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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02974
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 8/23/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02974
System ID: UF00084249:02974

Full Text





IWATEI


MIGHTY
WINGS


'm lovin' It.


HIGH 92F
LOW_ 79F

PARTLY SUNNY,
L, T-STORM


The Tribune

#i PAPER IN CIRCULATION



BAHAMASe EDiamiTIrON
BAHAMAS EDITION


Volume: 103 No.226


HURSD AUGUST 23,007 PRHIC- 5/b
I'i


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urPerP


I I I
lal IHup


so


Justice Peter Maynard

instructs jury foreman to

find out circumstances


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net
FREEPORT A juror sitting
on a murder trial failed to
appear in the Supreme Court
yesterday.
The murder trial of Haitian
Nixon Zephir accused of
killing his former wife had to
be adjourned yesterday when a
juror didl not .ppc:.r in court to
hear evidence in the case.
Before dismissing jurors, Jus-


ing the individual's absence.
While known to happen in
New Providence, the absence of
a juror, particularly in a capital
offence case, is extremely rare.
Zephir is accused of killing his
ex-wife Anne Thompson, 27, of
Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock.
Her body was discovered
hanging in the bathroom of her
home on October 3, 2005.
After almost two years, the
case finally began on August 13
before a jury of six men and six
women.


twice Peter Maynard instructed However. tile case was
the jury foreman to make con- adjourned for two days after it
tact with the missing juror to find
out the circumstances concern- SEE page 12


Minister: Guardian story

claiming ministry $300m
'in debt' is incorrect
* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net


THE report in The Nassau
Guardian's lead story yesterday
that the Ministry of Housing is
$300 million "in debt" is incor-
rect, Housing Minister Kenneth
Russell said.
When questioned about the fig-
ure yesterday, which was included
in the newspaper's headline,
which read: "Housing is $300m
in debt" and its lead story, which
said the government's commit-
ment to construct 3,000 new
SEE page 13


* THE family of the
country's 52nd murder
victim pictured yesterday.
(Photo: Tintm Clarke
Tribune staff)
* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
A FAMILY is left mnount
ing the senseless urIIr oi f t
loved one ;is the iltion's
murder rate climbed to 5.1
yesterday morning. police
say.
According to police
reports, 45-year-old I' vis
Colebrook was fountd 'lit-
less" ottiside his neighbho lh
home in the area of ('l\Co pen
Road ate tr po lic responded
al-olnld 3 ain to calls h:il
gunshots wetCre head iin li'W
area o'I lollywood SuLbdlVi-
sion.
"It it wasn't for someic loni
with a guln. lie couildt'a li
for anollicr 40 Vcai," ';i r
alive o l their dci'ic;scii sho it
cd as grieving ll 1ili ilm'ii
bers convened olusidc I lviv"
homeithe daI oy the lh .ck.
Describhil ;is :, "a ii d
working" businessml.l,uI l vis
was a con itictor "'livih to
make something ol liimscll"'
who moved into his dullc\
SEE page 13


Police expect
more in custody
in reggae star
assault case
* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE expect to have sev-
eral persons in custody by today
in the assault case of reggae star
DJ Chuck Fenda.
Chief Supt Glen Miller said
that police currently have one
man in custody for questioning
in connection with the incident,
but have not yet decided if he will
be charged with any crime.
Mr Miller yesterday said that
police are also following several
significant leads in this matter and
were expected to have more sus-
pects in custody by the end of the
day.
"This is a very sensitive case,
but we are comfortable with
where we at (with the investiga-
tion)," he said.
Reggae star Fenda. known as
the "Poor People Defenda", was
visiting the Bahamas over the
weekend to perform at a concert
when he was beaten and narrow-
ly escaped being abducted.
As Fenda was leaving the
home of his long-time friend 100


4


.~"- Mi SEE page 12

.HIV patient

USA Today joins slams PMH
The Tribune conditions
SSA,\ TODAY America's By BRENT DEAN
S -selling daily, will be T r h By BRENT DEAN


ni 01oporiated in IThe Tribune
It om next Monday, adding a
hl iollhi new chapter to this news-
p;IpHI 's continuing success story.
Anmcrica's most popular
pilecr, which sells 2.1 million
copies daily, will replace the
iiict rnalioial edition of The
NlMnmi I Icra,ld, which has been
The li 'rmhnes editorial partner


for the past decade.
Tribune publisher Eileen
Carron said last night that USA
Today would bring an exciting
new dimension to this paper's
international coverage.
SEE page 12


Developer who claimed ownership of Anna
Nicole home directs attention to 'parties
allegedly involved in real estate deal'
ih'l I im n \who claiims he owned Anna Nicole Smith's Bahamas home
has will lrii'.n ihis lawsuit against the late model as a result of her death
,nId hI's dii cicd his attention to "all the parties that Smith alleged were
im ol\ cd ii lh ical estate deal."'
(; -' I lioniipson atcinplted to evict Smith before her death in Feb-
Si.n \ ilh'in' lie loaned her the money to buy the house and she had
icl Iis'C l it Ic'|I y.
Nmil i cituicisued claiming the house was a gift.
AIIIna Nicole Smith's daughter, Dannielynn, will celebrate her first birth-
di\ i nextiL ionth at a party in Louisville at the home of Tricia Barnstable
SEE page 12


bdean@tribunemedia.net
A FRUSTRATED patient
infected with the HIV virus has
expressed her disgust over the
conditions of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, which she claims
includes roach infestation and
filthy bathrooms that are barely
cleaned claims that hospital
officials deny.
The source, who did not wish
to be named, spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday about the female
chest ward also called the Sealy
Ward where patients with HIV
and AIDS are treated.
"A cleaner comes in. she does-
n't use the broom, she uses he
mop. She mops in the middle of
the floor. They do not clean the
bathrooms. They don't clean the
bathrooms at all only mop the
floors," she said.
The angered patient told The
Tribune that "the place is ovenun
with roaches" to thle extent that
when patients are sitting down
SEE page 12


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I: '~1 I I 5'~ '~ I


Life. Money. Balance both:


lpi ctaak


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PAGE 2,OTHURSDAY, AUGUSNTE23,S2007THE TRIBUl


Need for regional co-operation



emphasised in port security


* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
bdean@tribunemedia.net
MINISTER of Maritime
Affairs and Labour Dion
Foulkes acknowledged that
regional co-operation is essen-


fkrie uThre


tial in enhancing port security.
He was speaking during the
opening ceremony of a sympo-
sium on the topic.
The International Ship and
Port Facility Security (ISPS)
symposium in it's fourth year
- began yesterday at Police
Headquarters and is a collabo-
rative effort between the Min-
istry of Maritime Affairs and
Labour and the US Southern
Command.
The symposium is being
attended by US law enforce-
ment officials, along with
Bahamian port, customs, immi-
gration, police and Defence
Force officials, and representa-
tives from the Turks and Caicos
islands too have flown in to
attend.
"Without a doubt, the way in
which we think about security


has changed significantly over
the last several years," Mr
Foulkes said. "Around the
world, militants and terrorists
have struck soft targets in ways
never before seen or in fact
even conceived by most people.
We can think of the train bomb-
ing in Spain; the school hostage
crisis that ended in bloodshed in
Russia; the attacks on the trans-
portation system of the United
Kingdom; and of course the
experiences of September 11,
2001.
"This kind of random vio-
lence seen in a few countries,
has now become a truly glob-
al phenomenon, with blurred
lines between combatants and
non-combatants; no distinc-
tion between military and
civilian targets; and an enemy
that is recruited from amongst


our own citizens."
The September 11, 2001 ter-
rorist attack in the US, Mr
Foulkes reminded the audience,
had wide ranging economic
effects throughout the
Caribbean basin, due to the
temporary closing of ports and
the cessation of air travel from
the US.

Ideals
"This geopolitical threat calls
for greater co-operation
amongst nations dedicated to
the ideals of freedom and the
protection of human rights.
Therefore, I am very happy to
see representatives from some
of the other islands of the
Caribbean present today. Only
through continued regional co-


operation, and the sharing of
technology and information can
we expect to ward off this
threat," he said.
US Charge d'Affaires Brent
Hardt, in brief remarks at the
opening, commended the mar-
itime officials present for their
work in ensuring the safety of
the nearly four million cruise
ship passengers most of whom
are American that visit
Bahamian shores annually.
"One thing tourists should
not have to worry about is the
security of their ship or dock
where it is berthed. Thanks to
the work, of all of you here
today, and of your counterparts
around the world, maritime
travel and commerce today has
remained safe from both acci-
dents and deliberate attack," he
said.


L raff ic fea[rsU I at jlun[ction14


i


* AT the intersection of Fox Hill Road and Joe Farrington Road, residents in the area are
concerned about the number of accidents at this junction and are asking for a traffic light to be
installed there
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff


OIn brief

Pair face
charge of
raping
17-year-old
TWO men appeared in
Magistrate's Court yesterday
afternoon in connection with
the rape of a 17-year-old girl.
According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that Scott
Joseph Hepburn, 21, of Coral
Lakes and Philip Jordan
Bethel, 20, of Blair Estates,
committed the offence on
Saturday, August 18.
The accused appeared
before Magistrate Guillimena
Archer at court 10 in Nassau
Street.
The men were not required
to plead to the charge.
They were each granted
bail in the sum of $15,000
with two sureties. The case
was adjourned December 4.

Movie event
planned for
Yamacraw
community


THE Yamacraw Commu-
nity Development Associa-
tion has announced that it
will host an event for resi-
dents of the area on Friday,
August 24.
The association will present
"Movie in the Park" for
Yamacraw children and their
families.
The event will begin at
7.30pm and will end at
9.30pm.


INSIGHT
: For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on
Monday
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I PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


THE TRIBUNE








THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 3


a brief

,panese man
Aenies failing
to declare
currency
A 51-YEAR-OLD Japanese
mian appeared in Magistrate's
Court on Tuesday, accused of
failing to declare thousands of
dollars in Yen as well as US cur-
rency.
Court dockets alleged that
Akio Kido of Kasuga Kumam-
to, Japan on Monday August
20 while at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport made a
false declaration to an officer
of the United States being, that
he was not carrying in excess of
$10,000.
Court dockets further alleged
that Kido was found to be in
possession of $10,000 US as well
as $5,603,000 Yen, which is
equivalent to $48,747,24.
Kido, who appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at court one in Bank Lane,
pleaded not guilty to the
charges and was granted bail in
the sum of $10,000 cash.
The case was adjourned to
November 6.

New Yorker
admits to
making false
declaration

A 39-year-old New York man
appeared in Magistrate's Court
yesterday where he pleaded
guilty to failing to declare near-
ly $20,000 in US currency
before leaving the country.
Court dockets alleged that
sometime on Tuesday August
21, while at the US Customs
pre-clearance hall at the Lyn-
den Pindling International air-
port, Albert Salvin Jr of New
York made a false declaration
to an officer of the United
States.
Court dockets further alleged
that Salvin failed to declare
$19,255.
Salvin, who appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at court one in Bank Lane
pleaded guilty to the charges
and was cautioned.
The money was ordered to
be confiscated.

Journalist is
third released
dissident in
two weeks
* HAVANA
AN independent Cuban jour-
nalist arrested on charges of
public disorder while covering a
family's eviction from their
home was released suddenly
after 15 months behind bars, a
New York-based reporters'
advocacy group said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.
The Committee to Protect
Journalists said Armando
Betancourt Reina was released
from prison Monday in the cen-
tral provincial capital of Cam-
aguey. He is the third dissident
to be released in less than two
weeks as the list of Cuban pris-
oners of conscience steadily
grows shorter.
"We are relieved that Arman-
do Betancourt Reina has been
freed," CPJ Executive Director
Joel Simon said in a statement.
"However, we reiterate our calls
for Cuban authorities to imme-
diately release the other 24 jour-
nalists unjustly imprisoned today
in Cuba for expressing their
.views."
Betancourt, a little-known
journalist who contributed dis-
patches to the Miami-based
website Nueva Prensa Cuba,
was detained on May 23, 2006,
while covering the eviction in
Camaguey. Police told Betan-
court's family that he had joined
a protest against the eviction,
but he denies that.
Internationally known rights
activist Francisco Chaviano,
who is among Cuba's most vet-
eran dissidents, was released on
August 11 after 13 years in
prison. Days later, Lazaro Gon-
zalez Adan, who belonged to
an independent labor move-
ment, was freed after spending
three years behind bars.


The number of Cuban politi-
cal prisoners dropped by more
than 20 per cent in the year
since Raul Castro took power
from his ailing elder brother
Fidel in July 2006, according to
the Havana-based Cuban Com-
mission for Human Rights and
National Reconciliation.

Fi-tiieFniie

Pes Cotro


Rally planned to




promote fight




again ns 'crime


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A PROMINENT trade
organisation will hold a march
and rally this coming Sunday
to address the rising levels of
violent crime in the Bahamas.
With the murder rate at 52
for the year and almost daily
reports of other incidents of
violent crimes, the Bahamians
Agitating for Referendum on
the FTAA (BARF) have
announced their intention to
"officially" join the fight
against crime.
"The violence is hitting clos-
er and closer to home for all of
us. It matters not who you are,
where you live, where you
work or who you know, if
nothing is done to stem the
tide of violence in our coun-
try, the next victim may be you
or me," BARF said yesterday
in a press statement.
The trade. organisation, led
by lawyers Fayne Thompson
and Paul Moss, says that they
. believe that there are sufficient
laws and policies in place to
prevent crime.


Dead man is

believed to

have been

accidentally

electrocuted

A 29-YEAR-OLD man of
Fox Hill is believed to have
been electrocuted Tuesday
night on a motor vessel on
which he was reportedly
employed.
According to police press
liaison officer assistant super-'
intendent of police Walter
Evans, for now the matter is
being ruled as an accidental
death with preliminary
reports suggesting that the
man was electrocuted.
ASP Evans said however
that an autopsy still has to
be performed.
According to Mr Evans,
police arrived at the scene of
the incident around 7pm on
Tuesday night.
There, they reportedly
found the lifeless body of
Anthony Miller near the air
condition compartment
room of the motor vessel
Jayette Dean which was
moored at the Potter's Cay
dock.
Mr Miller was wearing a
red shirt, and blue trousers.
ASP Evans said that there
were no signs of foul play but
there was some blood com-
ing from the nostrils of the
deceased.
"At this stage we are treat-
ing this as an accidental
death," Mr Evans said.


"And putting more police
on the streets is not the answer
either," they said.
BARF said that it believes
that violence is an issue Nwhich
much be addressed at the root,
and will*therefore host the
upcoming march and rally
under the theme ot "Let's
build up the family Slam the
brakes on violence."
"We firmly belie e that the
deterioration of the family unit


is a primary factor.
"Parents seem to have, for
the most part, lost control of
their children, in many
instances they seem to have
lost interest in their children.
Drive around New Providence
any night and you'll find scores
of children, some no more than
toddlers, on the streets unat-
tended," BARF said.
The long-term solution to
crime and violence, the trade
organisation said, is a renewed
focus on the family unit and
the community.
"We believe the solution,
over the long-term, is a return
to stronger families. We need
to find to ways to strengthen
and promote relationships, and
to turn the hearts of fathers
and mothers back to their chil-
dren and the hearts of the chil-
dren back to their parents,"
the organisation said.
A number of community
leaders have been invited to
the speak at the anti-violence
event, to take place on August
2b.
The venue of the march and
rally is vet to be announced.


. .. -
* A CORONIIt cnoes lithe bod\ of a mian that was found on
the Jayette Dcfa:>. 1a fihimng boat docked at Potter's Cay on
Tuesday night
(lihoto: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)


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PAGE4,THURSDAYAUTGUIST23,20R7TOTHETHTRTIBUNE


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.


Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398


Presumptuous arrogance of the PLP


THE PRESUMPTUOUS arrogance of so
many in the PLP has no limits. Imagine their
political scribblers presuming to tell the daugh-
ter of the late Sir Etienne Dupuch that the way
her father saw The Tribune in this country in the
fifties and the decisions he would have made for
it then, would be the same today if he were
alive.
If anyone knew that brilliant mind and how it
dealt with change, adapting to the times and
facing new and ever more challenging situa-
tions, would be his eldest daughter, for years his
close collaborator, and now the publisher of
his Tribune.
Sir Etienne was the publisher/editor of The
Tribune for more than sixty years according
to the 1984 edition of the Guinness Book of
Records he was until that time the world's
longest serving editor.
He took over the struggling Tribune in 1917
shortly after returning from overseas, having
served in Europe and North Africa in the First
World War.
He wrote his daily editorials up until four
years before his death in 1991 when his daugh-
ter took them over.
In 1967 he wrote, "Tribune Story," a book in
which he tells of the early struggles of this news-
paper in the context of the social and political
history of the Bahamas during that period.
The joint operating agreement entered into
between the 163-year-old Nassau Guardian,
founded by the Moseley family, and the
younger, 105-year-old Tribune, founded by the
Dupuch family, has so discombobulated the
lives of so many PLPs of myopic vision, that
they have gone to "Tribune Story" to prove to
Sir Etienne's daughter that she has let her father
down.
Wherever he is we can just see the twinkle in
his lively eyes and hear his hearty laugh at an
island-bound political group, completely out of
touch with how today's world turns.
The scribbler on the PLP's media website
presumes to take its readers "into the mind of
the late Sir Etienne Dupuch" by inviting them
to turn to page 118 of the book and read these
lines:
"Many people have asked me," Sir Etienne
wrote, "why I did not try to buy The Guardian
- I don't want it. I think it would be unfair,
both to the town and to my children, to have a
newspaper monopoly. There are always two
sides to every question and two newspapers
give a community a balanced view of political
and social trends. A monopoly would also give
my children too much power. This might throw
them off balance and eventually either destroy
them or make them an intolerable influence
on the community. I don't want this to happen
to my children. Money isn't that important and
power is a curse."


This was written by Sir Etienne in the late
fifties, early sixties, and it is in the context of
those times that it has to be read. At that time
the Bahamas had only two daily newspapers. As
a matter of fact Sir Etienne had the opportuni-
ty to purchase The Guardian before it was sold
to American John Perry.
The Guardian had been bought by a group of
Bay Street merchants from the Moseley family.
As time wore on it became not only a financial
burden, but a political embarrassment to the
UBP.
We recall the day that the late Sir Roland
Symonette came to The Tribune to almost beg
Sir Etienne to take the burden off his back. He
said he was tired walking Bay Street every week
to collect enough funds from Guardian share-
holders to pay the weekly salaries of that news-
paper's staff.
Sir Etienne thought about it long and hard.
Not only was The Tribune not equipped at the
time to take on the extra load, but he sincerely
believed that the country needed two leading
newspapers with different points of view. He did
not believe in a monopoly.
That was mid-twentieth century. Time and
events have moved on, we are now in the twen-
ty-first century different times, different
needs, different challenges and different solu-
tions.
Today the Bahamas has several newspapers,
many independent radio stations, access to all
kinds of information both true and false and
more political propaganda than the mind can.
process in addition to the electronic media
with Internet bloggers having open season to
present their points of view on every subject. It
would be extremely difficult for anyone to have
a monopoly in today's world of ideas.
Sir Etienne Dupuch did not have a fossilised
mind, frozen in a time warp.
His agile mind moved with the times. The
newspaper industry today is faced with chal-
lenges that Sir Etienne never dreamed of. With
the careful way in which the joint operating
agreement between the two newspapers has
been structured, not only to preserve their indi-
vidual identities, but to assure their healthy
future growth, Sir Etienne would have been
the first to have given it his blessing.
In the darkness before recorded history one
of the reasons the dinosaurs that inherited the
earth became extinct was because they could not
adapt to change.
Sir Etienne was not a dinosaur. Nor is his
newspaper. Its present-day owners have seen
the handwriting on the wall; they have taken up
the challenge and with The Nassau Guardian,
the two newspapers, in a spirit of cooperation,
are moving forward.
We are sorry for those of a narrow-mind, a
mind without vision who are being left behind.


EDITOR, The Tribune.

