
eleihl.e Bi-le leaching
Pc.,'OI flOr3n el Buys Clutji 16 *i
Mi i il'i iGils i'Iue' i I *

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
'rouith Ministrly Iiee-rn n

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundoys at 8 30 a m 2NS I TEMPLE lIME

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THE TRIBUNE SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 7OCAL NEWS


Ministers tour


AUTEC


naval base on Andros


TWO government ministers
visited the AUTEC base on
Andros, where they were told
about the US Navy's ongoing
study of the effect of sonar on
marine mammals.
The Navy has been involved
in a number of court battles
with environmentalists, who
claim the use of some forms of
sonar by US military vessels
injures dolphins and whales,
sometimes causing them to
beach and die.
In the latest case, an Ameri-
can judge barred the Navy from
further sonar testing, however
this was overturned on appeal,
when the Navy argued that the
tests were vital to national secu-
rity.
US Embassy Charg6 d'Af-
faires Dr Brent Hardt accom-
panied Minister of Agriculture
and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright, Minister of Lands
and Local Government Sidney
Collie and director of Marine
Resources Michael Braynen on
a familiarisation tour of the
Atlantic Undersea Test and
Evaluation Centre (AUTEC).
"The visit included briefings
on AUTEC's environmental
stewardship, their extensive sea
life and coral reef monitoring
efforts, the positive economic
impact of the base in Andros,
and AUTEC's record of part-
nership with the local Andros
community," said a government
press release.
Officer-in-charge of the base
Commander Jeff Pafford; Mark
Ciminello, AUTEC Staff envi-
ronmental engineer; Tim Legel,
Computer Science Corporation
(CSC) project manager, and
Conrad Fernander, general
manager of the Bahamas Engi-
neering Services and Technolo-
gies welcomed the ministers to
the base.
Charge Hardt thanked the
ministers for their visit, which
he hoped would enhance the
government's understanding of
AUTEC's operations and its


From left: Michael Braynen, director of Marine Resources; Minister Sid-
ney Collie; Minister Larry Cartwright; Commander Pafford, and US
ChaFg6 d'Affaires Dr Brent Hardt.


role as a good corporate citizen
in Andros.
He noted that the presence
of marine mammal experts at
AUTEC for cutting edge
research made the visit particu-
larly timely.
Commander Pafford
expressed AUTEC's apprecia-
tion for the government's ongo-
ing support. He said that one
of AUTEC's primary objectives
is to protect the natural and
environmental resources of the
Bahamas.
The ministers received a
detailed report on the ongoing
Marine Mammal Behavioral
Response Study being conduct-
ed under the leadership of Dr
Ian Boyd of St Andrews Uni-
versity in Scotland.
Dr Boyd and his colleagues,
including Bahamian marine
mammal researcher Diane Clar-
idge, highlighted the data col-
lected during the initial weeks
of the study and provided an
overview of initial scientific


, findings.
The study is examining the
effects of sonar and sound on
marine mammals, such as the
beaked whale, in the "tongue
of the ocean" area.
Dr Boyd provided the dele-
gation with a high-tech display
on how the study is conducted,
allowing the ministers to
observe computer monitors as a
research ship tracked sonar
sounds produced by a beaked
whale, sending back data from
the undersea hydrophones to
the research scientists at
AUTEC.
Dr Boyd was reportedly able
to identify the type of mammal
and even the type of activity,
such as foraging or hunting
prey, through the data and
graphics displayed.
Scientists continue to study
whether sonar or simply any
novel sounds may have effects
on the behavior of marine
mammals, and what those
effects may be. In the absence


the West Indian Whistling Duck
one of the rarest birds in the
I. .. Americas and elimination of
Sthe intrusive Australian Pine,
2- f' designated by the Bahamian
Government as undesirable, he
said.
Commander Pafford pointed
out the ongoing American-
Bahamian partnerships and the
positive economic impact of the
facility's presence on Andros --
from leasing, local purchases
and some 200 jobs totalling
nearly $20 million.
Tim Legel of CSC, and Con-
rad Fernander, himself an
Androsian, elaborated on
AUTEC's summer internship
.and scholarship programme.







