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The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02995
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 9/24/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02995
System ID: UF00084249:02995

Full Text








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Volume: 103 No.253


The


Tribune


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BAHAMAS EDITION


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


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US diplomat says

Knowles had

exhausted appeals


IN THE opinion of the Unit-
ed States Samuel "90" Knowles'
extradition to that country was
legal, US Charge d'Affaires Dr
Brent Hardt said yesterday on
Island FM's Talk Show, "Par-
liament Street."
"Mr Knowles was extradited
legally to the United States we
had a signed document. Mr
Knowles appealed his case to
the highest court in the land,
the Privy Council, and he lost.
To say that he was not extra-
dited in an legal manner (is not
true)," Dr Hardt said.
Last week former Foreign
Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell
and former Attorney General
Allyson Maynard Gibson
objected to comments made in
a ruling by President of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan
Sawyer that the two former
ministers erred in signing off on
Knowles' extradition.
While Dame Joan did not
suggest that the extradition was
illegal she said that there was
serious concern over the fact
that Knowles still had a matter
pending before the courts and
in her view he was taken out of
the jurisdiction before that mat-
ter was complete.
Mr Mitchell said that all actions
by him in this matter were lawful
"unless or until otherwise pro-
nounced in appropriate legal pro-
ceedings, properly adjudicated
after hearing both sides.
"As a lawyer of 21 years at
the Bar, I have always upheld
the rule of law and the better-
ment of the judiciary and will
continue to do so," he said.
Former Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson said


in her defence:
"The public should know that
the judgment of the Hon. Justice
John Lyons stands. It is there-
fore the law of the land," she said.
"As a member in good stand-
ing of The Bahamas Bar for
almost 27 years, as a former
Attorney General, as a former
Minister of the Government and
as a Senator of The Bahamas, I
have scrupulously adhered to the
laws and the conventions of our
Constitution and I reject whole-
heartedly and unreservedly any
suggestion to the contrary."
However, Dr Hardt pointed
out that the Supreme Court had
determined already that the
appeal had no merit.
"He had exhausted all of his
appeals and the Privy Council
had ruled and he had fought for
six years or more. At some
point a court has to be able to
arrive at a decision," he said.
Extradition, Dr Hardt said,
is a critical tool for law enforce-
ment agencies all over the world
to.ensure that criminals are not
allowed to use borders to
escape justice.
"We have found in places
where justice systems are at risk
of being extorted or under pres-
sure extraditions have been a
very useful tool to ensure that
no one can threaten the family
member of a juror or buy off a
member of the jury.
"There have been issues
around the world, Colombia for
a long time would not extradite
individuals to the US because
of issues of sovereignty and so
forth, but they have come to see
that justice systems are open to
influence," he said.


Straw vendors presented with options


TOURISTS SHOP in to the newly cleaned straw market yesterday. Straw vendors have been plying their
trade out of the tent on Bay Street since a fire destroyed the original in 2001


, By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
STRAW VENDORS have
been given several proposals
to consider for the future of
the downtown market, includ-
ing a possible plan to use the;
current site for the new mar-
ket and have the previous site
transformed.into an attractive
green space.
However, Minister of Public
Works Earl Deveaux empha-
sised yesterday that govern-
ment has not yet made any for-
mal decision on the final plans


for the new straw market.
Mr Deveaux told The Tri-
bune yesterday that in any
event, the vendors will be
required to relocate while a new
market is being constructed.
"They can either relocate to
another tent or they can utilise
the Prince George Wharf facil-
ity, both of which would be
considered temporary by us
because of our desire and
intent to construct a new mar-
ket," he said.
The existing tent, the minis-
ter said, needs extensive repairs
and the estimated cost of a new
tent would be approximately


Albany developers still to

have permits approved


$1 million.
However, should the vendors
agree to be moved to the alter-
native temporary location of
Prince George Wharf while a
new market is being erected,
Mr Deveaux said that this solu-
tion would be considerably
cheaper.
While government has no
precise estimate on how much
a relocation to Prince George's
Wharf will cost, Mr Deveaux
said that based on previously
completed renovations it is
likely to be much cheaper.
SEE page 12


Thomas wins
gold again
in Stuttgart

* By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net
WORLD champion Donald
Thomas won another presti-
gious title yesterday as he com-
peted in the fifth IAAF World
Athletics Final in Stuttgart,
Germany.
Yesterday in the final of the
men's high jump, Thomas
cleared 2.32 metres to win the
title as he out-duelled Sweden's
former world champion Stefan
Hplm (2.30) and Linus Thorn-
blad (2.27).
Thomas, who shocked the
world competing in pole vault
spikes rather than high jump
spikes, earned a pay cheque of
$30,000 for his efforts.

Youth may
lose arm after
shark attack
FREEPORT A Grand
Cay teenager is in serious con-
dition in the Intensive Care
Unit at the Rand Memorial
Hospital after being bitten by
a shark.
At about noon Sunday 18-
year-old Bernard Hield of
Grand Cay was diving in waters
just off that northernmost
Bahama island when he was
suddenly attacked and bitten
on his left arm by a shark.
SEE page 12


PLP 'never planned officers
to be in schools long term'


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* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
A MONTH after executives
of the Albany development
announced that their $1.3 bil-
lion project in the southwest
of New Providence will likely
have to be scrapped if govern-
ment does not honour the
Heads of Agreement signed
under the PLP administration
within two months, the devel-
opers have yet to receive
approval for three vital con-
struction permits.
Minister of Public Works
Earl Deveaux yesterday told
The Tribune that the Albany


developers are still awaiting
sub-division approval for the
first phase of construction, road
design approval and approval
for marina excavations.
However, the minister reit-
erated that once due diligence
is done in reviewing the appli-
cations, the FNM government
will be more than happy to
honour the Heads of Agree-
ment with the developers.
Last month managing part-
ner in the project Christopher
Anand said that Albany made
various commitments with the
expectation of being able to
open in two years.
SEE page 12


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net
IN the midst of calls for police
to be returned to public schools,
former prime minister Perry
Christie yesterday explained
that having uniformed officers
on school campuses was never
intended by the PLP to be a
long-term solution.
"Our plan was in the process
of establishing a uniformed
school policing unit that was
specially trained to handle the
unique school environment. The
system included a weekly review
of violence and other illegal acts
on the part of students in the


school environment," Mr
Christie said yesterday in his
weekly web chat on the PLP's
site.
The former prime minister
said that it was never a long
term plan to have the police sta-
tioned at government schools,
"but instead one that would sta-
bilise the situation."
"Our teachers, students and
their parents were frightened and
we had to react to address what
was happening in the schools.
We knew that we could add an
element of police enforcement
to bring some order back to our
schools," he said.
SEE page 12


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Maritime industry could rival



financial sector, says Foulkes


THE Commonwealth of The
Bahamas faces environmental
challenges in the maritime
industry when one considers its
archipelagic configuration over
100.000 square miles of water,
Labour and Maritime Affairs
Minister Dion Foulkes said yes-
terday.
Mr Foulkes made the state-


ment at the World Maritime
Day church service yesterday.
"The maritime industry is
extremely important to us,
therefore the Government of
The Bahamas, realising the vul-
nerability of our archipelago to
the worst effects of any envi-
ronmental pollutant, has acced-
ed to all the major IMO con-


SUPREME COURT Senior Justice Anita Allen was sworn in as
Acting Chief Justice by Governor General Arthur Hanna at
Government House on Friday




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Editorial/Letters ........................................P4
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ventions and protocols, espe-
cially as they relate to ship safe-
ty, certification and manning,
pollution and environmental
protection," the minister said.
The Bahamas takes an active
role in the International Mar-
itime Organization through the
Bahamas High Commission and
the Bahamas Maritime Author-
ity.
It has been a member of the
IMO Council for the past seven
years and will be seeking re-
election to the Council in
November 2007.
The Bahamas International
Ship Register is the third largest
in the world, boasting of more
than 45 million gross tons; and is
the premier register for cruise
and passenger ship fleet.
"We here in The Bahamas
still rely heavily on shipping for
both trade and communication.
Over the years, the industry has
expanded and diversified;
whereby in addition to the mail
boat traffic and oil transship-
ment terminals, we now have
the container port, shipbuilding
and repair facilities," Mr
Foulkes said.
The minister said that he was
convinced that the maritime


industry in the Bahamas can sig-
nificantly expand to rival the
financial services sector, once
we tap fully into its potential.
"I feel that this can be done
most effectively by training and
sensitising today's youth to the
career opportunities available
in maritime industry; and I do
believe that we are well on our
way in this regard with the Mar-
itime Cadet Corps Programme,
which caters to 10th through
12th graders, sponsored by The
Bahamas Maritime Authority
and the Magnet programme in


Maritime Studies sponsored by
the Ministry of Education at the
CR Walker Secondary High
School," he said.
"The Bahamas has a healthy
climate for maritime affairs, and
it is our responsibility to see
that it remains," said Mr
Foulkes. "The planning com-
mittee under the able chair-
manship of Barry Malc6lm,
executive chairman of the
Broadcasting Corporation of
The Bahamas, deserves to be
commended for having done an
excellent job. They have
planned activities for this week
specifically geared to achieve
two broad objectives.
"Firstly, it will serve as a plat-
form from which we can sensi-
tize Bahamians about the cur-
rent environmental issues which
occupy our local agenda as well
as that of the International Mar-
itime Organization. Secondly,
it will allow us the opportunity
to expose Bahamians, particu-
larly young Bahamians to the
many lucrative and rewarding
career opportunities available
in the maritime industry," the
minister said.
SEE page nine for more on
World Maritime Day


IQn brief

Four persons
accused of
assaulting
police officers

FOUR individuals, includ-
ing two minors, were
arraigned in Magistrate's
Court Friday charged with
assaulting two police officers.
According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that Shawn
Bain, 39, of Scott Street and
Delano Frazier, 20, of Hos-
pital Lane, as well as two
juveniles, were arraigned
before Magistrate Carlolita
Bethel on two charges of
assault with a deadly
weapon.
It was alleged that on Sun-
day, September 16, the two
men and two youth assaulted
a police officer with a hand-
gun.
The second charge alleges
that on the same day, the
four individuals, being con-
cerned together and with oth-
ers, assaulted a second police
officer with a handgun.



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Acting Chief Justice sworn in



..-
.,


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007








THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 3


0 In brief


Cargo plane
crash lands
on Florida
highway

THE pilot of a cargo plane
headed for the Bahamas
walked away with his life after
crashing onto a Florida high-
way.
Bob Robertson, a 34-year-
old pilot for the Monarch Air
Group, got into difficulties
when his twin-engine plane
began to lose power shortly
after taking off from Fort
Lauderdale Executive Airport,
headed for Nassau, on Satur-
day, the Sun-Sentinel report-
ed.
Just moments after the 1964
Super Twin Beech took off Mr
Robertson began losing power
and altitude, Florida p 'ice
said.
According to the Sun-Sen-
tinel, the plane clipped the
northeast corner of a Florida
Department of Transportation
storage building before crash-
ing down on to 1-95 Interstate.
The plane came to rest on a
grassy embankment.
Fire and rescue officials
reported that the pilot suffered
leg, arm and head injuries. He
had to be extricated from the
aircraft and was airlifted to
Broward General Medical
Centre. No one on the ground
was injured.
However, the accident shut
down the interstate's south-
bound lanes, causing massive
traffic delays.
Monarch Air owner Paul
Slavin praised Mr Robertson
for skilfully handling the plane
when he ran into trouble.
"He's extremely experi-
enced. He saved a lot of lives
with what he did," Mr Slavin
told the Sun-Sentinel.
The cargo plane was trans-
porting clothes and shoes to
Nassau.


Crash leaves
Reserve officer
in critical
condition

SOME time after 9 pm Fri-
day a male Reserve Police
Officer was the driver of a 1995
Chevy S-10 truck, which was
travelling south on Minnie
Street, when it hit a concrete
wall, then a parked vehicle.
The officer was removed
from the vehicle and taken to
hospital where his condition is
listed as critically ill.


Police seize
firearm
following ca'
pursuit
OFFICERS from the Flying
Squad Unit were on patrol in
the Andros Avenue area short-
ly after 11pm Friday 21st when
a heavily tinted Chevy Monte
Carlo was moving at a high
rate of speed.
The vehicle was chased
through Quintine Alley where
it hit a utility pole.
The car, which had four
male occupants, was searched.
Officers found a .9mm hand-
gun with eight live rounds of
ammunition for the weapon.
The men were arrested and are
in police custody.


Laing stresses benefits of China


EXPANDING the
Bahamas' tourism market is
but one of the potential bene-
fits of the country's relation-
ship with China, according to
Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing.
Mr Laing recently headed a
Bahamian delegation to the
China-Caribbean Economic
and Trade Cooperation Forum
held in Xiamen, China from
September 3-11.
The overall objective of this
year's forum was the strength-
ening of China's relationship
with the Caribbean by extend-
ing its vast potential for invest-
ment, commerce and social
programmes.
In the area of boosting the
Bahamas' tourism industry,
China has a population of 1.3
billion, one of the world's
fastest growing economies and
an estimated 40 million of its
citizens who travel abroad
despite its restrictive travel
policies.
"You get to see right away
that there is enormous poten-


Minister points to tourism and financial assistance


tial for The Bahamas to tap
into the tourism possibilities
of China," Mr Laing said.
"So for us, that requires our
being able to facilitate visas
that the Chinese need to trav-
el to the Bahamas, and have
that done in a more efficient
and effective manner.
"It also requires some trans-
portation logistics being
worked out so that there are
more direct and less expensive
flights between China and The
Bahamas."
He noted that China has
already given the Bahamas
some assistance in that regard
by designating the country an
Approved Travel Destination.
Hence, there is enormous
potential for this country.
An immediate benefit for
the Bahamas in its relations
with China is the building of a
national stadium, with bene-
fits in the long term involving


the extent to which Bahami-
ans are interested in accessing
the Chinese market for train-
ing opportunities and the
export of Bahamian products.
As for the economic factors
tied to China's financial assis-
tance in the region, Mr Laing
said the Bahamas would not
forfeit financial aid from world
lending banks as a result of
$500 million in assistance the
People's Republic of China
has granted to the Caribbean.
Mr Laing pointed out that
the Chinese contribution is
small in comparison to finan-
cial and technical assistance
provided by the Inter-Ameri-
can Development Bank (IDB)
and other international insti-
tutions.
To the extent to which the
Bahamas and the Caribbean
are being assisted, Mr Laing
said that China is furthering
its cause, which is a "win, win


situation."
The IDB has rendered an
estimated $700 million to the
Bahamas to fund technical and
infrastructural projects over the
years. Funding remains even
though the Bahamas is consid-
ered a developed nation and
needs to be graduated from
IDB funding.
"No Chinese contribution
comes near that," Mr Laing
said. "The only danger is you
are accumulating the kind of
per capital wealth that the IDB
would say you have to be grad-
uated. We have made the case
that there is no reason for us to
graduate because of our pecu-
liar needs as an archipelago."
Mr Laing said that there is
no competition among
Caribbean nations for China's
assistance. He said those coun-
tries that know their needs and
seize the opportunity are doing
so aggressively.


"One thing is certain is that
China is a force to be reckoned
with, it is also a country in polit-
ical and economic transition,"
he said. "We should be looking
at China as we should be look-
ing at other countries, includ-
ing India, to see the extent to
which there are lessons which
can be learnt."


Eight fishermen charged with having undersize crawfish


EIGHT Bahamian fisher-
men were formally charged in
Cooper's Town magistrate's
court on Friday with a breach
of the Fisheries Resources Act
following their arrests earlier
this month.
They were found in posses-
sion of undersized crawfish in
the vicinity of Carters Cay and
the Lilly Bank in the Abaco
Cays.
Among he first six to be
arraigned before Magistrate
Crawford McGee, charged
with possessing 182 pounds of
fresh undersized crawfish,
were Bunson Forbes, Samuel
Moxey and Robert Green also
of Andros. They pleaded not
guilty to the charge.
Their case was adjourned to
November 30 and they were
granted bail in the amount of
$3,000 with two sureties each.
William Forbes, Randolph
King and Sherrol Green also
of Andros pleaded guilty and


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were each sentenced to six
months at Her Majesty's
Prison.
On a second count Bunson
Forbes pleaded not guilty to
possessing 45 undersized craw-
fish. This case was also
adjourned to November 30
and bail was set at $3000 with
one surety.
William Forbes pleaded
guilty to this charge and was
sentenced to six months
imprisonment to run concur-
rently with the first six-month
sentence.
Randolph King and Samuel
Moxey were charged with pos-
sessing 72 undersized crawfish
at Carters Cay. Moxey pleaded
not guilty and his case was
adjourned to November 30.
He was granted $3,000 bail
with one surety.
Moxey pleaded guilty to this
charge and was sentenced to
six months at Fox Hill Prison
to run concurrently with the


first six months sentence.
Sherrol Green and Robert
Green were charged together
with possessing 109 fresh under-
sized crawfish at Carters Cay.
Sherrol Green pleaded
guilty and was sentenced to six
months to run concurrently
with his earlier sentence.
Robert Green pleaded not
guilty and his case was
adjourned to November 30
with the same bail conditions.
Alberto Adderley of Grand
Cay pleaded guilty to possess-
ing 55 pounds of undersized
crawfish in the vicinity of the
Lilly Bank off Walkers Cay.
He was fined $3,000 or three
months imprisonment.
On the final count Z'Tanna
Sears of Sgt Major Road,
Freeport pleaded guilty to
being found in possession of
17 pounds of fresh undersized
crawfish tails. He was also
fined $3,000 or three months in
prison.


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PAGE 4IMONDA, SEPEMBER 4,O207HTHEDRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Difference between freedom and licence


OPPOSITION LEADER Perry Christie
should be concerned that there is some-
one producing copy on his party's website
and transmitting releases to the news media
who seems to think that he is above the
law.
We all believe in freedom of the press -
God knows that The Tribune has fought
long and hard for it and made many sacri-
fices to protect that freedom. But there is a
difference between freedom and licence.
Today there are some in our profession
who don't know the difference. There are
those who believe that truth should never
get in the way of a good story. They seem
to think that the magic words "freedom of
the press" cloaks them in.immunity from
the law. Apparently they believe that they
can manufacture as many lies as their fin-
gers can tap into their computer to destroy
another person's reputation so long as it
makes a good story. As one newspaper
publisher told someone who recently ques-
tioned his carelessness with the truth: "It
sells papers!"
We recall the late Stanley Lowe, editor
of The Herald, who lived a lifetime ago
and eked out a meagre living from his small
publication. In his columns, the late Sir
Etienne Dupuch, publisher of The Tri-
bune, was his favourite whipping boy.
Often when he met Sir Etienne, he would
chortle: "Man, don't get mad at me. I
wouldn't sell papers if it weren't for you!"
Such people are a class unto themselves.
They don't belong to the profession of seri-
.ous journalists. Nor does PLP's "Scrib-
bler."
Somehow they think that they are pro-
tected by the Internet. Somehow they think
that if they open a Yahoo account under a
fictitious name, they are cloaked forever in
anonymity. That might have been so a few
years ago, but since 9/11 law enforcement
has cracked the code that will allow them to
trace the sender of an e-mail.
The PLP, angered about what the
Freeport News Editor said at the crime
symposium on September 14, vehemently


attacked him on their website. The PLP's
"Scribbler" even suggested that the editor
had a murky past, possibly even criminal.
This was followed by a release, sent by one
Fenio Miller from a Yahoo account, which
accused the editor in great detail of murder,
suggesting that there were possibly two
murders, and an attempt to commit a third
all of them his wives.
This was followed by an official release
compounding Fenio Miller's defamation,
which was sent to all media houses by "PLP
Media" under the heading, "Was it a libel-
lous e-mail on FNM henchman Oswald
Brown or ai criminalFact?
It is true that speech is free. However,
duties accompany the exercise of that free-
dom and the person who abuses free
speech is held accountable by the law.
When that freedom is turned into licence,
there are no duties, and these days those
who abuse these freedoms do not expect to
be held accountable. They honestly believe
that they are cloaked by the Internet, which
is beyond the long arm of the law.
That barrier came crashing down in Lon-
don recently when a British barrister was
. jailed for year for sending a false, incrim-
inating document by e-mail.
In passing sentence, Judge Tom
Crowther, QC, said that barrister Bruce
Hyman, a former radio producer, was
guilty of "appalling professional miscon-
duct." He ordered him to pay his victim
$3,000 compensation.
Paul Dunkels, QC, told the court: "He
has destroyed his career in the law and
damaged beyond repair his prospects of
returning to his previous career as a radio
producer."
After this verdict a local attorney
warned that Bahamians who smear other
people's character could be traced and
jailed for criminal libel.
Bahamians must remember that we now
live in a global community, and since 9/11
no one, anywhere can hide from the law.
Oswald Brown's complaint could be the
first test case.


||IE1( o IU 11(1111 .1.^^1 .n1l L'L
Lctd Thomp sonBlvd


A correction




over position




of Christie


EDITOR, The Tribune
TODAY'S editorial was
another example of your bla-
tant disregard for facts and the
truth when it comes to your
attempts to vilify the Progres-
sive Liberal Party. The Hon.
Perry Christie was not the Prime
Minister in April 1997. What-
ever your problems are with
them you need to just get over
it! Life goes on. I assure you and
your owners that there is a very
high and eternal price to pay for
harbouring so much hate.
A RELUCTANT READER
Nassau
September 17 2007
(This is indeed an error, for
which we apologise. Mr Christie
at the time of the 1997 show to
which we referred was Opposi-
tion Leader of the PLP.
(The reference was taken
from an editorial of April 17,
1997, headed "A voice from the
past." Said the editorial in part:
("Businessman Norman
Solomon, a former Opposition
Leader, speaking on the role of
the Opposition at a two-day
Parliamentary seminar last
week, gave newly-elected


Opposition Leader Perry
Christie some good advice:
("'Walk with kings if you
wish, but do not ever lose the
common touch. Remember
always that those you may have
passed on your way up the lad-
der of achievement you may
well pass again... on the way
down.'
("The same advice was often
given in this column, but the
PLP, so consumed by arro-
gance, could never conceive
that the day would come when
they would have to walk nay,
flee- down that ladder.
("And, so, it was not surpris-
ing on Sunday night when Mr
Christie, a guest on Ed Field's
100 JAMZ radio talk show,
received a call from someone
who wondered how the politi-
cian could claim that the 'PLP
was a 'people's party.'
("The voice from the past
identified itself only as 'Peter,
originally from Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera.'
("'I lived in Eleuthera for


most of my life before I went J
to school,' said Peter, 'but I
remember a time when I was a
very young boy my mother,
along with seven other young
ladies, was fired from the then
Hatchet Bay Plantation by one
of your former members of par-
liament for Governor's Harbour
and Minister at the time. And
the words that were used to her
by one of his generals who was
in charge of the plant were: 'If
you don't support the govern-
ment, you cannot live by the
government.'"
(And so the editorial contin-
ues. The reference was to Perry
Christie, Opposition Leader,
and not Perry Christie, prime
minister.
(We wonder who this anony-
mous letter writer thinks writes
The Tribune's editorials when
he remarks that "I assure you
and your owners...". We don't
know what owner he is refer-
ring to as the editorial writer is
the owner.
(We do not hate the PLP,
and we certainly do not hate
Mr Christie, but we certainly
do hate the PLP's constant
attempts to try to twist history,
and wish away the facts of the
past. ED).