COMMON Cause is of the
view that Parliament should
legislate a mandatory draft for
male high school drop outs.
Not necessarily to include any
sort of military training but
for job training skills and
socialization.
Parliament must move
swiftly to address this "social
problem" so that something
positive can come out of these
young men who, for various
reasons, would have dropped
out of school. It would appear
that those who occupy the hal-
lowed halls of Parliament are
only concerned with those
who may graduate.
Too many young mples in
the city of Nassau, between
the ages of 14 to 18 years of
age are dropping out of school
and hanging out on the streets
and under the trees, wasting
time and plotting nothing of
value either to themselves or
to the wider society.
Parliament can no longer
delay and neglect to address
the future of a people who are
incapable or unwilling to
make the right choices, such as
staying in school and learning
as much as possible.
Common Cause is also of
the view that many Bahamian
single mothers are crying out
to the elected government of
the day for hope and help with
their young boys who drop out
of school.
All political ,aders like to
talk about not leaving any
Bahamian child behind. Well,
the rubber has hit the road
and we need to move forward,
onward and upward together.
Campaign speeches, alone,
will not cut it. Former Minister
Neville Wisdom used to brag
about how he would be look-
ing out for "the lost sheep".
Well, "the sheep" are still lost
and crying out in the wilder-
ness.
We could easily "blame"
the former government for its
apparent "neglect" of our
young boys and males but that
would not provide a real solu-
tion. Wisdom and his cabinet
colleagues in the now defunct
PLP "failed", not because
they did not know what to do
but because they appeared not
to know how to do it.
Common Cause is pleased
with the budgetary allocations
for Youth and Sports. The


expansion of various pro-
grammes designed specifically
for young boys and men will
go a long way in "curing"
many of the societal ills which
beset us as a people. These
programmes, along with a
mandatory draft for males
could become that balm in
Gilead which we all seek.
We do not seek to tell the


politicians what do to but, as
stakeholders in this society, it
is incumbent upon us to agi-
tate; vocalize and act, where
possible. Common Cause
stands ready, able and willing
to do our part. Are you, fellow
Bahamians, prepared to do
yours?

EDWARD E.
DAWKINS JR.,
Secretary-General,
COMMON CAUSE,
Nassau,
July 15, 2007.


When will Mitchell


rebuke statements


made on website?

EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHEN are we going to hear Fred Mitchell come out and rebuke
the statements made on bahamasuncensored.com? When is the man
who served in the capacity of statesman going to act like one? If Mr
Mitchell did not pen those despicable threats of violence against the
prime minister, then let his voice be the loudest in condemning
them. If it was he who penned those words, he should do the hon-
ourable thing and apologise to the prime minister and the people
of The Bahamas forthwith. If he insists on remaining mute on this
matter, one can only conclude that his silence is consent.
The words printed on that website are not only a threat to Prime
Minister Ingraham, but they are a threat to our country's national
security and stability. They promote incivility and lawlessness, by
encouraging a lack of respect for those in positions of authority. If
such threats can be made against the prime minister, what will
stop similar ones from being made against our school teachers,
police et al? Is it any surprise that our schools need on-campus
police officers to protect the teachers, or that some police officers
have come under attack by high school students while policing
these campuses? Does this augur well for the future of The
Bahamas?
Had those words been uttered by a website sympathetic to the
FNM, about former Prime Minister Perry Christie, they would
have been no less repugnant. Under the Christie government, dur-
ing a sitting of the House of Assembly, a then sitting parliamen-
tarian made a comment that blood would be spilled in response to
a comment made by another member. In a swift rebuke, Mr Ingra-
ham declared that we don't do that here in The Bahamas refer-
ring to our political culture. It is now the responsibility of the PLP
leadership and Mr Mitchell to swiftly rebuke these writings, mak-
ing it unequivocally\ clear that this is neither the Bahamian way, nor
the PLP way.
S ANDRE ROLLINS, DMD
Nassau,
August, 2007.
(The bahamasuncensored.com website was started by Mr Fred
Mitchell as fredmitchelluncensored.com, but became bahamasun-
censored when Fred Mitchell became a cabinet minister. The archives
of fredmitchell.com can still be found on the bahamasuncesored web-
site whose news is devoted to the political activities of Mr Mitchell
and the PLP. .
(The new site carries a disclaimer that says:
("The site is compiled and edited in the Bahamas by Russell
Dames, with writer Claire Booth. This site does not represent the
views of Fred Mitchell, the Government of the Bahamas (at that time
the Christie govermnen), the PLP or the Ministry of Foreign Affairs."
(Depite this disclaimer the public still identifies the website with
Mr Mitchell.- ED).


















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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


I


I









THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007,CPAGEW5


* In brief

Two men
charged
with firearm
possession
FREEPORT Two men
were charged in connection
with the discovery of an unli-
censed firearm in Freeport
Magistrate Court on Tuesday.
David St Remy, 32, of Bass
Lane and Claude Williams, 31,
of Ponce-De-Leon Drive,
appeared before Acting Deputy
Chief Magistrate Helen Jon~s.
The men pleaded not guilty
to the charges.
It is alleged that on August
20, the men were found in pos-
session of a .45 semi-automatic
pistol loaded with nine bullets.
Magistrate Jones adjourned
the hearing to November 13 for
trial and remanded the men to
Her Majesty's Prison, Fox Hill.
Attorney Mary Bain of Carl-
son Shurland & Company law
firm appeared on behalf of the
defendants.

IAAP
Bahamas
Chapter
meeting
THE International Associa-
tion of Administrative Profes-
sionals (IAAP) Bahamas Chap-
ter regular general meeting will
be held tonight at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel at 6pm.
All members are asked to
attend and all invited guests are
welcome.

Economy of
Dominican
Republic
grows 8%
* DOMINICAN REPUBLIC:
Santo Domingo
THE Dominican Republic's
economy expanded nearly 8 per
cent in the first half of 2007,
down from blistering double-
digit growth last year, the Cen-
tral Bank said Tuesday, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Growth during the January-
June period was powered by
increases in the country's finan-
cial, communications and trade
sectors.
According to the second
report since the Central Amer-
ican Free Trade Agreement was
implemented in January,
exports were up 65 per cent
over the same period last year.
Imports were up 18 per cent.
The country posted a 12-
month inflation rate of roughly
6 per cent in the period.
Last year the Caribbean
nation's economy grew 11.7 per
cent as it made major strides to
recover from a 2003 banking
crisis and recession.


INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
News, read
SInsight on
SMondays


Union to vote



on removal of




three executives


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net
AFTER months of intra-
union wrangling, injunctions,
claims and counter-claims,
members of the Airport Air-
line and Allied Workers
Union went to the polls yes-
terday to vote on whether
three executive members
should be removed.
The poll was allowed to go
ahead after a court injunction
won by legal counsel for the
three officers against Nerelene
Harding ordering her to
"cease and desist" any action
towards removing them, on
the basis that doing so was
unconstitutional, was 1 lifted
on August 10.
Ms Harding said that "due
process was followed" in
determining whether the vote
should take place.
The faction of members
whose standing the poll is
intended to determine called
on minister of labour Dion
Foulkes to intervene on their
behalf to delay the poll on
Monday, again citing its
alleged unconstitutionality.
Yesterday, Ms Harding said:
"The members made a deci-
sion and they were the same
members that voted (the offi-
cers) into office . now, in
their opinion, (they) believe
that these members are not ful-
filling the object and purpose
of the constitution and are not
(acting) in their best interest."
Co-counsel for the three
officers who are on the ballot
to be removed, Fayne Thomp-
son, charged in July that Ms
Harding was simply seeking
to remove the officers "of her
own unilateral will... because
she perceives them as oppos-
ing her on various issues" and
said that any action to remove
the officers would constitute
a "gross breach" of the
AAAWU constitution.
If the officers secretary
general Anthony Bain, trea-
surer Fredericka Baker and
trustee Susan Palmer who
have united against Ms Hard-
ing as president, are success-
fully removed, it will mean
that they only serve roughly a
year of what is constitutional-
ly a three year term.
"We have a three year term.
The three year term ends in
2009... all we are trying to do
is to do the job that was con-
stitutionally laid out for us to
do," Mr Bain had previously
explained.
He and his'faction had


Airport Airlin and Allied Workers
Union to finally settle matter


cst by publicly aligned himself
with the ITrade Union Congress,
headed by Obie Ferguson.
Atwo thirds majority of all
those who voted in the poll would
be required to ensure the offi-
cers are ejected from their posts.
Attempts to reach Mr Fergu-
son for comment yesterday
were unsuccessful.


claimed that they were \work-
ing in the interests of union
members bv challenging the
union president over certain
actions taken by her.
However, on July 2 I around
50 members of the AAAWUL
held a press conference where
they expressed their support
for Ms Harding.
Diane Sands an AAA\VW'
shop ste\\ward said that iue to
manx' internal conflicts the
AAAWII membership had
decided that theCy would like to
remove the three officers.
She claimed Q5 per cent of
the union is behind N Is I lading.

Intervention

YesterdaL\. ix ministLe of
labour Dion Foulkes said his
department has not interlieneCd
in the matter as it is :m "linlel -
nal union issue."
Mr Foulkes said: 1 \\ill
make the determination some-
time this week w\\ whether 1 \\ill
instruct the director of labour
to intervene to see if w\e can
find a resolution to that par-
ticular problem. Of course \\we
would like to see all of tlhe
unions and all of the officers
get along, it would hC be bsl or
the country\ at large."
The intra-union dispute look
on a new dimension early this
month when president of the
National Congress of Trade
Unions John Pinder said Mr
Bain should resign from his
executive position in tlhe
NCTU the umbrella organi-
sation of the AAAWU as he
had created a conflict of inter-


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from people who are -
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neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning / /
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If so, call us on 322-1986 'L'-/
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- -


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6 THURSDAYAUGUST 23, 2007


LOA NW


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------ -

i HEDLEY Brown, left, and Erica Trablada are seen in
the wreckage of their home in Salt River, Jamaica following
Hurricane Dean. Jamaica avoided the direct hit when the
storm wound up passing to the south Sunday night. There
were no deaths reported in Jamaica, but the storm uprooted
trees, flooded roads and tore the roofs off many buildings


Bahamas among


countries in


trade talks with


European Union


THE Bahamas along with
other. countries of the African,
Pacific and Caribbean group-
ing is in me process of negoti-
ating a new free trade agree-
ment with the European
Union.
The new agreement is
expected to replace the pre-
sent COTONOU agreement
which expires at the end of the
year.
Under the COTONOU
agreement, goods from coun-
iri's ill these three regions
enjo\ preferential access to
the 1i market.
The new, Economic Part-
nership Agreement (EPA)
\\ill gradually remove prefer-
ences.
tlow\ever, as part of this
line\\ agreement, the EU will
provide technical and finan-
cial support to the signatory
,, 11i1ll Il S.
1H i new agreement will aim
to eie a stronger political
foundation to ACP-EU devel-
opmlent co-operation.
Therefore. observers say,
political dialogue must be one
of the key aspects of the
.t rangementl. which must
address new issues which have
previously been outside the
scope of d development co-
operation, such as peace and


security, arms trade and
migration.
Furthermore, the element
of good governance has been
included as a fundamental"
part of the new agreement,
the violation of which may
lead to the partial or com-
plete suspension of develop-
ment co-operation between
the EU and the country in
violation.
It was furthermore agreed
that serious cases of corrup-
tion, including acts of bribery,
could trigger a consultation
process and possibly lead to a
suspension of aid.
A meeting was held this
week, one of a series of brief-
ings being conducted by the
Caribbean Regional Negoti-
ating Machinery (CRN.M)
across CARICOM member
states..the Dominican Repub-
lic and the Bahamas, in an
effort to craft a common nego-
tiating position-on the liber-
alisation of trade in agricul-
tural products and manufac-
tured goods.
The CRNM is responsible
for developing and maintain-
ing a cohesive and effective
framework for the co-ordina-
tion and management of the
Caribbean Region's negotiat-
ing resources and expertise.


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0 In brief

Teenager dies
as hurricane
surge drags
him under sea
* DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo
DANIEL Setil joined the
crowds watching waves churned
by Hurricane Dean crash over a
highway when a surge suddenly
dragged him into the sea. As
onlookers watched helplessly,
at least one man trained a video
camera on the struggle that fol-
lowed, according to Associated
Press.
For 15 agonising minutes, the
16-year-old fought for his life,
swimming valiantly to try to
reach the rocky shore. But a
powerful undertow kept pulling
him out and then towering
waves crashed down on him.
The videotape shows his dark
figure rising out of the white-
water, gasping for air, reaching
out with powerful strokes. Yet
he keeps going under, longer
each time.
The last moments of Setil's
life were captured by telephone
repairman Carlos Fernandez
and posted to the online video-
sharing site YouTube, where
they have been viewed more
than 196,000 times since Sun-
day.
"You couldn't help, you
couldn't do anything ... the only
obvious result was death," Fer-
nandez said Tuesday.
Emergency Operations Cen-
ter Chief Edwin Olivares told
The Associated Press he decid-
ed to delay rescue efforts until
divers or boat crews could safe-
ly enter the waters.
"That type of response was
prudent," Olivares said. "We
could not guarantee the safety
of our rescuers."
Setil was one of .13 people
killed in the Caribbean Sea by
Dean the first hurricane of
the Atlantic season which left
a trail of death and debris in the
region.








TheS'
Way

"-Test
of things we
think, say or do
1. Is it the TRUTH?
2.Is it FAIR to all
concerned?
3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?
4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?
www.rotary.org






THE TIBUN II LJRSDY, AGUST23,C207,NAGES


o In brief

Hurricane
Dean destroys
banana crop
across region
* DOMINICA
Roseau
HURRICANE Dean
wiped out banana crops in
Dominica and did major
damage in Jamaica, officials
said Tuesday more bad
news for an industry that has
been struggling throughout
the Caribbean, according to
Associated Press.
The hurricane, which
roared across lush Dominica
on Friday, destroyed 99 per
cent of the mostly rural
island's banana crop, Agri-
culture Minister Colin McIn-
tyre said.
In Jamaica, which was hit
by the storm on Sunday,
Dean did extensive damage
to bananas and other crops
in at least four of the coun-
try's parishes but precise fig-
ures were not yet available,
Agriculture Minister Roger
Clarke said.
Marshall Hall, chairman of
Jamaica Producers one of
the country's biggest
exporters of bananas said
the export crop was "wiped
out" in an eastern Portland
parish while 90 per cent was
destroyed in St. Mary parish,
another leading producer of
the fruit.
The islands of Martinique
and St Lucia have also
reported that their entire
banana crops were destroyed
by Dean, which caused flood-
ing and toppled trees.
The banana industry in the
Caribbean has been strug-
gling for years because of
aggressive competition from
other parts of the world and
the loss of preferential treat-
ment in the European mar-
ket, but it remains an impor-
tant segment of the econo-
my in the region.
Bananas generate about 10
per cent of Dominica's gross
domestic product and the
island exported 11,264 tons
of bananas last year, earning
$8.3 million in revenues,
according to the Windward
Islands Banana Development
and Exporting Co.


iR"IAL
IEXTERMINATOR
FOR[PEST PROBLEMS


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Plans are
underway to have authentical-
ly-made Bahamian products
showcased globally on a soon
to be launched internet web-
site eshopbahamas.com to be
spearheaded by the Ministry of
Tourism.
Kerry Fountain, executive
director of the Grand Bahama
Island Tourism Office, said the
ministry is assisting Bahamian
artisans here to refine their
products to make them more
attractive to local consumers
and tourists.
Speaking at a two-day work-
shop for artisans yesterday at
the Westin at Our Lucaya
Resort (see page 11), Mr Foun-
tain said it is important that
artisans are equipped with the
skills necessary to profession-
ally package and present their
craft items to the global market.
"Soon eshopbahamas.com
will be launched to showcase
authentically Bahamian prod-
ucts. We want you to be
ready," he said.
There are about 160 local
manufacturers and vendors on
Grand Bahama who create and
sell Bahamian products.
A number of items were on
display at the workshop such
as shell dolls and figurines, pic-
ture frame sculptures, junkanoo
dolls, hair pins, jewellery, can-
dles, and the ever popular straw
handbags.
The workshop sponsored by
the Ministry of Tourism is
being conducted by interna-
tional craft marketing expert
Bruce Baker of Vermont. A
similar workshop was held in
New Providence last week.
Mr Baker said when people
visit the Bahamas they want to
purchase products made in the
Bahamas.
"What has happened is that
China has taken over they
are amazing at copying, but not
very great about innovating. So
every nation in the world has
found it economically success-
ful to send products to China to
have them reproduced and
brought back. In your case, it is
the Philippines and Thailand.
"But, customers ultimately
don't want products from Chi-
na when they come to the


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Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


lI I


EXECUTIVE director for the Ministry of Tourism on Grand
Bahama Island, Mr Kerry Fountain is pictured as lie addressed par-
ticipants at the Authentic Bahamian Workshop which got under-
way Wednesday morning at the Our Lucaya Resort. Seated left to
right are Sanique Culner, MOT; Mr Bruce Baker, Presenter; and
Mrs Lily Strachan Moxey, president of the Grand Bahama Craft
Association. (BIS photo: Simon Lewis)


Bahamas. They .want things
that are made locally," he
said.
"That is an issue we are fac-
ing in the world. If Bahamian
artisans can gain an edge to cre-
ate products that customers
find good value in, they are
going to choose those products
over things made in Thailand
and China."
At the end of the workshop,
Mr Baker said artisans will be
able to display their products
more effectively, know how to
redesign and price products so
they is easier to sell, and make
products more appealing to the
North American and European
markets.
Mr Baker said he was very
impressed with the straw hand-
bags on display, but added that
other innovative products can
be created with straw.
"I see a lot of very impressive
bags. But, the'people that are
making bags can take that same
straw talent and turn the same
skill and technique into deco-
rative home accessories, such
as lighting fixtures and place
mats for tables would be fabu-
lous, but you rarely see that,"
he said.
Workshop participant Nor-
ma Pyfrom of Freeport said
that a lot of persons, including
tourists and locals have
expressed an interest in her
authentically-made overnight
straw bag.
"I just started about six to
nine months ago, and the prob-
lem I am experiencing is find-


ing supplies needed to produce
my product," she said.
SEE story oin page II


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


i~~Wp-~


I












Pelican Bay at Lucaya scores




as one of world's best hotels


4UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading global wealth manager, is
seeking an experienced professional to join our team as


Operations Securities Specialist

The candidate will be responsible for the processing of complex
transactions within Securities Operations. This includes the
following tasks: transaction processing and control,
reconciliations, monitoring and processing pending
transactions, correcting and clarification of entry discrepancies
and producing written correspondence where required. The
Role-Holder will also need to act as a direct contact and
problem solver for internal and external clients.

Minimum requirements:

Minimum of BA in Accounting, Banking, Finance or the
equivalent.
Strorig problem solving skills
Proficient in Microsoft Excel, Access, Bloomberg and
Telekurs
Strong experience in trade processing, settlements,
corporate actions;
Strong knowledge of complex financial instruments e.g.
structured products.
Completion of the Series 7 or Series 6 course is a plus.

Interested? Written applications should be sent to:


hrbahamas@ubs.com


or UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas


GRAND BAHAMA-
Expedia.com's exclusive
Insiders' Select List has
positioned Pelican Bay at
Lucaya as one of the best
hotels in the world with a
score of 82.63.
The resort's "glorious"
water views, distinct
European architecture,
and luxurious amenities,
was among the top 100 -
ranking 78th in the world 0 p
and 7th in the Caribbean. ran,
And, Atlantis is the onli
only one other resort in wor
the Bahamas to make it suite
on the list.
Millions of customers
and in-house experts
choose Expedia Insiders' Select
rankings as a source when
choosing the appropriate trav-
el destination with first-class
appeal.
"Expedia' ranks hotels
around the world using a rating
system based on its traveler
opinions, expert input and val-
ue, producing a list so exclu-
sive it represents the top one
per cent of all its hotels and
resorts," said Pelican Bay's
management in a statement.
The resort's score and rat-


ELICAN Bay at Lucaya has been
ked seventh in the Caribbean among
ne company's top hotels and resorts
Idwide. Pelican Bay's one-bedroom
e is pictured.

ing was calculated with Expe-
dia's Insider's Select method-
ology, taking into account:
traveller opinion, value, Expe-
dia Hotel Expert Input.
"A favourite amongst locals
and visitors alike, Pelican Bay
at Lucaya is where guests find
the finest combination of
Caribbean and European
ddcor and pristine service,"
said the management's state-
ment. "Overlooking the Bell
Channel Bay, Pelican Bay's
suites feature furnishings from
around the world, water views,


private balconies, and
patios. When guests of
Pelican Bay's suites wake
up each morning, they
will find breakfast and
news updates from The
New York Times waiting
for them. The resort
delivers a delicious
breakfast of pastries and
breads through a special-
ly designed pass-through
on the door."
Sabor is said to be the
newest and freshest place
to savour all things tropi-
cal in Grand Bahama.
"With its innovative
fusion menu and Latin
beat, Sabor is. one of the
hottest restaurants in the
Bahamas," said the statement.
"The magic starts in the
kitchen where our chefs use
only the best seasonal catches
and ingredients. Diners can
always expect gourmet meals
with an emphasis on taste and
flavour.
"Located in the garden of
Pelican Bay, diners have a mar-
velous view over the yachts in
the Port Lucaya Marina plus
swaying palms and exotic
lounge music."