4


From left: Tim Legel, AUTEC staff environmental engineer; US Charge d'Affaires Dr Brent Hardt; Minister
Sidney Collie; Commander Pafford; Minister Larry Cartwright; Michael Braynen, director of Marine
.Resources, and Conrad Fernander, general manager, Bahamas Engineering Services and Techriologies.


of AUTEC's unique resources,
their job would be much more
difficult, he pointed out.
Mark Ciminello provided the
Ministers with a briefing on the
environmental protection and
management policies in place
at the facility, which he said
meet both Bahamian and US
law and international standards.
Mr Ciminello described an
environmental review process
encompassing all aspects of the
facility's operations, including


groundwater protection and
waste removal.
He spoke of AUTEC's com-
mitment to the proper manage-
ment of native flora and fauna,
monitoring of sea life and coral
reefs, as well as marine mam-
mal monitoring.
He also noted that AUTEC
conducts bi-annual coral reef
assessments that are shared with
the Bahamian authorities.
On-base efforts include pro-
tection of the nesting habitat of


They described their goal of
putting as many Bahamians as
possible into supervisory and
management positions at the
facility.
Both highlighted efforts to
build awareness about career
opportunities at AUTEC for
young people to encourage
them to return to Andros.
Ministers Collie and
Cartwright welcomed the schol-
arship programme and the local
connections and partnerships.


- ..---. -~v'LI



S... Used Car

Used Car


~;~fM;~I* I'


BRING YOUR OLD VEHICLE TO TRADE SO YOU CAN UPGRADE!!!


New direct flights from West-
ern Canada have opened the
Bahamas up to a new demo-
graphic of Canadians, who are
likely to bring more money to
the country than their country-
men who live in Toronto, a
Tourism official based in Cana-
da said yesterday.
Paul Strachan, director of the
Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
in Canada., said scheduled
flights by West Jet from Cal-
gary to Nassau will begin
November 5. He said the move
has great potential to increase
visitor expenditure in the
Bahamas due to the long vaca-
tions that are typical of Western
Canada residents.
"When you compare the mar-
ket in Western Canada to the
market in Toronto, the major
difference is the fact that the
Canadians coming from West-
ern Canada stay in our country
much longer," Mr Strachan
said. "From Toronto, the aver-
age length of stay is about four
nights. When you look at the
Canadian visitor from Western
Canada, it's somewhere in the
neighborhood of eight to 12
nights. So, obviously, that fil-
ters more money into the econ-


omy, and it also allows us to tap
into a brand new market."
Mr Strachan the air service
from Calgary also allows for
same-day connections from
larger cities such as Vancouver
and Edmonton.
Meanwhile, West Jet is also
starting a service out of Hali-
fax, Canada in February, which
is also expected to increase vis-
itor arrivals.
Tourism performance from
Canada has already shown con-
siderable growth. Preliminary
figures reveal that the year-to-
date number of arrivals from
Canada has increased by
around 14 per cent this year
.over last year.
Mr Strachan said he believes
the increase in visitors can be
linked to special promotional
efforts undertaken recently by
the Ministry of Tourism.
The efforts include an aware-
ness campaign that placed
Bahamas advertising on public
transportation street cars in
Toronto. He pointed out that
the Canadian economy is now
the strongest it has been in
more than three decades.
"What that means is that
Canadians now have more buy-


ing power and they are travel-
ling more," Mr Strachan said.
"So, I think that the combina-
tion of the fact that we have
been marketing and promoting
the destination and the fact that
the economy is growing and
strong contributed to that sig-
nificant increase in visitor
arrivals from Canada."
The Bahamas' tourism team
in Canada is also focusing on
promoting specific Bahamas
events in Canada.
A study conducted this year
demonstrated that Canadians
are more interested than Amer-
icans in travel for cultural expe-
riences.
Based on the study, special
advertising was undertaken in
connection the Junkanoo Sum-
mer Festival this summer. The
data collected showed that the
advertising did increase inter-
est in the Bahamas over that
period, Mr Strachan said.
TROPIC L

EXEMNATOR
FOR PETPOLM


Mothers...Daughters...Sisters...