My heartfelt thanks to police officers


EDITOR, The Tribune
Please publish this open letter
to the Commissioner of Police.
Mr Paul H Farquharson,
QPM,
Commissioner of Police,
Royal Bahamas Police Force.
Dear Commissioner Far-
quharson,
I TRUST this letter reaches
you in the very best of health. I
am the legal guardian and next
of kin to my brother, the late
Mr Mardio AJ Hall who suc-
cumbed to his. injuries at the
Queen Elizabeth Sports Cen-
tre, Sunday, July 8, 2007.
I write to you to offer my
gratitude and appreciation to
the officers who were respon-
sible and connected with the
processing and apprehension of
the two individuals allegedly
responsible for the 43rd mur-
der victim of our country.
I must say that the swift and
professional manner that the
officers executed their investi-


gation was truly appreciated by
my entire family. Further, I was
impelled to write to you, sir,
after being satisfied with the
Criminal Detective Unit.
I have been an Executive Pro-
ducer in Broadcasting for sev-
eral years and I have been privy
to much in our little country,
and even though I am at a low
point in my life because of this
tragedy, on the loss of my little
brother, I had to say thank you.
I am of the belief that the
Police are our first legitimate
line of defence against criminal
activity. Indeed, the role of the
police is that of protectors of
public safety and keepers of the
peace. This was taken to anoth-
er level with the family liaison
aspect of the Criminal Detec-
tive Unit and for this, I have a
greater respect for our Police
Officers.
I would like to thank the offi-
cers for their unselfish manner
that they conducted this inves-
tigation; and I would also like to
thank the officers for their con-
cern that was placed on our
family during our hour of


bereavement.
I took the liberty to include
the names of the officers who
had direct contact with my fam-
ily. Namely, Detective Altida
Khalfani, Assistant Superinten-
dent Clayton Fernander-O/C
Homicide Squad, Inspector
Christopher Wright, Sergeant
Michael Johnson, Sergeant
Michelet Meronard, Sergeant
Anton Rahming, Sergeant
Charles Knowles. SergednttiLeb''"'
Rodgers, WDC 2802 Gina--
Burnside, and DC 260 Vernon
Pyfrom.
Please Commissioner, express
my gratitude to the officers
mentioned. Finally, I will con-
tinue to boast the exemplary
service provided by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and in
particular the homicide squad
of the Central Detective Unit.
I thank you for your atten-
tion to this letter of gratitude
and I await your response to
my humble request.
MARIO A NEWRY Jr
Nassau
September 2 2007


Hats off to an outstanding nurse


EDITOR, The Tribune
I HAVE had the good for-
tune of meeting Trained Clini-
cal Nurse Sheila Ingraham
when she was assigned to take
care of my roommate, Mr
Wendel Higgs, as an outpa-
tient.
Ms Ingraham, who was
attached to the Fleming Street


Clinic has demonstrated impec-
cable bedside manners and per-
formed many random acts of
kindness namely: Sharing Sun-
day dinners and paying house
visits even in the worst of
inclement weather.
I would like to hereby con-
gratulate Nurse Sheila Ingra-
haii publicly aiid recommend
unequivocally that she be a


prime candidate to be consid-
ered for above normal mone-
tary increase or even Employee
of the month.
Hats off to Nurse Sheila
Ingraham.
WHITNEY S MORTIMER
KING
Nassau
August 16 2007


SBAHAMAS




S MANUFACTURING
S. COMPANY LIMITED


I


PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE







MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


t m


*In brief

Firefighters
tackle
blaze at SC
McPherson
FIREFIGHTERS
responded to a structural fire
at SC McPherson School on
Blue Hill Road shortly
before 8pm on Friday.
The three responding emer-
gency units arrived ten min-
utes after the call was received
and encountered smoke bil-
lowing from the home eco-
nomics unit of the school.
The fire services forced
entry into the building to
extinguish the fire.
It was confined to one
room; however, other nearby
rooms were affected by
smoke. The matter is under
active investigation to deter-
mine the cause of the blaze.
The fire was discovered to
have taken place in a room
in the home economics
department in the old block
bf the school. The new build-
ing was not affected by the
small fire.
Superintendent of Police
Jeffrey Deleveaux arrived at
the scene shortly after the
fire was reported.
Superintendent Deleveaux
said that two units initially
came from the South Beach
Station and later another
came from the Cable Beach
Station.
It was determined that
there was no need for the
Cable Beach truck and it left.
Also responding to the fire
was Marvin Bethel, of Mar-
vin's LP Gas. Bethel, the
supplier of the propane gas
to the school, was in the area
and came on the scene. He
disconnected the gas line.
After a thorough assess-
ment of the area by firemen
and school officials, it was
determined that the damage
caused the fire was not
extensive and would not pre-
vent students from attending
school on Monday.
Minister of Education
Youth Sports and Culture,
Carl Bethel, said that affect-
ed students would be accom-
modated elsewhere in the
school.


Fence damaged at high school


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AS NATIONAL debate continues about the safety of schools, this security fence at CH Reeves Junior High
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GB Power Company


oru

Discount Card
_______ i __


denies stalling union ,


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT Grand
Bahama Power Company is
denying that the company is
stalling negotiations in reach-
ing an industrial agreement with
the Commonwealth Electrical
Workers Union.
The company stated that it is
still awaiting an official response
to their official proposal that
was sent to the union on August
13.
"We are truly shocked and
surprised by the CEWU's state-
ments (in the press)," the com-
pany said in a statement issued
to The Tribune.
Additionally, company offi-
cials said that it had extended
an advanced formal invitation
to meet with union executives
on September 19.
However, no confirmation


regarding attendance was made
and union representatives
showed up without notice.
"While we were not in a posi-
tion to have the meeting mate-
rialize, we have set Friday, Sep-
tember 21, as the new date," he
said.
On Tuesday, CEWU presi-
dent Keith Knowles and sever-
al workers of the Grand
Bahama Power Company held
a demonstration in Freeport.
Workers are frustrated as nego-
tiations for an industrial agree-
ment remain at an impasse with
no settlement reached in the
last two years.
They also expressed concerns
over safety at workplace, and
the termination of injured work-
er Christley Smith, who has
recently died.
The company said that it
remains guided by the labour
laws of the Bahamas and will
continue to work in the best


interest of its employees and
customers to have negotiations
rapidly resolved.
With regards to comments
concerning safety matters at the
GB Power, the company said
that safety to staff and the wider
public is a top priority.
. "We wish to state again pub-
licly that we are saddened by
the death of our former col-
league Christley Smith, and our
prayers are with his family dur-
ing this most difficult time.
"However, we refuse to par-
ticipate with those who contin-
ue to utilise his tragic loss as a
means to make headlines."
"We remain committed to the
positive advancement and well-
being of our staff, providing a
service of excellence for our
customers and the growth and
development of Grand Bahama
Island, and by extension the
entireBahamas," the company
said. .


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Craftwork students


uate course


YOUR CONNECTION fO THE HVORLD


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BAIC CHAIRMAN Edison Key and National Craft Association president
Dr Melony Thompson study a piece from the exhibit


THE BAHAMAS
TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY,
LIMITED (BTC)


GOVERNMENT NOTICE
Invitation for Proposals


The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited (BTC)
is soliciting proposals from qualified suppliers for the provision
of a Direct Top-Up Pre-paid Mobile Solution.

Interested parties may obtain further information, including
eligibility to participate as of Wednesday, September 12, 2007
from the BTC Public Relations Department, John F Kennedy
(JFK) Drive, Nassau, Bahamas.

Any queries should be directed to Ms. Eldri Ferguson at (242)
324-9900 or (242) 424-2532 or eferguson@btcbahamas.com.

Please respond to this RFP by no later than 4:00 p.m., October
22nd, 2007, addressed to:

Mr. Leon Williams
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited
P. O. Box N-3048
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas


Proposals will be opened at 12:00 noon, October 23, 2007 at
BTC, JFK Drive.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all proposals.
*


* By Bahamas Information
Services
GOVERNOR'S Harbour,
Eleuthera Some of the finest
shell and coconut craft were
exhibited during graduation cer-
emonies for 80 participants in
souvenir creation here, officials
said.
And, Agricultural and Indus-
trial Corporation (BAIC) chair-
man Edison Key urged them to
tap into the $150 million spent
importing souvenirs.
"Our visitors are demanding
authentic Bahamian souvenirs
not something made half way
around the world and merely
has the name Bahamas stamped
on it," he said. "From what I
see here in Eleuthera, I am very
impressed."
Trainers April Martin-Fox,
Emily Munnings and Howard
Bevans showed eager students
the fine art of creating all kinds
of interesting pieces out of
coconut, shells, straw and other
ingredients, all of which are
found on the island.
"The quality of all of the
products is tremendous," said
Donnalee Bowe, manager of
BAIC's Handicraft Develop-
ment and Marketing Depart-
ment. "We have seen unbe-
lievable products and new
creations.
"We are certain Eleuthera
is going to become a part of
this growing movement that
is going to take the handi-
craft industry in the Bahamas
to another level."
Patrons, including South
Eleuthera MP Oswald
Ingraham, the Administra-
tor Gloria Bain, BAIC
board member Lonnie
Rolle, and local and region-
al representatives packed St
Patrick's Church Hall last F
Friday night to encourage s
the graduates.
The traditional Bahami-
an straw creations of hats,
bags and mats were well rep-
resented. But utilising colour-
ful shells, Eleutherans pre-
sented new creations of
broaches, cufflinks, tie pins,
wrist bands, pendants, hair
accessories, paperweights,
among others.


ing souvenirs from all over the
world," he said, "and we
haven't even tapped into it yet."
Bahamian products will be a
part of the Caribbean Gift and
Craft Show this weekend in
Curaqao.
Ms Bowe is heading the 15-
person delegation which com-
prises representatives from
various islands.
"We are not just waiting for
visitors to come to us to see
what we have to offer," said
Ms Bowe. "We are now tak-
ing our wares to the world.
"We would be promoting
and marketing the Bahamas
as a destination for fine hand-
icraft."
Meanwhile, Eleuthera is
making way to join Abaco,
Andros, Exuma, Grand
Bahama and New Providence
in the growing Bahamas
National Craft Association
headed by Dr Melony
Thompson.
vn "When you take into con-
sideration all the training
that BAIC is doing," said
Dr Thompson, "there is a
need for us to have a voice
so that we can properly do our
part in promoting authentic
Bahamian products. Individu-
ally it can be difficult but as a
group we can make a big dif-
ference."


7p3


'ATRICIA THOMPSON of Gregory Tow
shows off her broaches

of the BAIC training pro-
grammes and pursue the pro-
duction of authentic Bahamian
items which are in demand.
"This industry equals $150
Million that we spend import-


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*IJ-i


The coconut creations were
just as exquisite, bringing out a
variety of products from table-
ware to stationery utensils to
pieces of art.
Mr Key urged more
Eleutherans to take advantage


a


SEPTEMBER



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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007










THELC TRIBUENMONAYESPTEMBRW24,2007,P
S~~Ti


0 In brief

Water Depot
employee is
robbed at
gunpoint
ON Saturday an employee of
a Water Depot, located on East
Street south, was at work
when the occupants of a black
Nissan Maxima registration No.
756628 pulled up with four male
occupants.
A rear seat passenger asked
to buy a phone card. While the
employee was in the process of
getting the item, the passenger
pulled a handgun and robbed
him of cash and a small quanti-
ty of phone cards.
The vehicle sped off travel-
ling south on East Street.

Man armed
with shotgun
takes handbag
from woman

A FEMALE resident of
western New Providence had
just arrived home around 7 pm
when a man with a shotgun
approached her demanding
cash. Her handbag, which had a
large sum of cash and other
items, was stolen by the escap-
ing robber.

Phone booth
employee
robbed by
armed men

AROUND 3 pm Saturday,
an employee of a Quick Cell
booth located on Graham Drive
was approached by three armed
men who were in a grey
coloured Nissan vehicle (model
unknown). The employee was
robbed of cash and several
phone cards. The vehicle sped
off.

Share

your

news
Call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.


Students to see




the UN in action


FOUR deserving students
are about to get an experience
of a lifetime a trip to New
York to observe the United
Nations at work.
They will also hear first
hand an address by Deputy
Prime Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette,
who will represent the
Bahamas.


Mr Symonette will also sign,
on behalf of the Bahamas,
documents forming diplomat-
ic ties with Bulgaria and Lux-
emburg,
The students of Doris John-
son Senior High School are
winners of the Model UN
Debate held last year among
Bahamian students.
On Friday, at the Ministry


of Foreign Affairs headquar-
ters at Goodman's Bay Cor-
porate Centre, the students
and two teachers were pre-
sented with their tickets for
travel on Thursday, Septem-
ber 27.
The debate was facilitated
by the Rotary Club, which also
co-sponsored the students' trip
to New York


PICTURED FROM left are Rashad Rolle, 16, of grade 12; Sharon
Scavella, teacher/debate coach; Kevin Dagenheart, Nassau Sunrise
Rotary Club; Apryl Johnson, 17, of grade 12; Jaimee Smith, 16 of
grade 12; Minister of Foreign Affairs Mr Symonette; Precious
Bethell, 15, of grade 11; Rachael Sirra, language arts teacher/debate
coach; Krissy Hanna, Jr Officer, international relations division,
Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Dorothea Lafleur, senior officer
international relations division, Ministry of Foreign Affairs


Brazil foreign minister: Haiti peace depends on development


* HAITI
Port-au-Prince
HAITI'S improved security
climate won't be sustainable
unless wealthier countries ramp
up efforts to bring development
to the deeply impoverished
country, Brazil's top diplomat
said Friday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.


During a one-day visit to the
country, Foreign Affairs Minister
Celso Amorim said the 8,800-
strong, Brazil-led force had made
major strides in restoring calm
and reducing gang violence that
had plagued the country since a
2004 revolt toppled former Pres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
"But of course it's not per-
fect, far from it. That's why we


need the continued commit-
ment of the international com-
munity," Amorim told The
Associated Press as he toured
Port-au-Prince's seaside Cite
Soleil slum under guard from
heavily armed Brazilian sol-
diers and bodyguards.
Amorim noted that on past
-trips to Haiti it had been too
dangerous for him to visit the


teeming, fetid slum, which only
a year ago was awash in vio-
lence from daily gunbattles
between armed gangs and blue-
helmeted peacekeepers.
A UN crackdown on gangs
launched late last year has led
to a sharp reduction in shoot-
ings, bringing Cite Soleil's most
peaceful period in years.
Still, many slum dwellers live


in squalor and are in desper-
ate need of jobs, hospitals and
schools, a point Amorim said
he would urge the UN Security
Council to consider when the
vote to extend the peacekeep-
ing mandate next month.
"The security situation will
only be assured once Haiti goes
into a path of development,"
he said.


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 8, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


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Minister encourages



SHIP'S ROIGI.TY BANAMAS students at GHS

.. EDUCATlION Minister Carl grammes so that whatever stu
Bethel addressed 12th grade dents earn from the BTVI will
students of Government High mean something.
School about the world of pos- During the question and
sibilities opened to them answer session th e students


through education. The visit
was a part of the Minister's tour
of public senior high schools in
New Providence. Schools pre-
viously visited were C V Bethel
and Doris Johnson High
Schools.
Mr Bethel told the students
that they are the leaders of their
school, and he understood that
they are faced with tremendous
pressure to do the wrong things,
but they have the opportunity
to achieve their dreams through
the free education they attain
at Government High School.
He said that some of the coun-
try's leaders have attended
GHS, and there is no reason
they cannot follow in their foot-
steps.
The education minister told
students, "Gone are the days
when Bahamians with five
BGCSE's or more cannot
attend the College of The
Bahamas because of the lack of
finances."
He said the government has
given the college an additional
$1 million to ensure that any
student who lacks the means to


pay tuition can still pursue high-
er education at the college. He
also said that $2 million has
been set aside for students to
receive grants at local and inter-
national institutions. This year
112 Merit Scholarships were
awarded to Bahamian students
compared to 19 awarded in
2006.
He also shared that there are
plans to make the programmes
at the Bahamas Technical and
Vocational Institute (BTVI)
certificate and diploma pro-


asked the minister to provide
additional equipment to
enhance their technical and
vocational studies at the school.
In response to a student's
request for resources for the
construction programme, Mr
Bethel said that the answer may
be in establishing a Construc-
tion Club supervised by experts
in the field to teach interested
persons in tiling, masonry, dry-
wall and other skills. The club
would meet after school to facil-
itate the programme.
Mr Bethel also reminded the
students of the non-violence ini-
tiative established by the min-
istry. He reiterated the pro-
gramme's watch words, "If you
strike a blow you go, if you walk
away you stay." The minister
told the 12th-graders that the
younger students are looking to
them for leadership, and that
their behaviour can perpetuate
or decrease the rate of violence
in our schools.
Mr Bethel will also visit R M
Bailey, C I Gibson and C R
Walker on the last leg of his
tour..


Little Mermaid to grace the stage


Next month The Bahamas
OnStage YouTHeatre will pre-
sent The Little Mermaid a
"Broadway for Kids" produc-
tion at the National Centre for
the Performing Arts, Shirley
Street.
This new and vibrant initia-
tive has dazzled Bahamian audi-
ences, young and young at heart
already this year with perfor-
mances of Pinocchio, Black
Journeyr and Beautyr and The
Beast.
The Ministry of Education
Youth Sports and Culture has
endorsed the Youth Theatre.
The theory that exposure to
"the theatre" at a young age
opens children's minds to a new
and exciting world of the arts
has been embraced by all It is
known that while the honing of
literacy skills through reading
plays is critical, studies show


that the majority of our learning
and development is done
through additional senses,
specifically sight and sound.
Former educator and present
First Lady of the United States of
America, Laura Bush, recalled
the reaction of a class she accom-
panied to a theatre, remarking
that what followed the show was:
"The most exciting, insightful
and wise conversation I've ever
had a class engage in. No class
I've ever taught has understood
this play so well or has been this
emotionally engaged with the
characters."
Mrs Bush further said in
December 2002: "The arts and
humanities are critical building
blocks for a child's develop-
ment... Theatre brings history
to life. Arts and humanities help
to develop vocabulary and crit-
ical thinking and an apprecia-


tion for math and science."
Bahamas OnStage YouTHe-
atre plans to continue to import
and to locally produce chil-
dren's classics for the enjoyment
of Bahamian pre-schoolers and
primary schoolchildren such as
Cinderella, Aladdin, Pinocchio,
Pippi Longstocking and The
Wizard of Oz.
Additionally, the group plans
performances for high school
students preparing for nation-
al examinations, with renditions
of Woman Take Two, Romeo
and Juliet, King Lear, A Mid-
summer's Night Dream, The
Merchant of Venice, To Kill A
Mockingbird and more.
Performances are also
planned of The Gaulin Wife,
Anansy The Spider, Bookie and
Rabbi and The Chickcharnie.
Study guides are provided for
all schools that attend.


p


--c~


LOCAL NEW


i


Ank"a
EVW"


* eel












Events to mark


World Maritime


Day in Bahamas


* By Bahamas Information
Services
THE Bahamas celebrates
.World Maritime Day with a
week of activities beginning yes-
terday with services at the
Church of God of Prophecy,
East Street.
"The maritime sector is an
expanding and growing industry
in the Bahamas," said organis-
ing committee chairman Barry
Malcolm. "As a country, we are
yet to fully exploit the poten-
tial of this industry."
Today, Minister of Maritime
Affairs and Labour Dion
Foulkes will appear on a spe-
cial edition of the television
show "You and Your Money".
A one-day seminar organised
by the major oil companies on
their level of preparedness to
deal with oil spills takes place
tomorrow at the British Colo-
nial Hilton.
Topics set for discussion
include "The legal aspects of
pollution control", "Environ-
mental impact of oil spills",
"Safe handling and storage of
oil'" and "Contingency plan-
ning/training for marine spills".
On Wednesday, September
26, the four-day World Mar-
itime Day Exhibition opens at
the Mall at Marathon. The
theme is "IMO's response too


Bahamas still has to exploit
expanding industry, say officials


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ou o wntr nt
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WORLD MARITIME Day organising committee chairman Barry Mal-
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Com Herbert Bain, port security co-ordinator. Charles Dean of the Min-
istry of Maritime Affairs and Labour is pictured at left.


current environmental ch,al-
lenges".
On Thursday, September 27,
a small boat safety demonstra-
tion and exhibition will be held
at the headquarters of Bahamas
Air Sea Rescue Association
(BASRA).
It will feature a search and


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.