Soulful jazz singer Jon Lucien dies at 65


* FLORIDA
Poinciana
SINGER Jon Lucien, whose
deep baritone and soulful love
songs made him a respected jazz
artist for more than 35 years, has
died, his wife said. He was 65,
according to Associated Press.
Lucien died Saturday from
respiratory complications fol-
lowing surgery, his wife. Delesa,
said Tuesday.
Lucien, who was born in the
British Virgin Islands' main
island of Tortola and raised in
St. Thomas. began performing


in his teens.
His 1970 RCA album, "I Am
Now," launched a recording
career that earned him a loyal
following, though his hard-to-
categorise style never led to
breakout success.
Among his songs were
"Rashida," "Lady Love," "Din-
di," "You Don't Need Me,"
"Hello Like Before," and
"Sweet Control." Both "Rashi-
da" and "Lady Love" led to
Grammy nominations for
arranger Dave Grusin in 1974 in
the category of best arrange-
ment accompanying vocalist.


Lucien's 17-year-old daugh-
ter, Dalila, was among the 230
people killed in the crash of
TWA Flight 800 off New York
in July 1996. He sought solace
in the studio and recorded the
album "Endless is Love," which
was released in 1997.
In recent years, he performed
live with a jazz fusion group at
jazz festivals around the United
States and managed his own
record label, Sugar Apple
Music.
In addition to his wife, he is
survived by two sons, an adopt-
ed daughter and a stepson..


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007








THE--- TRIB E T


Baha Mar executive gives talk


on customer service at COB
0 ROBERT "Sandy" Sands,
senior vice president of gov-
ernment and external affairs
.at Baha Mar/Cable Beach
Resorts, addressed hundreds
of staff members of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas at the
college's annual faculty and
staff seminar held at that
Wyndham Nassau Resort
last week. Mr Sands gave a
very interactive and lively
address on quality customer
service. Mr Sands is shown
above (centre) with COB's
President, Janyne Hodder
S(left) and Rhonda
Chipman-Johnson, college
vice president for academic
." affairs (right)




COB registrar has




first engagement


THE College of the Bahamas
began orientation and registra-
tion of new students yesterday
under the direction of a new
registrar.
An important part of the reg-
istrar's mandate is to manage
and bring innovation to regis-
tration in support of the col-
lege's goal to enhance the stu-
dent experience.
The new holder of this office,
Dr Danny Davis, said: "We are
doing all in our power to
ensure, to the extent of our
resources, that we have put in
place all the necessary facilities
and service personnel to oper-
ate a smooth registration
process. We want our newcom-
ers to know that we have
planned for them and they are
indeed being welcomed into a
modem and well-run institution
that will give them the best
opportunities to acquire a first-
rate education.
"The non-scholarship stu-
dents, can expect .to undergo a,
five-step process, which includes
orientation, advisement, regis-
tration, bill collection and bill
payment. Students on scholar-
ships add a sixth step. After bill
collection, they will need to pre-
sent their official letters to our
Financial Aid Office, where
they will obtain a signature con-
firming their status as scholar-
ship holders," Dr Davis said.
He said it is very important


that all students preparing to
register for the 2007 Fall Semes-
ter bring all official documents
verifying their acceptance into
COB and any other documents
and materials needed for regis-
tration and bill payment, includ-
ing letters verifying scholar-
ships, loans or any other grant -
whether from the college, the
government or private institu-
tions.
Dr Davis said that accurate
and timely information is vital
to a smooth operation. For this
reason, the college is making
use of as many available ways to
communicate to students about
the registration procedure as
possible.
"We have prepared registra-
tion packages that clearly out-
line the main steps of the regis-
tration process. Among the
notices provided is one that
gives the locations to which stu-
dents must go for advisement
and course selection.
The locations are assigned
according to the schools that
offer the subject or major area in
which the student is interested.
"We are also transmitting a
wealth of information via the
college website
www.cob.edu.bs/Students/Notic
es.php, and through radio and
newspaper advertising.
"Posters featuring the steps
have been put up all over the
Oakes Field Campus, which is


the registration centre for New
Providence. We are even dis-
tributing the basic information
to departments across campus
and have provided security offi-
cers with the notices as well."
While there may be return-
ing students on campus seeking
to register, Dr Davis said the
primary focus will be on new
students.
"The official registration for
current students took place ear-
lier this year," he explained.
"We arrange it this way each
year so that such students can
register with ease, without
enduring any overlong waits.
Some students have chosen not
to avail themselves of this
opportunity and must now reg-
ister during the late registration
period from August 29 through
August 31."
According to Dr Davis, stu-
dents are expected to be part-
ners in the process.
"We achieve best results
when students turn up on time,
have in their possession all the
relevant documentation and a
method of payment. We expect
them to pay careful attention
to and heed notices and
announcements and to be
respectful of the rights of all
with whom they come into con-
tact. Attendance at orientation
is a must; this is when the regis-
tration information packages
will be handed out."


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE













1 i--ii i--B 4lA ft r.nhkci


Play on women's issues



makes a comeback


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* By ARTHIA NIXON
If lE Samaritan Daughters
are returning to the 0 )urndas
stage for the second time this
summer bringing with them a
message of girl power, wom-
en's liberation and the reasons
whv women must seek them-
selves in order to find happi-
ness.
Starring choreographer Paul
Whylly, Phillipa Rolle-Bain,
Tina Price, Candy Rigby, 'et -
ran Brown, Vanessa Coopel-
Penn, Deangelo Brown,
Arthia Nixon, C'hristine Dean,
Emnmanual Rolle and Nekisha
Sn mms-, the play is based on
llih hootl o thell sami'l -ni e i: v


A'Visi
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Mai lene Minus.
A special guest appearance
by a popular Cable TV show
host and Reveie Academy
School of Dance teacher will
also have audi'ncuc' tmembeitrs
wanting more.
Having impressed Bahami-
an poets with international
acclaim such as Michael Pin
tard, and inade a name for
herself as a motivaloi and
inspiration to women. Ms
Minus is a poet. pleac her and
playwright.
Her hook, which was origi-
nally published in 2001, is
colmpriscd ofl wo collections
of poetry and deals \ilth tile
extrellmes of eilatioinships ltor
women whether wilh sldca/y
i len.[, llec r sisters ilotlheis,
e\en with Ilh mseli s
"1 ami lrUtl\ excited about
seeing what started out as just
a little idea come to fruition,'
says Ms Minuti "The book' is
basically an a thlo.i Ito the sin-
ful Saillaritan \xll inan at lhe
\well N hoe was ,olgl xet n by
(C'lnst. lThrough thlse poems,
I Ir\ to identify that it is tlhe
pain of rejectio that folu bids
us tion draw ing (from and
pouring into the \ell of loe


M 'l I'. iilt ,I' 'he Samaritan Daughters


and relationship. The ecstasy
of o\ e will cause us to come
back again for we know there
is something at the well that
will satisfy our thirst."
Despite what readers may
presume, the love Ms Minus
talks about is God and she
says her readers will become
enlightened by understanding


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the true depth of her poems. ;
Since the play debuted in"
June, several talk shows and'
churches have invited Ms
Minus and her cast to appear";
to give views on relationships. '
"People who thought my
work was trashy and a waste
of time came up to me in tears
and said that seeing it por-
trayed through this talented'
group made them see that it's
so much more than what
appears on paper," said Ms,
Minus. "With single mothers I
by far out numbering wives in


the delivery rooms, and so .
many women falling victims to)
rape, abuse and murder, this
play is something that those
silent victims can come and
see themselves."
Minus says she is most
impressed with the fathers
who came to the show with
their daughters and restored
ties in faltering relationship.
"I've been in touch with
many people including the
Bureau of Women's Affairs.
These are perilous times for
women and we can't always
admit something is wrong or
admit we need help. I hope
that the women who see them-
selves in this play can open up
and release their inhibitions."
The Samaritan Daughters
comes to life Thursday.
August 23 through Saturday
August 25 at 7.30pm at the
Dundas.


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-~--I--


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


Myth over quality of


Bahamian products


'must be dispelled'


THE myth that Bahamian
products are not good enough
must be dispelled for good
according to Terry Fountain,
executive director for the Min-
istry of Tourism's Grand
Bahama tourism office.
Mr Fountain's comment
came as he officially opened a
two day Authentic Bahamian
Workshop at the Our Lucaya
Resort on Wednesday morn-
ing.
The Ministry of Tourism has
as its presenter Bruce Baker, a
master in the art of jewelry
design and everything connect-
ed with it.
Mr Baker has reportedly con-
ducted more than 500 work-
shops throughout the United
States over the past 24 years on
booth design, sales and presen-
tation for craft artists. He has
also been a juror for numerous
craft shows.
Mr Fountain also took the
opportunity to welcome
Sanique Culmer to his team at
the Grand Bahama office of the
Ministry of Tourism.
The co-ordination of the two
day workshop was her first
assignment. According to Mr
Fountain, she is the ministry's
point person for the "Authen-
tically Bahamian" programme
in Grand Bahama, and her
duties will include planning and
co-ordinating relationships with
government agencies and pri-
vate sector partners to research,
develop and facilitate entre-
preneur funding and technical
assistance; ance; and to ensure that
"endorsed" vendors participate
in all on-island and off-shore
festivals, exhibitions, group site
inspections and destination pro-
motion.
He also said that Ms Culmer
will co-ordinate an annual
Authentically Grand Bahamian
Gift and Craft Show in Novem-
ber and promote the develop-
ment of the Authentically
Grand Bahamian products,


Comment made at

opening of workshop


with emphasis on having quali-
ty items produced by craft per-
sons and artisans thereby urg-
ing local entrepreneurs to reach
for greater volume production,
while maintaining quality as a
hallmark.
Mr Culmer, according to the
tourism executive, has "hit the
ground running and has already
forged close relationships with
officials at the Bahamas Agri-
culture and Industrial Corpo-
ration, and Lily Strachan-
Moxey, president of the
Grand Bahama Craft Associa-
tion.
"Together they will bring
efficiencies to the developing
structure of the local craft
industry; and establish stan-
dards that we can all be proud
to support," Mr Fountain said.
Memory
He stated that more and
more Bahamians are looking
for and finding ways of leaving
visitors with a lasting memory
of the Bahamas without resort-
ing to selling items made by
someone else from somewhere
other than the Bahamas.
"From fashionable ladies
hand bags, to fine jewelry, orna-
ments, teas, preservatives and
much more. Bahamians are
finding ways of creating and
preserving things Bahamian."
He told the workshop partic-
ipants that having produced
such authentic Bahamian craft
pieces, the next step is market-
ing and presenting their work in
a way that makes it look attrac-
tive.
According to Mr Fountain


that is one of the reasons for
the gathering, where Mr Baker,
Ms Culmer were on hand to
assist.
"You are going to need these
skills because the magic is
returning to the nation's sec-
ond city. We want you to be
ready.
"As we are dealing with a
global market, we want our
small business persons, whom
we support, to be equipped
with the skill to professionally
package and present their craft
items.
"Soon eshopbahamas.com
will be launched to showcase
authentically Bahamian prod-
ucts and we want you to be
ready," he said.
Mr Fountain also said that
the Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation, an
important partner in the
Authentically Bahamian move-
ment, has been holding work-
shops in souvenir creation,
mainly straw and shell work
throughout the islands and that
the results have been nothing
short of amazing.
"The myth that Bahamian
products are not good enough
must be dispelled for good. I
can say beyond a shadow of a
doubt that millions of tourists
who vacation in our islands
don't think so.
"As a matter of fact, accord-
ing to our surveys, our tourists
prefer to patronise authentical-
ly Bahamian products. They
would tell you that is what they
want.
"They want something from
the islands, something indige-
nous to the Bahamas to take
back with them." he said.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


LOA NW


USA Today joins The Tribune


FROM page one
"I1 feel the brand name recognition of LISA
Today will greatly improve The Tribune's cov-
erage," she said.
The 24-page inserted edition will offer a
comprehensive international news, sport, busi-
ness and features element to The Tribune, Tri-
bune President Robert Carron said.
"USA Today is a colourful and extremely


readable newspaper with excellent writers who
will keep the Bahamas up to speed on every-
thing that's going on in the outside world," he
said.
Managing editor John Marquis said: "USA
Today will really put the seal on this paper's
phenomenal success over recent years."
The Tribune will, of course, continue to
bring readers the very best coverage in local
news, features, sports and business.


FROM page one Jurorabsent


started.
During this adjournment a
voir dire a mini-hearing
held during a trial was held
on the admissibility of con-
tested evidence.
The trial is expected to
resume on Thursday with
witnesses called by the pros-
ecution to give evidence in


j -. . .... -
the murder case.
Neil Brathwaite of the
Attorney General's Office is
prosecuting on behalf of the
Crown. Attorney Carlson
Shurland represents the
accused Zephir.
Justice Peter Maynard
presides over the case.


FROM page one

watching TV, roaches are "crawling on you."
"It's unsanitary," she continued. "We should be in
a sanitised area. All of us are HIV positive and
should be in a sanitised area. The simple reason is
because we won't die from the AIDS, but we would
catch sicknesses associated with the AIDS such as
pneumonia infections."
Deputy Hospital Administrator, Dorothy Hep-
burn, when contacted by The Tribune said that the
hospital has regular pest control services and that
that particular area was sprayed on August 3, while
high cleaning and scrubbing occurred and on August
13.
But, Ms Hepburn said, when food is left unat-
tended, there is the possibility that roaches can
breed under these circumstances.
"Pest extermination services is an ongoing ser-
vices throughout the institution," Ms Hepburn
emphasised.
Regarding the specific complaints on the condi-
tions of the bathrooms, Ms Hepburn told The Tri-
bune that she inspected the facilities personally and
"the bathroom was clean."
"Now, I don't know if the lady means some spots
as far as the bath tub is concerned. But, you would
also appreciate that, even though you-scrubthe-tub,
that there still may be little spots. And I must say the


Reggae star
FROM page one
JAMZ DJ Dion "The Butcher"
Knowles in Jubilee Gardens Mon-
day night he was suddenly attacked
by 12 men, some armed with guns.
The assailants, who pulled up in
four vehicles at the home, attempted
to abduct Fenda by trying to lock
him in the trunk of one of their cars.
Fenda, however, fought back and
was badly beaten for his efforts.
When the kidnapping attempt
failed, the 12 men fled the scene and
Fenda escaped back into the home of
his friend.
Fenda was scheduled to appear on
stage with Buju Banton at an Alpha
Sound-organised concert in Nassau
on Saturday night, but did not per-
form because of a payment dispute
with the promoter.
After travelling to Abaco to per-
form at a Sunday concert, Fenda
returned to Nassau on Monday to
record a message of apology for his
Bahamian fans and explain why did
not perform on Saturday night.
Fenda claimed that the promoters
refused to pay -him and his band
members in advance for their Satur-
day night performance.
The reggae star said that because
he did not want to let the Bahamian
people down he decided to perform
for free on Saturday.
However, Fenda claimed, he was
barred from performing and he and
his band members were threatened
with Immigration officials if they
should attempt to return to the
Bahamas for any future performance.


PMH conditions
tubs are clean."
The patient also complained that there is no refrig-
erator for patients to use.
"There is nowhere for female patients to keep
anything," the patient said. "If their (the patients')
parents or spouse or children bring them food, and
it's left over, the nurses will not put it in the fridge for
them."
Wards have general refrigerators, Ms Hepburn
said in response to this, and patients can ask nurses
to place food items there for storage when necessary.
Ms Hepburn told The Tribune that the ward has
tinted windows and curtains, and nurses at the desk
upon entry restrict access to the ward, to close rela-
tives of the patients, in response to a claim that
non-relatives frequently track through the ward.
The frustrated patient in her claims, does not
blame the doctors for these conditions. She com-
mended Dr Perry Gomez for his extraordinary
efforts in treating those infected. However, the
source thinks the poor treatment she perceives
relates to the stigma associated with HIV and AIDS
in the country.
When asked if The Tribune could tour ther'ilvate
ward Ms Hepburn said that the area'i restricted'to
close relatives and this particular issue would-haVe to
be discussed.


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Developer G Ben Thompson
FROM page one
Brown, who hosts an annual Kentucky Derby Eve party. Smith
and Dannielynn's father, Larry Birkhead, met at the 2003 party.
Smith gave birth to Dannielynn in the Bahamas on September
7. Her 20-year-old son, Daniel, died three days later at her hos-
pital bedside from a combination of drugs. Smith died in Florida
on February 8, at 39, from a mix of prescription drugs.
Mr Thompson, who faces contempt charges from an alleged
break-in at the home the day after she died, did not appear in
court on Friday, reports said.
The South Carolina developer, who dated Smith briefly before
she had baby Dannielynn, said in an affidavit made available
exclusively to investigative journalist Art Harris that "the reason
I will not be attending the hearing is due to allegations and
threats made against me."
Mr Thompson's attorney, Godfrey 'Pro' Pinder, declined to
name the source of the threats. He was granted a new hearing
date of August 28.
Mr Thompson claims he bought the Bahamas house for the late
TRIMSPA spokesmodel in exchange for signing a mortgage to
pay him back. But Smith claimed the Horizons home was a gift.
The day after Smith died, Thompson's son-in-law Ford Shelly
removed items of Smith's property from the premises, including
her laptop and personal paintings, for "safekeeping," he has
said.
Executor Howard K Stem is suing Thompson for trespassing
on behalf of Smith's estate.


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD


THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS
COMPANY LIMITED






The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC)
is pleased to invite Tenders to provide the Company with
Motor Insurance coverage.

Interested companies/firms may collect a Tender
Specification from the Security's Desk located in the
Administrative building on John F Kennedy Drive, between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday.

The deadline for submission of tenders is Friday,
September 7th, 2007. Tenders should be sealed and
marked "TENDER FOR MOTOR INSURANCE" and should
be delivered to the attention of the "President and CEO,
Mr. Leon Williams."

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


1


xs







THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


LOA* ES


Man shot in

year's 52nd

murder

FROM page one
less than a year ago.
Reportedly, the deceased was
i asleep with his fiance in the
occupied unit of his duplex when
i three armed gunmen forcibly
I entered the couple's home
I through a bedroom window. The
gunmen reportedly asked the
deceased "where the money
Lwas", family members told The
i Tribune yesterday. A confronta-
-tion followed, leaving the cou-
Spie's bedroom "ransacked" and
"bloody", according to police.
Fearing for his life and the
i safety of his fiancee, Elvis man-
Saged to get away from his attack-
ers and ran "attempting to seek
!refuge" and help from police
officer Kevin Greenslade, a
neighbour. According to family
I reports, two gunmen pursued
- Elvis, while one assailant
remained in the duplex with his
fiancee.
"At some point (the victim)
I got away and ran to a neigh-
bour's house.. .it was further
reported that these individuals
I pursued Mr Colebrook and they
I fired upon him resulting in him
Receiving multiple gunshots
About the abdomen area. As a
result of that he fell on his stom-
ach and he expired at that loca-
tion," Chief Supt Hulan Hanna
said yesterday. Colebrook was
shot on the front doorstep of
police officer Greenslade's
home.
Officer Greenslade's wife
spoke to The Tribune about yes-
terday's harrowing events:
"I heard when (Elvis)
screamed and banged on the
door about three times," she
said.
"At that time about four or
five shots were fired, that's when
I woke up my husband. I told
him 'someone got shot, call the
police."'
She added that in the two
years she has lived in the Holly-
wood subdivision, she has "'never
heard of any crime in the area
before."
There were gunshot holes in
the front door and front room
window of the Greenslade home.
According to eye witness
reports the gunmen, who were
wearing "dark clothing", escaped
on foot. One gunman had a
Sdreadlocked hair style," police
say.
As police search for the
assailants, Elvis' family struggles
to come to grips with his death.
"He (was) my oldest cousin,
he always encouraged me.. .he
was a very self-motivated, caring
person. He served time in prison,
but he was trying to make some-
thing of himself," said Khadafy,
a relative who came to pay his
respects yesterday outside Elvis'
home.
Authorities are not clear
about the motive for the murder,
but an intensive investigation is
underway. The deceased's
fiancee, whose identity has been
withheld, escaped without injury.