Warriors ...Victors... Survivors...


The Tribune observes Breast Cancer Awareness Mouth starting October 1-31, 2007
with health tips, mammogram vouchers and survivors profiles.


The Tribune

N w0 14'1


Denise

Baker

r Smith
S Breast Cancer
survivor and
2007 Denim Day
Spokeperson
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Direct flights open Bahamas

to wider Canadian market


yl


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 8, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007 THELTRIBUNE


In days gone by looks at....


Co aystore a
H~~kS^~I^C.~f^


George Capron tells the tale of his dramatic escape from the blaz-
ing store as he lie on his hospital bed.


About 20 minutes after the fire began on June 9, 1976, firemen
are pictured climbing n to the roof to knock a hole in to stop the fire
from spreading to the front section of the building.


The aftermath of the fire at the Maura Lumber Company.


TOP: Phillip Burrows's picture shows flamed leaping from the back section of the building as
firemen struggles in vain to stop the fire from spreading.
BELOW: Firemen scramble to extinguish the blaze.


1. ASSISTANT WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR
Must be competent and experienced in
warehousing and deliveries.


2. APPLIANCE REPAIR TECHNICIANS
Must be competent, experienced and able
to work without direct supervision.


Please send resume along with first 4 pages of passport,
a police character certificate, and copies of
certification(s) achieved from reputable institutions) to:


Human Resources Manager
RO. Box N7220
Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline for receipt of applications is October 8th, 2007.


'A
'4


Career

Opportunities


A leading home appliances and electronics retail
distributor invites suitably qualified applicants to
apply for the following posts:


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE






SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 9


rilE TRIBUNE


. P ALP]n1m~ ]i I~ women's branch m ets Governor-General~


C'


tA~f ~'


t


Ic


Governor-General of the Bahamas Arthur Hlanna p,",s i m' I k '
Liberal Party, during a courtesy call at Governnient Hfoi',., *'r .'i in


,.' h


Executive Motors Ltd.
PARTS DEPARTMENT
At the Auto Mall, Shirley Street
Will be CLOSED for
STOCKTAKING
SEPTEMBER 27 to
SEPTEMBER 29.
(Thursday, Friday, Saturday)


We will re-open for busiJns
%7 on Monday, October 1
We apologise to our valued customers and
regret any inconvenience this may cause. All other
departments will be open for business as usual.


EXECUlYTI'VE n' w ' ..r- .3 ;.m 5 ti
M()IOTORS LI TD 397-1700
F mnadi dmoiorfi'baieinrei bs
Ai f i, t', i [ N li. r%.m L,.R Piarft and -rv eai urr th1nd"lff
I .- 122-. Abaco or Malo. M acI Kay 8W. 367291i6


3
S 4 4 4


STOREWIDE


Cash in on BIG savings on
your favourite shoes, bags,
accessories and scrubs.


20%
All Regularly priced
women, children


Off
shoes for men,
and scrubs.


250 O* ff
Selected Accessories

a 10% Off
darks and Timberland Regularly
Priced Shoes
Plus
25-50% Off selected Items!
Sale starts Wednesday, 26 September and ends Monday 1
October. All sales are final. Return or exchange on sale items
is not allowed. No lay-aways are accepted during the sale.


p


MEDICAL FUND I
Jor










Deborah Theresa Wive
better knewi u.
Debra...our


! '-4^


Saturday, September 29
at Club Waterki6


10pm until
$20 Entrance Don
-----------


Featuring:


iigh Tide & Sub Culture Band

Your support/ ll
be appreciated


>;~ ~7'.


p I


--I


THE TRIBUNE


New judge
:..i ?.
.... sworn in
0

K Neville Adderley (left) is sworn in as Justice of the Supreme
Court by the Governor General Arthur Hanna at Government
House on Friday, September 28.
(Photo: Tim Aylen IBIS)


. Rosetta Street 325-4944 Care Wear 325-7288 bay street 322-31 S56
rm M- .I- .I l& .I -: I MI I- z


C1









PAGE 10, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALN


Mother finds son's body



upon return from cruise


FROM page one

there is no police presence.
During this time, individuals
are seen pouring into the area
seeking to sell their wares to
visitors.
"For the most part when
there's no police out there it's
total mayhem, it's like the wild
wild west, they're just doing
what they want they're drink-
ing, they're cursing, they're
loud, they're scaring some of
the tourists for sure some
come into the store like, 'What's
going on out there?!'"
Among products being
pushed by the street sellers are
drugs, bracelets and necklaces,
he claimed.