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rescue demonstration by the
Royal Bahamas Defence Force,
BASRA and the United States
Coast Guard.
On Friday, September 28, the
Minister's World Maritime Day
address will be broadcast on
Radio Bahamas.
.World Maritime Day events
focus attention on fhe impor-
tance of shipping safety, mar-
itime security, the marine envi-
ronment, and the work of the
International Maritime Organ-
isation (IMO).
"We want to use the occasion
to sensitise Bahamians to the
opportunities open to The
Bahamas and Bahamians in the
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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


L:
t-~urasii;rci"








PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


Guyana's 9/18 ruling




raises expectations




for future oil wealth


* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business exec-
utive and former Caribbean
diplomat).

ON Thursday, Septem-
ber 18th, a Law of the
Sea Arbitration Tribunal unan-
imously decided on a maritime
boundary between Guyana and
Suriname, neighbours on the
South American Atlantic coast
and members of the Caribbean
Community and Common Mar-


ket (CARICOM).
In the words of the Guyana
President Bharat Jagdeo, "The
award is very favourable to
Guyana" It is an award that is
legally binding on both coun-
tries.
It resolves a disagreement
that has been ongoing since
June 3, 2000 when Surinamese
troops expelled a rig, owned by
the Canadian Oil company,
CGX, from waters whose own-
ership was disputed by the two
countries.
The Tribunal found that Suri-


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name's action "constituted a
threat of the use of force in
breach of the (Law of the Sea)
Convention, the UN Charter,
and general international law.
Attempts to reach a neigh-
bourly settlement failed after a
series of encounters which were
stalemated. Finally in February
2004, Guyana sought interna-
tional arbitration. But, Suri-
name argued that the Tribunal
had no jurisdiction.
The Tribunal disagreed, and"
its award is the result of pro-
ceedings in which both coun-
tries employed legal luminaries
and technical experts to vigor-
ously argue their case. In
Guyana's case, its team was led
by Sir Shidath Ramphal, for-
mer Commonwealth secretary-
general and a former Attorney-
General of Guyana.
It would have been easy for
the Guyana government to claim
a great victory and.to show off
over the judgment. It didn't.
Indeed, President Jagdeo chose
not to speak of 'winners or
losers" saying instead: "The
great achievement of the Award
is to open up before Guyana and
Suriname the prospect of prac-
tical harmonious cooperation in
their economic development and
in their relations as good neigh-
bours."
The Guyana government's
posture augured well for peace-
ful and cooperative relations in
the future between the two
neighboring states, and for the
further development of the
Caribbean integration process
under CARICOM. .

Undoubtedly, there is
disappointment in
Suriname over the award, but
.the government and.the pation.


would earn its own place in his-
tory by showing its respect for
international law in the peaceful
settlement of disputes.
The 163-page judgment
accompanied by various maps
is an account of solid research
,.and argument by both sides.
SThe last thing that could be said
by anyone with the stamina to
read the judgment carefully is
That Suriname did not put up a
: strong fight.
The Tribunal said that the
boundary it has established "for
the most part follows the


People rightly
expect to see
revenues from
oil spent on
improving
health
standards, the
quality of
education,
tackling poverty
and creating
jobs.

equidistance line between
. Guyana and Suriname. Howev-
er, in the territorial sea, the
boundary follows a N10E line
from the starting point to the
three nautical mile limit, and
then a diagonal line, from the
intersection of the N10E line
and the three nautical mile lim-
it, to the intersection of the
twelve nautical mile limit and
the equidistance line."


The Guyana
government's
posture
augured well for
peaceful and
cooperative
relations in the
future between
the two
neighboring
states


Well what does that mean in
practical terms? For Guyana, it
means that the companies it has
licensed to explore for oil can
return to the areas in which they
were operating. Specifically, it
allows the Canadian company
CGX to re-establish its rig and
continue drilling in an area
where it is confident that there
is a reservoir of oil
Guyana's economic fortunes
can change by this 9/18 a
date that could live in the mem-
ories of Guyanese for ever.
Now, classified as a Highly
Indebted Poor Country by the
International Monetary Fund
and the World Bank, an early
find and exploitation of oil
could transform the economy
of this country, which has
always been rich in natural
resources, but plagued by poli-
tics that has divided its two
main ethnic groups the
descendants of African slaves
and Indian indentured labour-
ers.

Nothing will change
tomorrow for Guyana
or for its people. They will wake
up with the same difficulties
they now face which includes
rising inflation, unemployment
and crime. But they will also
wake up with a greater expec-
tation of a better future, and
they will look forward to enjoy-
ing the oil wealth of their neigh-


bours, Venezuela and Trinidad
and Tobago.
Should oil be found and
exploited in the commercial
quantities that have been
rumoured for years, the
Guyanese people of all races
will expect to see their standard
of living and quality of life
improve significantly.
The Guyana government
would do well to take this time
to study carefully the experi-
ences of other countries to
ensure that oil wealth, if it
comes, is managed properly and
transparently by agencies in
which there is broad based and
professional representation.
People rightly expect to see
revenues from oil spent on
improving health standards, the
quality of education, tackling
poverty and creating jobs. And,
by and large, they will expect
to see oil wealth distributed
even handedly amongst all
races.
9/18 was in the words of
President Jagdeo "a good day
for Guyana." If oil wealth
comes in the future, good gov-
ernance could give better days
for Guyanese and for other
CARICOM countries which
could benefit from an improved
Guyana economy.
Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


OSERMUOI'


Sbah 'ama6's



0
r,



THIRD INTERNATIONAL
AFRICAN DIASPORA HERITAGE TRAIL CONFERENCE
OCTOBER 10-14, 2007
ATIANTIS RESORT, PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS

REGISTRATION FORM
Please use one registration form per full conference registrant. You may photocopy this form as necessary.
Please type or print legibly to Insure accurate processing. For more information or assistance, please
contact Mrs. Yvonne Woods at the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism at (242) 323-5804 or
ywoods@bahamas.com, or Mrs. Lllisbelle Swann at the Bahamas Ministry of Tourism at (242) 302-2000 or
Iswann@bahamas.com.


REGISTRANT INFORMATION:

Name:

Title:

Organization:

Address:

P.O. Box:

Island/Country:

Telephone No.:

Fax No.:

SEmail Address:




PAYMENT INFORMATION:

* Bahamian Residents: $100.00 per day, Thursday and Friday (lunch and
dinner or Cultural Show included), or $50.00 per day, Saturday and Sunday.

* Bahamian Students (with I.D.): $150.00

* One-day registration (all others): $150.00 (excludes special events.)

Please indicate whether you require assistance with hotel/lodging information.


Please pay by cash or cheque. and submit payment with your L ninpleted applicanuon fornm.
Make all cheques payable to: Henderson's Associate, Inc.


II llN P'ol
arrutl 513, ru lo


' .**"p


PAGE 10, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 200.7


THE TRIBUNE


~









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 11


Tenth BahamaArts



festival is touted



as 'the best ever'


* By Bahamas Information
Services
THE chairman of the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation has said
that the 10th annual
BahamaArts Festival will be the
best in the 10-year history of
the festival.
Speaking at a press cponm-
ference on Wednesday, Sep-
tember 19, Edison Key said:
"At this festival we will high-
light and invite all major Fami-
ly Islands and Nassauvians to
display and show off their
incredible craftsmanship, which
they have learned during our
craft, shell, straw and wood
training programmes held over
the last three years."
He said this year's festival will
also see the inclusion of sisal at
the festival.
"Over the years, the festivals
have grown tremendously. The
very first festival was held from
October 31 to November 2,
1997, under the theme 'Silver
top, sea treasures' and featured
the straw industry and other
products made from the sea
resources."
The festival will be held at
Arawak Cay, at the Fish Fry
site from Friday, October 26, to
Sunday, October 28.
BAIC's handicraft develop-
ment and marketing manager
Donnalee Bowe said there are
over 70 booths and 50 per
cent of them are already paid
for.
She also said there is a large
contingent of persons coming
from the Family Islands to show
off their craft, art work and
cooking skills. Andros has the
largest delegation followed by
Abaco.
Ms Bowe said that all prod-
ucts must be Bahamian made.
That is the main criterion for
artisans and artists wishing to
participate in the festival.
But she noted that BAIC is
still trying to define just what
constitutes "Bahamian
made".
"This year we will seek to
explore that some more when
we meet at the second annual
general meeting of the Craft
Association.
"We did a lot of work on that


BAIC CHAIRMAN Edison Key (background at right) announces plans
for the upcoming BahamasArts Festival. Also in background from left
are Benjamin Rahming, BAIC consultant, and Donnalee Bowe, BAIC
handicraft development and marketing manager. In foreground from
left are president of the Bahamas National Craft Association Dr Melanie
Thompson, manager of public relations at Royal Bank of Canada; Jan
Knowles, public relations representative from Scotiabank; Nicollette
Eldon, and Inspector Ronald Campbell, organiser of the Battle of the
Bands.


last year and hopefully we will
refine it some more this year,
so we can send out some release
as to what we are defining as
Bahamian made products," Ms
Bowe said.
The Bahamas National Craft
Association in conjunction with
BAIC will host a week of activ-
ities during the week leading up
to the festival.
On Sunday October 21, there
will be a church service.
On Monday October 22, and
Tuesday October 23, there will
be handicraft training sessions
on refined plaiting and the art
of plaiting.
During October 24-25, the
Bahamas National Craft Asso-
ciation will hold its second
annual general meeting.
On Friday October 26, the
10th Annual Bahamas Arts Fes-
tival will officially open with a
ceremony at 10am.
On Saturday, October 27,
there will be a Battle of the
Bands Competition.
On Sunday, October 28, the
third annual gala tea party will
be held.
Sponsors of the event include
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company, the Royal Bank
of Canada, Scotiabank, the
Bahamas Development Bank


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--


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. MONDAY SEPTEMBER 24. 2007


L


Youth may lose

arm after attack


FROM page one
Others diving with him, assist-
ed him from the water and
rushed him to the local clinic,
where he received emergency
medical treatment.
Due to the serious extent of
his injury, he was immediately
airlifted by a private aircraft to
Freeport and transported by
EMS personnel to the trauma
section at the Rand Memorial
Hospital.
After being stabilised, Hield
was detained in the Intensive
Care Unit, however it is uncer-
tain whether his arm can be
saved.
"It is not known at this time,
what pieces of shark attacked
and bit young Hield," said Chief
Superintendent of Police Basil
Rahming.


FROM page one
"It really depends on what
is going to be built into it. The
roof has been repaired, most
of the bathroom facilities are
near to be being repaired," he
said.
All cost arising out of the
use of the Prince George
Wharf facility will come from
the new security arrangements
and the creation of walkways,
the minister said.
Government officials, he
said, last week met with the
vendors and accommodated
them in their request to tour
'the Prince George Wharf
facility.
While the majority of ven-
dors and downtown mer-


chants agree that the straw
market should remain on Bay
Street, Mr Deveaux said that
it has not yet been decided if
the new market will return to
its previous site or remain
where it is now.
"There has been a fair
amount of dialogue about the
opportunity to establish an
authentic Bahamian craft and
straw market close (on the
current site) to the museum,
to attract visitors of a broader
base and then there was con-
sideration given to utilising
the previous site for other pur-
poses," he said.
Some stakeholders, the
minister said, are in favour of
creating a green space on the
site of the old straw market.


A Public Utilities Commission






PUC Representatives will be in Abaco from
September 26-28, 2007
TO MEET WITH LICENSEES, CONSUMERS &THE PUBLIC

All interested persons may meet with the PUC staff at locations
listed below:

* Ministry of Tourism Training Center, Marsh Harbour, Abaco from
9am -5pm DAILY on September 26 28, 2007
* Coopers Town Court House, Coopers Town, Abaco from 1 Oam-
2 pm on THURSDAY, September 27, 2007 ONLY
* Anglican Church Hall, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, from 7 pm 9 pm
on THURSDAY, September 27,2007 ONLY (General Information
Meeting)
* Sandy Point Commissioners Office, Sandy Point, Abaco from
10am-2 pm on FRIDAY, September 28,2007 ONLY

PUC staff will address concerns of telecommunications and
radiocommunications licence holders, consumers and other
interested parties. Licence fees will also be collected.
Information on the PUC's functions and role will also
be available.



U U


Public Utilities Commission


TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT, 1999
REGULATION OF RADIOCOMMUNICATIONS


The public is notified that it is an offence under the Telecommunications Act,
1999 for any person to establish, operate or use any radiocommunications
station or install, operate or use any radiocommunications apparatus unless
he is authorized to do so by a licence granted by the Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) under section 30 of the Telecommunications Act.


Cordless telephone devices are radiocommunications apparatus, but
certain units that restrict service to a single set of premises, which are also
Part 15 Certified by the Federal Commupications Commission (FCC) of the
United States, are authorized for use by the PUC under a Class Licence. All
other types of cordless telephone devices, including "Long Range
Cordless Telephones", are not authorized for use in The Bahamas. Addi-
tional information and technical details on authorized cordless telephone
devices may be found on the PUC's web site at www.PUCBahamas.gov.bs
or collected from the PUC's office in Nassau at 4th Terrace East, Collins
Avenue. The use of unauthorized cordless telephone devices causes
harmful Interference to essential national services that use radio
spectrum. The use of such devices constitutes an offence against the Act.


Operators and installers of unlicensed radiocommunications apparatus, as
well as the landlord of buildings where such devices are installed, may each
be fined ten thousand dollars ($10,000) in accordance with section 36 of the
Act. Violators can expect to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
The public is therefore invited, in the strictest confidence, to provide the
PUC with information concerning all such illegal activities by contacting the
PUC at tel 322-4437, fax 323-7288, e-mail puc@pucbahamas.gov.bs or
visiting the PUC's office at 4th Terrace East, Collins Avenue.
Mr. Barrett A. Russell
Executive Director
Public Utilities Commission
P. 0. Box N-4860
Fourth Terrace, East, Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas.
Sept.11,2007


"(Some say it) would be won-
derful enclosing the old market
place with an attractive wall and
putting seating and walk ways in
where people can have access
to clean bathrooms, a space to
sit down and have a cup of cof-
fee and read," he said.
Others, however, Mr
Deveaux said, are in favour of a
placing a multi-storey commer-
cial centre on the site.
The public works minister
emphasised that it is necessary
when making any decision
regarding the new straw mar-
ket to keep in mind the goal of
transforming the entire down-
town area.
Mr Deveaux explained that
government does not want to
be forced into just building a
market that addresses the
immediate needs of a few hun-
dred vendors and risk missing
the opportunity to plan for the
overall strategic direction of
downtown.
The Cabinet sub-committee
on the straw market develop-
ment is expected to deliver its
final proposals by October 3.


PLP 'never planned officers


to be in schools long term'


FROM page one
The school policing unit, Mr
Christie said, was his governmen-
t's way of impressing on Bahami-
ans, "our serious commitment to
rid violence and other hostile acts
from our school grounds."
"We knew that we could add
an element of police enforce-
ment to bring some order back to
our schools," he said.
A group of teachers and par-
ents last week protested against


government's decision to remove
police from the schools after two
stabbing incidents and one attack
on a teacher occurred on gov-
ernment school campuses.
Mr Christie in his chat yester-
day said that the former PLP
administration decided to assign
police to the schools because
they could not afford to risk the
loss of life or serious injury to
school children or teachers.
"Our plan was to rid the
schools of violence first and then


allow the schools and their
boards to determine the long
term security needs. We had reg-
ular weekly reports from the
Commissioner of Police and
these reports were the basis for
the plan we were developing.
"People were being trained
for this purpose. The power of
the uniform is a symbol of
authority that made a major dif-
ference and it reflected a very
serious commitment to protect
our schools," he said.


Albany developers still to


have permits approved


FROM page one
He said that tIe 'developers
can ohly make that 2009 dead-
line if they begin construction in
the next two months.
Commenting on this state-
ment by Mr Anand, Mr
Deveaux said yesterday that he
believes government has been
successful in ignoring this "gun
to the head."
The minister explained that
government is currently still
receiving environmental advice
on Albany's proposed marina
component, golf course and cut
into the beach.
"I think the outpouring at the


town meetings should have indi-
pated to Mr Anand4t1et $e4 isj
immense public concern atd
interest (in the project). He
should be mindful of that as we
were.
"We're not trying to stall him
or derail him, it is a very, very
serious project, a huge project,"
he said.
As it stands now, Mr
Deveaux said that government
is more than prepared to go
ahead with the approvals that
are straightforward and to dis-
cuss those that are not so
straightforward.
The Albany project, which
was negotiated and signed by


the. previous PLadministra-....
Stion,;ncpmpasse.s some 500'
acres which will include 450%00
residences; a small hotel; an 18-
hole championship golf course;
a marina, berths for yachts up to
240 feet; an equestrian centre;
and a beach club.
Partners in the deal include
Park Ridge Securities, the Tavi-
stock Group and world-famous
golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie
Els.
A major component neces-
sary to the project, which has
raised significant concern
among the Bahamian people, is
the re-routing of the southwest
road.




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Straw vendors presented with options


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T TBMD ST E 40 PE


JOHN NUTT, Harbour Bay Liquor Store, a franchisee of Burns House,
with Therese Demeritte and Fabian Fernander of the wine department at
Burns House


ELOY ROLDAN, a proprietor of the Poop Deck Restaurant also a winner
of the Wente Sales promotion


Pair are awarded a vine holiday


TWO wine vendors have won
an all expenses-paid trip to San
Francisco after coming out on
top in an incentive programme
from Wente wines.


* The programme ran from
April 2 through to July 31 to
encourage sales of Wente wines.
, The trip will include a tour
of, the Wente Estate. Once


there they will have an oppor-
tunity to sample several vari-
etals, such as the Riesling,
Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot
Reserve.


As an added bonus the win-
ners will be treated to fine din-
ing at the exclusive Wente
Vineyard restaurant, horseback
riding and golf.


Kingsway Academy



students raise money



for Braille machines


Large SWIment oUsed Cars


FROM field trip to friend-
ship, Dora Chisholm's Christ-
ian Values class at Kingsway
Academy is the perfectexample
of positive peer pressure. After
meeting-the inspirixi shitudents .
of the Salvation Army's Erin H
Gilmour School for the Blind
earlier this year, the class
embarked on a mission to make
work a little easier by purchas-
ing one much needed Braille
machine.
Unlike the Kingsway Acade-
my students whose back to
school list includes pens, pen-
cils and regular books, those
attending the Erin H Gilmour-
School rely on costly Braille
machines to do nearly all of
their assignments. With so many
students and not enough
machines, sharing them can;
often mean a lesson cut short
so that everyone can have
access.
"We first became acquainted
with the students at Erin H
Gilmour on a field trip to meet
first hand people who are slight-
ly different from us," explained
Chisholm. "However, when the
students got here, they were in
for a shock because they didn't
meet any disabled people. They
met peers with the same interest
for computers, love for music
and living with the same Chris-
tian principles. They also
realized that there weren't
enough Braille machines and
wanted to help get at least one
to help out."
According to Charltoneia
Deal, she and her classmates at
Kingsway Academy quickly
organised a weekend fundraiser
that included a souse out, bake
sale and car wash to help their
new friends. .. -....
"It took a lot of careful plan-
ning and lots of cooperation,"
noted Charltoneia. "The
fundraiser was a huge success
and we exceeded our goals. We
set out to get one Braille
machine but we were able to
obtain three and bags to carry
them in. It would not have been
possible without the guidance
and help of God, the organisa-
tional'skills of Ms Chisholm our
teacher, the sponsors, staff, par-
ents and students of Kingsway
Academy."
Last week, Ms Cliisholm and:'
her class were joined by the
school's vice-principal Udean
Sattem to present the machines
and bags valued at over $750
each. Principal of Erin H
Gilmour Maria Deleveaux and


her students expressed thanks
through songs, musical instru-
ments and a presentation in
Spanish before inviting them
fo_.a small:rexcep.tionin.the
school's library where they got


to check out familiar books
typed in Braille.
"You truly don't understand
the value of these gifts," said
. Ms Deleveaux........ --- .
"Our students don't use pens


and pencils and regular black
and white books. These Braille
machines are their books and
pencils. Your care and consid-
eration-for-your peers is truly
commendable."


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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


.,
...,.



Il~i~BP~
:_Yf~i~o
InLO


E&R
.::*1:
VijSini








PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


"An Evening




of Writers"


Featuring:

Pat Rahming

piatrick Anthony
Rahming was
born in Grants
Town, Nassau
and studied at
Government High
School and McGill
University. He has
recorded two
albums and three
singles over past 22
years, including two
Timothy Award win-
ners. He is the
recipient of the
Bahamas Musician
and Entertainers Lifetime Achievement Award and has
written two books of poetry Reflections and
Thoughts in Black & White. Mr. Rahming has also
penned a book of essays and letters The Nai've
Agenda. An architect by profession, he is presently the
principal of Patrick Rahming & Associates. He's the
founding president of the Bahamas Writer's Association
and is a Past President of the Rotary Club of West
Nassau. His hobby is discovering life.