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Minister on Guardian story


FROM page one
homes may be in jeopardy as the ministry "is in
dire need of money to pay off it's debts -
$300 million, to be exact," Minister Russ ll
said this was not what he had told the newspa-
per.
"I told them," he said, "that the other gov-
ernment had applied for 300-odd million dollars


to continue on with the housing programme.
They applied for it. It wasn't owed nowhere."
Such an application refers to a request for
parliamentary approval for the floating of
bonds to be sold to the general public to raise
funds.
Mr Russell has said that the ministry under
this government will soon go to parliament to
request approval for the floating of bonds for
this purpose.
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PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


CARIBBEAN


Swiss government extends



freeze on former Haiti



dictator's funds by a year


* SWITZERLAND
Bern
THE Swiss government has
extended a freeze on bank
accounts linked to former Hait-
ian dictator Jean-Claude "Baby
Doc" Duvalier, an official said
Wednesday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The accounts, which were due
to be released to Duvalier's fam-
ily at the end of August, will
remain blocked for a further year,
government spokesman Oswald
Sigg said after a meeting of the
seven-member Cabinet in Bern.
They contain 7.6 million
Swiss francs (US$6.3 million)


that many in Haiti consider to
have been stolen from public
funds before Duvalier was oust-
ed in 1986 something he has
always denied.
Swiss Foreign Ministry
spokesman Jean-Philippe Jean-
nerat said the extension fol-
lowed assurances by Haiti that
the Caribbean nation would ini-
tiate proceedings against Duva-
lier "in the near future" a nec-
essary step for Switzerland to
confiscate the funds.
Lawyers for victims of the
Duvalier regime are trying to
prevent his family from gain-
ing access to the money, argu-
ing it should instead be


returned to the Haitian people.
A Geneva lawyer acting on
behalf of two Haitians awarded
US$1.75 million in damages
against Duvalier by a US court
in 1988 welcomed the Swiss
government's decision.
Marc Henzelin said his firm
also was informed Wednesday
that a separate freeze of one of
the accounts imposed by a
Geneva cantonal (state) court
in May had been confirmed
by the local tribunal.
The court ruling affects only
one of the accounts, "but almost
all the assets are in this
account," he said.
The Swiss government agreed


in June to a limited, three-
month extension of the freeze
first imposed in 2002 to allow
for further negotiations with the
Duvalier family and to prevent
any of the funds being returned
to the former dictator now liv-
ing in exile in France via a
complicated chain of offshore
trusts and companies controlled
by his relatives.
Switzerland's supreme court
ruled last year that an indefinite
freeze on privately owned funds
was unconstitutional. The case
involved 8 million francs (US$6.6
million) deposited in Swiss banks
by the former Zairean President
Mobutu Sese Seko.


* JEAN-CLAUDE Duvalier, known as "Baby Doc", pictured
at his ranch outside of Port Au Prince, Haiti in 1980.


Obama expresses sentiments

of majority of Americans on

Cuba, foreign minister says


* BRAZIL
Brasilia
US Presidential candidate


Barack Obama's criticisms of
Washington's restrictions on
travel and sending money to
Cuba echo the sentiments of


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the majority of the Americans,
Cuba's foreign minister said
Wednesday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Felipe Perez Roque said
Obama's "declarations express
a sentiment shared by the
majority of people in the Unit-
ed States, that the draconian
measures adopted by the gov-
ernment of President Bush vio-
lated the constitutional rights
of North Americans and con-
stitute an anachronism and bar-
baric act."
Perez Roque made his com-
ments upon arriving at the
Brazilian Foreign Ministry for a
meeting of Latin American and
East Asian officials.
In an article published Tues-
day in The Miami Herald,
Obama said criticised tighter
US restrictions on travel to the
island by relatives of Cubans
and on their shipment of mon-
ey to family members. He said
he would reverse the mea-
sures.
"The primary means we have
of encouraging positive change
in Cuba today is to help the
Cuban people become less
dependent on the Castro
regime in fundamental ways,"
the Illinois senator wrote.
"Unfortunately, the Bush
administration has made grand
gestures to that end while
strategically blundering when
it comes to actually advancing
the cause of freedom and
democracy in Cuba," he added.
While the US embargo has
limited travel, trade and money
transfers with Cuba since the
early 1960s, Bush's restrictions
made visiting and shipping gifts
to Cuba more difficult.
Cuban-Americans can only
visit the island once every three
years and can only send quar-
terly remittances of up to
US$300 per household to
immediate family members.
Previously, they could visit
once a year and send up to
US$3,000.
The US also tightened
restrictions on travel for edu-
cational and religious groups.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


_ __





,: -. ,Y, At-..,. 23s,2o007, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 17


INERAIOA NW


SIn brief

Mayor of
Oslo resigns
over bank
scandal

* NORWAY
Oslo

OSLO Mayor Per Ditlev-
Simonsen announced his res-
ignation on Wednesday,
after admitting that he hid
an inheritance in a secret
Swiss bank account when he
should have paid taxes on
the amount, according to
Associated Press.
Ditlev-Simonsen inherit-
ed the 1.5 million kroner in
the account (US$254,000)
after his first wife died in
1990, and admitted this week
that he should have paid
inheritance and wealth tax
on the funds.
In a brief statement, the
longtime mayor said he was
stepping down as of noon on
Thursday.
Ditlev-Simonsen, who
served as mayor of the Nor-
wegian capital since 1995,
had been under increasing
pressure since media first
reported news of the account
this month.
Some members of his own
Conservative Party urged
him to step down, staying
the party's interests were not
served by a member who
admitted tax evasion in the
run-up to Sept. 10 local and
county elections.
Ditlev-Simonsen, a former
defense minister, was also a
member of Parliament's
finance committee during his
years as a representative
from 1980-85.
His daughter, Cecilie
Ditlev-Simonsen, was grant-
ed a leave of absence from
her post as chief communi-
cation officer for Norsk
Hydro ASA this week, after
acknowledging that she also
failed to inform tax authori-
ties and kept a 750,000 kro-
ner (US$127,000) inheri-
tance from her mother in a
Swiss bank account.

Georgia says
airspace
violated
by Russia

* GEORGIA
Tbilisi

GEORGIA said Wednes-
day that an aircraft from
Russia violated its airspace
on Tuesday, raising tension
just weeks after the ex-Sovi-
et republic claimed a plane
from Russia dropped a mis-
sile on its territory, according
to Associated Press.
Georgia demanded an
explanation from Moscow,
which denied the new accu-
sation.
The Georgian Foreign
Ministry said the country's
air defense system tracked
an aircraft that traveled 5
kilometers into Georgian air-
space near a separatist
enclave. It said the incursion
lasted three minutes.
In a statement, the min-
istry said it had sent a protest
note to its Russian counter-
part "demanding immediate
and clear explanations."
Russian air force
spokesman Col. Alexander
Drobyshevsky said no Russ-
ian plane had violated Geor-
gia's airspace, the state-run
RIA-Novosti news agency
reported.
Relations between Geor-
gia and Russia have been
strained in recent years as
Georgia's leadership seeks
to shed centuries of Russian
influence and to cultivate ties
with the United States,
NATO and the European
Union.
They were further dam-
aged when Georgia said a
Russian Su-24 jet entered
the country's airspace on
Aug. 6 and dropped a mis-
sile. The missile did not
explode and no one was
hurt.
Russia also denied that
accusation.


Russia and Georgia are at
odds over a welter of issues,
including two separatist
regions in Georgia Abk-
hazia and South Ossetia -
that Tbilisi says Moscow uses
to destabilize the smaller
nation.
The farmer's field where
Georgia says the missile
landed about two weeks ago
is near South Ossetia. The
alleged incursion Tuesday
was in a Georgian-controlled
but volatile part of Abk-
hazia.


Matadors miffed as Spain





takes bullfighting off TV


* SPAIN
Madrid

STATE-RUN Spanish TV
has quietly dropped live cover-
age of bullfighting, ending a
decades-old tradition of show-
casing the national pastime on
grounds the deadly duel
between matador and beast is
too violent for young viewers,
according to Associated Press.
For the first time since Tele-
vision Espanola began airing on
a trial basis in 1948 its very
first broadcast was in fact a bull-
fight in Madrid this season
there have been none shown
live on state-run channels, just
taped highlights on a late-night
program for aficionados.
In practical terms, the unpub-
licized decision by the Socialist
government is largely symbolic.
Of the hundreds of bullfights
that fill the March-October cal-
endar each season, state-run TV
only tended to broadcast about
a dozen anyway. Pay TV chan-
nels and stations owned by
regional governments are full
of bullfights.
Still, many in the bullfighting
world are livid, as is the conser-
vative opposition, over a move
they see as slighting a cherished
piece of Spanish culture.
"We think it is awful," said
Juan Manuel Albendea, a law-
maker of the center-right Pop-
ular Party. He added that when
Spain comes back from vaca-
tion in September his party will
press Prime Minister Jose Luis
Rodriguez Zapatero to restore
televised bullfights.
Juan Belmnonte. critic for TV
station Canal Sur in Seville. said
matadors and promoters are
angry that all this was done
without consulting them on the
possibility of cheaper broadcast
rights another issue cited by
Television Espanola.
"It has been a totally dicta-
torial decision," Belmonte said.
Promoters report 65 million
people went to bullfights in
Spain last year, and pulling


them off free television is unfair
to older people or those with
limited resources who cannot
afford to go to the ring or watch
on cable, Albendea said.
"Bullfighting is a spectacle
that is alive, and spectators have
a right to see it," he said in an
interview.
Television Espanola released
a statement this week saying it
had nothing against bullfight-
ing it noted it aired the famed
running of the bulls in Pam-
plona, although that's not a bull-
fight but that it cannot always
afford to buy broadcast rights.
The network also insisted it
had to respect a voluntary,
industry-wide code that, with-
out specifically mentioning bull-
fighting, seeks to limit on-screen
violence or "sequences that are
particularly crude or brutal"
from 5 pm to 8 pm to protect
child viewers. Bullfights tend to
start at 6 pm.
Albendea said this argument
is nonsense, insisting it is par-
ents, not the government, who
should decide if their kids can
watch a matador risk a horrific
goring while stabbing a snort-
ing 500-kilo bull to death.
Indeed, bullfighting is not
everyone's cup of tea, even in
Spain. Polls show that few
Spaniards are hard-core fans
that go out to the ring regularly.
And bullfighting impresarios
are keenly aware that the
crowds are short on young peo-
ple. Fans tend to be middle-
aged and up.
Bullfighters may have been
national icons decades ago,
even for kids, but today's young
Spaniards idolize a different
kind of star. They want to be
David Beckham. They want to
be Beyonce Knowles.
Still, even if the allure is fad-
ing for some, bullfighting is a
fixture of Spanish society. At
neighborhood bars and cafes,
the rhythmic cheers of "ol!"
blaring from TV sets are as
common a sound as soccer for
Europeans or baseball for


* A MIURA'S bull is dragged
away after being killed in a
bullfight in the bullring of
Pamplona, northern Spain, in
this July 8 photo



Americans.
Animal rights groups
denounce bullfighting as cruel,
and Barcelona and other cities
have declared themselves offi-
cially against it, but there is no
significant, nationwide move-
ment to have it banned. Most
Spaniards may not go to bull-
fights, but they don't want to
lose them either. For them, bull-
fighting's something that is just
there.
And as Belmonte notes, bull-
fighting on state-run TV was in
fact profitable and had decent
ratings. A bill with topflight
fighters could earn an audience
share of up to 24 percent, which
is above average for program-
ming here, according to Tele-
vision Espanola.
Belmonte said it is silly for
the government to cite money
woes in bidding for bullfights
when, it forks out vastly larger
sums for, say, soccer games.


* HUNGRY
Budapest '

SPURRED by protests from
Jewish organizations, Hungary's
prime minister asked the coun-
try's chief prosecutor Wednes-
day to keep tabs on a new
extreme nationalist group,,
according to Associated Press.
The Magyar Garda (Hungar-
ian Guard) was formed recent-
ly by members of Jobbik, a
small far-right party. Little is
known about the group.
Earlier this month, Mazsihisz,
a Hungarian Jewish umbrella
group, called on the govern-
ment to ban the Magyar Garda,
saying its black uniforms were
reminiscent of the Fascists from
the 1940s.
The World Jewish Congress
and the European Jewish Con-
gress also asked for action
against the Magyar Garda.
Prime Minister Ferenc
Gyurcsany asked Chief Prose-
cutor Tamas Kovacs to moni-
tor the group "with special
attention ... and act without
delay in case of acts counter to
the laws in force or the Hun-
garian Constitution."
"I share the opinion of those
who say that the creation of the


Magyar Garda, based upon the
facts and statements known so
far, carries with it the direct
danger that our most important
common values may be harmed
- the respect for human dignity,
the right to everyday life with-
out fear and the respect for each
other's culture, descent and
world view," Gyurcsany said in
a letter sent to Kovacs Wednes-
day.
On its Web site, the Magyar
Garda lists the "physical, intel-
lectual and spiritual" develop-
ment of its members, participa-
tion in emergency rescue and
civil defense activities and care
for Hungarian culture and his-
tory as among its main activi-
ties.
Earlier this month, Magyar
Garda founder Gabor Vona
told state radio that so far about
300 people had applied to join
the group, which plans to hold
an induction ceremony for 56
members on Aug. 25 in Buda
Castle, to be conducted by
Lajos Fur, a former defense
minister.
Several left-wing groups have
said they will hold an anti-Mag-
yar Garda protest on the same
day, not far from the induction
ceremony.


* IN this photo released by WildlifeDirect, a female mountain
gorilla holds her one-day old son, in Virunga National Park in
eastern Congo Wednesday, August 22, 2007. Conservation
experts appealed last week for help to improve security and
animal safety in the wildlife park where five mountain gorillas
were massacred in July. Wildlife conservationists estimate that
just over 700 mountain gorillas remain in the wild today.


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PAGE 18 THURSDY, AUGSTE23,A007OTHETRIBUN


Public urged to be on alert for



endangered Peruvian artifacts


* AUSTRIA
Vienna
PERUVIAN antiquities -
including mummies, statuettes
made of semiprecious stones
and well-preserved textiles are
at high risk of looting and illic-
it international trade, a group
dedicated to preserving the
world's natural and cultural her-
itage said Wednesday, accord-
ing o Associated Press.
The Paris-based Interna-
tional Council of Museums,
issuing a list of endangered
Peruvian artifacts, appealed to


authorities, the art world and
the general public to be on the
alert.
The group, which works with
Interpol and other agencies on
art theft issues, presented a
"Red List" with 18 categories
of Peruvian cultural artifacts
particularly at risk from looting
and illicit art trade.
"The Red List is an appeal
to museums, auction houses, art
dealers and collectors to pro-
vide all the necessary guaran-
tees of provenance for every
purchase of a cultural antiquity
coming from Peru," ICOM said


in a statement issued during the
organization's general confer-
ence in Vienna.
"The idea is to illustrate the
categories with examples so that
customs (officials) and police
are able to identify them ... ones
like them are constantly stolen
and regularly appear on the
market," spokeswoman Jen-
nifer Thevenot told The Asso-
ciated Press.
She said endangered items
also could include fossils, coins
and prints. Thevenot added that
the list of categories was not
exhaustive but that experts felt


U IoIwr wor] due1![-fetch El mn


SA VISITOR looks at a painting by LS Lowry painting entitled The Football Match at
Sotheby's auction house in Londonyesterday. The painting is to be auctioned on December
13 with an estimated price of 1 million (US$1,981,900).


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these were objects seen most
often on the art market.
"The idea is that anyone
thinking of buying an object
thoroughly do theii home-
work," Thevenot said.
Attention has long been paid
to the looting of Peru's archae-
ological sites but thefts also hap-
pen in other historical and cul-
tural sites, as well as places of
worship, "to fulfill a sustained
market of age-old and exotic
objects," ICOM said. .
In a separate document,
ICOM noted that the roots of
illicit traffic also lie in Peru's


"serious economic situation,"
and called for the implementa-
tion of global policies to find
economic alternatives and to
teach Peruvians "the necessity
of respecting and protecting its
cultural heritage."
Previously, ICOM has issued
similar lists about the risk faced
by antiquities in Africa, Latin
America, Iraq and
Afghanistan. Future lists are
planned to focus on endan-
gered cultural property in
Central America and Mexico
(combined) and Cambodia,
Thevenot said.


Britain may loosen


foot-and-mouth


restrictions soon


* LONDON
BRITAIN could take a major
step toward declaring itself free
of foot-and-mouth disease with-
in days, veterinary officials said
Tuesday, according to Associ-
ated Press.
Chief Veterinary Officer
Debby Reynolds said she
hoped to significantly loosen
some restrictions as early as Fri-
day. The regulations had barred
the movement of animals from
within 2-mile protection zones
set up around two sites where
cattle was found to be infect-
ed.
Specifically, the disease struck
two cattle farms in southern
England and sparked worries
of a repeat of a major 2001 out-
break, when 7 million animals
were slaughtered and British
meat was shut out of world mar-
kets for months.
Reynolds said Britain was on
track to declare itself free of the
disease by early November.
The disease affects cloven-
hoofed animals, including cows,
sheep, pigs and goats.
Around 600 animals have
been slaughtered as a result of
the latest outbreak. The Nation-


al Farmers' Union said restric-
tions on meat exports had cost
the industry around 1.8 mil-
lion pounds (US$3.5 million) a
day since the first case was con-
firmed Aug. 3.
Though several sites were
tested, only two farms both
about 30 miles southwest of
London had cattle confirmed
with the disease.
An investigation concluded
that the disease probably spread
by human movement from a
research laboratory facility in
Pirbright, Surrey. The complex
houses vaccine-maker Merial
Animal Health the British
arm of U.S.-French pharma-
ceutical firm Merial Ltd. and
the government's Institute of
Animal Health.
Several countries have
banned imports of British live-
stock, and Britain has voluntar-
ily suspended exports of live-
stock, meat and milk products
since the outbreak was identi-
fied.
Reynolds said she was hop-
ing for an easing of a European
Union ban on British meat and
dairy exports during a sched-
uled meeting Thursday in Brus-
sels, Belgium.


OIn brief

Tourist

attraction

shark dies

in Spain
* SPAIN
Madrid
A SEVEN-FOOT shark
that had become a regular
tourist attraction at a Spanish
beach died Wednesday, two
days after it was taken to the
Barcelona Aquarium, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Biologists had said they
had not expected the female
sandbar shark to survive
because it stopped swimming
after being brought to the
aquarium on Monday and
needed help from divers to
keep moving, and thus
breathing.
First tests results showed
the shark had died due to a
2.7-inch hook caught in its
esophagu.
The shark first turned up
early last week and became a
novelty by swimming regu-
larly into plain view in very
shallow water. Authorities
closed the beach to swim-
mers.
After the shark was taken
to the aquarium, biologists
determined its dorsal fin had
been punctured by a harpoon
and that it had some kind of
internal problem, possibly
from swallowing an object.

UK venue
warned after
Stones breach
smoking ban
* LONDON
THE Rolling Stones are
keeping the flame of rock
rebellion burning, according
to Associated Press.
A London concert venue
was given a warning Wednes-
day after members of the
band were pictured smoking
onstage during the first
British date on their Bigger
Bang tour.
Newspaper photographs
showed guitarists Keith
Richard and Ron Wood
holding lit cigarettes during
the show at the 02 Arena on
Tuesday. Smoking is banned
in enclosed public places in
England under legislation
that came into effect July 1.
Companies that allow the ban
to be breached can be fined
up to 2,500 (US$5,000).
Greenwich Council, the
local authority for the south-
east London area where the
arena is located, said no one
had complained about the
onstage smoking, but the
venue had been warned not
to let it happen again.


Share your news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


LuTury Vehlole Starting from










In. brief Britain's Brown and Germany's

Zre


to pay fine
over death of
polar bears
* ST LOUIS
THE Saint Louis Zoo has
agreed to pay a $7,500 fine
to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture over the deaths
of two polar bears, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
The department said in
documents filed earlier this
month that the zoo's viola-
tions of federal laws result-
ed in the deaths of Penny, a
20-year-old female polar
bear, and Churchill, an 17-
year-old male, in May and
June of 2005. Churchill had
trash bags and rags in his
digestive tract, and Penny
died with two dead fetuses in
her uterus.
The USDA licenses zoos,
aquariums and other animal
attractions.
The zoo said it "funda-
mentally disagrees" with two
of the USDA's claims but
agreed to the deal to avoid
costly litigation.
"With or without allega-
tions, (animal care) is the
core of the zoo. If we don't
take care of animals, we
don't take care of the core of
the zoo," said Dr. Eric Miller,
the zoo's senior vice presi-
dent.
Churchill's death prompt-
ed People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals to
seek the USDA investiga-
tion.

Bill Murray
could face
drink-driving
charge
* SWEDEN
Stockholm
CADDYSHACK star Bill
Murray could face a drunken
driving charge in Sweden
after cruising through down-
town Stockholm in a golf cart
and refusing a breath test -
citing U.S. law, police said
Wednesday, according to
Assoicated Press.
Police officers spottedithe
56-year-old actor-comedian
early Monday in the slow-
moving vehicle and noticed he
smelled of alcohol when they
pulled him over, said Detec-
tive-Inspector Christer Holm-
lund of Stockholm police.
"He refused to blow in the
(breathalyzer) instrument,
citing American legislation,"
Holmlund told The Associ-
ated Press. "So we applied
the old method: a blood test.
It will take 14 days before the
results are in."
Murray, who had been at a
golf tournament in Sweden,
signed a document admitting
that he was driving under the
influence, and agreed to let a
police officer plead guilty for
him if the case goes to court,
Holmlund said.
"Then he'was let go. My
guess is he went back to
America," Holmlund said.