"There are people who try to
put bracelets on the people's
arms and tell them it's a free
gift from the Bahamas and then
afterwards they come back and
say 'Oh, can you make a little
donation for the school kids' or
'school's just starting, can you
make a little donation for
that'," he said.
If these tactics fail, "they say
you already have it so you've
got to pay for it," he said.
A new police and tourism
booth was installed this week
in the walk area in an effort to
further increase visitor safety
downtown. The booth was
donated by Omar Chemaly of
stores Pirana Joe and Venetian
Jewellers.


By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A 45-year-old
man who suffered from seizures
was discovered dead inside a
house at East Coral Estates on
Thursday evening.
Valerie Taylor, 66, of 64 East
Coral Estates, reported to


police that she discovered her
son, Edmund Taylor, lying on
the floor in a bedroom around
6.45pm after she returned from
a Caribbean cruise.
Chief Supt Basil Rahming
said Ms Taylor had left her son
to take care of the house while
she was away.
When she arrived home on
Thursday evening she, along


with other family members,
noticed that her son's bedroom
door was locked, which was
unusual. After calling him sev-
eral times and getting no
response, Ms Taylor became
concerned and summoned a
locksmith and police.
On gaining entry into the
bedroom, Ms Taylor and the
officers found her son lying


dead on the floor.
Officers examined the body.
There were no visible signs of
injury and the room was not dis-
turbed. Ms Taylor told officers
that her son had previously suf-
fered from epileptic seizures.
Police do not suspect foul
play. An autopsy will be per-
formed to determine the cause
of death.


y""'-8


FRIENDLY MOTORS

Parts Department
Thompson Blvd.









CLOSED





WE WILL BE



OPEN
for Business on Monday
October 1st, 2007 at 8an.




We thank you for your patronage
and apologize to our customers for
any inconvenience caused.


Concern continues to mount over the construction of this warehouse in Twynam. (Pic: Tim Clarke/fribune Staff)


FROM page one

into the next door neighbour's
yard, further escalating tensions
in the neighbourhood.
Concern has been raised
about the warehouse's poten-
tial to negatively impact the
landscape of the neighbourhood
with residents fearing the build-
ing would increase traffic con-
gestion, create noise pollution,
jeopardise the future of historic
poinciana trees near the pro-
posed site, and possibly cause
an increase of crime in the
neighbourhood.
Many residents also
expressed frustration over the
fact that they were not made
aware of the proposed building
plans for the site until after con-
struction began.


"We didn't get any kind of
notice (about the warehouse).
We didn't even know what it
was until (a neighbour) brought
it to our attention," Paulette
Daxon, who has lived in the
neighbourhood for 27 years,
told The Tribune.
As reported previously, some
45 Twynam residents signed a
petition against the proposed
building last year. Ms Bethel is
planning to circulate another
petition in the coming weeks as
part of the ongoing protest
against the warehouse.
"It's not just the construction
of the warehouse that bothers
(residents) its other types of
businesses that were established
(in the neighbourhood) with-
out proper zoning," Nelson
George, a long-time resident of
Twynam Avenue revealed.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ADELE-ROSE BRUTUS
OF MILTON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND day of
September, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.