The National Art Gallery


of the Bahamas




Tuesday September 27, 2007

at 7:00 pm

Admission Free



( The 'Ihibune ..... .

Partnership

fbr literac y.
College of The Bahamas-k


New photo shows


Castro standing


* About The Tribune's Newspaper in
Education Literacy Programme

The Tribune recognizes its responsi-
bility towards an informed and literate
citizenship. Our Newspaper in Educa-
tion Literacy Programme is an initiative
to increase awareness of the need and
importance literacy, and the role it
plays in developing constructive citi-


zens.


NATIONAL ART GALLERY
OF THE BAHAMAS


A component of this programme is story serialisation.
We publish stories that are educational, interesting and entertaining.
To learn more about The Tribune's Newspaper in Education Literacy
Programme, call 502-2394 or e-mail nie@tribunemedia.net.


* HAVANA
CUBA published a photo
Sunday of a standing, smiling
Fidel Castro looking heavier but
still gaunt as he met with Ango-
la's president, the first head of
state to see the ailing 81-year-
old since June, according to
Associated Press.
The picture, which appeared
on the front page of Commu-
nist Party youth newspaper
Juventud Rebelde, shows Cas-
tro in a track suit, athletic pants
and tennis shoes. The Cuban
leader appears to have gained
weight and wears a warm half-
smile as he shakes hands with
Angolan President Jose Eduar-
do Dos Santos, who was in
Cuba since Thursday on an offi-
cial visit.
The image was released two
days after Castro gave a sur-
prise hourlong interview on
state television, during which
he answered rumors about his
death that have swirled recent-
ly in the United States by saying
simply, "well, here I am."
Sunday's photo was the first
time Castro has been seen
standing in months. He stayed
seated during the interview,
which aired Friday evening just
hours after officials said it was
taped.
Held in an undisclosed loca-
tion, the meeting between Cas-
tro and Dos Santos reportedly
took place Saturday afternoon
and lasted an hour and 45 min-
utes.
"I could see him recuperat-
ing," Dos Santos told Cuba's
state news agency, Prensa Lati-
na. "He's strong, with good
enthusiasm."
Castro has not appeared in
public since announcing on July
31, 2006, that emergency intesti-
nal surgery was forcing him to
step down in favor of a provi-
sional government headed by
his 76-year-old brother, Raul.
The younger Castro
addressed reporters Sunday in
the province of Matanzas after
seeing Dos Santos board a flight
off the island. "There is a mag-


IN THIS photo released by Cuba's Juventud Rebelde newspaper,
Cuba's President Fidel Castro shakes hands with Angola's President
Jose Eduardo Dos Santos in Havana on Saturday. According to the
Cuban government, Dos Santos became the first foreign dignitary
since early June to meet with the convalescing Castro


nificent photo on the front
page" of Juventud Rebelde, he
said.
Fidel's condition and exact
illness are state secrets, and
before Friday it had been more
than three months since Cuba's
government released images
showing his recovery prompt-
ing rumors in Miami and else-
where that he had died.
Dos Santos, who also met
with Raul on Friday, is the first
head of state to visit with the
elder Castro since June 12,


when the ailing leader's close
ally, Venezuelan President
Hugo Chavez, made a surprise
visit to Havana.
Cuba and Angola have had
close relations for more than
three decades. The Caribbean
nation sent as many as 350,000
military and technical person-
nel between 1975 and 1988 to
help the Angolan government
and the Namibian Liberation
Movement defeat US-support-
ed rebels and South African
troops.


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THE TRIBUNE


!
I









I TI ORCIARIJNW P
I I


Lecturer holds poetry



reading at gallery


TANYA Shirley, a poet and
lecturer in the Department of
Literature in English, Mona
Campus read her poems at the
Sine.qua.non Gallery in Nassau
on September 13.
Shirley brought her audience
to tears at points and to roaring
laughter at others as she
addressed a variety of topics.
Shirley immediately made her
audience feel comfortable by
kicking off her shoes, explaining
that her sandals had burst en
route to Nassau and the pair
she borrowed for the evening
were not her exact size.
She then began the reading
with the poem, "The Shifting
Ground" dedicated to her
mother, who travelled from
Jamaica to be a part of the
evening. Midway through the
poem, which chronicles the
closeness that she shares with
her mother, Shirley's voice
cracked and her eyes filled with
tears.
To lighten the mood, she then
read a poem entitled "Duppy
Conqueror" in which the per-
sona refers to her mother as a
duppy monster because of a
beating issued by the mother
and prays to God to make her
mother "sweet again" in the
morning. The prayer reflects the
child's uncertainty about God's
powers and His ability to under-
stand Patois. In the morning
when the child is awakened by a
penitent mother, the persona
realizes that "di Lord God [is]
bilingual/or better yet, Him
muss be a Jamaican."
Shirley read other poems
centred around family and
belonging. In "Grandpa in the


TANYA SHIRLEY reads her work to the assembled crowd at the
Sine.qua.non Gallery


Departure Lounge" the per-
sona pleads with her grandfa-
ther to "wear red to bed, sprin-
kle this oil under your pillow,
walk with salt" in order to stay
on the side of the living and in
"Where is God In All of This?"
Shirley remembers her grand-
mother who passed away from
cancer but who comforted her-
self and her family during her
illness by repeating that her
earthly suffering was "nothing"
compared to what Jesus
endured.
Her poems also dealt with
serious social issues such as the
escalating crime in the
Caribbean. In the poem, "If I
Loved You More, I Would Risk
My Life" Shirley skilfully
explores the relationship
between young love and the
fear of violence and death and
in "A West Indian Poem" the
persona, after discovering a
bird's dried blood smeared on a


column of her house, hopes that
the blood will remind "the
dream stealers...of God and
[they] shall be passed over".
However, Shirley ensured
that patrons were not left in a
sombre mood by interspersing
her erotic poems throughout
the evening. Even in poems
exploring the negative side of
love, Shirley's rich imagery and
evocative metaphors left
patrons with a feeling of con-
tentment: "you've left me dry
again / ... in this garden of mad-
ness / to dream of fruit / sweet
shady brown naseberries / full in
your mouth / green cherries /
you hope will ripe by the time
you return / they fall I water
bearer man / you gone."
Shirley's second to last poem,
arguably one of the most touch-


Are YOU Vex?

Email us at whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net
and tell us what's on you mind
................................


ing, was dedicated to her god-
daughter. She brilliantly cap-
tures a child's joy and imagines
the role she will play in the
child's life: Years from now /
we will read together, I sail on
magic carpets / to foreign lands
/ rub hands over genie lamps /
shake bells on our shoes, /
dance through pages."
The last poem of the evening
entitled "Negotiation" was a
humorous list of questions
geared at ascertaining whether a
man met the persona's require-
ments. Shirley said it was impor-
tant for her to read that poem
because she did not want to end
the evening in tears and be
remembered as the poet who
cried during her reading.
A number of Shirley's poems
can be found in the anthology
New Caribbean Poetry, edited
by Kei Miller and available at
www.amazon.com.
Shirley's reading was com-
plemented by the intimate
atmosphere created by
Sine.qua.non Gallery owner,
artist Nicole Collie and the
Bahamian art that decorated
the walls of the Gallery.
Shirley, a Jamaican residing
in Kingston, is a frequent visitor
to Nassau and considers it her
second home. Shirley was invit-
ed to read in Nassau by
Bahamian poet, Marion Bethel.
Shirley and Bethel are both fel-
lows of Caven Canem, a presti-
gious writers' colony in the
United States for African
American writers.


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There will be an interruption in ABM and online banking services
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to 9:00am October 1st, 2007.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
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MUNUAY, atr-r- I r-ivltrn e4, eUU/, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


I uI #1



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I t










MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


SECTION m.,


ColinaImperial.


*o *i fe


business@tribunemiedia.net


Cabinet minister urged ex-





PM to hold Port inquiry


* Alfred Sears expressed concern that potential conflict between Port and national regulators

on financial institution licensing could cause 'international criticism or harm' via FATF
Other concerns on telecoms licensing, regulatory standards and Price Control Act

Port's public functions 'incompatible' with those of sovereign nation, as relationship
to government and Bahamas needed to be 'restructured'


a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

net minister
warned that
the Grand
Bahama Port
Authority's (GBPA) ability to
licence financial institutions
appears to conflict with other
Bahamian regulators and could
expose this nation to "interna-
tional criticism or harm", when
he encouraged ex-Prime Perry
Christie to establish a Royal
Commission of Inquiry into the
GBPA.
A November 27, 2006, let-
ter written to the former Prime
Minister by Alfred Sears, then
minister of education, science
and technology, suggested that
the GBPA's relationship with
Freeport, the Government and
the wider Bahamas be restruc-


tured in light of the ownership
dispute that then had just
erupted between the Hay-
wards and the late Edward St
George's estate.
In calling for a Royal Com-
mission of Inquiry into the
GBPA, Mr Sears suggested
that it should examine four
areas as part of its terms of ref-
erence:
Make recommendations to
harmonise the GBPA's regu-
latory functions with national
regulatory functions, and sug-
gest options for amending the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.
Determine when, if and
how the Government's 7.5 per
cent equity stake in the GBPA
was disposed of
Review the GBPA's equi-
ty ownership
Review the functions car-
ried out by the GBPA in rela-
tion to the Bahamian consti-


tution and rights of Freepo't
residents.
Mr Sears' suggestion that a
Royal Commission of Inquiry
be appointed t' examine the
GBPAa .aff.mr nurriri tih call


made in this newspaper a week
ago by leading Freeport busi-
ness executives, who suggested
that the same body and inves-
tigation be undertaken.
, The letter also shows that
there was deep concern at the


highest levels in the Christie
administration about the
potential economic, social,
investment and international
ramifications that the GBPA
ownership battle could have,
and the need for an inquiry to
determine how affairs in
Freeport had reached their
present state.
It.is unclear how former
Prime Minister Christie
responded to the suggestions
by Mr Sears, who was no
longer attorney general after
giving up that post in the Cab-
inet reshuffle, although he did
ask Paul Adderley to intervene
as an amicuss curae' or 'friend
of the court' to see if he could
broker a settlement between
the GBPA owners.
The concerns contained in
Mr Sears' letter are still rele-
vant today, as the GBPA's
principals debate two offers to


acquire the company and its
Port Group Ltd affiliate from
them.
One offer came from the
Hong Kong conglomerate,
Hutchison Whampoa, which is
Port Group Ltd's 50/50 joint
venture partner in the Grand
Bahama Development Com-
pany (Devco) and Freeport
Harbour Company, and has $1
billion tied up in investments in
the Grand Bahama economy.
The other offer came from
the Fleming Group, the lead-
ing global financial institution
and asset manager. It has
already reached an agreement
to acquire the Hayward family
trusts' 50 per cent GBPA stake
for a price believed to be
around $100 million, and is
understood to be in intensive

.SEE PORT, page 10


Main Royal Oasis


re-opening targeted


for early 2009


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
HARCOURT Development
Company is planning to re-
open the bulk of a totally-trans-
formed Royal Oasis resort by
early 2009, The Tribune has
been told, with its $33 million
purchase of the still-closed
Grand Bahama property on
track to close by the end of
October 2007.
Although the deal is due to
close in about a month's time,
Freeport and Grand Bahama
will have to wait for over a year
for the main part of the resort -
its hotel and casino, which will
be branded, managed and
operated by Foxwoods Devel-
opment Company to open its
doors again by January 2009.
This is due to the huge
amount of refurbishment and
remodelling that Harcourt/Fox-
woods will have to do, given
that the property has been
closed since September 20034,
when it was heavily damaged
by Hurricanes Frances and
Jeanne, and in some parts is
said to have been stripped
down to the bare brick.
However, it is understood
that Harcourt and Foxwoods
have plans to double the size of
the previous Royal Oasis casi-
no, and add another 'tower' to
bring the resort's total hotel
room inventory to 650-700
rooms.
Freeport and Grand Bahama
residents are also likely to see


* Purchase still on
track to close by
October-end, with
plans to double
casino in size
* Timeshare owners
bid for $17.603m
default judgment
blocked by
Florida judge

the first signs of progress by
next summer, through the re-
opening of the Ruby Golf
Course and timeshare units.
The Emerald Golf Course will
also be re-opened eventually.
Meanwhile, on the timeshare
front, a group of Royal Oasis
timeshare owners have suf-
fered a setback at least tem-
porarily in their efforts to
bring a class action lawsuit
against the resort's former
owners and operators.
US District Judge Daniel
Hurley, sitting in the US Dis-
trict Court for the southern
District of Florida, denied the
motion filed by Robert Snee,

SEE page 4


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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


I F ID LI R IR .I


Come celebrate with The Mall At Marathon

O1 at our







Saturday, September 29th


The Annual Cake Cutting

will be held at 12 Noon in Center Court.

Enjoy two Live Remotes: 100Jamz and Love 97 FM
from 10am to 2pm. Also two bouncing castles, balloons,
face painting and karaoke.


To be eligible to win persons must make a Mall purchase
Between September 22nd -28th.


Prizes include Mall Shopping Spree

Grand prize winner $2,500
Four (4) $1,000 prizes
Four (4) $500 prizes
Four (4) $250 prizes
Five (5) $100 prizes

V

F *


rzrLJt
iW~T


c-~jYp~;~S~:
fZi~l





k-


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.60
$1.74
$0.85
$9.55
$11.60
$14.60
$3.73
$11.02
$16.00
$3.15
$14.72
$2.35
$6.18
$0.70
$6.10
$12.79
$7.25
$10.05
$10.00


$-
$0.12
$-
$0.01
$-0.10
$-
$-0.01
$-
$0.36
$0.05
$0.02
$0.03
$-
$-
$-
$0.02
$-
$-
$-


8,230
3,000
0
6,628
1,500
0
6,400
2,920
15,970
68,613
6,200
20,500
300
0
3,450
3,500
0
0
0


The Bahamian Stock Market
FINDEX 858.35 YTD 15.67%


CHANGE VOLUME


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
162.30%
39.20%
11.84%
18.93%
2.65%
0.00%
113.14%
10.20%
27.90%
65.79%
4.03%
-6.00%
6.74%
27.27%
-51.39%
6.41%
1.40%
16.86%
0.00%


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets

t was an active week of
trading in the Bahamian
market as more than
148,175 shares changed
hands. The market saw 14 out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which seven advanced, three
declined and four remained
unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was Colina Holdings (CIL),
with 68,613 shares changing
hands and accounting for 46
per cent of total shares traded.
Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the big advancer for the
week, increasing by $0.36 or
2.3 per cent to close at a new
52-week high of $16.
CBL's share price has con-
tinued its upward soar since the
announcement of a planned
three-for-one stock split to be
held in November 2007.
Also advancing was Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited
(BAB) up $0.12 or 7.4 per cent
to end the week at a new 52-
week high of $1.74.
The FINDEX increased by
4.54 points or 0.53 per cent,
week-over-week, to close at
858.35.

COMPANY NEWS

Doctors Hospital Health
System Limited (DHS) -
During the week, DHS
released its financial results for
the 2007 second quarter. Net
income for the quarter was $1.2
million ($0.12 per share), com-
pared to $995,000 ($0.10 per
share) in the 2006 second quar-
ter, an increase of 17 per cent.
Revenues of $10.7 million
increased by $470,000 (4.61 per
cent) in comparison to the 2006
second quarter, while expenses
of $9.3 million were up by
$355,000 (3.97 per cent).
Salaries and benefits
increased by $369,000 or 10 per
cent compared to the 2006 sec-
ond quarter. DHS continued
to suffer a loss from its discon-
tinued operations, the Western
Medical Plaza, of $145,000,
slightly less than the $167,000
recognized in the 2006 second
quarter.


DHS total assets at July 31,
2007, were $31.2 million, an
increase of $2.2 million com-
pared to the 2006 year-end, due
primarily to higher cash bal-
ances of $2.6 million.
Total liabilities were consis-
tent with the year end, only
declining by $299,000.
DHS management indicated
that its strategic objectives to
increase cash reserves, reduce
accounts receivable and min-
imise debt are falling into
place as anticipated.

FirstCaribbean
International Bank (CIB) -
CIB's 2007 third quarter results
for the period to July 31, 2007,
showed a net income of $19.8
million, a decline of $8.3 mil-
lion in comparison to the 2006


comparative:
Net interest income for CIB
was $34.6 million compared to
$37.2 million last year, a
decrease of $2.6 million, while
operating income remained
consistent with the 2006 third
quarter at about $8.1 million.
The bank's total expenses
increased in comparison to the
2006 third quarter by $5.5 mil-
lion to a total of $22.8 million,
primarily as a result of higher
loan loss expenses, which rose
by $7.4 million.
CIB management indicated
it was affected by the higher
cost of deposits resulting from
the tight Bahamian dollar liq-
uidity, with higher loan provi-

SEE page 9


0 .00abank


III I Is~s"%l"~L IIBUSINESSI I I


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:
CBL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on Sep-
tember 28, 2007, to all shareholders of record date September 14,
2007.
Consolidated Water Company has declared dividends of $0.013
per BDR, payable on November 7, 2007, to all shareholders of
record date September 30,2007.
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited will hold its Annual Gener-
al Meeting on September 26, 2007, at 6pm at the British Colonial
Hilton, Number One, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.
CBL will hold an Extraordinary General Meeting on October
17, 2007, at 5pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay Street, Cable
Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.









THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 3B


Ex-MP


by


freezing


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
Former FNM MP
Lester Turnquest has
been hit by a
Supreme Court-
ordered asset freeze, which has
frozen the assets of numerous
companies that he and his for-
mer business partner, Hywel
Jones, president of the Britan-
nia Group, are disputing own-
ership of.
Sources familiar with the
legal battle between the pair,
first revealed by The Tribune
last week, confirmed that Jus-
tice John Lyons had granted
the application for a freezing
injunction brought by Mr Jones
and his companies, Britannia
and Hampton.
It is understood that BDO
Mann Judd accountant Clifford
Culmer, regarded as one of the
Bahamas' foremost experts
when it comes to acting as a
receiver or liquidator, has been
appointed to look after the
companies in question until the
ownership battle is resolved.
It is thought the injunction
could apply to companies con-
taining up to $80 million in
client assets, based on the con-
tents of an affidavit filed by Mr
Jones to support his case.
However, it is understood
that Mr Turnquest, who is
being represented by his broth-
er, Stephen, an attorney and
partner at .Callender's & Co,
are likely to apply to set the
injunction aside.
And Mr Jones, who is being
represented by Brian Simms,
senior partner in charge of liti-
gation at Lennox Paton, is also
thought likely to apply to set
aside two default judgments
obtained by Mr Turnquest
relating to two of the three
writs filed against him and Bri-
tannia.
Neither Mr Turnquest, nor
Mr Jones, could be contacted
for comment. Their respective
attorneys could not be contact-
ed either, despite The Tribune
leaving detailed phones mes-
sages seeking comment on Fri-
day afternoon. The messages
were not returned.
On September 20, Mr Turn-
quest and his company, the
Bonnycord Group Ltd,
obtained default judgments
that, in the absence of a defence
and appearance entered by Mr
Jones and his Britannia Group,
awarded him $2.348 million and
$133,000 respectively.
These judgments relate to
separate writs, one claiming


$2.348 million from Mr Jones's
Britannia Group, alleging that
this was a sum that Bonnycord
had lent to it.
The other writ, naming Bon-
nycord as the plaintiff, was
claiming $133,000 from Britan-
nia Group. It alleged that this is
due to Bonnycord as principal
and interest on a promissory
Snote, which was signed on
December 20, 2006. The writ
alleged that the promissory
note contract was originally
signed between' Britannia and a
company called Horse Whis-
per, but was then assigned to
Bonnycord by the latter on July
3, 2007.
Mr Turnquest had also filed a
Supreme Court summons seek-
ing an order that Mr Jones and
Britannia Consulting "be
restrained from interfering with
or intervening" in his compd-
ny's business affairs.
He was also claiming dam-
ages "for conspiracy to defraud
and/or injure" himself and Bon-
nycord, and for alleged "fraud-
ulent misrepresentations" made
against them.
Yet in an affidavit filed in
response by Mr Jones, he
describes Mr Turnquest's inter-
ference allegations against him-
self and his companies as
"demonstrably false" and
"wholly without foundation".
He adds that the affidavit is
to support his application "for a
proprietary freezing injunction
and worldwide Mareva injunc-.
tion" to freeze Mr Turnquest's.
assets and those of companies
he controls.
Mr Jones is counter-alleging
fraud against Mr Turnquest,
claiming he "removed" $20 mil-
lion from Britannia and the
company's client accounts
before the two parted ways, and
that the former MP is now
falsely claiming ownership' of
companies he wholly owns on
the basis of "fraudulent share
transfers".
The companies at the cen-
tre of the dispute were said to
hold assets worth more than
$80 million.
Mr Jones alleged: "The total
assets in the Hampton sub-
sidiaries are approximately $80
million. The vast majority of
this sum are client assets. These
are sums in respect of which
Hampton remains contractual-
ly liable to its clients. When
there is a draw on the life insur-
ance policy, the clients are
legally entitled to look to
Hampton for satisfaction there-
of, whether or not those assets
have been transferred."