Merkel seek goals


* LONDON
BRITISH Prime Minister
Gordon Brown planned to use
talks Wednesday with German
Chancellor Angela Merkel to
revive stalled global develop-
ment goals starting with a new
health program, according to
Associated Press.
A new International Health
Partnership will link donor
nations, including Britain, Ger-
many, Canada and Norway,
with the World Bank and
World Health Organization to
improve the management of aid
by poorer countries, Brown's
Downing Street office said.
"The lack of clinics, poor
equipment and insufficient doc-
tors and nurses are among the
main obstacles to access to basic
health care in developing coun-
tries," Brown said in a state-
ment. "So the next challenge is
to devise, organize and manage
health care as a whole."
In a speech last month at the
United Nations, Brown said he
had won support from 12 world
leaders and 20 leading busi-
nesses, including Microsoft
Corp., Google Inc. and Wal-
Mart, for a plan to focus nations
on meeting the Millennium
Development Goals.
A recent report card showed
progress toward achieving the
benchmarks on education,
poverty, health and childcare
by 2015 was poor. The goals
were agreed during a U.N. sum-
mit in 2000.
Brown wants to launch the
health initiative on Sept. 5, try-
ing to cut infant and maternal
deaths and reduce HIV/AIDS


and malaria, Downing Street
said.
Officials said developing
countries would be asked to
submit longterm health plans
to donors and international
agencies, who would try to
improve coordination of fund-
ing and pledge financial sup-
port.
Opposition Liberal Democ-
rat leader Menzies Campbell
urged Brown to press Merkel
during talks on Germany's con-
tribution to NATO forces in
Afghanistan.
Britain. has complained that
its troops, with those from the
U.S., Canada and the Nether-
lands, are the only ones from
NATO countries fighting the
Taliban in the most violent
areas of southern Afghanistan.
Other NATO-contributing
countries restrict the use of their
forces to relatively peaceful
areas in the north.
Spain, Italy, Germany and
France, all members of both the
EU and NATO, have refused
to send additional troops to
Afghanistan.
"The prime minister should
take this opportunity to impress
upon Chancellor Merkel the
overwhelming necessity to
ensure that NATO forces win in
Afghanistan," Campbell said in
a statement.
Following their talks, Brown
and Merkel planned to watch
their countries renew rivalries
at an exhibition match on a soc-
cer field at London's Wembley
Stadium.
Though Merkel is more fre-
quently seen watching opera,
she was a fixture during Ger-


* LONDON
A POLISH count laid claim
Wednesday to a medieval cross
fished out of a trash container in
Austria, saying it had been
stolen from his family by the
Nazis, according to Associated
Press.
Count Adam Zamoyski said
photographic and archival evi-
dence left no doubt that the
cross was the one held by his
ancestors at the Goluchow Cas-
tle in Poland before World War
II. The item was found by a
woman rooting through the dis-
carded belongings of a deceased
hotel owner in western Austria
in 2004, but it was not until last
month that it was taken to an
Austrian museum for valuation.
Experts estimated that the
medieval French cross is worth
US$500,000. But Zamoyski told
The Associated Press neither
he nor the other heirs to the
treasure would sell it, saying his
ancestors wanted the cross on
public display.
"Ultimately we intend'to take
it back to Poland and place it on
show, because that was the aim


of the collection." he said. "We
feel that we're more custodians
of our ancestors' wishes rather
than taking it to a sale room
and flogging it and having a nice
holiday."

Plundered

The cross was acquired by
Zamoyski's relatives, the
Czartoryski family, in the 19th
century, but was among the
thousands of pieces of art plun-
dered by the Nazis during
World War II. Zamoyski, who
now serves as the chairman of
the Czartoryski Museum in
Krakow, where the family's col-
lection is kept, has spent years
tracking the missing artwork
across Europe and the United
States.
Most of the pieces have been
recovered, but some of the most
valuable items, including a self-
portrait by Raphael, have yet
to be found, Zamoyski said.
But Zamoyski, who lives in
London, said the accidental dis-
covery confirmed his belief that
many more pieces from the col-


elections might still be in western
Austria, explaining that resi-
dents might have helped them-
selves to a stash of Nazi loot
left there in the waning days of
the war without necessarily
knowing its true worth.
"I'm convinced there must
be dozens of things still there,"
Zamoyski said. "We hope that
maybe this will be a spur for
other people to look through
(their attics) rather than throw-
ing things into the rubbish
bin."
He said he didn't know how
long it would take to retrieve
the cross, which has being held
in the Austrian museum for
safekeeping. The Commission
for Looted Art in Europe,
which he said was handling the
effort to have the cross
returned, did not immediately
return calls seeking comment.
Poland's government has
written independently to Aus-
tria's government to ask for the
return of the artifact, Culture
Ministry spokesman Jan
Kasprzyk said. He said he
expected a response from Aus-
tria within the next few weeks.


- of all kinds


"4,


Ma.B


* PEOPLE walk through a
new metal security barrier
installed across a road outside
Houses of Parliament in
London yesterday. Because
of fears of terrorist attacks
traffic restrictions have been
installed around Parliament
Square in London.

many's soccer World Cup cam-
paign last year, cheering in the
stands at the national team's
matches as it fought its way to a
third-place finish.


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~\2~YA ~/ L~


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APPLIANCES & EL E-C"' 0 NICS


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 19


-.0, 14 cuft. Refrigerator: stocked with PEPSI
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THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007

GN 560




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September 21, 2007 ..


THE TRIBUNE
INERATIOALNW


Baby giraffe makes her

second public appearance
HOUSTON Zoo's new Lab) Masai giraffe is nuzzled by her mother Noel in her second public
appearance Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2007. in Houston^ According to the zoo, she is approximately two-
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FRENCH'S MUSTARD
Regular, 20 oz.................................$1.69
GAIN FABRIC SOFTENER
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GAIN LAUNDRY DETERGENT
Powder 63 oz ................................... $6.99
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HUNT'S PUDDING or GEL
Snack 4 Pack...................................$1.89
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24 Variety Pack (Nassau Only).......$10.99


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PG2,HRAU S2,27T TRU


'In brief

10,000 Congolese

refugees flee

to Uganda to

escape violence

-1 KAMPALA, Uganda
\S MNANY ,is 10.000t( Con-l
lc-,scse refugees ha% cIrossed the
loildeti nt lm Uganda in the last
',o diavs, tcleing violence in their
ilulCs. local govcinment offi-
.:lk <,i:dl Wednesday, according
S., mc oft the iclugees said they
11 i eJleCr :1 demonstration by vil-
,', potesting the failure of
I .N;. peacekeepers to improve
,'ivits in their remote south-
ishe n Congolese territory.
Refugees told of demonstra-
tors hurling rocks at U.N. troops,
and some said they feared that
11' situation would deteriorate,
said David Masereka. the district
o ,-mmissionci of Kisoro. which
,its .long the border with the
,ioc0atic Rcpublic of Congo.
I lie inluttx hegan yesterday
'"',ii and co tiltlnues up to
",* .' Nlasercka said.
I k said the rclfugees had gath-
.'.I ,.1 the site of a primary
i i t ti ;ialli holder town of
!i is llostl\ \\IIomen and chil-
dittnl t hat have ari\ed but they
ciiie in haste stand \were unable to
lint1ie food. I'liese people are
:ilied\ lutingri \ bl i we have no
',i|lics to giec them.'" Masereka
Y t, I'he Associated Press.
I are- scale influxes of Con-
g etse refugees into Uganda are
n ti unusual. The mineral-rich
eastern pat of Congo. bordering
I'g.inda. Rs\aIlda and Burundi,
icmains the most unstable' area
of the country. Fighting among
iv il militias, including groups
from neighboring countries, reg-
ularly breaks out and often results
in civilian casualties.
l 'ganda occupied part of the
region during a 1998-2002 war in
Coango that drew in military forces
m oM six neighboring countries.
"\e are taking these reports
Ifoi local t government seriously
ceiu'sec of the largc numbers of
tclugecs ainolved and we have
IlispacliCed assessment teams to
kii ron,." said Roberta Russo, a
Ig !nlda based spokeswoman for
the t.N.'s refugee agency. "But
\\ e 'uspecl that as soon as the sit-
untion in Congo normalizes most
,.ill cross back to their homes."























i.'-.^"


China says it has found problems




with soybean exports from the US


* BEIJING

CHINA said Wednesday
it had found pesticides, poi-
sonous weeds, and dirt in
shipments of imported U.S.
soybeans, and a toy indus-
try representative said U.S.
manufacturer Mattel Inc.
was partly to blame for lead
tainting that caused massive
toy recalls, according to
Associated Press.
China has gone on the
defensive following discov-
eries of high levels of chem-
icals and toxins in a range
of Chinese exports from
toothpaste and seafood to
pet food ingredients and
toys. The government has
responded by defending its
safety standards and high-
lighting similar problems in
other countries.
China's General Admin-
istration of Quality Super-
vision, Inspection and
Quarantine said it has
found "numerous quality
problems" with soybeans
imported from the United
.States. The quality watch-
dog said it had found pesti-
cides, poisonous weeds, and
dirt in the U.S. exports.
The American Soybean
Association says the beans
- crushed for oil and used
as animal feed are the
biggest single U.S. farm
export to China, which has
bought billions of dollars
worth since the current
market year began in Sep-
tember.
Because a growing num-
ber of countries have reject-
ed or recalled its exports,
China has been forced to
launch a campaign to both
reassure its consumers at
home and abroad.
In the latest development,
a distributor announced a
recall in Australia and New
Zealand of Chinese-made


S-I


Is


is'
.5'a


0~


r --t
F'ai


-,.~.-.,'
w t
t ....
kg.


... .


MATTEL toy lab technicians test the sound quality of Chicken Dance Elmo in Henggang district in Shenzhen, Guangdong
Province, China, July 18, 2007. Chinese manufacturers and American toy giant Mattel Inc. are both responsible for recent recalls of
millions of lead-tainted toys worldwide, a Chinese official said in an interview published Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2007.


blankets found to contain
high levels of formalde-
hyde, a potentially cancer-
causing chemical preserva-
tive that gives a permanent
press effect to clothes.
Earlier this month, El
Segundo, Calif.-based Mat-
tel recalled 19 million Chi-
nese-made items including
dolls, cars and action fig-
ures around the world.
Some were contaminated
with lead paint. Others had


small magnets that children
might swallow.
Two weeks before that
announcement, 967,000
Chinese-made plastic
preschool toys from Mat-
tel's Fisher-Price unit were
recalled because of possi-
ble lead-paint hazards.
In an interview published
Wednesday, Li Zhuoming,
executive vice chairman of
the Guangdong Provincial
Toy Industry Association,
said both Chinese manufac-
turers and American toy
giant Mattel' are both
responsible for the recalls.

Industry

Blame "cannot be pushed
to either side," said Li,
whose government-backed
association is in the south-
ern province of Guangdong,
the center of China's mas-
sive toy export manufactur-
ing industry.
The region's exporters
stand to lose billions of dol-
lars from canceled orders if
consumer confidence con-
tinues to decline. Popular
Sesame Street, Barbie and
Polly Pocket products made
in the province were among
those recalled.
"The producers are
responsible because they do
not have tight controls over
purchasing and produc-
tion." Li was quoted as say-
ing in the state-run


Guangzhou Daily newspa-
per. "But the buyer Mattel
cannot evade responsibili-
ty."
Robert Eckert, Mattel's
chairman and CEO, last
week defended the mea-
sures the company has tak-
en to ensure the safety of
its toys, saying he was "dis-
appointed in what has
occurred and what has tran-
spired."
But Li said Mattel
neglected to "do its job well
in quality inspections.'" He
did not give any details or
say how the producers did
not follow standards.
Li said profit margins in
China's toy industry are low
and "it's hard to make mon-
ey" because of the cost of
labor and materials. He
warned foreign companies
run the risk of getting shod-
dy products if they demand
too low a price from Chi-
nese manufacturers.
"If you give a high price
for purchasing, the facto-
ries will use high quality
raw materials to produce.
But if the price is low, they
can only use inferior raw
materials," said Li,
U.S. safety officials have
said no injuries had been
reported with any of the
products and the broad
scope was to prevent poten-
tial problems.
Both cases hint at the
long and murky supply
chain making it difficult to


trace the exact origin of
components, chemicals and
food additives produced by
Chinese manufacturers.
In the Fisher-Price recall
- which included Big Bird
and Elmo toys with exces-
sive amounts of lead -
Chinese media have report-
ed the factory used "fake
paint" sold by the maker's
best friend.

Suicide
Cheung Shu-hung, who
co-owned Lee Der Indus-
trial Co., committed suicide
after the recall.
Police are investigating
Lee Der and Hansheng
Wood Products Factory,
which made wooden rail-
road toys and set parts that
were recalled by New York-
based RC2 Corp. in June,
for using "fake plastic pig-
ment." Such pigments are a
type of industrial latex used
to make surfaces smoother
and shinier.
In another instance, Ear-
ly Light, a Hong Kong-reg-
istered company that makes
its toys on the mainland,
subcontracted the painting
of toy cars to another com-
pany, violating Mattel's
rules by using paint from an
outside source. Some
436,000 "Sarge" cars based
on the character from the
movie "Cars" were part of
the recalls.


"' . ... .



THE MALL AT MARATHON REMINDS YOU

THAT LEARNING IS EARNING!

STUDENTS, BRING YOUR

SUMMER '07 REPORT CARD

TO CENTRE COURT ON

Saturday, August 2

10:00am 2:00p-

AND GET A PRIZE IF YOU GOT AN 'A'

OR IF YOUR GRADE IMPROVED. ,







r *lp


Ristorante


Villaggio

Bahamian Seafood Celebration!

Starting August 17th 2007
Indulge your senses with our Spectacular Seafood Specials

Abaco Stone Crab Claws
Butter Broiled Bahamian Lobster Tails
Linguine Pasta with Abaco Crab
Lobster Risotto
And Many More Mouth watering Dishes

Enjoy a complimentary glass of White Wine with each Special
Entree on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights

Reservations are recommended
Open Tuesday through Saturday from 6pm

Ristorante

Villaggio

Caves Village,West Bay Street
Telephone 327 0965, Fax 327 0966


~,~---~-~---~,~------ .--- -~-~~~-~~--~~--


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


~ "pt


4~- ~tir'


~glX







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 23


AUGUST 23, 2007


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

Antiques Road- Ken Burns American Stories "Frank Lloyd Wright" Ken Burns American Stories "Frank Lloyd Wright"
B WPBT show A posset The enius and questionable character of architect The genius and questionable character of architect
pot. FrankLloyd Wright. A (Part 1 of 2) (CC) (DVS) Frank Lloyd Wright. (Part 2 of 2) (CC) (DVS)
The Insider (N) Big Brother 8 One must leave. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "Connections" A
WFOR (CC) (Live) n (CC) Murder suspects believe aliens are teenage girl disappears shortly after
trying to conquer Earth. C leaving an Intemet cafe. /
Access Holly- My Name Is Earl 30 Rock "Corpo- The Office "Prod- (:31) Scrubs "My (:01) ER Kovac feels the pressure
B WTVJ wood(N)(CC) Joy's pregnancy. rate Crush" n uct Recall" C Conventional of a busy emergency room; Sam
A (CC) (CC) (CC) Wisdom" befriends an ill photojoumalist.
i Deco Drive NFL Preseason Football Jacksonville Jaguars at Green Bay Packers. From Lambeau Field in Green Bay,
B WSVN Wis. (Live) n (CC)
SJeopardy! (CC) Ugly Betty "Pilot" Plain woman Grey's Anatomy A traumatic car ac- (:01) Boston Legal A man with a
0 WPLG works in high fashion. C (CC) cident fills the ER; Cristina has a cri- longtime grudge against Denny
sis of conscience. C (CC) takes the firm hostage. C (CC)

00) CSI:amCSI: Miami Miami "Urban Hellraisers" A The First 48 The body of a 14-year- Dallas SWAT A bank robbery sus-
A&E Nailed" (CC) group of video gamers start to play old boy is found; immigrant is found pect might be barricaded in a
their game for real. A (CC) stabbed to death. (N) garage. (N) (CC)
Hardtalk BBC News World Business BBC News Talking Movies BBC News World Business
BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). (Latenight). Report
Hell Date (N) The Black Car- AccessGranted S.O.B.: Offen- TheWire Amsterdam" Greggs learns how Maro takes
BET (CC) pet (N) (CC) (CC) sive Behavior care of business. n (CC)
S Just for Laughs The Town at the Top of the World Doc Zone Four overweight teens at- CBC News: The National (N)4CC)
CBC___ Gags (CC) (N) (CC) tend a Fit Intervention Camp.
:00) On the Fast Money American Greed: Scams, The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CN_ BC Money Scoundrels and Scandals ID
C N (:00) The Situa- Open Mike CNN Presents "God's Christian Waniors" Christianity and world politics.
CNN _tion Room (N) (CC)___________
Scrubs My The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Reno 9111 Fire South Park South Park Mind of Mencla
COM Nightingale" With Jon Stew- port (CC) and police events "Goobacks" (CC) Stan's dad is ar- (CC)
(CC) art (CC) clash. rested. (CC)
COURT Cs Inside American Inside American Bounty Girls Miami (N) Forensic Files Forensic Files
COURT "SeattleTJacoma" Jail(N) Jall(N)
The Suite Life of HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL 2(2007, Musical Comedy) Zac Efron, Vanes- That's So Raven Life With Derek
DISN Zack & Cody C sa Hudgens, Ashley Tisdale. Ateen befriends members of a wealthy fami- l (CC) The Bully Broth-
(CC) ly. C 'NR'(CC) ers" (CC)
DI This Old House Home Again Sweat Equity Blog Cabin (N) Blog Cabin (N) Rock Solid Desperate Land-
C (CC) (CC) Iscapes (N)
DW nachtstudio Thadeusz Journal: Tages- Bundesliga Kick Journal: In Euromaxx
DW them Off Depth I
E! The Daily 10 (N) Chelsea Lately The Girls Next Forbes Celebrity 100: Who Made Bank The 100 wealthiest celebrities of
E! Door. 12007.
E N Little League Baseball World Series U.S. Semifinal -- Teams TBA. From Baseball Tonight (Live)
ESPN Williamsport, Pa. (Live) (CC)
Little League WNBA Basketball First Round Gar.s 1 -- Teams TBA. (Live) (CC) MLS Soccer Club Deportivo Chivas
ESPNI Baseball USA at Los Angeles Galaxy.
EWTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Parable The Holy Rosary Back Stage The Pure Life
EWTN Lady II
T TV 00) Cardio Art of the Athlete Greg Louganis" Insider Training Robby Naish and Deadly Arts "Karate' n (CC)
FIT TV last n (CC) Greg Louganis. (CC) Dave Kalama. (CC)
FOX NC Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith _Susteren (Live) (CC)
FSNFL Marlins on Deck MLB Baseball Florida Marlins at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (Live)
(Live)
GOLF (6:30) Golf U.S. Amateur Champi- PGA Golf The Barclays First Round. From the Westchester Country Club in Harrison, N.Y.
_GOLF onship -- Day 2. (Live)I
GSN Lingo (CC) Weakest Link C (CC) High Stakes Poker (CC) Grand Slam (CC)
G e (:00) Attack of X-Play "Planet X-Play Star Wars Cops 2.0 Traffic Coos 2.0 C Ninja Warrior NInja Warrior
G4Tech the Show! (N) Puzzle League." games. stop. C (CC) (C)
M*A*S*H "He- Walker, Texas Ranger Drug run- CLAIRE (2007, Suspense) Valerie Bertinelli, Fredric Lane, Micole Mercu-
HALL roes" (CC) ners kill the husband of Alex s ro. A woman who has second sight provides clues to murders.
friend, Nicole Foley. (CC)
Buy Me Mary's Holmes on Homes "Wall of Sound" Dream House Over Your Head Disaster DIY Junk Brothers
HGTV family's triplex. n (CC) tC (CC) Hole in the living Sloppy home Fighter pilot cof-
n (CC) room. n gym. 1 (CC) fee table. (N) C
IN P Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day The Gospel
INS (_CC) day (CC) Truth
Reba Cheyenne My Wife and According to According to Friends Rachel Everybody Eveybody
KTLA thinks shell be Kids Jr. wins a Jim "House for Jim "Dana Gets has plans for Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
prom queen. l competition. A Sale" n (CC) Fired" C (CC) Joshua. n (CC) Cl (CC) "Liars' (CC)
Still Standing Reba "Switch" Reba Reba * MICHAEL (1996, Drama) John Travolta, Andie MacDowell,
LIFE "Still Responsi- Reba tries speed spends Christ- William Hurt. Tabloid journalists see the light with an angel's help. (CC)
ble" C (CC) dating, mas Eve alone.
MS C Hardball Countdown With Keith Olber- MSNBC News Live Murder by the Sea
MSNBC CCHd mannMudrbthSe
K Jimm Neutron: Drake & Josh SpongeBob Funniest Home Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of
NICK Boy Genius C (CC) SquarePants C Videos Bel-Air Bel-Air Bel-Air
TV The Office The Big Brother 8 One must leave. Shark "Starlet Fever" n (CC) News(N) C News
Negotiation" \ A (Live) Cl (CC) (CC)
SPEED Pinks Pinks- All Out (N) Rapid Turnover; Speed Records NOPITunerv- NOPI Tunervi-
SPEED I_ slon (N) slon
Against All Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN Odds (CC) Scenes (CC) Dr. Michael Jakes (CC) (CC)
Youssef. (CC)
Everybody Friends The Friends The Friends Monica Friends Monica's ** METRO (1997) Eddie Murphy.
TBS Loves Raymond gang parties with Bings go for fertil- and Chandler in- high-school friend A hostage negotiator and his new
"The Plan (CC) soap stars, ity tests. (CC) terview donors. visits. C partner unt a psychopath.
(:00) Monster American Hot Rod "59 Corvette 1" American Chopper "Peavey 2" Hard Shine "Screwing With an Icon"
TLC Garage "Full A 1959 Corvette. (N) Work continues. (CC) 1934 Ford pickup. (N)
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(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order Detectives race to find ** DANGEROUS MINDS (1995, Drama) Michelle Pfeiffer, George
TNT der Tabloid" 'C the killer of a parolee before two Dzundza, Courtney B. Vance. A teacher works wonders on a class of edu-
(CC) (DVS) bounty hunters do. C national misfits. (CC)
T Pokemon: Die- Courage the Camp Lazlo Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Courage the Naruto Scroll's
mond and Pearl Cowardly Dog nary Friends tures Cowardly Dog Secret"
TV5 00) Toute une Paradls a sauvegarder D6couverte de trois paradise naturels menaces Les Coups de Sur la route des
Ti histoire don't la savane afncaine. coeur de Bruno festivals
TWC Storm Stories Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
I VV (CC)
(:00) Yo Amo a Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha Destlando Amor Aqul y Ahora
UNIV Juan Querend6n para salvar a la mujer que ama.
(:00) Law & Or- * THE PACIFIER (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham, Faith Burn Notice "Hard Bargain" (N)
USA der; Special Vic- Ford. A Navy SEAL becomes the guardian of five siblings. (CC) (CC)
times Unit n
VH1 (:00) Fabulous Fabulous Life Of... The Hamptons" Fabulous Life Of... "Young Hot My Big Fat Fab- I Hate My 30s
Life Of... n n Royalty" C ulous Wedding Horrible credit.
VS. Boxing Boxing 2007 Will Grigsby vs. Ulises Boxing 2007 Hasim Rahman vs. Taurus Sykes.
(:00) America's THE AVENGERS (1998, Adventure) Ralph Fiennes, Uma Thurman, WGN News at Nine (N) ,C (CC)
WGN Funniest Home Sean Connery. Two British spies attempt to bring down an aristocrat. n
Videos C (CC) (CC)
Everybody Smallville "Progeny" Lex develops Supernatural Sam and Dean get CW11 News at Ten With Kalty
WPIX Loves Raymond a drug to wake Chloe's mother from thrown into the state penitentiary to Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
"Liars" N (CC) her catatonic state. hunt a ghost. C (CC)
Jeopardy! (CC) Dr. Phil Aspiring child stars. C News (N) Jeopardyl (CC) Frasier Rival Frasler Niles
WSBK (Part 2 of 3) (CC) steals Frasier's considers parent-
ratings, agent. hood. (CC)