Software Applications
Specialist/Personal Assistant.
Salary commensurate with experience.
Transportation required.
Please email resume to:
ftdcit@gmail.com


According to Mr George and
several other residents, an
injunction was allegedly filed
by the Department of Town
Planning to halt further con-
struction on the site until "fur-
ther notice". The next meeting
is reportedly scheduled on
October 9.
George Adderley, contractor
for the project, said he never
received any instructions from
the Department of Town Plan-
ning to cease work on the site,
as claimed by residents.
"Only Town Planning can
stop me from working," he said.
"If they give me a letter to stop,


I will stop."
The Tribune made several
attempts to contact the Depart-
ment of Town Planning, but up
to press time no-one could be
reached for comment.
Dennis owner of the prop-
erty, who operates another busi-
ness nearby, spoke to The Tri-
bune earlier in the week, but :
declined to comment for this
article. He would only say his
building plans were government .
"stamped and approved."
Ms Bethel is planning anoth-
er neighbourhood meeting in
the coming weeks to address
mounting concerns on the issue. ;


Pricing Information As Of C F A L'"
Frida. 28Setember 2007 CBM FOR MOlk DATA & INFORMATION
%WKGCH 00.16 / YTD 233.39 / VTD % 13.92
52wk-HI 52wk-Low SecunI y Preious Close Today's Close Change Dadi \c., EPS I Di. P E Y.el
1 78 0.54 Abaco Markets 1 60 1 60 0 C,0 ,3 7 0 00,', 17 0 00C'
11.74 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.60 11.60 0.00 1.527 ,0.400 7.6 3.45%
9.55 7.51 Bank of Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 0.733 0.260 13.0 2.72%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.048 0.020 17.7 2.35%
3.74 1.52 Bahamas Waste 3.73 3.73 0.00 0.275 0.060 13.6 1.61%
2.14 1.20 Fidelity Bank 2.14 2.14 0.00 0.051 0.040 42.0 1.87%
11.00 9.55 Cable Bahamas 11.00 11.00 0.00 2,000 0.996 0.240 11.0 2.18%
3.15 1.80 Colina Holdings 3.15 3.15 0.00 8,362 0.208' 0.080 15.1 2.54%
16.20 11.60 Commonwealth Bank 16.20 16.20 0.00 1.190 0.680 13.6 4.20%
7.22 4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 6.11 6.00 -0.11 0.112 0.050 54.6 0.82%
2.76 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.35 2.35 0.00 0.284 0.000 8.3 0.00%
B.40 5.54 Famguard 6.30 6.30 0.00 0.804 0.240 7.8 3.81%
12.80 11.51 Finco 12.80 12.80 0.00 0.768 0.570 16.7 4.45%
14.75 13.82 FirstCaribbean 14.75 14.75 0.00 0.934 0.470 15.8 3.19%
6.10 5.18 Focol (S) 6.10 6.10 04)0 2,000 0.364 0.133 16.7 2.17%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.70 0.70 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.49 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
10.05 8.52 J.S. Johnson 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.991 0.580 10.1 5.77%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10 00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
:2wk14I 12Wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yiela
14.60 14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.125 1.485 13.9 10.17%
8.00 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
'0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0 3 0 40 0 20 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
0.5n020RNeHd Oohna' Securities
41.00 41.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 4.450 2.750 9.0 6.70/.o
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.125 1.485 12.6 10.17%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 04, 0 55 0 45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52wk-Hi 52Wk-Low Fund Name NA YTD- [Lacs tI t.1,r.lr.s Di. "1 ieil
1 3576 1.3084 Collna Money Market Fund 1 35755 "
3.3402 2.9449 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.3402-"
2.8869 2.4606 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.886936**
1.2698 1.1923 Colina Bond Fund 1.269803*"*
11.6581 11.1622 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11 6581 .""
62wk-Hi Highest doing price in lart 52 w aks. Bid $ Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest dosing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fdelity 21 September 2007
Previous Close Previous day' weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 30 June 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week "* 31 August 2007
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mnths 31 July 2007
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
K7Raa mI*in O E7a 0 o i ITy 2424W77&4i / pft OR DAATA & IINFVO IO CAN GL. 4.


BKG,410.03
ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS
Sealed tenders for B$63,000,000.00 of 91-Day
Treasury Bills will be received by the banking
manager, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick
Street, Nassau up to 3:00 p. m onTuesday, October 2,2007.
Successful tenderers, who will be advised should take
up their bills against payment on Thursday, October
4, 2007. These bills will be in minimum multiples of
B$100.00. Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable
from the Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial
Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked "Tender" The Central Bank of
the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.