Mr Turnquest is understood
to be vehemently denying such
allegations.
As a result of the ownership
dispute, Mr Jones alleged that
Ansbacher (Bahamas) had said
it could not release information
on any accounts it held for a
number of Hampton sub-
sidiaries the disputed compa-
nies because this could only
be authorised by Mr Turnquest.
Ansbacher wrote on August
22: "We have received conflict-
ing information regarding the
signing authorities relating to
the companies, and until the
dispute between you and Mr
Turnquest is resolved, I am sure
that you will understand that
we cannot release any infor-
mation to either disputing par-
ty until we have received either
a court order or an agreement
signed by both parties deter-
mining the authorised owner of
the accounts."
Other Nassau-based banks
alleged to have maintained
bank and securities accounts
for Britannia and its clients
include Caledonia, Bank of
Butterfield and Experta.


hit


I r1


" In i I dI ri '[.', ,Thi elr to' \\ h.at's h.pl llpnin
in the local economy, we turn to The Tribune
as our source of intornmation. When we want
comprehensive and insightful articles about the
business community. The Tribune is our number
one choice. The Tribune is our newspaper."
RYAN WILLIAMS, TROY SAMPSON, RENEA BURROWS
APPROVED LENDING SERVICES


READ THE
BUSINESS
SECTION
MONDAY TO FRIDAY


The Tribune
// 1/,Zell.


asset


NOTICE OF VACANCY

Excellent opportunities for career advancement exist in the Legal
Department of Port Group Limited. The Company invites qualified
applicants to apply for the position of Legal Assistant.

The successful candidate must have at least five (5) years experience
as a Legal Assistant in the fields of conveyancing, commercial
transactions and probate matters, and must be proficient in all
Microsoft Word and Excel programmes.

The successful candidate must also have:

1. Completed a recognized paralegal/legal executive course,

or

2. A minimum of five (5) B.G.C.S.E "O" levels or equivalent,
two (2) of which should be Math and English with grade
"C" or above.

R6sum6s with supporting documentation should be submitted to:

The Personnel Department
The Grand Bahama Port Authority, Limited
P.O. Box F-42666
Freeport, Grand Bahama
BAHAMAS
or
Email: personnel@gbpa.com
On or before October 1st, 2007


;VNw Investment
Opportunities!


KINGS
REAL ESTRIT


Indigo Investment Opportunity
A unique opportunity to own 5 odlacent lots in this quani gated
community Each lot measures 60 ft x 130 h zoned for 15 units.
Amenti.es include double onnis court and swimming pool Was
$650,000 now reduced to $550,000 for quick sale

Lot 170 Hope Town, Abaco Land for Sale
Large lot located less than 300 hf from the beach with partial ocean
views. Prced ta sell at $285,000

Orange Hill West Bay Street Land for Sale
17.2 acres of superb oceanfront in the most desirable location or
the island. Ideal for a hgh-end condo development or a class "A"
office/financial centre Offered at $7,500 000

Gilingam House, Montague Class "A" Office Space Available
Top Floor comprises of 2.562 sq ft of leasable area and 1,108 sq
ft of commor leasable area toalling 3,670 gross sq ft lease is $32
per sq ft with CAM charges being $12 per sq ft This floor is berng
leased with partial office fiRnlshings.

Contact Kingsley Edgecombe for more information.
Ph: 242 394 4397 ,,kingsley@kingsrealty.com


Gilingam House, Montague, *4 East Bay Street
P.O.Box N 10414, Nassau, The Bahamas


I BUSINESS


I -4


~q~O~lUI


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


It-










PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


Bank of The Bahamas
L I M I T E D






Head Office
Claughton House
Charlotte & Shirley Streets
P. 0. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas




NOTICE


TO SHAREHOLDERS




THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BANK OF THE

BAHAMAS LIMITED IS PLEASED TO ADVISE

THAT A DIVIDEND OF SIXTEEN CENTS (160)

PER SHARE WAS DECLARED ON 20TH

SEPTEMBER, 2007 TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS OF

RECORD AS AT 1T OCTOBER 2007 AND

PAYABLE AS OF 8'T OCTOBER 2007.






LAURA A. WILLIAMS
CORPORATE SECRETARY






I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I "


FROM page 1

Robert Greco and Judith Gre-
co for a $17.603 million default
judgement against Sunrise
Properties (the holding com-
pany for the Royal Oasis time-
share properties) and five oth-
er defendants on July 13, 2007.
Judge Hurley denied the
attempt to obtain a default
judgement on the grounds that
the lawsuit had never been cer-
tified as a class action, that he
was uncertain whether the
$17.603 million sum claimed
was the proper amount, and
that it intended to add addi-
tional defendants.
In denying the default judge-
ment motion, the judge said
the 30-day period that began
on June 7, 2007, during which
the timeshare owners were
supposed to add additional
defendants, had elapsed with
no action taken.
The judge gave the Royal
Oasis timeshare owners 10
days from his July 13, 2007,
judgment to decide whether
they wanted to amend their
case and move forward with a
hearing at which they would
have to produced evidence to
back their default judgment
claim.

Capital
It is understood that the
$17.603 million being claimed
was almost double the $9 mil-
lion in pre-paid and unused
investment capital that the
Royal Oasis timeshare owners
- who number around 2800 -
had invested in their proper-
ties.
Sorting out the timeshare
headache is understood to
have been one of Harcourt's


priorities, and the company is
keen to keep them with the
Royal Oasis by offering a vari-
ety of options, likely to include
contract extensions and
upgrades.

Reported
The Tribune previously
reported how Harcourt Devel-
opment Company, an Irish-
headquartered property devel-
oper, was planning to invest
$150-$200 million in revitalis-
ing the Royal Oasis, eventual-
ly building a new hotel on the
beach and using the property
to target the US convention
market.
It still has to complete the
purchase with the Royal Oasis'
de facto owner, Lehman
Brothers private equity arm,
which took over the resort by
virtue of the mortgage it held
on the property after Drift-
wood (Freeport) closed its
doors and left some $22 mil-
lion in debts and liabilities
behind.
Exploiting Grand Bahama's
proximity to Florida and the
US, the Royal Oasis' location
in Freeport city centre and the
short drive from Grand
Bahama International Airport,
it is understood that Harcourt
will use the convention tax
break granted to the Bahamas
by the US to target the Amer-
ican conference and conven-
tion market.
Harcourt is already heavily
involved in the Grand Bahama
economy through the Bahamia
subdivision, for which it is the
estate manager, and its Suffolk
Court condominium project,
with at least five such build-
ings currently under construc-
tion. The company also owns
beachfront land at Xanadu


Beach, where The Tribune
understands it wants to con-
struct a condotel development.
Lehman Brothers had been
seeking $40 million for the
Royal Oasis, having been
eager to recoup the equity it
invested in the $27 million pur-
chase price and subsequent $45
million renovations. The pri-
vate equity arm has already
received the proceeds from the
2004 hurricane insurance claim
on the property.
Many believe the Harcourt
purchase of the Royal Oasis
should have been concluded
in 2005, but the Irish develop-
er was sidelined by a late $40
million bid from World Invest-
ments Holdings, a Florida-
based group.

Consortium
That consortium split apart
after it was unable to convince
the Government and Lehman
Brothers that it could raise the
necessary capital and find a
world-class casino operator.
Meanwhile Foxwoods, which
is owned by the Pequot Indian
tribe and in one US hotel oper-
ates 400,0000 square feet of
gaming space, four times the
size of the Atlantis casino,is
still understood to be interest-
ed in the proposed Beka
Development Company pro-
ject for eastern Grand
Bahama.
To establish good relations
with the former Christie gov-
ernment and smooth the path
for the Beka project, it was
understood to have indicated
its willingness to help out Har-
court on the Royal Oasis deal,
effectively having communi-
cated: 'Come and see'us when
you're ready and we will help
you in any way we can'.


COME GROW WITH US!!


This is a great opportunity for positive and
effective: individuals to join our team.






Exciing ositons







" Commodity Buyeri


Picture left to right: Sherry Bastian, Vice President of The Cancer Society
and Peter Cumberbatch, President of Bahamas WebPortal.

Bahamas Web Portal has been in partnership with the Cancer Society of the Bahamas for
over two years, producing and designing the artwork for various programs including the
Stride for Life Banner 2006, Stride for Life registration form, tee-shirts, newspaper
advertisement, Banner 2007, the Look Good Feel Better Seminar which was held in August
2007, Survivors Day 2006 and upcoming Survivors Day Seminar October 27th, 2007, and
the design of the Support Group Living Beyond Cancer Support Tee-shirts and video
production.
Bahamas Web Portal (BWP) is an advertising based website, which promotes the websites
and logos of Bahamian businesses and civic organizations. Bahamas Web Portal provides
a myriad of media design services, including:
Media Design Services
1. Web Design
2. Graphic Design
3. Video Production
Business Consultancy
1. Advertising Campaigns
2. Brand Management
The Bahamas Web Portalwebsite provides a comprehensive directory of Bahamian websites
within a very dynamic and intuitive (3D) three-dimensional design. The Bahamas Web
Portal design was developed to provide an avenue for the private and public entities within
the Bahamas to advertise their various services, products and or special events. The BWP
website is a central location, in which Bahamian businesses and civic organizations can
promote their newly developed websites, or create awareness for a preexisting website.
The Cancer Society would like to thank Bahamas Webportal for designing all the artwork
for Stride for Life and assisting the Support Group with its various programs.
This Awareness Walk is to continue sending the message to the public that there is hope,
healing and life after being diagnosed with cancer. The Walk will have participants who
are survivors, person walking in memory of loved ones and persons who wish to support
the Society. Exciting Prizes will be given out!
The Cancer Society is committed to being of service to cancer patients and their families;
educating the public about cancer so that it may be prevented, diagnosed and treated in its
early stages.


Main Royal Oasis




re-opening targeted




for early 2009


BaamsWe ora

~~lnlr M u~om~


SOLOMON'


PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


RIGTm












THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 5B


Senator: Privatise




Hotel Corporation


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

eral Party (PLP)
Senator has sug-
gested that the
government privatise the Hotel
Corporation of the Bahamas,
allowing Bahamians to invest
in it and take ownership of the
country's tourism and resort
development.
Senator Michael Halkitis,
the former MP for Adelaide,
who is presently a consultant
with British American Finan-
cial, told the fourth annual
Abaco Business Outlook con-
ference that young Bahamians
were increasingly feeling they
were being priced out of the
land and real estate market.
As a result, they were com-
ing to believe that they will
never be able to purchase a
new home in the Bahamas
because of the pace of foreign
direct investment and its per-
ceived inflationary impact on
real estate prices.
"When we combine this with
the impression among many
Bahamians that somehow all
the prime land is being given
over to, or being allowed to be
sold, to land speculators we
have a problem.That problem
is pessimism and, eventually,
alienation," Mr Halkitis said.
"How, then, is the worker in
the tourism industry or other-
wise motivated to go to work
every day and perform at a
high level, if he is looking
down the road and is very pes-
simistic about his prospects to
own property in his own coun-
try?" the former MP added.
"I suggest that we privatise
the Hotel Corporation by sell-
ing shares to the Bahamian
public. Allow for a small min-
imum investment to enable


most Bahamians to participate
in the development of the
tourism industry on behalf of
the shareholders.
"This privatised entity can
then contract the necessary
expertise for the development
and management of proper-
ties, raise necessary funds on
the local and international
markets and, from investors,
pursue concessions from.gov-
ernment.
"Generally, it would become
the vehicle through which
Bahamian ownership in the
tourism industry is expanded,
particularly for the small
investor who otherwise would
not have very much chance of
participating."
Mr Halkitis suggested the
privatised Hotel Corporation
could have public offerings and
raise money on the stock mar-
ket. "For example, a project to
develop a five-star golf course
on Cat Island or Abaco could
be funded by offering shares
to the general public. Addi-
tional funds could be raised by


4. .1 -A V .'W '.' .'


',
.* ,, .... ^ -* .,^ ..'..
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S, .* ;*. : ..*'- . ,


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: .4*' ,










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;' .,' ..e,i'" %' "'' s


borrowing, professionals hired
to run the operation, and the
profits go to a wide array of
Bahamian shareholders," Mr
Halkitis said.
This would, he added,
enable Bahamians to have a
greater sense of ownership in
the Bahamas, reduce the
reliance on foreign direct
investment and "get everyone
to be a true ambassador for
the Bahamas because the bot-
tom line affects them even
more directly".
Mr Halkitis said an increased
level of Bahamian ownership
could lead to a deeper com-
mitment to developing the
linkages in the tourism indus-
try that "we are so fond of talk-
ing about".
He added that with a broad-
er cross-section of Bahamian
society participating, the econ-
omy would grow stronger and
have more depth and sustain-
abilty, redirecting national sav-
ings away from consumption
credit towards building pro-
ductive capacity.


Located next to Atlantis,
with 228 beautifully
appointed Junior Suites
and meeting facilities
to accommodate
up to 70 people.

Our guests have
full use of the
exclusive facilities of
the fabulous Atlantis
just steps away.

In-room amenities
include: king size or
two double beds,
sitting area
with sofa bed,
cable tv, refrigerator,
in-room safe,
coffee maker, hair dryer,
complimentary
deluxe continental
breakfast served daily,
pool with swim-up bar,
Crusoe's garden
restaurant serving
breakfast and lunch,
Bamboo cocktail bar.

Guest rooms and
interior public facilities
are designated
non-smoking areas.

Ask about our local
corporate, group and
wedding rates.

Contact our
management team
for a site inspection.








PARADISE ISLAND
BAHAMAS
1 Paradise Island Drive
Paradise Island, Bahamas


it

It








A leading hotel invites qualified
persons in the above mentioned
field to apply for the position of
Chief Engineer.

The successful candidate must
possess the following:

- A Engineering Degree or a
minimum of 5 years experience
as a Chief Engineer, or
Assistant Chief Engineer in a
major hotel

Must be proficient in
Preventative Maintenance
Programs

Must be a Team Leader and
able to work with little or no
supervision

SMust posses strong
interpersonal, communication,
problem solving and customer
service skills

Applicants with supporting
documents also including a clean
Police Certificate should be sent
to the address below:

Competitive salary and benefits
package commensurate with
experience.

Applicants for Chief Engineer
should apply to:


DA #13987,
clo The Tribune
P.O. Box N- 3207
Nassau, Bahamas


Legs hurt

when you walk or


exercise?


Do you have any of the
following symptoms:

Q Leg pain when you walk or exercise

C3 Coldfeet or legs

O Leg pan that goes away wien you rest

O M ibsness and tingl in your legs

0 Ulcers or sores that wont heda

You may have FVD (peripheral
vascular disease). Early
treatment of PVD may prevent
heart attack and stroke. Dr.
Delton Farquharson, M.B.B.S.,
F.R.C.S.C., General and Vascular
Surgeon, will be conducting a
FREE FVD lecture, Tuesday,
September 25th, at 6 pm in the
Doctors Hospital conference
room.


Dr. Delton Farquharson
Vascular Surgeon


Doctors Hospital

Conference room


Date: Tuesday, September 25th
Time: 6:00 pm 7:30 pm







DOCTORS HOSPITAL
-P- F,&ArLP


I 111 1_11 1


II IMM M


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE














Abaco 'closest' to tourism balance


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL.
Tribune Business
Reporter


tors during the
2007 first half,
generating some 590,000 visitor
nights who stayed an average
of 9.4 nights, the director-gen-
eral of tourism praising the
island for being "closest to mir-
roring the balance we ought to
strive for in our tourism mix".


Vernice Walkine told dele-
gates attending the fourth
annual Abaco Business Out-
look that the island was a
leader in Family Island tourism
and continues to receive the
highest repeat visitor percent-
ages, its growth having been
"organic or natural as opposed
to being forced", something
that had enabled communities
to support the development
they were being asked to sus-
tain.
"Here in Abaco, the relaxed
feel of the island, the well-kept


surroundings, and the
unmatched hospitality of Aba-
conians have made Abaco a
leader in our Family Island
tourism. Our guests tell us that
they are very likely to return
here and very likely to recom-
mend Abaco to their friends
and relatives," Ms Walkine
said
She explained that Abaco's
tourism had been shaped by
repeat visitors and residents,
"those who were really com-
mitted for the long-term and
not simply speculating and


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proven track record in consumer marketing


Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is tte leading beverage company
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from beer to spirits and wines, BHG Is the market leader and trend setter
in the respective categories;

Within our marketing department we seek to fill the position of M g q9i
Manager. In this position you will be responsible for a large portfollo .
consumer brands like Budweiser beer, Ricardo rums, Climax energy dtnk,
Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi wines to name a few.

The marketing manager we are looking for is a team player, has profound
knowledge of the marketing mix and is an excellent planner with great
passion for execution.

SBHG will offer you a challenging environment with International growth
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International training opportunities.

Profile of the ideal candidate
Bachelor Degree in Marketing, Business Administration is essential; Master
In Business an advantage
3-5 years of supervisory experience in marketing
Team building skills
Consumer goods Marketing experience


seeking to flip for quick profits.
I am convinced that that
underpinning has been the dri-
ving force behind the island's
stability as a destination".
The tourism director gener-
al said departure surveys taken
between 2003-2006 revealed
that 83 per cent of visitors said
they were very likely to rec-
ommend the Bahamas as a
vacation destination for other
travellers.
"It should be noted, howev-
er, that Treasure Cay and
Marsh Harbour are areas that
require work in terms of very
likely to recommend levels.
Marsh Harbour 80 per
cent, Treasure Cay 77 per
cent, and the Abaco's
85 per cent," she said.
In addition, Ms Walkine said
repeat visitors stay far longer
than first time visitors in Aba-
co. For example, visitors from
the US that repeat stay four
nights more than first timers.
Canadian repeats stay 10
nights more than first timers,
and European repeats stay 11
nights more than first timers.
"This underscores the cru-
cial need to work at keeping
intent to return or recommend
at the very high levels we see,




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especially in the Abaco Cays,
and raise it a bit more in Trea-
sure Cay and Marsh Harbour,"
said Mrs Walkine.
She added that most of Aba-
co's visitors were arriving via
scheduled airlines, which
accounted for 73 per cent of
its stopover visitors during the
2007 first half.
Continental brought in 44
per cent of those airline visi-
tors, American Airlines. 19 per
cent, and Bahamasair 7 per
cent. Twelve per cent of visitor
nights are attributed to visitors
arriving by private plane.
A significant percentage of
these arrivals were affluent, Ms
Walkine said with their house-
hold income exceeding
$75,000, accounting for 60 per
cent of visitor nights.
Comparing 2006 first half
visitor nights to the 2000 first
half showed there were about
123,700.more visitor nights in
2006. The highest proportion
of this growth came from those
staying in apartments, villas
and condos, who accounted for
94 per cent of the 123,700
increase in visitor nights.
Some 60,000 more visitor
nights were spent in Abaco by
affluent US visitors (hlouse-
hold income of $75,000 and
above) compared to 2000, Ms
Walkine said, a figure that rep-
resented 48 per cent of the
growth in visitor nights
between then and 2006.
And there had also been a
60,000 visitor night increase for
those with a household income
of between $50,000 to $75,000,
Ms Walkine said.
Abaco, she added, benefit-
ed from a "very high level of
repeat business", with 74 per
cent of visitor nights for 2006
attributed to repeat visitors


staying 11 nights on average.
Some 57 per cent of visitor
nights for private boaters was
repeat business staying 22.8
nighbts on average, while 69
per cent and 67 per cent of vis-
itor nights for apartment/vil-
la/condo owners and hotels
respectively were attributed to
repeat visitors, staying 10.4
nights and 7.7 nights.
Some 98 per cent of home-
owners were repeat visitors,
staying for an average 18.2
nights.
To the end of June 2006, Ms
Walkine said 44 per cent of
Abaco visitor nights were reg-
istered by those visitors staying
in private homes, apartments,
villas and condos, staying on
average 8.8 nights.
She added that 22 per cent
of Abaco visitor nights were
registered by those visitors
staying in hotels, on average
6.6 nights.
And 13 per cent of Abaco
visitor nights were registered
by those coming to Abaco by
yacht/boat and staying, on
average, 22.7 nights.
For those who used yachts
and boats as accommodation
this increased to 26 per cent of
Abaco visitor nights, with a
12.3 night stay on average.
As for Abaco's challenges,
Ms Walkine said that while the
island received some 200,000
cruise passengers annually at
Castaway Cay, and produced
some spin-offs to Abaconians,
"we are barely scratching the
surface in terms of the revenue
opportunities from this seg-
ment of visitors".
Ms Walkine said a plan to
deal with this was being devel-
oped, led by the efforts of the
Miknistry's Abaco office under
Don Cornish.


SLampki
company
UInsurtan e Brokcrs & Rlinifit (:tnsiultants It.d,



RACQUEL CHEA

is no longer employed by Lampkin &

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free to contact us for assistance!

Phone: (242) 325-0850 Fax: (242) 326-8024
12 Montrose Avenue P.O. Box EE-15280
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BAHAMAS BUSINESS SOLUTIONS LTD.
wishes to inform the general public that
TEKITO STEVENSON
is no. longer employed with the company,
and is not authorized to
transact any business on behalf of
the company.

(B Bahgamas
BSL Business Solutions Ltd.