(6:30) When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts "Acts 1-IV" Stories of the effects of Hurricane Katri- (:45) Rocket Sci-
H BO-E na on New Orleans residents. n (CC) ence: HBO First
Look (CC)
(6:00) * THE AGE OF INNO- Entourage Eric Flight of the * BEERFEST (2006, Comedy) Jay Chandrasekhar;
H BO-P CENCE (1993, Drama) Daniel Day- manages a new Conchords Kevin Heffernan, Erik Stolhanske. Premiere. Brothers
Lewis. n 'PG' (CC) client. C (CC) Tripled fan base. play beer games in Germany. C 'R' (CC)


(6:00) ROBIN HOOD: REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts
HBO-W PRINCE OF THIEVES (1991) Kevin l "Acts I-IV" Stories of the effects of Hurricane Katrina on
Costner. C 'PG-13' (CC) New Orleans residents. l (CC)
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H BO-S PERFECT MAN makes Alby a tempting offer. Cl Vaughn. A husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations: Cl
(2005) 'PG' (CC) (CC) I'PG-13' (CC)
(5:45) * MUNICH (2005, *' THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE: THE BE- ** THE SENTINEL (2006, Sus-
MAX-E Suspense) Eric Bana, Daniel Craig, GINNING (2006, Horror) Jordana'Brewster, Andrew pense) Michael Douglas, Kiefer
Geoffrey Rush. C 'R' (CC) Bryniarski, R. Lee Ermey. l 'R' Sutherland. C 'PG-13' (CC)
(.10) * THE LAST BOY SCOUT (1991, Action) * THE BREAK-UP (2006, Romance-Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer
MOMAX Bruce Willis, Damon Wayans. Private eye and ex-quar- Aniston, Joey Lauren Adams. A couple end their relationship, but neither
terback team up on dirty case. l 'R' (CC) is willing to move. C 'PG-13' (CC)
(:45) *v, LARRY THE CABLE GUY: HEALTH IN- (:15) SHERRYBABY (2006, Drama) Maggie Gyllenhaal, Brad
SHOW SPECTOR (2006, Comedy) Larry the Cable Guy, Iris William Henke, Danny Trejo. iTV. An ex-con wants to raise her child. 'R'
Bahr, Bruce Bruce. iTV. C 'PG-13' (CC)


TMC


wieG Gift Certific

SLmake great gifts


THURSDAY EVENING


(:45) * n BEAUTY SHOP (2005, Comedy) Queen Latifah, Alicia Silver- * GET RICH OR DIE TRYIN' (2005, Crime Drama)
stone, Andie MacDowell. A determined hairstylist competes with her for- Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson. A drug dealer turns to rap
mer boss. l 'PG-13' (CC) music for salvation. Cl 'R' (CC)









AP GE 24 THURSDAYAUGUS 7


THE TRIBUNE


COMI SPG


Tribune Comics


JUDGE PARKER
OW, MR. CA_6AtR OO000 WH-N PO
16 6ENING ONe I X C6T TO 566 THB
OF HIS P&OPLe6 CU(4REN1 BOOK57
IN TH- MORNVTN6












APARTMENT 3-G


BLONDIE


MARVIN



-TO PUBLICIZE 71 E
2SA ANNIVERSARY
OF Hi; COMIc STRIPS
MAVIAN APPEARS
ON A NUMBER OF
7V I/NTrVIE./W ,/sOW,..


M%( NEX-r GUEST
OI"ELLEN" WAS
604NG6'O BE'-TEl
FAMOUS CARTOOrt-
BAB6 MARVINt4


I CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
3 Fighting force finally
8 Vortigern's cat (5)


ly silent (5)


10 Arrange something for Walpurgis
Night, perhaps (3,2)
11 Headgear for use in an
unsafe zone (3)


12 Sea room (5)
13 No particular
15 Drinker's cry


officer? (7)
when a girl is just


about a knockout! (5)
18 Exclude from the pub (3)
19 Old codger who happens to
be stony? (6)
21 Say one happens to be in
Menton (7)
22 Instrument used excessively by
an apprentice (4)
23 Superman's hairstyle (4)
24 Always a warning to some lovers (7)
26 Hear in silent bewilderment (6)
29 Very keen to unite mother and
daughter (3)
31 Be an outsider no longer (5)
32 Boss or master
capable of anger (7)
34 Bad ignition (5)
35 The direction of a glance? (3)
36 A measure, or just
about half of it (5)
37 The top officer figures it's lunny (5)
38 Bird with a wooden leg? (5)


cryptic solutions
ACROSS: 8, Jour-ney 9, Fail to see 13, A-L-one 14, Repel
15, Took out 16, Pe-rsis-t 17, NoR-ma (rev) 18, Sight 20,
Rum-my 22, In-s-ane 23, Eno-ugh 25, Rallied 27,Nu-M-
eral 30, MO-dish 31, Ho-(ye)ar-ds 32, A-C-hed 35, Turns
36, All in 37, Wi-thou-t 39, Runs out 41, Gril-L 42, Raise
43, Concerned 44, B-oulder
DOWN: 1, H-on-our 2, Breezily 3, Tear-stained 4, B-allE-
rina 5, Pla-tea-u 6, No-nonsense 7, Zero 10, Ham-per 11,
Spani-sh 12, S(hor)t-il-ch 19, Go-ulash 21, Mean-der 24,
Pussy willow 26, Loses touch 28, Bow-l-egged 29,
F(o)r-antic 30, M-O-to-rs 32, After all 33, D-ither 34,
Can-ters 38, Olive-R 40, No-on


I,~r--


DOWN
1 Crashed flier long in prison (5)
2 Bad woman in a good book (7)
4 Test of articulation? (4)
5 It's not entry that's barred here! (6)
6 Founders of kitchen equipment? (5)
7 Where carelessly to daub a little
paint? (5)
9 Info of some urgency (3)
12 Packing nothing in a cardboard box
may seo,;, funny (7)
14 Managed to y0 the right one (3)
16 Rosie's willowy form (5)
17 Animal meaning everything,
possibly, to its master (5)
19 A go-ahead gaffer (7)
20 New tales somehow old (5)
21 Love In a mist may
seem a bit wet (5)
23 The moving craft involving
footwork (7)
24 Hunt around for something like
a polecat (6)
25 Vehicle used by
Beethoven (3)
27 The man to feed heartily? (5)
28 Those shed as you stare
in distress? (5)
30 First thing to do is for Joe to, get
Ban out (5)
32 Flanders girl? (4)
33 Stone used in fridge manufacture (3)


easy solutions
ACROSS: 8, Resumes 9, Volunteer 13, Alibi 14, Verge 15,
Creator 16, Garnish 17, Nears 18, Grand 20, Satin 22,
Natter 23, Thrice 25, Hatchet 27, Varnish 30, Exhale 31,
Pellet 32, Sweat 35, Aorta 36, Leave 37, Matador 39,
Exhibit 41, Norse 42, Reins 43, Lawn mower 44,
Neither.
DOWN: 1, Senior 2, Audition 3, Heavy-handed 4, Tolerates
5, Success 6, Strengthen 7, Pest 10, Haggis 11, Granite
12, Drudge 19, At issue 21, Teacher 24, Bad-tempered 26,
Collarbone 28, Remainder 29, All ears 30, Enamel 32,
Salurate 33, Thrash 34, Glutton 38, Driver 40, Heal.


ACROSS


Shoot (5)
Warehouse (5)
Recess (5)
Vehicle (3)
Mediterranean
island (5)
Dreary (7)
Beginning (5)
Failure (3)
Whole (6)
Forgive (7)
Dutch cheese (4)
Overtake (4)
Last game (7)
Creased (6)
Tin (3)
Large shrubs (5)
Hardness (7)
Weary (5)
Anger (3)
Navigate (5)
Symbol (5)
Prepared (5)


3
8
10
11
12
13
15
18
19
21
22
23
24
26
29
31
32


34
35
36
37
38


Dennis


* OL' MA9GAR r POESN'T HAFTA WEAR V,
PE ZME TO KEEP THE BOY5 AWAM."










A TOOPercent Solution


North dealer.
East-West vulnerable.
NORTH
*653
VAK8
*A4
+K 10 8 7 2
WEST
4 AQJ 107
V10752
*J63 4
45


EAST
442
V963
Q 972
6Q643


SOUTH
4+K98
VQJ4
K 10 8 5
A J9
The bidding:
North East South West
1 4 Pass 2 NT Pass
3 NT
Opening lead queen of spades.

The most interesting hands to
play are those where there is a sub-
stantial danger of defeat and declarer,
despite the threat, finds a way to pro-
tect himself against every possible lie
of the adverse cards.
Consider this simple example
where West leads the spade queen
against three notrump. Declarer's
only real problem is the location of
the queen of clubs. If he knew where
'the missing lady was located, nine
tricks would become a certainty,


since a finesse in the right direction
would easily do the job.
But, lacking this information,
South nevertheless found a line of
play that ensured the contract. He
started by ducking the queen of
spades. This kept West on. lead and
free to attack wherever he wished,
but powerless to inflict mortal dam-
age whatever he did next.
If West continued with the ace
and another spade, South would
counter by leading the A-J of clubs,
willing to lose a finesse to East, who
could do him no harm.
If West elected instead to lead the
jack of spades at trick two, South
would win and follow the same plan.
If the club finesse lost to East's
queen, East either wouldn't have a
spade to return because the suit was
originally divided 5-2, or he would
return a spade, in which case the
spades were divided 4-3. Either way,
South would be sure to score at least
nine tricks.
Also, and with equal effectiveness,
if West chose to shift to a heart or a
'diamond at trick two, declarer would
win in dummy, lead the ten of clubs
and let it ride. He wouldn't 'care
whether the finesse won or lost,
because if West had the queen, he
couldn't harm South, while if East
had the queen, the finesse could be
repeated to assure the contract.


HOW many words of
four letters or more A
can monke fm E |
the B own .
here? In making a -
word, each letter may
be used once only. L
Each must contain the
centre letter and there ,
must be at least one S
nine-letter word. No l
plurals or verb forms
ending in "s", no
words with initial capitals and no words with a
hphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase as permitted (e.g. inlet -
in inket printer).
TODAY'S TARGET .
Good 29; very good 44; excellent 57 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.


DOWN
1 Lure (5)
2 Tedium (7)
4 Chime (4)
5 Chant (6)
6 Titan (5)
7 Transparent (5)
9 Friend (3)
12 Confused (7)
14 Amusement (3)
16 Indian instrument (5)
17 Anxious (5)
19 Tempted (7)
20 Type.of ..... ...
earthenware (5)
21 Cord (5)
2'3 Allowance (7)
24 Want (6)
25i Karate export (3)
27 Speak in public (5)
28 Dissuade (5)
30 Alloy (5)
32 Action (4)
33 Annoy (3)


)I( Calvit, -47


MATrS THAT CEREL rT'S ITw N FIORE,
Wv..RC_ EN ZI "Lv FS,;,


THURSDAY,
AUGUST 23


ARIES March 21/April 20
A new love is set to turn your world
upside down this week, Aries. Just
make sure that special someone is
the right one for you.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
Everyone's not out to get you, but
nevertheless it pays to be on your
toes this week, Taurus. Make time
for family events later in the week
- you'll enjoy it and everyone will.
be glad to see you.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Look before you leap should be
your personal motto this week,
Gemini. If you jump to conclu-
sions this week, you're likely to
get it completely wrong, with dis-
astrous results.
CANCER June 22/July 22
You'll be the first to spot a new
business opportunity, but take
care to see that all is as good as it
appears. Old friends stop by later in.
the week, bringing good luck.
LEO July 23/August 23
You're quite capable of getting along;
with anyone's help. It might not be a
bad idea to be on your own for a'
while, this week.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
What you need is a new way of
looking at life. Virgo, and this week
is an ideal time to start searching..
And who knows? Love may follow.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
No matter how straightforward sit-
uations may seem this week, you
can bet there's a twist to it, and it's
wise not to rush to judgment. Take,
time to relax this weekend.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You won't want to hear it, but some
of the criticism that will be coming
your way this week will get to the
heart of what you're doing wrong. If
you're prepared to listen and learn,
you'll end the week a lot wiser.
SAGITIARIUS Nov 13/Dec 21
You've a knack for telling it like it
is with little regard for others' egos,,
but the shoe will be on the other
foot this week. Can you take it as.
well as you dish it out?
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 '
Trust your instincts, Capricorn.'
The more opinions you seek the
more reasons others will come up
with for why you should not fol-
low your dreams.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
There's a danger this week that !
you'll see things the way you want to
rather than how they really are. Look
for advice from friends and family.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
You're feeling rather lazy this week
and confident that you can get-others
to do the dirty work for you. That's
fine, if you can manage it, but don't
expect them to do a good job.


a

clavier
new-
i'ffT'W ,ismlTI'
WOFO"'%M^^^^

^^^B^ ^^ e for^


CHESf S byLeonard Barden


Samuel Franklin (England) v
Eduard Khatoev (Russia) world
schools under-13 championship,
Halkidiki, Greece 2007. Talented
Dulwich College schoolboy
Franklin is rapidly becoming one
of the UK's top junior prospects,
and he scored a career-best result
when he took the bronze medal
in the world schools event,
defeating one of the Russian top
seeds in today's position. The
Forest Hill youngster, who has
honed his skills at the
Croydon/Crystal Palace chess
club which meets in Sydenham
on Monday evenings, scored
another recent success with first
prize in the major section at the
Surrey congress. Here as White
(to play) he has gained an ideal
position with all his pieces
menacing Black's exposed king.
Note particularly how White has


a i e I -
advanced his pawns to g5 and h6
where they squeeze Black for
space and create possible entry
points for the queen and knight.
White's position is crushing and he
can win in several ways, but
Franklin chose the sharpest route.
How does White force victory?
LEONARD BARDEN


Chess solution 8418:1 Be6+! Kxe6 2 Rxe4+ Kd7 3
Rxe7+ Kc8 4 Qh3+ Kb8 5 Rd7 Qc86 Ne7
Resigns. Black loses his queen.


C


TIGER


J


---


Y.


nT







,,, .,ouo I 23, 2007, PAGE 25


THE TRIBUNE


NASA looks to


three more launches



at risk from same



damage as Endeavour


* CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
A 3 1/2-INCH-LONG gouge
in Endeavour's belly did not
endanger astronauts in the shut-
tle's safe landing, but NASA is
looking ahead to three more
launches at risk for the same
kind of damage, according to
Associated Press.
Endeavour touched down
Tuesday for an early home-
coming prompted by a hurri-
cane ending a nearly two-
week orbital drama that cen-
tered on the gouge.
The gouge in Endeavour, car-
rying Christa McAuliffe's back-
up for the doomed Challenger
flight in 1986, helped keep
NASA officials acutely aware
of past shuttle disasters.
Back before Columbia flew
Its last mission four years ago,
NASA knew it had a foam
problem with its fuel tanks but
never imagined a piece of the
airy insulation could severely
wound a space shuttle.
: Columbia shattered during
re-entry to Earth's atmosphere,
just five days before engineers
were to propose possible
repairs.
This time; NASA knew it had
a foam problem with brackets
on its fuel tanks but never imag-
ined a stray piece would rico-
chet off the tank and smash into
the shuttle.
Retired Navy Adm. Harold
Gehman Jr., who headed the
2003 Columbia investigation,
was reluctant to comment this
week on the troublesome brack-
ets, which support the fuel feed
line on the tank. He said he did-
n't have enough information.
But he observed: "You have
to assume thing; afe going to
happen and you "iave to miti-
gate the consequences, that's
what our report was all about."
Endeavour's gash, although
deep, was too small for scorch-
ing atmospheric gases to pene-
trate and cause serious damage,
mission managers said during
the flight. It was also on the bel-
ly, a more benign area than the
nose or wings, which are sub-
jected to much higher heat. The
platesize hole that brought
down Columbia pierced the left
wing.
Commander Scott Kelly said
he was "a little bit under-
whelmed" when he saw the
gouge for himself after touch-
down. "We knew how big it was
conceptually. We were told the
dimensions. But to see it, it
looked rather small," he told
reporters.
Officials who checked out
Endeavour on the runway said
there was no apparent charring
to the exposed felt fabric, the
last barrier before the alu-
minum frame.
But now NASA finds itself
playing catch-up. It's analyzing
a variety of temporary bracket
solutions, which may or may not
be in place before the next
space station construction mis-
sion in late October.
Making the brackets with tita-
nium, which would require far
less foam insulation than the


NASA workers secure the space shuttle Endeavour landing at the Kennedy Space Center's
Shuttle Landing Facility Tuesday afternoon Aug. 21,2007 in Cape Canaveral, Fla.