....w'TT.^r*dm***.
0


The Home Store


To all of our loyal customers
We have closed our Sandyport
location and have relocated to
Caves Village.
We will open 1st October, 2007
Ourone day

Blowout Opening Sale!

6th October, 2007

50-75% off selected items
our numbers have
remained the same.
327-1132
Come in and see.


1


THE TRIBUNE
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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2007, PAGE 11


Little Mermaid



to make a major



Bahamas splash


Next month the Bahamas
OnStage YouTHeatre will pre-
sent The Little Mermaid.
The Broadway for Kids pro-
duction will be held at the
National Centre for the Per-
forming Arts on Shirley Street.
"This new and vibrant initia-
tive has dazzled Bahamian audi-
ences, young and young at heart
already this year with perfor-
mances of Pinocchio, Black
Journey and Beauty and the
Beast," said organizers in a
statement.,
The Ministry of Education
Youth Sports and Culture has
endorsed the Youth Theater.
"The theory that exposure to
"the theatre" at a young age
operis children's' minds to a
new and exciting world of the
arts has been embraced by all,"
the statement continued. "It is
known that while the honing of
literacy skills through reading
plays is critical, studies show
that the majority of our learning
and development is done
through additional senses,
specifically sight and sound.
Imagine those who have no
interest in reading suddenly
having a desire to revisit the
spectacular performance wit-
nessed on a stage by picking up


a book."
Former Educator and present
First Lady of the United States
Laura Bush, recalled the reac-
tion of a class she accompanied
to a theatre, remarking that
what followed the show was:
"The most exciting, insightful
and wise conversation I've ever
had a class engage in.
"No class I've ever taught has
understood this play so well or
has been this emotionally
engaged with the characters."
Mrs Bush further stated in
December of 2002: "The arts
and humanities are critical
building blocks for a child's
development ... Theater brings
history to life. Arts and human-
ities help to develop vocabulary
and critical thinking and an
appreciation for math and sci-
ence."
It is the vision of the
Bahamas OnStage YouTHeatre
to continue to import and to
locally produce children's clas-
sics for the enjoyment of
Bahamian pre-schoolers and
primary school children.
The organisation said it will
continue to consider plays like
Cinderella, Aladdin, Pinocchio,
Pippi Longstocking and The
Wizard of Oz.


"Additionally, it is our long-
term objective to expose those
high school students preparing
for national examinations with
renditions of Woman Take
Two, Romeo & Juliet, King
Lear, A Midsummer's Night
Dream, The Merchant of
Venice, To Kill A Mockingbird
and more.
The organisation said it also
aims to source plays like The
Gaulin Wife, Anansy The Spi-
der, Bookie and Rabbi and The
Chickcharnie.
Study guides are provided for
all schools that attend.
"Schools in New Providence
have already booked and we
are in talks with schools in
Grand Bahama who hopefully
will be able to attend," said
Kathy Davis Ingraham. "Until
we are able to venture out to
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands, we will continue to look
for ways through Corporate
Bahamas' support to bring
those students here."
She said more information
can be found at: www.bahama-
sonstageyoutheatre.com.
Performances for the general
public will be held October 12
to, 14 and school performances
will be held October 15 and 16.


THE TRIBUNE


-GALA CONCERT
Saturday September 29 2007
Dinner 7:00 P.M. (Gala Ticket Holders) :: Concert Begins 8:00 P '1
Rainforest Theatre :: Wyndham Nassau Resort
Cable Beach Nassau Bahamas
FEATURING


U [ir Ns spon7so~ r theatre visi


Bahamian companies have come together to
give New Providence students a night at the the-
atre.
BTC, American Airlines, Post Boxes Etc,
Colgate, Thompson Trading's Soft & Beautiful
and Colgate, Bahamian Springs Purified Water,
Holiday Auto, Village Hardware, and AID
have committed sponsoring children to see The
Little Mermaid next month.
"We are really happy", said, Kathy Ingra-
ham, CEO of Bahamas OnStage YouTHeatre.
"Corporate Bahamas has been amasing. The


performance is October 15 and 16 for the
schools and AID is lending a helping hand in
sponsoring 25 students from Claridge Road
Primary along with Fidelity sponsoring a group
of students from Palmdale Primary."
"Post Boxes Etc stepped up to the plate with
a sponsorhip of the entire Gambier Primary
School who will attend the theatre on Tues-
day, October 16."
She said the New Village Hardware Store
has also pledged its support to sponsor 30 chil-
dren to the theatre for this great performance.