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PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE

















Deputy PM pledges more scientific





plan on project approvals


a By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

The Government can
no loliger approve
projects based sim-
ply on the hope
they will be viable and eco-
friendly, the Deputy Prime
Minister said, pledging that it
woald fully consult with com-
mmnities set to be impacted by
developments and more rigor-
otsly enforce marina, golf
course and environmental reg-
uhtions.
Stressing that investment
projects needed to be placed
under greater scrutiny before
trey were approved, Brent
Symonette said: "Long gone is
the time when a government
could approve a barrage of
development projects in the
hope and expectation that at.
least a few would be imple-
mented, and thereby meet the
community's needs for
employment.
"Today, projects must be
carefully considered to ensure
that only the most viable are
approved, and that once
approved, they move to imple-
mentation in a timely fashion."
Addressing the fourth annu-
al Abaco Business Outlook
conference, Mr Symonette said
the Government intends to
take a stronger stance on
developers' environmental
practices.
"It goes without saying that
development can only proceed
with careful attention to the
environmental impact of the
project," Mr Symonette said.
"This government is deter-
mined to stop the assault on
the environmental integrity of
the Bahamas, resulting from
harmful practices such as unau-
thorised excavations of hills,


back filling of wetlands and
dredging of sand.
"Toward this end, we will
refine legislation for the regu-
lation and provision of guide-
lines for the Environmental
Impact Assessments."
Mr Symonette's comments
on the environment were par-
ticularly well received, bearing
in mind the concerns many
Bahamians have regarding the
impact of numerous develop-
ment projects.
Mr Symonette indicated that
the experience of the Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club on
Great Guana Cay, which is
being fought in the courts by
people on that island, and the
Bimini Bay project, has led the
Government to reevaluate
development strategies to
ensure past mistakes are not
repeated.


"I might say that we are not
necessarily convinced, for
example, that every resort
development on every island
and cay require their own golf
course and marina," he added.
Mr Symonette said the Gov-
ernment intends to move expe-
ditiously to conclude consulta-
tion on, and the adoption of,
the National Marina Policy,
and will look to establish inde-
pendent standards to be
applied to golf course devel-
opments, seeking to more ade-
quately regulate coastal zone
construction.
Mr Symonette said planned
growth requires a community
that is ready for development
and able to benefit fully from
its implementation
It was, he said, equally
important, that "we ensure that
the number of approved pro-


FOR SALE


jects does not exceed the
capacity of our communities
to meet the manpower
demands or infrastructure
requirements of the projects.


"What is also now clear is
that decisions on development
matters require the full,
informed involvement of local
communities. The time when


governments could sit in Nas-
sau and determine the future
for citizens living in the Fami-
ly Islands without their
involvement is now gone."


*.. eu ,-. a.' '. .4 '


CFA Society of The Bahamas


2007/2008 Officers & Directors
President
Kristina M. Fox, CFA
Email: kfoxcoralwave.com
Vice-President
David Ramrez, CFA
Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.
PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242)3022217
Fax: (242) 327 6610
Email:dramirezipictet.com
Treasurer
Christopher Dorset, CFA
Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242)302 8668
Fax: (242) 302 8569
Email: Christopher.a.dorsett@citieroup.com
Secretary
Sonia Beneby, CFA
ScotiaTrust
PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242)502 5700
Fax:(242) 326 0991
Email: sonia.benebvyiscotiatrust.com
Programming
Karen Pinder, CFA
EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242)502 5400
Fax: (242) 502 5428
Email: karen.pinder@iefgbank.com
Education
Pamela Musgrove, CFA
Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.
PO Box CB 12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242)502 7008
Fax: (242) 356 3677
Email: pmusgroveacfal.com
Warren Pustam
Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.
PO Box N-4873, Nassau Bahamas.
Ph: (242)302 2222 -
Fax:(242)3276614
Email: w pustamlOhotmail.com
Membership
Geneen Riviere
Pearl Investment Management Limited
PO Box N 4930, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242)5028022
Fax: (242) 502 8008
Email: geneen.riviere(pearl-investment-
management.com
Past President
David Slatter, CFA
KPMG
PO Box N-123, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 393 2007 '
Email: dslatter(.kpme.com.bs


MONTHLY SPEAKER / WEBCAST EVENT


Topic:

Date:

Time:


China's Economy: Structural Strength, Cyclical Weakness

Thursday, September 27th2007


6:00 pm


Cocktail Reception (Hors d'Oeuvres)


6:30 pm Webcast
Please arrive promptly!


Location: Luciano's of Chicago
Cagliari Room
East Bay Street

Presentation: Webcast
Jim Walker
Chief Economist
CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets


Reservations:


Members $25.00
Non-Members $35.00
(If paying by cheque, please make cheque payable to: CFA
Society of The Bahamas)

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED -by Tuesday
September 25,2007
Karen Pinder, CFA
karen.pinder@efgbank.com
*Prepayment required through one of the Board Members


gFA
INSTITUTE
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
OUALIFIEDACTIVITY


The Clifton Heritage Authority is seeking the services of persons to fill the
following positions at the Clifton National Park:




Park wardens have significant responsibilities in visitor services, Resource
management and the provision of the interpretative services.



Assists with monitoring the activities at the park to ensure the proper use of
the facilities.
" Assists with the facilitation of tours at the site, school programs and special
events.
Implements resource management techniques required to manage and restore
natural and cultural resources including exotic plant and animal removal,
native plant restoration, erosion control and prevention of historic structure
remains and archaeological sites.
Properly uses herbicides'and other chemicals in conjunction with the
maintenance team.
o Provides emergency assistance.
o Assist with any other duties assigned.



o Minimum of 3 BGCSE's or 5 BJC's
Have sound knowledge of security techniques.
Police vetting is a requirement
Trainable and preparedness to be trained.
Graduate of the Bahamas Host Program is a plus




Responsible for the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds and facilities
of the Clifton Heritage Park.




Ensures the daily maintenance and upkeep of the grounds of the Clifton
Heritage Park, facility cleaning, facility repairs and maintenance, and natural
and cultural resource management as directed.
Removal of debris and other identified plants.
o Cleans and properly stores all tools, vehicles and equipment.
o Constructs, maintains and repairs building and structures, including
plumbing, wiring and paintings


Minimum of 3 BJC's
o Ability to operate general landscaping equipment
o Trainable and preparedness to be trained
Applications are available at the Authority's Office Colins Avenue.
Telephone contact 325-1505..


n w in Wll m


0 EIL A S _iM I








Prime MedTicl District
^^^^Seious inquiries only^^


NAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company


Do you want to join our team?

The following position is currently available:

SUPERVISOR PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE TEAM

We are looking for a dynamic Supervisor who places safety and teamwork as top priorities.
reporting to the Manager, Maintenance Services, the Supervisor is responsible for
overseeing and supervising the daily activitlesof the Preventative Maintenance Team. This
Includes planning all preventative maintenance programs, providing support and leadership
to staff and working as a collaborative member of the Maintenance Supervisory Team.

The ideal candidate will have at minimum, a high school diploma and 3 years supervisory
experience. Demonstrated leadership skills and communications skills are a must; both
written and oral. The successful candidate will have strong mechanical and electrical skills
along with a good working knowledge of building trade and codes. A trade's certification
would be a definite asset.

Please send your resume to:

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Company
P.O. Box AP-59229
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for Applications is September 28th, 2007
Only those applicants granted interviews will be contacted.


."--.'.I 1~4


In this presentation, Jim Walker discusses the long-term growth outlook for
China, He will speak about the drivers of this growth including: Private
property rights and market signals. In addition, reasons for short-term market
concerns will be reviewed.

Jim Walker is chief economist at CLSA Asia-Pacific Markets. Previously, he
worked as a research fellow at the Fraser of Allandder Institute and then at the
Royal Bank of Scotland, where he was responsible for coverage of the oil
industry and the U.S. economy.

Well known as "Dr. Jim," Dr. Walker has been named the Best Economist for
Asia for 11 consecutive years in the Asiamoney Brokers Poll. He is best
known for his coverage of Hong Kong and China and is widely recognized as
one of the first to predict the 1997 Asian crisis. Dr. Walker received a BA and
PhD in economics from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


I


.1












BNT Nature Walks are Back!

Retreat Garden
National Park,
Village Road
Sat, Sept 29 @ Sam


THE TRIBUNE


I1, U ,- - -
BUINS


'Something must



be done on beach



access reforms


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
Owners of beach-
front property
own the land up
to the high water
mark and have a right to refuse
access up to and beyond that
point, making it perhaps nec-
essary to change laws relating
to this form of ownership.
Don Saunders, a senior asso-
ciate at Halsbury Chambers
and former FNM candidate for
Golden Gates, explained to
persons attending the firm's
free legal'clinic that while this
was true under Bahamian law,
the Crown is the only body
with absolute ownership of
property.
"So while you may own
land, you do not have the
absolute right to do with your
property as you wish," Mr
Saunders said.
He explained that according
to the law, a person with
beachfront property only owns
that portion of the property
that lies above the high water
mark.
The bottom line, Mr Saun-
ders said was that while the
beach belongs to the people,
the property owners also have
rights as well.
This issue of beach access is
particularly topical given the
recent public uproar sur-
rounding the rate of develop-
ment in the Bahamas. Many
Bahamians feel the Govern-
ment has given away too much
prime beachfront land,deny-
ing locals access to the beach.
,Andrew Wilson, a Bahamian,,
entrepreneur, said Bahamians


DON SAUNDERS, a senior associate at Halsbury Chambers and fo-
mer FNM candidate for Golden Gates


needed to reclaim their public
beaches before they were lost
forever.
He said it was particularly
distressing that, as people
drove around NMew Provi-
dence, the majority of sea
views were obstructed by pri-
vate walls, and access to the
beach which should be free
under law was now being
blocked.
"There are supposed to be
roads leading to the beach,
allowing for firetrucks to have
access to water in case of fire,
but they are being blocked by
private owners. Something
needs to be done," Mr Wilson
said.
Retired Justice Jeannie
Thompson, who is now a con-
sultant with Halsbury Cham-
bers, pointed out that while
persons were concerned about
beach access, they ought to
remember the point that the
property owner does own the
land up to the water mark.
"So really what that means is;'


that you can have access to tie
water, but not the beach, and
unless you have a boat or
something, how do you access
the water," she asked.
Ex-justice Thompson told
the audience of meeting a ladi
about 20 years ago, who hac
purchased beachfront proper-
ty.
"She told me that she had a
choice of purchasing in Barba-
dos or here, and she said she
chose the Bahamas because
she wanted to own the beach.
In Barbados, she was not legal-
ly allowed to own the beach'
because, according to law, the'
beach was owned by the peo-
ple," she explained.
Ms Thompson pointed out
that in effect the damage has
been done, because having
sold the land, it belongs to the
landowner and cannot just be
taken back. Therefore, some-
thing would have to be done
to legally enable Bahamians to
have access to land above the
high water mark. ' "


"*PYouth Empowerment & Skills Trainin institute


The YEA AST Institute inite


applicions for admission to
-mP ... .. '- ... a I HtlH^^


mThh


L2L\ @?


JMoLA


LUDIA
b I


October 20, 2007


June 30th


J08


Applicants must he males, 12-19 years of age, who can benefit from an
intense program of discipline, leadership, vocational skills, and academics.

The Restorative Program is a 9-month residential leadership and'character
development cu,/rriculum,hn that hene.fits the whole male child to become a leader
in his colmmuniIi'.


Please contact: YEAST ",,,
40 Deveaux Street (Next to Our Lady's Catholic Church)
Nassau, Bahamas


242-322-8335 242-326-5781
Office hours: 8a 4p, M-F


AP GE 8B MONDAYSEPTEMB 7


wp -.- --- - ~ --


M~~a9~11;2~Q11


Y@oza


-afoTe7 af


I


__~p~


Id~lQ










THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 9B


* I


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
B ahamians have
been urged to use
the services of a
mortgage broker
when purchasing real estate,
the former head of the
Bahamas Mortgage Brokers
Association saying they
could find the best interest
rates available.
Troy Sampson said that a
difference of even 0.5 per
cent on an interest rate could
save a person at least
$15,000-$30,000 over the life-
time of their mortgage.
Speaking at a free legal
clinic sponsored by the Hals-
bury Chambers law firm, Mr
Sampson said many persons
interested in home purchases
tended to enter the process
with little planning and sim-
ply accepted the interest
rates that a single financial
institution have to offer.
Services
"If you use the services of
a mortgage broker, they can
get you not only the best rate


a single bank has to offer, but
the best offers of several
banks," Mr Sampson said.
SAdvised
He advised that persons
should get pre-approval
before they begin their
search for a home, because
viewing homes out of their
price range can only lead to
heartbreak.
Mr Sampson said there
were four important steps
that should be followed in
the home purchasing process.
They included goal setting
and planning, determining
how much you can afford,
and obtaining multiple
approvals from lenders with
rates. Only then should the
search for a home begin.
Mr Sampson warned that it
was important that persons
keep in mind the associated
cost of the home purchase,
including closing costs, bank
fees, attorney fees and mort-
gage indemnity.
Also speaking at the clinic
was Julia Bowleg, the recruit-
ment officer at the Bahamas
Technical and Vocational
Institute (BTVI), who spoke
on the value of a technical


MARKET WRAP, from page 1

sions being made in the 2007 third quarter.
Year-to-date total net income was $85.2 mil-
lion compared to $82.9 million at the same time
last year. However, unusual items accounted
for $4.9 million of the higher revenues in the
period.
In comparison to year-end 2006, CIB's total


education.
Ms Bowleg said greater
emphasis needed to be
placed on technical educa-
tion.
She pointed out that at one
particular school, out of the
363 12th grade students, 109
male students did not have
the qualifications for a school
leaving certificate, a category
that 64 female students fell
into.
Some of these students
could have benefited from
being placed in a technical
stream of classes, Ms Bowleg
said.
Growth
She added that given the
growth of construction in the
Bahamas, there needed to be
a stream of qualified
Bahamian professionals in
place to meet the demand.
Ms Bowleg said that con-
trary to the belief that these
types of jobs are menial,
many technical persons are
starting their careers at $12 a
hour.
"So you can make money
in these fields and have a
great career," Ms Bowleg
said.


assets and liabilities increased by $350 million
and $325 million respectively, standing at $4.8
billion and $4.2 billion at the end of July 31,
2007.
The growth in assets/liabilities is attributed
to higher customer deposits and loans during the
period. .i.i. . 1;


1. ASSISTANT WAREHOUSE SUPERVISOR
Must be competent and experienced in
warehousing and deliveries,



2. APPLIANCE REPAIR TECHNICIANS
Must be competent, experienced and able
to work without direct supervision.


Please send resume along with first 4 pages of passport,
a police character certificate, and copies of
certifications) achieved from reputable institutions) to:



Human Resources Manager
PO. Box N7220
Nassau, Bahdmas.



Deadline for receipt of applications is October 8th, 2007.


F. II


ISAD
Nassau Airport
Development Company

Invites Tenders for providing


Public Relations

AT

LYNDEN PINDLING INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

In keeping with NAD's objective to develop and maintain a world class gateway to
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Proponents shall:

a Be fully Bahamian owned & operated
Be holder's of a current business license
a Demonstrate the ability to fulfill the requirements
set out in NAD's official Request for Proposal.
Show a track record of commitment to service
with excellence
a Have experience in graphic design, strategic
marketing & media relations
Provide assistance outside normal business
hours
B Have the ability to deliver a multi year public
relations /communications plan

RFP's may be collected from NAD's corporate office in Terminal 1 at The
Lynden Pindling International Airport between the hours of 10:00 am 4:00 pm
commencing September 28t until Oct 5th 2007.

All submissions must be returned in the prescribed format by 3:00pm on
Oct 26th, 2007 and addressed to:

Nassau Airport Development Company Ltd
Level 2 International Terminal Building
Lynden Pindling International Airport
Nassau, The Bahamas

SAttention: Vice President, Marketing


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for
CFO Bahamas


Qualifications:


Accounting designation (ACCA, CPA or other similar designation)
Audit experience (4+ years post qualification)
Prior experience working in/with financial institutions (5 years +)
Prior experience in managing external audits
Technical competence in relevant statutory accounting and financial
management business principles
Detailed understanding of accounting principles and consolidations
In-depth knowledge of IFRSs
Good understanding of tax computations
Well developed analytical skills and modeling techniques

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Providing advisory services to senior officials of the client
organizations) as to the status of their specific financial resources
(e.g., assets, capital, expense, revenue) and the financial trends or
results of operations.
Making financial recommendations based on analysis of applicable
operational, legal, regulatory and accounting issues.
Investor relations- Responsible for coordinating, planning, and
holding annual investor relation meetings together with the Managing
Director.
Strategy- Responsible for development, monitoring and execution
of strategy
Participates in the co-ordination and integration of selected planning
cycles (strategic, tactical, financial, business).
Directing he provision of effective internal controls.
Providing professional specialized expertise to the business or
organization by diagnosing problems and issues and proposing
solutions within the area of responsibility.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via
email by October 5th, 2007 to:

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under consideration
will be contacted.

Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.


A leading home appliances and electronics I I L n I J I 1~11~ reti

distributor invites. suitaIly qualify ied applicants to


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


4










THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B MONDAYSEPTEM 2007


PORT, from page 1

negotiations with the St
George estate and its execu-
tors about purchasing their
shares.
In his letter to the former
Prime Minister, Mr Sears
detailed a number of potential
concerns and conflicts between
the GBPA's licensing and reg-
ulatory powers, and those of
Bahamian national regulators.
They were:

The GBPA's ability to
licence financial institutions,
such as banks, broker/dealers
and insurance companies,
appears to conflict with the
powers conveyed on the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas,
Securities Commission of the
Bahamas, and Registrar of
Insurance
Mr Sears warned that this
could potentially attract neg-
ative attention from the inter-
national bodies scrutinizing the
Bahamian financial services
regulatory and anti-money
laundering systems, especially
the International Monetary
Fund (IMF) and the Financial
Action Task Force and its
Caribbean affiliate.
The potential conflict
between the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement and Public Utili-
ties Commission Act on licens-
ing of Freeport-based telecoms
operators.
The problems Customs has
in administering the Customs


Management Act, and possi-
ble breaches of the Price Con-
trol Act.

Mr Sears said in his letter:
"I submit, Prime Minister, that
the sovereign functions per-
formed by the Port are incom-
patible with a sovereign inde-
pendent nation. This incom-
patibility is most stark in the
area of an overlapping juris-
diction in a number of areas
which places the national inter-
ests of the Bahamas at risk.
"For example, the Port's
encouragement of entrepre-
heurial activities in Freeport
often results in a lower regula-
tory standard than the nation-
al regulatory standard in the
areas of financial services, cus-
toms control, environmental
impact of rock blasting, spirits
and beer manufacturing and
road traffic."
He added that the 1955
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
allowed the GBPA to licence
financial institutions operating
from within the 230 square
mile Port area.
Mr Sears wrote: "These pro-
visions appear to conflict with
the Central Bank Act, which
gives the Central Bank author-
ity to license and regulate all
banks and trust companies
operating in the Bahamas. The
Registrar of Insurance, under
the Insurance Act, is given
authority to license and regu-


Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT
(No.45 of 2000)


DINVEST INTERNATIONAL CORP.
In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
DINVEST INTERNATIONAL CORP. has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the llth day of September, 2007.

Epsilon Management Ltd.
Suite 13, First Floor
OliajilTrade Centre
Francis Rachel Street,
Victoria, Mahe.
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator


Legal Notice

NOTICE


VINITA INVESTMENTS LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
18th day of September 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., PO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


late all insurance companies
and agents operating in the
Bahamas.
"A similar conflict exists in
the securities area. The Secu-
rities Commission has
expressed a concern about the
Port licensing broker dealers
to operate in Freeport, with-
out reference to the Commis-
sion.
"In light of the Governmen-
t's commitment to anti-money
laundering and combating the
financing of terrorism, as part
of our international coopera-
tion with FATF, CFATF and
IMF obligations, this apparent
conflict may expose the
Bahamas to international crit-
icism or harm."
The various Supreme Court
rulings against the Govern-
ment and Comptroller of Cus-
toms, allowing duty-free
exemptions to apply to house
appliances and furnishings
imported by GBPA licensees,
had made it difficult to admin-
ister the Customs Management
Act, Mr Sears said.
He added: "Some licensees
in Freeport are selling these
commodities duty free when
the same products may have
two prices, in contravention of
the Price Control Act."
Finally, Mr Sears noted the
potential conflict between the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
and the Public Utilities Com-
mission Act had created "con-


fusion" as to whether
Freeport-based telecoms oper-
ators paid license fees to the
GBPA or the Nassau-based,
PUC.
"Further, the grant of licens-
es by the Port forvoice ser-
vices by Internet Service
Providers has implications for
regulation and the revenue of
BTC," Mr Sears said, indicat-
ing that this was allowing
Freeport ISPs to offer Voice
over Internet Protocol (VoIP)
services in direct competition
to BTC, even though the state-
owned carrier and Systems
Resource Group (SRG) were
the only two licensed to deliv-
er fixed-line voice telephony
using VoIP technology.
Mr Sears described Freeport
as a 'company town', with the
GBPA influencing "every
aspect of economic and social
life", through its ability to
licence all businesses med-
ical, legal and architectural
included and regulate them,
and its ownership interests in
all key utilities, ports of entry
and infrastructure.
Referring to a legal case in
the US, which established that
the more private owners of
infrastructure opened it up to
use by others, the more their
rights were "circumscribed" by
the public function and consti-
tutional rights of the users, Mr
.Sears said this should be
applied to the GBPA. This


75e 5 t ho pUso Vyrr we U e iiWt I
*a wi ttss nb m e im f F5s en ^
Carey Building, Dowdeswell Street 5. .
Tel: 31,22-1103 Laura
Monday: Friday
www.lukeandlauraco.com


Legal Notice

NOTICE


PENNE DIAZ CORPORATION

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
18th day of September 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., PO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.


ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


would mean that the GBPA
would be obliged to "observe
the standard of due process"
demanded by the Bahamian
constitution and common law.
"For example, the Port
should be required to publish
the set of criteria it uses to
determine whether to grant an
application of a licence and to
provide a formal appeal mech-
anism for those Bahamian and
other applicants whose licence
applications are denied by the
Port," Mr Sears wrote in his
letter to Mr Christie.
"Given the fact that these
decisions determine whether
Bahamians can pursue their
occupational and entrepre-
neurial endeavours, standards
of due process should be used
to minimise personal and polit-
ical victimisation and other
unfair practices."
He added: "In the circum-
stances, there is a compelling
national policy interest of self-
determination implicated in
the relationship between the
Bahamian community and the
Port. There is an urgent need
to develop a formal mecha-
nism for Bahamian licensees
to participate in the making of
corporate policy of the Port in
light of its public function'.
'"I recommend, therefore,
that the Government first
negotiate with the Port to har-
monise the latter's public func-
tions with the requirements
that a sovereign people partic-
ipate in the formulation of
policies that affect their vital
interests.
"Secondly, the Port, in light
of its "public functions, should
be a publicly traded company
in which Bahamians own
shares and have a voice in its
governance.
"Thirdly, the Port should.be
required to publish its annual
reports, since its economic
health is critical to the contin-
ued vibrancy of the Freeport
economy."
Mr Sears suggested that a
Royal Commission of Inquiry
was needed due to the "regu-
latory confusion" and uncer-
tainty created within the
Bahamian and international
investment community as a
/result of the Port ownership
dispute.
Among those he suggested
could possibly serve on such a


Commission was former
Jamaican Prime Minister P. J.
Patterson as co-chairman,
alongside Mr Adderley.
"If our response.is not
immediate and thoughtful, the
confidence of Bahamians living
in Grand Bahama and else-
where, as well as that of for-
eign investors, in our Govern-
ment may be irreparably
impaired," Mr Sears conclud-
ed.
The Tribune revealed last
week how Chris Lowe, the
Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce's president, and
attorney Rawle Maynard, on
behalf of the Freeport
Licensees and Property Own-
ers Association, urged that a
Royal or Blue Ribbon Com-
mission be established to assess
whether the GBPA's regula-
tory responsibilities should be
devolved to a local government
authority.
The pair charged: "The time
has come for a forensic audit of
the affairs of the Port Author-
ity, and an injunction imposed
to prohibit the sale of any
shares in the Grand Bahama.
Port Authority and affiliated.
companies until community
assets have been accounted for
and the covenants on the part
of the Port Authority to be
performed guaranteed.
Mr Lowe said of the need
for an inquiry into the GBPA
and how Freeport reached its
current state: "I think it's crit-
ical, otherwise we're going to
go through a litany of potential
suitors and investors, and shift
further and further away from
the root cause and purpose of
the Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment. We're building castles
on sand.
"If they're [the GBPA own-
ers] selling assets which, in
point of fact, are privately held
for private profit, they will take
the profits and leave, and
Freeport will be left holding
an empty bag.
"The assets were to be capi-
talised on for the development
of Freeport, and whilst rea-
sonable profits are to be
expected, special dividends to
be derived from the revenue
generated from the sale of
these assets is unreasonable.
This habit of profiteering and
liquidation has been incredi-
bly detrimental."


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, LILLY DOUGLAS
of House #1794, Avocado Street, Pinewood Gardens,
Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my name to LULIE
DOUGLAS. If there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.


Legal Notice

NOTICE


VICTORIA INVESTMENTS GROUP LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
18th day of September 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., P.O.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE


TOTARA LIMITED


NOTICE IS HERE BY GIVEN as follows:

(a) TOTARA LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution under
the provision of Section 137 (4) of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
19th September 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Mr. Paul Evans of
Helvetia Court, South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guemsey.

Dated this 24th day of September, A.D. 2007.

Mr. Paul Evans
Liquidator


14i r] '. i ,'


Pricing Information As Of: C F A L'"
Friday, 21 September 2007 .

52wk-HI 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. BEPS Dlv S PIE YIeld
1.76 ,0.54 ADac I.larKGEt 1.,L- 0 ,4 I- 00 i i.
11.74 11,00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.70 11.60 -0.10 1,500 1.527 0.400 7.6 3.45%
9.55 7.50 Bank of Bahamas 9.55 9.55 0.00 2,428 0.733 0.260 13.0 2.72%
.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.048 0.020 17.7 2.35%
374 1.52 Bahamas Waste 3.73 3.73 0.00 0.275 0.060 13.6 1.61%
1.74 1.20 Fidelity Bank 1.70 1.74 0.04 2:000, -..064 0.040 27.2 2.30%
11.00 9.40 Cable Bahamas 11.02 11.02 0.00 0.996 0.240 11.1 2.18%
3.15 1.80 Colina Holdings 3.13 3.15 0.02 5,000 .0.208 0.080 15.1 2.54%
16.00 11.50 Commonwealth Bank 16.00 16.00 0.00 1.190 0.680 13.4 4.25%
7.22 4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.85 5.98 0 0.13 964 0.112 0.050 52.3 0.85%
2.76 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.35 2 35 0.00 0,284 0.000 8.3 0.00%
6840 5.54 'Famguard 6.18 6.18 0.00 .,804 0.240 7.7 3.88%
12.79 11.51 Finco 12.79 12.79 0.00 0.768 0.570 16.7 4,46%
1472 1382 FirstCaribbean 14.72 1472 0.00 0.934 0470 15.8 3.19%
610 5.18 Focol (S) 6.10 6.10 000 1.450 0.364 0133 16.7 2.17%
1.00 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.70 0,70 0.00 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
849 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 00 0.411 0.200 17,6 2.76%
10.05 8.52 J. Johnson 10.05 10.05 0.00 0.946 0.580 10.6 5.77%
10n0 10 00 Premier Real Estate 1000 1000 000 1.167 0600 86 6.00%
S . : ',dilt,,. ;,....' i Over-The-Counter Seouritlms .
52wk-HI 52wk-Low Symbol Bid S Ask 1 Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div S PIE Yield
14.60 14. Bar.amas ,updrmaikets 14.60 15.,0 1,.0uu 1 1 1 1 1'"
8.00 6 00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 600 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
S0 1 D H .:3.r s 3 i : 11 '- .
41Lu 4Cm~AB.A6 -, .flr: t.Quei'..cTwounter suourmts leiL, tiddiMjcl : -,
4 I.i,, 41.0 BD.B 4 1.'' .1 4 d :
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 1550 14.00 1.125 1.485 12.6 10.17%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0 5,5 045 .-0.030 0.000 N/M 000%
SIX Listad Mutual Funds
52wk-HI 52wk-Los* iFund Name HfAV YTD-., Last 12 Months DIv T Yield c.
1 3566 1.2828 Collna Money Market Fund 1.356630*
3.3402 2.9449 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.3402-
2.8869 2.4606 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.886936-
1.2698 1.1923 Colina Bond Fund 1.269803**
11 6E81 11 li?2 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11 6581*-"
-Ii fi 'i.p pi* OO. i. Y-ro is.91.6 s2% o1209, P a3 M M'IWn 7 -j-
BIsX A.LL SHARE INDEY I :. ,:: i .:,:. .:1.: MAR ET TERMS VIELD i i.
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying prico of Coline nnd Fidollty
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling prico of Colino and fidelity 14 Sptlonber 2007
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Prie Last traded over-tho-counter price 30 June 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior wook 31 August 2007
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported onrnings poi share for the Inst 12 mths .. 31 July 2007
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $- Dividends per share paid in the last 12 month N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month eastnlii*s PINDEX The Fidelity Bahams Stock Inde J tar Ii f5 a l 100
8) 4-for-1 Stook Split Effetive Dati 811/2007
a TO TO 4-356-7764 FORaMORE DATA *. W"PORAM" CALL (24,2M)-a


II 1 1 1 -... I


I


BUSINESS I


1








THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE liB


Paradis
(Club L









-0,


Blue L
. Seafood Restaura

DINNER SERVE[
4 .Ask about the Chef's Sp

*, OPEN FOR BREAKFAST


e Island
u 'naor


. r-.xtY.RIR.* .as -asu


agoon
Int & Grill Terrace

D FROM 5-10PM .
ecial four-course dinner


3T FROM 7:30 -11AM


OASIS LOUNGE, 7PM-12- MID-NIGHT
Live entertainment provided
By
The fabulous Frankie Victory
HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM MON-SAT
!Buy one r get second drinkfree Hot hours d'oeuvres
PRESENT THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% DISCOUNT Off Dinner Check.
CLUB LAND'OR RESORT PARADISE ISLAND
Located on the Atlantis Marina & the Marina Shopping Village


FREE PARKING


.:.. '


Reservations Suggested
Telephone 363-2400

Closed on .SundaysianrAdond~ s.;
-, ~~____


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMA
Sisuit our websie at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCdGIkG AJ CB &H A


UNDER THE STARS
FESTIVAL 2007


OU"P


GALA CONCERT
Saturday September 29.b 2007
Dinner 7:00 P.M. (Gala Ticket Holders) Concert Begns 8:00 P.M,
Wyndham Nassau Resort ,
Cable Beach Nassau s BaB~ham is
FEATURIN i ,


The following persons are asked to contact
STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED
in connection with items left in storage:


* JAMIE SMITH
* MICHAEL HANNA
* MARVA SMITH
* FRAN HAVEN
* DENNIS BASTIAN
* CLIFFORD JONES
* IRENE SMITH
* BANCO POPULAR
* PERRY WILLIAMS
* PAPA JOHNS
* DALE ANDREWS


OWEN BURROWS
MARK BETHEL
ROCHELLE KNOWLES
*WAYNE SMITH
ROBERT THOMPSON
JACQUELINE GLINTON
* GEORGETTE THOMPSON
RALF MADILL
CRAIG SIMMONS
MAT ENTERPRISES
SONIA ADDERLEY
DEMETRI WELLS


All rentals must be paid and items removed
no later than September 26th, 2007


stor-it-all


FABULOUS
GOURMET


MUSIC
DINING


TICKETS ON SALE AT
CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE and
in THE OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION
Block A Oakes Field Campus
Gala Concert and Dinner $175 For reservations,
includes Gala Concert and Dinner sponsorship opportunities and
Includes Gala Concert and Dnne rather information, please calu
Office of Communication
General Admission $50 at telephones
302-4304/4353/4354/6366


















Executive Producer Patricia Olinton-Meicholas
Show Producer Roscoe Dames "Mr Jazz"


KS~armuiEu~sza r"B~n*^KaoSlliS~^B~?^ I""iS.?:


i. r.


T~:~jLfl;E~I- ~1J~*~~_C~~st~(lf*BIYE~~LdUsOBI~~ I


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE










.i. ] l


PAGE 128, MONDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


. __ ." ,, ..


\Visit our website at www.cc
'* .:; *," ....,
.. ,: , .?


Regular Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
September 28, 2007 4:00pm
Application fee $40.00


Late Admissions Deadline
Spring (January) 2008
October 5, 2007 4:00pm
Application fee $50.00


For further information contact the Office of Admissions at
1-242-302-4499 or 1-242-302-4394


International Conference

Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave

Trade: Telling the Story
The College of The Bahamas
February 21-23, 2008
Nassau, The Bahamas


Call for Papers


The College of The Bahamas will host the Conference: "Abolition of The Transi
Atlantic Slave Trade: Telling the Story, February 21-23, 2008 at the Oakes Field.
Campus, Nassau. '" "

Abstracts of approximately 200 words are invited on the following topics:
Language and Oppression .
Religion in Slavery: Agent Provocateur or Opiate?
Slavery and Human Sensibility
Power and Enslavement
Kinship across the Diaspora
Identity: Culture, the Arts, Race and Gender
The African Diaspora's Gifts to the World
Enslavement and Liberation: Telling the Story through Teaching, Song,
Story and Preservation
Liberation: Ideologies, Contexts and Dynamics
Liberation: Simple Past or Present Continuous?

Please send abstracts as an attached Word file to Jessica Minnis, Chair of the
Conference Committee at abolitionconference cob.edu.bs Deadline extended to
Monday, October 1, 2007.
Conference Structure


The conference will feature 20-minute papers from all disciplines, followed by 10-
minute discussions, presented in concurrent and plenary sessions. Panel and
poster proposals will also be considered. Such proposals should be as complete
as possible.


Submissions (an electronic copy) should be directed to:
Jessica Minnis
Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences
The College of The Bahamas
P O Box N4912
Nassau, Bahamas
E-mail: abolitionconf@cob.edu.bs

Deadline for Submission: Monday, December 31, 2007.


Registration
Three Days:
Day Rate:
Late Registration Fee:
Student Rate:
Student Day Rate:


$450:00
$150:00
$125.00
$150.00
$75.00


For information on the availability of student subsidies, please contact:
Vice President Research, Graduate Programmes and International Relations
Tel: (242) 302 4455

Registration is open and online at http://www.cob.edu.bs/abolitionconf.php.


*...Es'


SEDUC IN'G &I Ir~ N ;


The College of The Bahai

PROGRAMMES IN





..
o ~ ." 5.,


A Contemporary Approach to Administration for Producivity ani
SEffective Management in Public and Private rntitles
The School of Social Sciences of Thn. Colih.ge of Ti-he .31ian.aiS in-
vites members of the public and private 'jectori t1o .in o ur Collegei/
University community as change aqens' of the Tventy-first Centiirl
working in partnership for national development
Individuals: This is your chance to read your thlrinlric arid 1 kill 1-t
seize 21st century oipportunitil and be ,.rl L, ilon.- .'ii:, Is pr:,j, ,.-
and makes things happen
Employers: Discove'r ways oft creating lrt .c.I:Ii ret', L]:r.; s to in-
crease your organization's ability to compete in a rapidly changing
global economy.
Prospective students and participants have these options:
i Pursue the BA Degree in Public Administration
* Participate in seminars/workshops and short courses [with cer-
tificate of attendance]
Programmes are conducted in a progressive environment which
takes into onsideraior,
Needs o individuals through mall q.roup iniclr i iar...,
'Bottom line of organizations throuqrh p:.p'-:uri to pirnninq.
strategic and lonr -range .jnd IctI l qujiht, a anijii nrr,,r
Ma1or contemporary i sues of .rg-arii '.;iijun. ,. q i iiiin nred,-
Soccasioned by the challenges oC globaiizatino
r Issues relating to sustainable development
Public/PrivalE Sector Parlin. -rs~p--. [PPr] I


r.
5. ;


nas











7IN






















ri

W it
e o ( i


0,1607-8


A;" NOTICE

PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS FALL 2007

GRADUATION EVALUATION FORMS are now
available on The College's website or from the Records
apartment. ALL prospective graduates for FALL 2007
ikst submit completed Graduation Forms to the Records
Department of The College on or before September 28,
2007

graduation Forms will not be accepted without:
I ALL SIGNATURES, (i.e. student's, advisor's and
chairperson's), &
PROOF OF PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS
OI~IlICE. (i.e. stamp, receipt)
ADVISEMENT FORM (Course Outline)

NB: Forms submitted after September 28 will be considered
se and will be forwarded to the next graduation period,
ing 2008.


Fr detals
I Ch aill
IS,_ oot- ofL:1 ocr; ii


r6@.


I?


NOTICE









FleCleeo h aaa die rs


"~"


"
:


-'V *










MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS


THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND CULTURES INSTITUTE (ILCI) TIlE COLLE(;E OF FlE IJAHAMI.\S
EVENTS CALENDER 2007-2008
DATE EVENT LECTURERS / PARTICIPANTS VENUE
September 14 GERMAN FILM Slide slhou by Dr. Irene Mlos,. Director. ILCI Munnitl, IR,.oni 2
Friday ______
September28 CHINESE FILM Presented b\ Professor Xian XianJAen Mlurniing- Room 2
Fnday
October 26 SPANISH FILM Presentation Foreign Lang. Depr: A-.sistanl Munnngn Rom 2
Friday ProIcssor Guadalupc del Hierro Higucras
October 6 OKTOBERFEST Organized b) I Mosu with ill relevant COB Band Shell
Saturday Departments. Communications. Securit~. etc ) II
November 8 FRENCH FOLK SONG EVENING Slide show by I. Moss. I Leger on guiar. .I MNtnninmf Room 2
Thursday Mereus on socals and other muTica.l friendN 7 PM
November 14 THE HOLOCAUST a mo\ ie presentation Mr Absil holocaust survn'or LWI Dining Rooni
Wednesday and lecture 7 PMK
December 4 JUNKAN(X) ART designing and pasting Presentation and demonstration bh Hlenr Mlos Jr Nlunnin. RLoom 2
Tuesday costumes WORKSHOP slide show bh I. IMoss 6-
December 13 MERRY MULTI-CULTURAL Organization & musical direction I. Moss MNlunings Room 2
Thursday LCHRIS1IMAS ILCI. Foreign Lang Dept. members and C OB 7 PI'M
January 9 Wed CHINESE NEW YEAR Presentation b% Prolessor Xu Xaitienit Iluniling, Room 2. 7PM
January 19 DRUMFEST A drum summit regrouping Video ofMontreal TAM TAM lAM by I Miss Band ,hell
Saturday members from all the Junkanoo teams Director 13BA 2 PM
February 7 PANEL DISCUSSION- Tourism and Panel members front Tourism. Immigration. (COB NMunning. Room 2 oi B IC
Thursday Ianguages and private tourim hbusincsse I.ecture Hull' 7 I'M
February 19 FRFNCH FILM ASTERIX Presenitaion ona Roman hitotN background h b Munrinin; Roomn 2
Tuesday Professor Stephen B. Aranla ... 7111....
March 1-15 IRISII PUB NI FL -to be announced With Montreal Band SWII T ILARS LUWl i)inmn Room
March 21 Fri VICTOR HUGO- Beyond LES MIZ Lecture and slide sho. by I Mlos, Munninu Roomin 2
Apnl 10 HAITIAN FILM Slide presentation. Assistant Professor Ficnand Muninmgi R,.oin 2
I eger. Foreign I anguage I Dleparlineil
April 16 AN EVENING OF BAHAMIAN MUSIC Slide show on Bahamian Nusrmian, and TBBA
Friday Guests- The DICEY-DO SINGERS Ententainers by I Moss
Mam 6 MAIFEST Slde Show b\ I hlo.s. panicipation of Gernan- Munnings Rooml 2
Tuesday speakers in Nassau & ILCI students
May 23 CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENING Piano solos by I.Moss. ello. piano duelt by II Munling. Room 2
Friday _Peloqum & I.Moss, guests 1 BA
Dates are subject to change


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTEN M'S
FALL 2007 COMPUTER COURSE OFFERINGS


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I
Cours DRDllon: T als ou kItr he bliegnwr *m
mm very Wae a nboul oWnputw d daor n t m idmnd
how Mywork L ~ ~lmor cas li tu computer can
5eb aserth n handmn arcls ofvarlolua sloit
(1) IaiDMft Offic Word PrTehg Pi) MIaroa f
E Spread~,n (t IHI) MMkmoft AAcce Dlatdu

Dale 12 SeptMMra. 2007
Tn t 11 OOam wp Sectin l (ICEES)
Dale Monday. 10 Seplnme. X.07
Tmoe 6.00pm -om Secon 02 (CEES)
Dale2 Salay. 15 SecTgle f' 2007
Tme 10Won-Ipn Sectidon 03 I(GEES)
Durton. 12 weeks Venue CEES Compuef Lab
Tulon. 545000


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
Coum DesClprmn: Thbe m aC Doasic concepts of Inlnabon
Tedhnoogy The couie prove Iraig in I i blong areas
Basic Haldsfe Profiiency. Appmclban Fatures Proftceuc
Openbng Syslem Prooncy, mhewl Hd Email Procency
PRe ,quef. Non
BegI. Wednesday. 12 SepmOwer. 2001
Tme 6pn00pm.900n Duano 12 eems,
Vwj CEES Cornple Lab Fee n 5 00W
MICROSOFT EXCEL
Cow Descrap~c This ourn mraes n ludau s ol a
mcrosoA Excel preadsheet 1boa etl s needed W lo basic en"y
and mSnpulabin' dos and wrheb am preolnted
APag : Ne:
Beow Saldayw.29 Seple 2007
Timhw'0l SIOpgl DOraotn 8 wts
c.P sa; 500
S. ......>.i. ...-"si" ,, .

Co aw W Oespnm The oine sumas rno palurauW beciond
ond W to sljdl I r lime enet on to mldancad mew
Atm tghaunrie n ll ba h duiuetmao t docunnl hanftng
krt MIitlt Wo0d Dprseted.
fRnelluM Nam
Begis: Tueday, 26 Septemner. 2007
Time 11-00a n- 2-i00p Durtin eeks
V~u CESCmpula Lab Fees 250 00


PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
Coure Desao Thspis m course a i dBa-onl u dn tolterikno
ogy rsfens lor uese in Inmmaton &nfriuWwt The oouraa
oner ine bowmg tor Basic HaOra Opeming Ssiem
TrouOesr otnog m-a Repas
P-nrequrale Nae
Begns blay Wedue=day. 1? SeprmaW, 2007
Tmne 60)pn -. 3 pm Duratri 12~eeks
Vense BmTC CDnipme Lao tFes 5 '
QUICKBOOKS
Coure Descnplion This n is degned to rari new ande ostn
smcal Osa'wne entmrernueila IClran s M mlryoleei now ,
organa Wsd manager lir mc=an lg acavs u -snq Owu.Souo
Pri softaae Smda ntA iem hM. o se M rs ind e ampoy fihe
can oaccumnW buigel. lsUlciner .s and ernoyee M
Pre-rQuate None
Begins Tuesday 25 Seplnmber, 2007
rTnme 00pin -O00pm Dwaoh 6woees
,nue.CEESConPpWL :. :: Fe. S33000 .
EBPAEDESIGN WORKSHOP
Coure Desosa on The course *ten targets persons w o m
lie m oleae te ,Vraiebiap mWge ,, coA r Web Page CrealM
Web Srte Managemeni ana HrML Speci c wpcs anl indude
Fonnatmn Gmrc ,es Mlimedo Fmns and TaOes no hottin g d
wb amges.
PAri ie@ae Patrmpa in musl be CorrW Itelre and me a
Basc knouWiedge ofrw -omcessing
Begps Thndary i Frouay 181 Olcuobe i007
Tirre 9 30an-. 4 aOD Duamaon 2 days
vMnu6. CEES Comnpuer Lab Fees 55500


325-5714 /(242) 328-0093 328-1936 or email aerdavlEob.edu.bs fees are Includ
(qne time). When submitting application, kindly provIde copies of the first four pages
', Fees, ,Course Content Course Schedule and Course.
" *... *" v


CENTRE FOR CONTINUING

EDUCATION & EXTENSION


PERSONAL


THE COLLEGE. .:

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SElRVIC

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an
overview of the fundamentals of superior customer service.
It focuses on customer value, retention and relationship
building and employee motivation.