A GASH in the thermal tiles on the space shuttle Endeav-
our caused by foam breaking away from the external tank dur-
ing launch, is shown after the orbiter landed at the Kennedy
Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility Tuesday afternoon
Aug. 21, 2007 in Cape Canaveral, Fla.


aluminum version, is the per-
manent solution ordered after
the problem first cropped up
last summer.
But that won't happen until
next spring.
By then, NASA will be just
two years from retiring its three
remaining space shuttles after
wrapping up a demanding
schedule for finishing construc-
tion of the international space
station.
Engineers are considering
several short-term options:
shaving some foam from the
brackets or possibly applying
an oil to the foam to reduce
condensation and ice buildup.
Because the bracket problem
has intensified for the launches
since Columbia, engineers the-
orize it might be due to the one-
hour earlier start of fueling a
new rule intended to provide
more time for ice checks. That
extra hour that the super-cold
fuel is in the tank could be
allowing more undetected ice
to form, which then can cause
the neighboring foam to pop
off.
NASA Administrator
Michael Griffin said after
Endeavour's landing that he will
need to be satisfied that any
change "is necessary and, in
fact, beneficial" before order-
ing modifications. The last thing
the space agency wants to do is
to change something and make
it worse.
NASA still doesn't know


whether the debris that
smacked Endeavour was foam,
ice or a combination of both.
Whatever it was, it broke off
the bracket, fell nearly 25 feet
onto a strut lower on the exter-
-nal fuel tank, then shot into
Endeavour's belly.
Each fuel tank is covered
with 4,000 pounds of foam and
each bracket has only ounces
of foam on it, NASA's space
operations chief Bill Gersten-
maier said. "We've really taken
this huge complex problem ...
and we've really shrunk it down
to just very, very few areas,
essentially ounce-size pieces of
foam that we need to go work
with."
A NASA veteran who now
chairs the mission management
team, John Shannon, is quick
to point out that once the prob-
lem was discovered, the differ-
ence in the way the Columbia
and Endeavour flights were
handled was "night and day."
Columbia's damage was not
seriously addressed by mission
managers and worried engi-
neers did not speak up.
Endeavour's much smaller
damage was analyzed for a full
week using every resource avail-
able. A group of engineers went
against the tide and argued it
would be better to fix the gouge
than return with it unmended
- because of concerns about
damage to the returning shuttle.
By that time, the experts had
ruled out risks to the crew.


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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


-.4 THETR.-IBUN


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THE TRIBUNE


Frc~








THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


ss


Realtor criticises former BREA




president over comments on




the proposed Albany project


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
A Bahamian realtor has
criticised the former
president of the
Bahamas Real Estate
Association for com-
ments he made regarding the pro-
posed Albany development.
In a press release to Tribune Busi-
ness, Sidney Bethell of C A Christie
said that he read the comments attrib-
uted to Pat Strachan in the August 8
edition of Tribune Business with inter-
est and dismay.
In the article, Mr Strachan said that
he and several other residents of
South Ocean Village Phase One had
been approached by representatives


of an unknown purchaser.
"I don't know who they are repre-
senting. What is the agenda of this
group? Where are we supposed to go
when they buy these homes?"
Mr Strachan had further questioned
why no-one could say what was hap-
pening in the area and why the resi-
dents had not been privy to any
sketches or plans of the project. He
asked what the agenda was behind
the request.
In addition, Mr Strachan backed
the decision by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham to place the Albany
project on hold.
He cited concerns about the road
re-routing and beach access for
Bahamians that needed to be
accessed. He also emphasised that he


had no difficulties with foreign invest-
ments.
However, he reiterated the prime
minister's concerns that Albany
included a small hotel component as a
way to access the customs duty and
stamp duty exemptions under the
Hotel Encouragement Act for its
main residential offering.
He said that this was unfair as for-
eign home purchases in Albany would
enjoy tax-free benefits on construc-
tion materials that ordinary Bahami-
ans could not access when building
their own homes.
According to Mr Bethell, Mr Stra-
chan has an obligation to advance the
real estate industry in this country.
"However, through his comments,
he displayed an absence of reason-


able propriety."
Mr Bethel went on to note that Mr
Strachan had admitted that he made
no effort to contact potential pur-
chasers or investors,
"If he had, his remarks could have
been more responsible and balanced.
He prejudged the developments and
some of his words were brash and
could only be intended to cause con-
cerns and fears."
Mr Christie acknowledged his own
efforts to attract capable
investors/developers with the ready
resources to reinvigorate the South
Ocean area.
"Finally, there seems to be light at
the end of the tunnel and this has
been accomplished in spite of previ-
ous failures."


He also said that it would be com-
forting and responsible to stop nega-
tive approaches, assumptions and pre-
judgments, "lest we succeed in undo-
ing all the good which has been
done."
Last night, a town meeting on
Albany was scheduled to be held.
Albany, the multi-million golf and
resort gated community, denied that
that they were behind the offers.
Tribune Business has learned that
they were likely to have originated
with the developers of the proposed
$867 million South Ocean Resort,
which includes a five-star and four-
star hotel and other residential
options and amenities.
The developer for that resort is
RHS Ventures.


Bank thanked for

'tremendous support'

of Sandilands' annual

junkanoo rush-out


SANDILANDS Rehabilita-
tion Centre is expressing
thanks to Commonwealth
Bank for providing "tremen-
dous support and contribu-
tion" to their 10th annual
Junkanoo rush-out parade, to
be held in December this year.
The bank made a donation
to the group which hosts the
event for Sandilands patients,


Simpson Penn School for Boys,
Willie Mae Pratt School for
Girls and their families as a
fun day.
"We are very happy to assist
Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre with their Junkanoo
parade," said William B.

SEE page 15


* SANDILANDS Rehabilitation
Centre expresses thanks to Com-
monwealth Bank for supporting
their 10th annual Junkanoo Rush-
Out Parade. Shown (1-r): Sllbert
Cooper, senior manager, credit
inspection; Carole Strachan, VP,
internal audit, credit inspection
and CISO; Betsy Duvalier, public
relations manager, Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre; and Erald
Thompson, manager, internal
audit.
(Photo: Tim Aylen)


Wo


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Beverage company

eyeing Bahamas


for expansion


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
A CARIBBEAN beverage
company is considering the
Bahamas a strong market for
potential expansion.
Banks Holdings Ltd is eye,
ing the Bahamian market
because of its high tourism
numbers.
A Barbadian newspaper, the
Advocate, said the company's
recent Rights Issue Circular,
indicated that the Caribbean
Bottling Company Ltd (CBC)
had historically been strong.
"Banks which mentioned
plans of a rights Issue since last
year incorporated Caribco in
July, 2006, specifically to
acquire 100 per cent of the
shares of Caribbean Bottling
Company Ltd situated in Nas-
sau, Caribco duly acquired
shares of Caribbean Bottling
Company. The business of
CBC is the only asset of Carib-
co," the article said.
It is believed that competi-
tion will come from both
domestic production and direct
imports.
Officials at the company told
the paper they believe the
operation can return to and
improve on this volume, giv-
en the investments being
undertaken in respect to pro-
duction.
Additionally, they have


Banks Holdings
Limited has
eyes on the
local market
because of
the nation's
high tourism
numbers

been able to identify several
areas where immediate savings
on inputs can be achieved
through pool purchasing and
other activities.
Savings in these areas flow
directly to profit.
Caribbean Bottling Compa-
ny is the licensed manufactur-
er/distributor of Coca-Cola
brands in the Bahamas. The
company operates three filling
lines, a post-mix line, canning
line and a pet line.
The report indicated that
the initial focus will be to ease
the efficiencies and productiv-
ity within the plant in an effort
to prioritise the upgiliding of
those assets to better position
the entity to participate in the
stronger margin potential.


U U
Money Safe.


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Money Safe.
Money Fast.



SBank of The Bahama
I N T NATIONAL
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PTH A U 22T I


In


economy,


* By RICHARD COULSON


R eight now, any
or seeking a mort-
gage or investing
in equity shares should be glad
he lives here rather than in the
"sophisticated" economy of
the United States, where the
sulprime" meltdown is in free
fall.
Millions of American home-
,owners now face default or
foreclosure. New buyers face


Millions of American home-owners face default or foreclosure


terms that only yesterday
seemed ludicrous as interest
rates have escalated and liq-
uidity has dried up.
Huge firms specialising in
mortgage lending are now in
bankruptcy proceedings or
struggling to stay alive,
Hedge funds now offer their
investors stunning nosedives
in value or even freezes on


redemptions, and banks that
promoted them see their earn-
ings at risk, their share prices
decline, and their executives
sacked.
Stock
The stock market's eupho-
ria has vanished, as the Dow
Jones Industrial Average


(DJIA) has dived about eight
per cent from its brief all-time
high of 14,000 just last July.
These sudden reversals did
not spring from any unfore-
seeable natural disaster or the
human mechanism of a terror-
ist attack, or even from any
fundamental weakness in the
world economy. No although
regulators seem too cautious


RBC is pleased to announce the opening of a new branch
on Carmichael Road. This new location will house both
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO under one roof.
Here, Royal Bankmwill offer a full range of banking products
and services, while RBC FINCO will offer a full suite of
mortgage products and financial advice.



Services include:
Business and Consumer Loans
Personal and Business Account Services
Mortgage Loans
24-Hour ATM
Foreign Exchange Services
Night Deposits
Card Services
Royal Online Internet Banking
and more!


Come see us at the corner of Carmichael Road and Turtle
Drive. We look forward to welcoming you to our new
location soon!


to put it bluntly they arose
simply from a combination of
greed and incompetence
among financial executives,
spreading from the USA to
infect markets elsewhere,
thanks to our wonderfully
instantaneous world commu-
nications network.
The root factor was simply
the separate decisions of hun-
dreds of American lenders to
offer mortgages to subprime
borrowers who provided no
credit history, asset list, or
earnings record credulous
first-time buyers mesmerised
by the American dream of
becoming an owner, or existing
householders who needed to
refinance their improvident
credit-card borrowing.
Often these were "teaser"
loans: no money down and low
(or zero) interest for the first
two years, followed by an
abrupt and painful adjustment
to prevailing market rates.
Once upon a time, any loan
used to be retained by the
lender who made it. But now,
the original lender either sells
his loan into the market, or
borrows in the market to make
new loans, using the two-edged
sword of leverage.
Experts in higher-math com-
puter programmes (the aptly-
named "quants") took bundles
of loans and sliced and diced
them into various levels of
credit risk creating Collater-
alised Debt Obligations
(CDOs),
Savvy firms recognized a
demand for these CDOs and
earned big commissions by
selling them to professional
investors: pension funds,
employee retirement funds,
college endowments, hedge
funds for the super rich, insur-
ance companies, bank portfo-
lios, etc all of them eager to
acquire the CDOs using mini-
mum cash and maximum
leverage.
These steps were taken
under the praiseworthy prin-
ciple of "spreading the risk"
among a wider range of
lenders. And here is where
true incompetence is obvious.
Any major financial institu-
tion, to say nothing of the reg-
ulators, should have been


aware that the system was rad-
ically increasing the volume of
credits, so that the market's
total risk exposure was vastly
inflated.
And they certainly knew
that, just as subprime loans
were ballooning, housing
prices were rising to an unsus-
tainable level that was bound
to implode.
Happened
And that's just what hap-
pened. The first cracks
appeared this spring, when
borrowers began to default,
Buyers of CDOs became wary
and shut off their credit lines to
mortgage lenders, who sud-
denly were caught in a liquidi-
ty squeeze, And naturally the
use of leverage back-fired, as
the face amount of every
defaulted mortgage was multi-
plied into the resulting CDOs.
The earliest warning to the
market appeared in April
when the nationwide mortgage
lender New Century Financial,
a pioneer in granting sub-
primes, couldn't get any new
funding to meet its commit-
ments and had to close its
doors.
Then Bear Stearns, known
as the smartest bond-trading
firm on Wall Street,
announced the collapse of its
two billion dollar hedge funds
heavily invested in CDOs, the
grandly named "High Grade
Structured Credit Strategies

SEE next page


C____II_ ~_~ __


RBC Carml*chael Road


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007





THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE


'subprime' meltdown in free fall


FROM page 2


Fund" and the "High Grade
Structured Credit Strategies
Enhanced Leverage Fund".
High Grade indeed: one of
the funds lost 100 per cent of
investors' money, the other
only 90 per cent. The firm's
chief financial officer rashly
announced that credit condi-
tions were the worst he'd seen
in 22 years, causing the DJIA
to lose 280 points that Friday,
and over the weekend the fir-
m's president was sacked.
The following week
revealed that the disease had
spread abroad. France's largest
bank, BNP Paribas, stopped
redemptions on three of its
funds with assets over $2 bil-
lion, stating that it could find
no market for trading the
CDOs based on US mort-
gages. .
An obscure German finance
house, IKB, revealed that it
could no longer find buyers
for its commercial paper to
support its imprudent CDO
investments, and had to be res-
cued by a consortium of major
banks who demanded resigna-
tion of its chief executive.
Time
About the same time,
America's 10th largest mort-
gage lender, American Home
Mortgage, filed for bankruptcy
because it could not get new


funding to carry its $58.9 bil-
lion loan portfolio, even
though very little was owed by
subprime borrowers.
With that news, the DJIA
dropped another 382 points in
one wild day. Clearly, the col-
lapse of the mortgage market
was forcing major players to
initiate massive sell-offs of
traded equities to strengthen
their capital base.
Virtually
Virtually every day there's
been news of another hedge
fund collapse or freeze-up of
lending as liquidity dries up.
Countrywide Financial,
America's largest, says it can
survive after lining up $11.5
billion in emergency credits,
while its shares have fallen 40
per cent. Blue-chip Goldman
Sachs suffered the ignominy
of seeing its $8 billion Global
Alpha Hedge Fund fall 26 per
cent this year. Estimates of
outstanding subprime loans
vary widely, from $600 billion
to $2 trillion, and it has been
predicted that 1.7 million US
homeowners face foreclosure
during 2007-2008 as interest
rates are adjusted upwards
after initial grace periods.
Meanwhile, world financial
authorities have not been idle.
Overseas, The European Cen-
tral Bank has pumped out
over EU 200 billion in short-
term credit to provide liquidi-
ty, and the Federal Reserve
System has been doing much


the same with dollar advances
in the US. although neither of
these moves seemed capable
of turning the market around.
Finally, just last Friday, the
Fed dropped the discount rate
to 5.75 per cent, encouraging
the DJIA to a 233-point one-
day explosion to culminate a
month of volatility.
But every day the picture
changes. What comes next?
Will the Fed reluctantly drop
the all-important Fed funds
rate which it held at 5.25 per
cent for over a year to fight
inflation? Would this in itself
be sufficient to inspire confi-
dence in the mnarkcl't
Or should \ve believe the
pessimists who predict a bear
market for the next couple of
years, with declining share
prices until IIS house prices
decline to a sLu.ltaiMable level
and mortgages go through a
painful period ot defaults and
refiinancig? Who cin be ce'"-
tain at this poitl .'
Initially
As said initiall. \\e in The
Bahamas have been fortunate..
Of the roughly $2.3 billion
mortgages held by bainks and
insurance conipinies few have
been made t suhpiinimc bor-
rowers, and llie inc\ table
defaults are \xwell \\ithini expect-
ed limits.
In most c:';Is banks retain
the loans they hl\ e made and
maintain direct relationships
with their borrowers. We do


not have the complex arrange-
ments for creating CDOs and
passing the debt up a daisy-
chain to other lenders.
Without the risks of lever-
age, there seems little likeli-
hood of a profound liquidity
squeeze which is fortunate,
since our Central Bank, unlike
the Fed, does not have the
resources to become a "lender
of last resort" and inject mas-


sive liquidity, even by
overnight funds, into our
financial system.
Our only concern is that the
"zero-down" lot loans adver-
tised by some banks are not
granted indiscriminately,
encouraging speculation rather
than investment. And we hope
that the government's policy
of easing exchange control
restrictions on foreign invest-


ment will not be cut back sim-
ply out of fear that Bahami-
ans will invest in the poisonous
US dollar CDOs derived from
subprime loans.
There are plenty of sound
investments in the foreign
markets, and plenty of conser-
vative investment advisers,
both here and abroad, who can
direct Bahamians down a sen-
sible path.


British American Financial


&


The Surgical Suite


Sister, Sister Breast Cancer

Support Group


Prayer Breakfast


Saturday


&

4



rn
']'


(a

2007




2007


The Ball Room

Wyndham Crystal Palace
Cable Beach.


Donation $30.00


Tickets are available at the Surgical Suite, Collins Ave.
Phone 3261929


Rigt o~, nyRactiin olin o seknga mortgage
inesin i euiyshre soud e ld lielvsheerte
tha inthe'sohisicaed'ecoomyof he nitd Sate, wer
th6'up6 6 etdw i n*re al.Milon f mria
hoieower owfae efut r*orclsre Nw uyr
fae ers 0ha nl ystrdyseme ldirusasiners
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Richard6Coulso


GN561

MINISTRY OF FINANCE

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Public is hereby notified that a Public Auction will be conducted by the
Customs Department on un-entered goods at the places and times listed below:-

1. Customs Headquarters, Thompson Boulevard, 24t September, 2007
on Automobiles.

2. Air Express, National International Airport, 25* 260 September,
2007 on General Merchandise.

3. Customs Warehouse, J.F.K. Drive 274 September I' October, 2007
on General Merchandise.

4. Bahmar/Cavalier, Arawak Cay, 2" October, 2007 on Damaged
Vehicles.

5. Marsh Harbour, Abaco 4t October, 2007 on General
Merchandise.

The above goods will be sold under the Provision of Section 43 of The
Customs Management Act and the auction will commence at 10:00 a.m daily.

A list of the goods to be auctioned can be viewed at Customs Headquarters,
Thompson Boulevard, Customs Warehouse, John F. Kennedy Drive, Air Freight,
Lynden Pindling International Airport, and the various docks.

The right is reserved to accept or reject any or all bids tendered.



Ruth Millar (Mrs.)
Financial Secretary


B"d


-- -l mlim
am ma


IBM Bahamas Limited


CAREER OPPORTUNITY


CLIENT REPRESENTATIVE

Description:

This is a key role to drive IBM growth in The Bahamas. This role will work
in conjunction with IBM Sales and Technical Support Teams. covering
accounts in The Bahamas. Responsibilities will include:

Driving new business in the territory
Delivering annual revenue target while accurately forecasting revenue
and effectively managing a sales pipeline
Performing extensive prospecting within a set geographic Icrriior
Developing strong relationship with customers
Assisting with the development of integrated marketing
communications strategies, plans and programs
Assisting with organization, management and coordination ol all
details and aspects of specific marketing events, promotions and
functions

Qualifications:

University degree in Sales/Marketing, Business Administration or
Equivalent experience
Business to business selling is an asset
Proven success in prospecting and managing a territory
A solid track record of achieving/exceeding sales targets
Strong written and verbal skills

An equal opportunity employer, IBM provides competitive salad ies a'nd
benefits. Thus, compensation will be commensurate with experience cid
qualifications.

Please submit detailed applications or electronic resume to the attention of:

Human Resources Administrator
IBM Bahamas Limited
Fourth Floor
Atlantic House
Second Terrace & Collins Avenue
Nassau, Bahamas
email: jmoss@bs.ibm.com

Deadline: August 27th, 2007

All applications will be held in the strictest confidence. Only applicants
who are short-listed will be contacted.


mommomm






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, SHARON
JENNIFER FRANCIS of Southern Heights, P.O. Box
N-9859, Nassau,Bahamas intend to change my name
to SHARON JENNIFER RITCHIE. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DAS DUMIQUE OFWELLINGTON
STREET, P.O. BOX N-2557, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 23RD day of AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible
foi Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas







Responsibilities Include, But Not Limited to:

>Scheduling customer work
>Typing customer proposals and letters on Microsoft
office
>Using Accpac Corp. series for A/C's Receivables.
>Updating Customer Data Base
>Credit Stop lists and collections.
>Inter-Office reports.
>Filing new quotes & work completed.

Desired attributes:
Ages between 35 to 45 years, excellent communications,
inter personal and organizational skills, excellent
computer and typing skills, attentive to detail, goal
oriented.

>Competitive Salary
>Health Insurance
>Pension Plan

Please send resume to the following:
Fax: 322-3969
Or P.O.Box N-1388, Nassau, Bahamas


44


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Looking for a
producing preschool?
Look no more Call us today!

Ebenezer Preschool. St. Charles Vincent St.

The low price leader.

Ph: 393-7557 or 322-8161



Creative Early Learning Centre
)uflitil\ Care Afqurd -bl Priced











Child Safe Parent Friendly
Registration On-Going
Location Robinson Road East/Phone: 394-1148


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FOWL CAY'"
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e>ta*i*oB -
LAND AND SEA PARK.
AsAcO co AVvAT*4ow socsrv


MAN .OF WA2 CAY
(Hwe1Hn ENoD


REVISED BOUNDARIES FOR

THE FOWL CAYS NATIONAL PARK
The Bahamas National Trust recently submitted a proposal to the Government
of the Bahamas to have the Fowl Cays area declared a National Park. Once the
Fowl Cays and the associated rocks are protected under the national park system,
this will ensure that the local communities and visitors to the area will be able
to enjoy access to the area for many generations to come. The Trust received
several comments from the Abaco Cays community including a letter to the
editor, protesting the proposed boundaries. These comments suggested that the
boundaries were unnecessarily too broad, and would not be supported by the
community.

The Trust would like to thank the Abaco community for the input received
regarding the proposal for the Fowl Cays National Park. As a result of the
community's input and suggestions the boundaries have been changed to reflect
the traditionally accepted boundaries as depicted above.


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41


44.