HELP IS RIGHT AT HAND AT YOUR

NEAREST PHARMACY!



Pharmaton Capsules


A complete multi-
vitamin and mineral
combination of
ginseng G115 and
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FABULOUS MUSIC
GOURMET DINING

TICKETS ON SALE AT

CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE and
in THE OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION

Block A Oakes Field Campus
Gala Concert and Dinner $17


Gata Concert and Dinner $175
Includes Gala Concert and Dinner

General Admission $50


For reservations.
sponsorship opportunities and
further information, please call
Office of Communication
at telephones
302-4304/4353/4354/4366


ROYAL SPOSR











AmrcnAi insAmeica a
Exicua AttiveeP o fuc Jazz Unde'~Ir tthe Starsi
ShWyndham Nassau Resortaz
The fficat Rsortof Jzz U der he tars


UNDER THE STARS

FESTIVAL 2007


Highly recommended for:
* LETHARGY, FATIGUE AND EXHAUSTION
* GROWING TEENAGERS
* SPORTS PEOPLE
* ENHANCING VITALITY


ljL~










PAG 12 SI~~_l~ UFIDAYIl--.~~ SH I--II~-U~~--I-~ I' 'h Ii *TH TRBUN


Franklyn G Ferguson


NASS


A U


EVENTS


CAPT


U R E D


ON CAMERA


Shane enjoys a special day


Friends Shane Gibson, the former minister of immigration,
labour and training, held a surprise birthday party for him on Sat-
urday, September 8, at Club Blue Note, one day after his birthday.
In attendance were 250 of his family
and friends. The evening featured a live performance by the
Soulful Grover's Band.


From L to R: Dale Davis, Dorothy Moss, Shane Family memihber% gather for the cutting of the cake. Ann Hutchinson. Jarmin Gibson
Gibson, Katie Symonette, Elizabeth Barr, Vincent Moss. (daughter). Jacqueline Gibhon. Shane Gibson. Jaimie Gibson tdaughler). Shane Jr (son).


Linamae Bowe, Ethric Bowe, Melanie Griffin (former Minister of Social Services
From L to R: Eric Gibson Jr, Sharon Gibson Williamson; Shane and Community Development), Shane Gibson (former Minister of Inmiira.iin
Gibson; Yvonne Gibson Sands; Ann Gibson Hutchinson. Labor and Training), Monique Mcquay, Kevin Ferguson.


Pictured in the front row (1-r): David Elmo, managing officer, US
F -! aw: Vincent Peet, former minister of Financial Services and
Investments;Virginia Ramadan, counsular chief; leader of the
epli,iuioii and former prime minister Perry Christie; Brent Hardt,
Charge; Fred Mitchell, former minister of Foreign Affairs.
Back row: Paul Jukic, polititical officer, responsible for domes-
tic politics and human rights, US Embassy; Margot Pogorzelski,
economics officer, US Embassy; Dave Foran; narcotics officer.
US Embassy; Alfred Sears, former Attorney General and Minis-
ter of Education; Melanie Griffin, former minister of Social Ser-
vices; Michael Halkitis, former parliamentary secretary in the
fiini.qr3 of Tourism, Dr Bernard Nottage, former minister of
Health. Also present, Cynthia Pratt, former PLP deputy prime min-
ister, Hope Strachan, and Phillip Davis. Not present were Shane
I *ib>. and Frank Smith.


4.~ .,~ i,,, .*, p
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(j7vra tnkd (, vJrruuon
^Ifrnfeyn I <3 rgusanr


O. Box N4o" o, 1
Nhffiu, % iin I


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Irl - ~e_-_s, III 11


- -- -------------I1I~k- L-- -- -r-- --- rrle -II I


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, SEP i; .-,, ..:.,,i ,/


I


....-- _


THE TRIBUNE


(242) 3577-8472