Date: Thursday, 11 October, 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pmr
Venue: Grovenor Close Nursing School
Tuition: $170.00

EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide participants with an
overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. It
focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint
presentations.


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS
Date: Thursday, 4 October, 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $160.00
WEB PAGE DESIGN
This course will cover Web Page Creation, Website
Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy fiddling with
computers and would like to create their own web pages are
encouraged to attend. Specific topics will include Formatting,
Graphics, Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
pages.

Date: Thursday & Friday, 18th & 19th October, 2007
Time: 9:30am 4:30pm
Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road
Tuition: $550.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 1 (242) 328-00931 328-1936 or email
perdev@cob.edu.bs. All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When -
submitting application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.


School of Social Sciences

Study Sessions on Censorship



In collaboration with



The Bahamas Plays and Films

Control Board


Cordially invites members of the public to attend



"STUDYING CENSORSHIP

IN THE BAHAMAS:

EXAMINING THE BAHAMAS

FILMS CONTROL BOARD"



Presenters:



Ms Cheryl Cartwright, Chair,

The Bahamas Plays and Films Control Board
Mr Lestr JI Mortimer, Jr,
Attorney-at-Law

Mr Lyall Bethel, Pastor
Mr Christopher Mortimer, CEO,
Galleria Cinemas

Mr Michael Stevenson, Associate Professor,
School of Social Sciences


PLACE:

Boardroom, Third Floor
Michael Eldon Complex, Thompson Blvd.


TIME:

October 4, 2007 at 7:00 p.m.







Thursday, November 8, 2007


The College of The Bahamas
Counsellirig and Health Services


CAREERS/JOB FAIR
is coming your way



Employers, bright young students and
other interested persons have the.
opportunity to meet for mutual benefit.

Individual Booths Available for
Organization Displays


Benefits to employers/organizations:

> Exposure to hundreds of the best-trained college
students in The Bahamas/Access to prospective
employees

> A direct opportunity in becoming a stakeholder in
preparing COB students for their future endeavours

> Exposure to high school students seeking career
information

> A complete 8' x 10' booth for display purposes

> Signage on all print advertisements


Contact:
Ms. Norma Turnquest, Advisory Committee
Executive Secretary


Career & Placement Counsellor, COB
at Tel: 242-302-4445
Fax: 242-302-4448, ntumquest@cob.edu.bs


,TAW~









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAuMANS


The Alumni Association of The College of The Bahamas
2007 Hall of Fame Induction and Luncheon
Friday, November 23, 2007 at 12:30 p.m.
British Colonial Hilton, No. 1 Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

Tickets avalabe r onion of $50

Contact the Alumni flR*i I ~yi Dopment Office
Tel (24t *:
.' ,


"PI
'
dF'*


Have you done anything special


Try a Personal Development Workshop at
The College of The Bahamas
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services...
With one of our courses, you can gain
new job skills, increase your chances for
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success
in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up
for a course today.
",-1 ".


ENQUIRIES
Email:: nlacroix@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception of
the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition,
Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule
and Course Materials.


t the Coot


for yourself lately?


Personal Development Fall Schedule of Courses

COURSE
NO. SEC. DESCRIPTION TIME DAY START DURATION
ACCOUNTING
ACCA900 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS I 6:00pm -8:00pm Tues/Thurs 2-Oct 10 wks
ACCA901 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS II 6:00pm -8:00pm Tues/Thurs 2-Oct 10 wks
ACCA902 01 ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS III 6:00pm -8:00pm MoVnWed 1-Oct 10 wks
BUSINESS
BUSI900 01 CREDIT & COLLECTION
PROCEDURES I 6:00pm-9:00pm Tues 2-Oct 8 wks
BUSI904 01 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I 6:00pm-9:00pm Thurs 4-Oct 10 wks
COMPUTERS
COMP901 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 11:00am-2:00pm Wed 19-Sep 12wks
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 6:00pm-9:00pm Mon 17-Sep 12wks
COMP901 03 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I 10:00am-1:00pm Sat 22-Sep 12wks
COMP902 01 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00pm-9:00pm Thuis 20-Sep 12wks
COMP903 01 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I 6:00pm-9:00pm Wed 19-Sep 12wks
COMP 941 01 QUICKBOOKS 6:00pm-9:00pm Tues 2-Oct 6 wks
COMP907 01 MICROSOFT EXCEL 2:00pm-5:00pm Sat 6-Oct 8 wks
COMP905 01 MICROSOFT WORD 11:00am-2:00pm Tues 2-Oct 8 wks
COMP953 01 PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00pm-7:30pm Mon/Wed 24-Sep 12wks
DECORATING
FLOR800 01 FLORAL DESIGN I 6:00pm-9:00pm Tue 2-Oct 10wks
FLOR801 01 FLORAL DESIGN II 6:00pr-9:00pm Mon 1-Oct 10 wks
FLOR802 01 FLORAL DESIGN III 6:00pm-9:00pm Thurs 4-Oct 10wks
MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I 6:00pm-9:00pm Thurs 27-Sep 12wks
MGMT901 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENTII 6:00pm-9:00pm Mon 24-Sep 12wks
SEWING
SEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING I 6:00pm-9:00pm Thurs 4-Oct 10 wks
FSEW 800 01 BASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING II 6:00pm-9:00pm Mon 1-Sep 10wks
SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING 10am 1:00pm Sat 6-Oct 10wks
SEW 805 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00pm-9:00pm Tues 2-Oct 10 wks
SEW 811 01 UPHOLSTERY I 6:00pm-9:00pm Wed 3-Oct 10 wks
MEDICAL
MEDT900 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 6:00pm-9:00pm Wed 3-Oct 10wks
HEALTH AND FITNESS
MASG900 01 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS I 6:00pm-9:00pm Thurs 4-Oct 10 wks
MASG901 01 MASSAG-E THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00pm-9:00im Mon 1-Oct 10 wks
HLTH800 01 GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR I 6:00pm-9:00pm Wed 3-Oct 10wks


INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND
CULTURES INSTITUTE
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Communication: The Key to Global Understanding
COURSE OFFERING: FALL 2007 Beginning September 24th
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: Mon/Wed: 6 7:30 PM
CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE II: Tues/Thurs; 7:30 9 PM
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I: Mon/Wed: 5 6:30 PM
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 6 7:30 PM
ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Tuesday: 1 2 PM
ADVANCED SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP:
Thursday: 1 2 PM

These are directed conversation and practice "brown bag" sessions
- bring your own lunch!
10 consecutive sessions: $100 ($50 for COB Students)
CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I: Mon/Wed: 6:30 8 PM
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN I: Mon/Wed: 7:30 9 PM
CONVERSATIONAL MANDARIN H: Tues/Thurs: 6 7:30
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 6 7:30 PM
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6-7:30 PM
DELE SPANISH PROFICIENCY TESTING:
Registration: Sept 3 Oct. 12
LOCATION: Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB Roundabout):
Room 16
DURATION: 3 hours per week for 10 weeks, total course hours: 30 hours
PRICE: $ 250.00 per course (except for Advanced French and Spanish Conversation
Group)
TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs

TIMES MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE













THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007, PAGE 15B


THE COLLEGE OF THE B AHAMA S

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS


OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Faculty Advertisements 2008

School of Communication and Creative Arts
Assistant Professor m Music (New Providence Campus)
The successful candidate must be able to teach traditional theory and harmony, piano skills, music history and
analysis up to the bachelor level and must possess skills in choral work. The ideal candidate will have a
doctoral degree in the subject area and tertiary-level teaching experience. However, candidates with at least
a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary level and
choral work experience will be considered.
Assistant Professor in Journalism and Communication (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach courses in all or most of the following areas: reporting, photojournalism, video
production, communication and business writing and should have experience with curriculum and programme
development. The ideal candidate will have a doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching
experience and some professional experience. However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the
subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary level and professionalexperience
will be considered.
Assistant Professor in Foreign Languages (Spanish) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Spanishat the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. The ideal candidate
will have a doctoral degree in the subject or a related area, native speaker competence, tertiary-level teaching
experience and the ability to teach language, literature and culture courses up to the bachelor degree level.
However, candidates with at least a Master's degree in the subject or a related area, a minimum of five years'
teaching experience at the tertiary level, native speaker competence and the ability to teach language, literature
and culture courses up to the bachelor degree level will be considered. A teaching certificate or equivalent
and experience in teacher training are desirable.
Assistant Professor in Foreign Languages (French) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach French at the beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. The ideal candidate
will have a doctoral degree in the subject or related area, native speaker competence, tertiary-level teaching
experience and the ability to teach language, literature and culture courses up to the bachelordegiee level.
However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject or a related area, a minimum of five years'
teaching experience at the tertiary level, native speaker competence and the ability to teach language, literature
and culture courses up to the bachelor degree level will be considered. A teaching certificate'or equivalent
and experience in teacher training are desirable.
Assistant Professor in Foreign Languages (Haitian Creole) (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Haitian Creole atthe beginner and intermediate levels. The ideal candidate
must have at least a master's degree in the subject or a related area, a minimum of five years' teaching
experience at the tertiary level, native speaker competence and should be able to develop courses in Haitian
culture. A teaching certificate or equivalent and the ability to teach French language and literature courses
are desirable.

School of English Studies
Assistant Professor College Composition and Literature (New Providence Campus)
The ideal candidate wilt have a doctoral degree in English, tertiary-level teaching experience and the ability
to teach college composition and literature courses up to the bachelor degree level. However, candidates with
at least a Master of Arts degree in English, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary level
and the ability to teach college composition and literature up to the bachelor degree level will be considered.
The ideal candidate will have a background in Composition and Rhetoric as well as in Post-colonial literature
and/or literary theory. A background in creative writing or experience in a writing lab setting would be an
asset. Teacher training is preferred.

School of Social Sciences
Assistant Professor in History (New Providence Campus)
Candidate should display, competence in the field of African and African Diaspora History and should also
expect to teach courses in Caribbean History, United States History generally, African American and Atlantic
History. Familiarity with the historical experience of persons of African descent in Latin American societies
would be an asset. The successful candidate should anticipate working as a team player with colleagues who
are committed to expanding the consciousness of students with particular, although not exclusive, reference
to the historical experience of peoples of African descent. Applicants should possess an earned doctoral degree
in History. A relevant master's degree candidate will be considered, provided the applicant is committed to
pursuing a doctoral degree.
Duties and Responsibilities include:
Student advisement '
Programme and couisedvelopent. ., .. .
Providing services to the College/University of The Bahamas and the wider Bahamian society; and
On-going research and a commitment to publication.
Assistant Professor in Psychology (New Providence Campus)
Candidate should demonstrate a commitment to promoting cultural diversity and international education; the
ability to teach a broad range of psychology courses; expertise in social and industrial/organizational psychology;
statistics and research methods (qualitative and quantitative methods), and/or biological (physiological)
psychology is preferred; demonstrated strength and/or potential for excellence in teaching; strong evidence
of professional psychology engagement; capacity to contribute to the development of a nationally relevant line
of scholarship; ability to create and enhance partnerships with community agencies and organizations.
Duties and responsibilities will include:
Teaching courses across the curriculum, along with specialty courses in the applicant's area of
expertise
Student advising; supervision of service-learning experiences and coordinating senior capstone
practicum
S Assisting with programme administration, curricular development and evaluation
* Providing services to the programme, the university and wider communities
* Scholarship that is consistent with the programme and institution's focus
Candidates are expected to have an earned doctorate degree in Psychology; however, strong master's degree
candidates will be considered.
Lecturers in Law (New Providence Campus)
Candidates should have at a least a first degree in Law, with no less than Upper Second Class Honours or
equivalent. Possession of a postgraduate degree and some experience as a legal practitioner is desirable. The
curriculum includes all branches of Common Law and courses pay special attention to the place of Law in
Commonwealth Caribbean jurisdictions. The ideal candidates should be competent in at least three of the
basic or core Common Law subjects including, but not limited to, Law and Legal Systems of the Commonwealth
Caribbean; Criminal Law; Legal Writing and Research; Law of Torts; Commonwealth Caribbean Constitutional
Law; and Law of Contract. Experience in teaching in a semester system would be an asset. .The successful
candidates will be expected to pursue individual and departmental research interests and to publish in reputable
law journals.

School of Business
Associate/Assistant Professors Accountin (Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Financial and Intermediate Accounting, Business Mathematics, Advanced
Accounting, Accounting Theory, Management, Cost, Fund and Tax Accounting up to the bachelor degree
level. Knowledge of computerised accounting would be an asset. Professional certification or experience is
desirable. The successful candidates should have an advanced degree (Ph.D. preferred).
Assistant Professor in Management (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must be able to teach a full range of Management courses both at the introductory and master's
degree level. A minor concentration in Marketing would be an advantage and knowledge of the Bahamian
economy is desirable. Teaching experience at college/university level is required. The ideal candidate will
have a doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional experience.
However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching
experience at the tertiary level and professional experience will be considered.
Assistant Professor in Computer Information Science (New Providence Campus)
Candidates must be specialize in Networking, Programming and have a strong Programming background
(VB.Net, C#, C++, ASP, PHP, Java) MS certification background, teaching experience at college/university
level. Background as a consultant or Systems Analyst would be an asset. The ideal candidate will have a
doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional experience.
However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching
experience at the tertiary level and professional experience will be considered.
Assistant Professor Accounting (New Providence Campus)
Candidate must be able to teach Financial and Intermediate Accounting, Business Mathematics, Advanced
Accounting, Accounting Theory, Management, Cost and Fund Accounting, Individual and Corporate Taxation,
at the bachelor and master's levels. Knowledge of computerized accounting would be an asset. The ideal
candidate will have a doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional
experience. However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years'
teaching experience at the tertiary level and professional experience will be considered.

School of Sciences & Technology
School of Sciences and Technology
Mathematics (New Providence Campus & Northern Bahamas Campus)
Candidates must be able to teach Mathematics at introductory through final-year levels. The ideal candidate
will have a doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional
experience. However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years'
teaching experience at the tertiary level and some professional experience will be considered. j
Assistant Professor Biology (New Providence & Northern Bahamas Campus)
Ideal candidates must have at least a PhD in Biology with specialization inagricultural sciences and must be
able to teach biology at introductory through final year levels. The ideal candidate will have a doctoral degree
in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional experience. However, candidates
with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience at the tertiary
level and some professional experience will be considered.
Assistant Professor Chemistry (New Providence & Northern Bahamas Campus )
Ideal candidates must have at least a PhD in Chemistry with specialization in agricultural sciences. He/she


must be able to teach Chemistry at introductory through final-year levels. The ideal candidate will have a
doctoral degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional experience.
However, candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching
experience at the tertiary level and some professional experience will be considered.


Assistant Professor Physics (New Providence Campus)
Ideal candidates must have at least a PhD in Physics with specialization in agricultural sciences. He/she must
be able to teach Chemistry at introductory through final-year levels. The ideal candidate will have a doctoral
degree in the subject area, tertiary-level teaching experience and some professional experience. However,
candidates with at least a master's degree in the subject area, a minimum of five years' teaching experience
at the tertiary level and some professional experience will be considered.
Assistant Professor Pharmaceutical Sciences (New Providence Campus)
Ideal candidates must have at least a PhD in Pharmacy and professional experience as a pharmacist. The
candidate will be expected to coordinate a new pharmacy programme and to teach content area as well as
professional courses at the bachelor degree level.

School of Education

Assistant Professor Science Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Science Education with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching. However,
consideration will also be given for persons with a master's degree in Science
Education/Biology/Chemistry/Physics, plus 5 years' teaching experience along with Teacher Certification or
a Diploma in Education. Candidates will be expected to teach elementary science methodology to prospective
teachers, assist with teaching General Science courses, assist with supervision of student-teachers and assist
with curriculum development of science education courses/programmes.
Assistant Professor Art Education (New Providence Campus)
Candidate should have a Ph.D. in Art Education, with a minimum of 3 years of school teaching. However,
consideration will also be given for persons with a master's degree in Art Education plus 5 years of teaching
experience, along with a Teacher Certification or a Diploma in Education. Candidates will be expected to
assist with teaching Art courses, assist with supervision of student-teachers and assist with curriculum
development of art education courses/programmes.
In ALL cases, preference will be given to candidates with strong academic backgrounds, teaching and research
experience.


Salary Scale For Assistant Professors:
Master's Degree
Doctoral Degree


,$39,460- $61,960
$42,160- $ 69,160


Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute (New Providence Campus)
Chef
Applicants should be able to teach a variety of cooking and culinary courses to Bahamian chefs in training
and should master the culinary fundamental, and possess a passion for cooking and teaching as well as a love
of sharing knowledge and experience.
The minimum requirement for this position is a bachelor degree in culinary or hospitality management.
Additionally, the successful applicant should have at least three of the following designations: C.C.E., C.C.A.,
C.E.C. or C.M.C.; and National Restaurant Association (NRA) Sanitation Certification (ServSafe). Individuals
with a minimum often (10) years experience in progressive responsibilities and teaching experience will be
considered.


Salary Scale:


Instructor


$27,110- $40,110


Library and Instructional Media Services
Librarians (New Providence Campuses)


The positions are in the areas ofPublic Services and the Law Library. The incumbents should be dynamic,
innovative individuals with a strong commitment to service within a diverse community. Librarians will
demonstrate successful administrative experience in a library, sound understanding of emerging technologies
and the ability to use them within the library setting. Also required is a commitment to developing a strong,
integrated library service within the academic environment.
The duties of each Librarian will include: management of his/her Unit/Branch, leadership in short and long-
range planning to expand and diversify library services, development and promotion of library resources and
services, budget and personnel management, initiation and management of appropriate emerging technologies,
and liaison with relevant internal and external groups.
The Librarians must possess master's degrees in Library and Information Science from accredited institutions,
and a minimum of two years post-Master's professional library experience. The position of Law Librarian also
requires that the Librarian possess a law degree. All incumbents will demonstrate strong communication and
interpersonal skills that engender an excellent customer-friendly environment and professionalism. Evening
and weekend reference service (on rotation), library research, service to the community and library instruction
will also be required. ..
Salary Scale: Master's Degree $32,710 S 47,710
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by October 31, 2007. A complete
application packet consists of:
S An application letter
S The College of The Bahamas Application Form
S A detailed curriculum vita
S Copies of all transcripts (original transcripts required upon employment)
S The names and contact information for three references
The Director, Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. O. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
Now transitioning to the University of The Bahamas, The College of The Bahamas is the national institution
of tertiary education. The institution grants certificates, diplomas, associate and bachelor degrees and offers,
in conjunction with a number of universities of international repute, a limited number ofmaster's programmes
The College serves nearly 4,000 students located around the Bahamian archipelago. It has extensive links
with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America and its credits are accepted by more than 200
colleges and universities in those regions and in Great Britain. For the past two years, The College has
been engaged in a major expansion of its programme offerings, its research activities, and its physical
facilities, and the incorporation of distance teaching methodologies into its repertoire of strategies for
delivering instruction.
Please visit the College's website at www.cob.edu.bs for more information about the institution and to
access the College's Employment Application Form.


FTHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.


CMassae v Es s I Ma e ThaEUCATON ns
















Massage Therapy Essentials I Massage Therapy Essentials II Group Fitness Instructor


This Introductory course gives you
the opportunity to leam basic tech-
niques of massage therapy. Major
topic areas will include Massage
Theory, Manipulations and
Techniques, Wellness Education
(Psychological and Physiological
Benefits), Indications and
Contraindications, Serving Special
Populations and Complementary
Bodywork Systems to include
Aromatherapy Essentials.

Begins: Thursday, 27 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $465.00
Venue: Munnings Building*,
The College of The Bahamas


This is an advanced course for
learning techniques of massage
therapy and its many benefits.
Major topics include introduction
to hydrotherapy, spa and body
treatments, the basic facial,
aromatherapy-fundamentals or
essential oils, relaxation and med-
itative methods, and hot stone
therapy.

Begins: Monday, 24 September, 2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm.
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $620,00
Venue: Munnings Building*,
The College of The Bahamas


This is an introductory course
for learning how to teach group
fitness and exercise classes.
Major topics of discussion will
include: Basic anatomy and
physiology, choreography and
cueing, the five components of
fitness, nutrition, basic exer-
cise testing and how to teach
group exercise.

Begns:Wdnesday,26Septembe,2007
Time: 6:00-9:00pm
Duration: 10 Weeks
Tuition Fee: $400.00
Venue: Munnings Building*,
The College of the Bahamas


S,*NOTE: The Munnings Building is situated next to KFC

www.cob.edu.bs








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 16B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2007


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