* A FAMILY uses a cart at a Lowe's store in
Sunnyvale, California, in this May 18, 2007
file photo. Lowe's Cos., the nation's second
largest home improvement chain, said Monday
that its second-quarter profit rose nine per
cent on higher overall revenue. The results
came in ahead of Wall Street expectations,
and its shares rose six percent in morning
trading.

(AP Photo: Paul Sakuma)


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILBERT ESPERANCE OF
EXUMA STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 23rd day of AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.








Responsibilities:

Day to Day running of the store

Inventory Control

Day to Day sales

Computer literate

Must have a good personality



Please provide your resume to:



Andrew Aitken Frame Art

50 Madeira Street

Palmdale Ph.: 325-1771


A leading global, research-based pharmaceutical company
seeks qualified persons for the following position:

Medical Sales Representative
The medical rep will be responsible for promoting
pharmaceutical brands within the healthcare community in
The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements:
" Bachelor's degree in medical science, allied health, or
business management
Effective communication and presentation abilities
Proficiency in time management, planning and organizing
SComputer literate
SSelf-motivated team player

V Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing would be
an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor vehicle, be willing
to travel to the family islands, to the U.S., and other foreign
countries.

Please send resums by September 10th to:
Medical Rep
Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or FAX: 393-0440
We thank all applicants lor their interest, however;
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


I


BUSINESS


w_





THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE


ELEUTHERA LOT NO. 14B & 7B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvement comprising of 20,355 sq. ft. being Lot #14B and 7B and situated in the
SE i i Palmetto Point District of the Island of Eleuthera, Northward of the public road which runs from the Palmetto Point settlement
II1 1 to Savannah Sound in the coastal area northward of Ingraham's Pond, and which said piece, parcel or Lot of land and improvements
forms a portion of several parcels of land containing 2.947 acres or thereabouts and which also includes Lot No. 7B. This site
encompasses a 2-storey structure comprising 3-bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathorooms, front room, dining room, dining room, family
room, utility room, pantry, kitchen, stairwell, basement, 2-car garage and attic office. The entire house is equipped with central
SBair-conditioning. The upper floor to the porch area has been converted into a storage and an area for the irrigation system and
equipment. There is a pool area at the rear of this building approximately 537.14 sq. ft. with the garage area approximately 777
.sq. ft. This area is complete with all utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $513,959.00

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an area fot a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas
.g Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A
concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the
interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl tiles.

Appraisal: $265,225.00


Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision LOT NO. 1, BLOCK NO. 45,
All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section "E" in the subdivision called and
Known as Eleuthera Island Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey building which is approximately 14 yrs old and is
abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7'-4" wide by 20'-0" on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed
living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper
level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area. All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.

LOT NO. 12, BLOCK 3, MILLER'S HEIGHTS

All that lot of land having an area of 7,500 sq. ft., being lot 12, of the subdivision known and designated as Millar's Heights, situated in the
Southwestern district of New Providence, Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
2,375 sq. ft of enclosed living space with three 2-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining rooms, and kitchen apartment complex. The land is on a
grade and level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are
fairly kept, with improvements including parking area, walking pathway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing at the
back and southern sides.
Appraisal: $239,500.00
Traveling west on Carmichael Road, enter West Avenue, on the South side immediately after Topps Laundromat. Take first right which is Wimpole
St., go around the curve on the left which is London Avenue, traveling south on London Avenue the subject property is the 9th building on the
right before the T, Junction (high street) the subject building is an L shape triplex, painted green, trimmed white.
LOT NO. 1 WESTERN SHORES

All that lot of land having an area of 7,389 sq. ft., being lot #1 of the Subdivision known as Western Shores Phase II, the said Subdivision situated
in the Western District of New Providence, Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single structure comprising of a single family residence
I ... consisting of approximately 2,430 sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The residence comprises of 3-bedroom with closets, 2 1/2 bathrooms, living/dining
rooms, study, kitchen, utility room, porch and enclosed garage with electronic door. The land appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the
possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly well kept with improvements including driveway,
walkway and swimming pool. The yard is enclosed with walls.
Appraisal: $753,570.00
Traveling west on West Bay Street. Go pass Orange Hill and Indigo Subdivisions, the house is located on the left near Tusculum Subdivision and
painted all white.



Island Harbour Beach, Exuma
All that parcel or lot of vacant land containing 10,000 (80'X 100') sq. ft. being Lot No. 9, Block 2, Island Harbour Beach Subdivision situated the western most portion of the Hermitage Estate, Little
Exuma Bahamas. The property is located on an unpaved road known as Stocking Road. The property also has a commanding view of the ocean.
Appraisal: $80,000.00

Nassau Village Subdivision
All that lot of land having an area of approximately 5,000 sq ft, being Lot No. 11 & 12 of the subdivision known as Nassau Village Subdivision, situated in the Eastern District of New Providence Bahamas.-
This property is zoned multi-family/single family. This property is comprised of foundation for a duplex building consisting of approximateV 1,985 sq. ft. of enclosed living space. The floors are poured,
electrical & plumbing roughing is in place.
Appraisal: $70,212.50.00
Travel east on Charles Saunders Highway, pass Arawak Homes Development on the left side of the Highway, take second corner left, make a right tum go all the way almost to the end of the road. The
Property is on the Right By 'Fish For Sale' sign with boat in the yard.

LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham's Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B
and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20' wide road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said
Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately
50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated "E" which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly
the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft;
eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft; westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a
distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has a
topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now
of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30' wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128
hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately
44,847.76 sq. ft. This .neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.


APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as "Mutton Fish Point"

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated "F" which forms a portion of land known as "Mutton Fish Point" situated about
two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly
by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and
running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the
property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography
of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,276.00





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B. THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


. ...B N


^.rp^/


^---(3!


School Fees Reminder



SCHOOL FEES
Faith Temple Christian Academy wishes to remind parents
of Returning Students that all Seat Fees and First Term
Tuition Fees are Past Due. Parents are encouraged
to safeguard their child/children Seat (s) by paying all
outstanding fees promptly, as space is limited. The
Academy can not guarantee space for unpaid. school fees.


PRESCHOOL
The Academy wishes to announce that there is limited space
available in its Preschool, Grades: K2-K4, and is presently
accepting applications for the academic year 2007 2008


INFORMATION
For more information contact the Academy at 324-2269 or
Fax: 324-1129. That's Faith Temple Christian Academy,
"Committed to a Christ-Centred Education."


Prince Charles Drive
P.O. Box SS-5765
Nassau, Bahamas
Email Address ttca(Oftca.edu.bs


b adets nM Ume-te# esae


For delivery of the leading Bahan mi
newspaper, call The Tribunem'
Circulation Department at b02 2383
or visit our offices on t,., ,, St,;.
to sign up today!


3 months (13 weeks)
6 months (26 weeks)
1 year (52 weeks)


$ 45.95
$ 84.9,
$ 160.00


HAROLD ANTOR
INSURANCE EXECUTIVE


The Tribune
111 1lD ll


FAD
Nassau Airport
Nassau Airport Development Company
(NAD) is seeking bids for Construction services from suitably
qualified local Bahamian contractors to carry out bathroom
renovation projects at the Lynden Pindling International Airport.

Qualified contractors must:-
Demonstrate an ability to obtain $1,000,000.00 liability
insurance
Provide evidence of financial ability to carry out a
$1,000,000.00 project
Provide evidence of adequate staff to work at more than
one location
Provide evidence that all Government tax payments are
current
Provide at least three references from owners of projects
in excess of $50,000.00

Bid packages can be obtained from the offices of NAD
on Monday, August 27 th between the hours of 9am
and 5pm. A site visit has been arranged for 9am on
Thursday, August 30th. Contractors wishing to participate
are asked to notify NAD of their intention no later than 5pm
on Wednesday, August 29th at telephone number 702-1000.

The Deadline for submission of bids is 4:00pm on
September 7, 2007. Bid packages should be delivered to the
NAD offices no later than 4:00pm September 7, 2007. All
packages received after this time will be returned unopened.


NAD reserves the right to reject any or all bids.


-"-~Y---Y


--





THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


JPrincess Margaret Hospital






a The Public Hospitals Authority



The Public Hospitals Authority hosted its
2nd Annual Employee Recognition & Long Services Awards Ceremony
at the Government House on July 12th, 2007
Under the theme:
"Public Hospitals Authority, GEMS: Reflecting Quality Service"


Princess Margaret Hospital Congratulates the Public Hospital Authority


S/'/ f /-//
j/ 2 0* /' Jlu^ / r
(/


-~ *41'~' -~'k(L'J


Sandra Bethell


Valda Hunt
Vaida Hunt


Pearlene
Hanna-Knowles


Louise Simms


Lenora Smith


Elizabeth Taylor


Princess Margaret Hospital Congratulates the Public Hospital Authority


(iy


Sidney Cleare


Sandra Rolle


.-Mizpah Da



Mizpah Davis


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Irwin Weecdl


- .P.; 4..A


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aldeine Swee..ting

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Ruth Russell


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rs~lru~~l~~.;ry~~*r*lr~prrlylr~ .^SPY~LILa e"x-P~d41


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THE TRIB


PAGu 8B. THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


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Sunmaid Mini, 14 pk
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* By JANE WARDELL
AP Business Writer
LONDON (AP) Thou-
sands of jobs aie likely to be
slashed and annual bonuses
severely crimped in Britain's
financial sector because of the
turbulence in equity, and cred-
it markets in recent weeks,
economists said yesterday.
Up to 5,000 positions could
be cut as tirms try to trim
expenses to cope with losses,
said Jonathan Said, a senior
economist at the Centre for
Economics and Business
Research.
Global stocks have headed
south on fears of a worldwide
credit crunch sparked by sub-
prime mortgage lending trou-
bles in the United States.
"We are looking at job loss-
es across industries including


hedge funds, private equity,
investment banks, those work-
ing in structured funds," said
Said.
Philip Shaw, chief economist
at Investec Securities, said that
it was still early to draw con-
clusions but that if turbulence
continues and deals are post-
poned the financial district
should be "prepared for a
wave of job losses in coming
months." There is already evi-
dence that a shortage of credit
is delaying buvout deals.
A private equity purchase of
music company EMI Group
PLC scraped through after the
bankers for buyer Terra Fir-
ma Capital Partners insisted
the firm reach a 90 per cent
shareholding threshold before
handing over the money -
banks normally waive that
requirement when a buyer is


close.
Virgin Media Inc. h.'s
delayed putting itself on the
auction block and there is also
murmuring in the market thtif
Cadbury Schweppes will drop
plans to spin off its US drinks
arm after already extending
the deadline for bids because
of market volatility.
Shaw said the real test will
come in September, when the
financial sector is back up to
full speed after the tradition-
ally quiet summer holiday pet i-
od over August.
The market turbulence
comes after a boom period for
London's financial district.
known as the City. Said poitr
ed out that the industry had
added around 10,000 jobs in
the past six months amid
strong trading on the London
Stock Exchange and other
markets.
Annual bonuses in the City,
which employs 340,000 profes-
sionals. rose 18 per cent la-i
January to a record 8.8 billion
pounds (US$17.5 billion). Salu
said that bonuses will fall bv
up to 15 per cent this year.
However, economists
stressed that the current mar-
ket jitters were not in the same
league as the bursting of the
dot-com bubble in 2000 and
2001. which led to a mild reces-
sion.


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Thousands of job


cuts likely in UK


financial industry


after market turmoil,


economists say


6IM ;Jm1;m 4111 ,1 1


I


\t~~S"






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B. THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


I -- I I


Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd. is seeking the services of:

Centre Director

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Centre Director is responsible for establishing business plans for the Scotia
Private Client Group (SPCG) Centre in which they reside, and the branches
in smaller, secondary markets also under their direction, and executing them
through the dynamic leadership of teams of highly skilled professionals
representing each of the Wealth Management business lines (private banking,
brokerage. and where applicable, personal trust, investment management &
insurance). These objectives will be met through the promotion of the SPCG
Centres in the marketplace and, internally throughout the Bank.

Key Accountabilities for This Role:

The primary purpose of the position is to increase profitability through the
development of the required skills and motivation within the teams to achieve
increased consolidation of client assets, maximize cross-sell opportunities,
increase client retention and satisfaction and ensure clients receive the products
and services that best satisfy their financial needs. This is achieved by leading
their teams through sales and relationship management, directing consolidation,
retention and coverage strategies, ensuring the required behaviours are
instilled in, and consistently displayed by, each individual, and ensuring that
sound business analysis and a shared client centric bias exists across the
teams. The Centre Director is also responsible for building and exploiting an
effective business and community network, by developing and maintaining
relationships with key business and community leaders and maintaining
close relationships with influential clients, to maximize business referral
opportunities and introductions to potential clients. The Centre Director must
also forge close working relationships with Scotiabank partners in their market.


Qualifications:

- University undergraduate and/or equivalent degree/diploma preferred.
- Professional Financial Planner (PFP) or Chartered Financial Planner (CFP)
designation, Canadian Securities Course (CSC), and/or any other industry-
related accreditations are highly desirable.


The Scotiabank Group is an equal opportunity employer and welcomes applications
from all interested parties. We thank you- for your interest, however, only those
candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Qualified candidates only should submit application in writing, marked Private
and Confidential, by Friday, August 31 to: Manager. Manpower & Succession
Planning, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd., Mlain Bianch. PO Box N-75 18, Nassau,
Bahamas or,e-mail scotiabank bs@scotiabank com.


., ,


TENDER- ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE

AND UTILITIES WORK






Montana Holdings Ltd. the developers of Rum Cay Resort Marina is pleased to.
invite Tenders from qualified and experience companies to bid for the road infra-
structure and utilities work located on the island of Rum Cay.


Tender documents and other related infonnation, can be collected between 9:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Reception Desk, Montana
Holdings Ltd, #2 Nassau Court, Nassau, The Bahamas.


Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tender for Road Infra-
structure and Utilities Work" delivered to:


The Managing Director
Montana Holdings ltd
#2 Nassau Court
P.O. Box N-9322
Nassau, The Bahamas


All Tenders must be received at the above :1id,,I., by
2007 at 5:00 p.m.


Friday, September 28,


Montana Holdings Ltd reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


I I


Wall Street advances as investors


* By MADLEN READ
AP Business Writer

Nt W YORK (AP) -Wall
Street showed nascent confi-
dence in the credit markets
Wednesday, surging higher in
response to a pullback iiI Trca-
surys and an increase in bor-
rowing by banks. Investors saw
both trends as signs that the
Federal Reserve's efforts to
loosen up the credit market
might be working.
The Dow Jones industrial
average soared more than 140
points as the three-month
Treasury bill, which earlier in
the week drew massive buying
as investors sought the safety
of short-term government
assets, fell Wednesday. The
selling boosted its yield to 3.66
per cent, up from 3.59 per cent
late Tuesday and Monday's


low of 2.51 per cent an indi-
cation that stocks are no longer
seen as risky as they were just
a few days ago.
"It gives the market a little
comfort that it's not all about
buying risk-free securities,"
said Scott Wren, equity strate-
gist for A.G. Edwards & Sons.
"There's less of a flight to qual-
ity. ... In my mind, the pullback
in the stock market is entirely
due to what's going on in the
credit market. The fundamen-
tals have been good. Valua-
tions are reasonable. It's just
the fear of the unknown in
terms of the credit market."
Wall Street, which has been
angling for the Fed to help
ease the credit crunch by cut-
ting the benchmark federal
funds rate, was knocked down
several rungs in recent weeks
by worries about lending trou-


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or jillC astellamarisresort.com.


bles crimping economic and
corporate growth.
Wednesday's advance was
Wall Street's first substantial
move higher after the Fed low-
ered its discount rate Friday,
trying to calm investors and
avert damage to the economy
from the stock market turmoil.
Although stocks rose Friday,
the advance was seen as an
attempt by investors to square
their positions rather than a
fundamental shift in sentiment.
And trading Monday and
Tuesday was clearly shaky.
However, market watchers
cautioned that trading volumes
were lower than normal
Wednesday and that any trou-
bling headline in the lending
industry could still trigger cred-
it fears and more selling.
Giving some investors rea-
son to believe the steps the Fed
has already taken may be
enough, the nation's four
biggest banks Citigroup
Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co.,
Bank of America Corp. and
Wachovia Corp. said they
each borrowed $500 million
from the Federal Reserve's dis-
count window.
Investors were also heart-
ened that dealmaking is per-
sisting despite credit jitters. An
affiliate of Dubai's government
said it was investing $5.1 bil-
lion in casino operator MGM
Mirage; Nymex Holdings Inc.'s
chairman said the commodi-
ties exchange has been meeting
with suitors; and mining com-
pany Rio Tinto PLC said it was
able to close the loan syndica-
tion to fund its buy of Canadi-
an miner Alcan Inc.
According to preliminary
calculations, the Dow rose
145.27, or 1.11 per cent, to
13,236.13.
Broader stock indicators also
jumped. The Standard &
Poor's 500 index rose 16.93, or
1.17 per cent, to 1,464.05, while
the Nasdaq composite index
gained 31.50, or 1.25 per cent,

SEE next page


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KINGSWAY ACADEMY
Vacancies for September 2007

Kingsway Academy, an Interdenominational, Evangelical, Co-Educational Christian Day
School, invites applicants from qualified and experienced candidates for teaching
positions at the Elementary and High School levels and a position at the Business
Office.
Elementary:
Trained Physical Education Teachcr for grades K-4 through
grade 6
HiLh School
I igh School applicants should possess a Teachers Certificate, at least a Bachelor's
Degree in the particular subject area and be able to teach to the AP level. A Masters
Degree in the content area or in education for the subject area would be an asset.
Mathematics
Mathematics Information Technology
hinormation Teclmology
Health and Geiceral Science
Business Office:
An Accounts ('lerk
The successful candidates should have the following:
An Academic Degree in the area of specialization
A'caching Certificate
Excellent Conmmunication Skills
A love for childh'rcn and learning
HI igh standards of mioralitv
Be a born again Christian
Letters of application together with a recent color photograph and detailed Curriculum
V\ila (includingthc names and addresses of at least three references, one being the name
of onle's church
minister) should be forwarded to:

NMs. Kelcine Ilamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Deadline for applications is Friday August 24, 2007.







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 11B


sell safe government bonds, banks borrow from Fed


FROM pagc 10

to '.552.80.
\s short-termin overnmenli
set urity prices tell, so did theii
loniger-termt countlCerpars. The
10 year Treasury note's yield
climbed to 4.64 per centl from
4.59 per cent late I uc'S(.l;i
Also calming investors, the
Fed made a relatively small
repurchase of $2 bhiiiuon in
which it buys that amount inI
collateral from dealers. who \
then deposit the money\ into
commercial banks.
The fed funds rate. the rate
banks charge each other for
loans, fell to 4.25 per cent after
opening at 5.125 per cent. But
traders who bet on the Fed's
next move were still pricing ini
an interest rate cut at its next
meeting on September 18.
Some speculate the central
bank will lower lates before
tihen.
Wall Street's senltiCnitt
could turn if it doesn't get that
rate cut which is a distinct
possibility, Wren said.
"I don't want the stock mar-
ket betting on, counting on,
needing the Fed to cut rates
in September." Wren said.


" C I' rc'sa lot Iol I'fIc ISOIIS \I\
it' I d \wouildln't cuI IIi les.
lih , c beeii talking 1lomill
S 1 in 1for fol cV'e ."
I11S now. lthoilh, i11 esi l l '
p,i|l ,, .'d satisfy icd l iail i i
I cd's move C' ridai to low ci
the dliscounl rate is helping Io
ket'p incl" ll1;1ltw Is 1 i(1IId

oaiiks are LI5iio lilh' dliscotllm
Silidtcow ;s til I'. cIu enOlunged
iilcii o. said Michelle Girard.
:eiiior CL'oo11i0ist at fixed
inconi lirmi RlBS (ircenwich
( apltal. On the other hand.
she said the four institutions
that did so aren't ones that
have had difficulty tapping
funds elsewhere.
"1 still think everybody's in a
\aithful. bitingg mode."
UO iilaii.l said. t, ci titinl\ thingss
oida(i looked iloi) sI l I .
lut it's way to soon Ito Ihreiilic
. big sigh of relief indLl sI the


tliii noil has past."
l'h Russell 2000 index of
sn.iileir c ie panies rose 10.18,
01 i '9 pri cent, to 798.56.
Advancing issues outnuIm-
inlc'cd decliners by about four
to one on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume
came to 1.45 billion shares, up
lioin I i5 billion shares Tues-
day hbut below last week's lev-
els
Nymex Holdings Inc. rose
$ .28, or 6.1 per cent, to
$126.06. A Deutsche Bank
analyst raised his price target
on Nviymex, saying even if the
exchange is not bought, it can
cut costs and raise prices.
M(,M Mirage rose $6.62, or
8.9 per cent, to $80.94 on its
deal with Dubai World.
Rio I into rose $14.87, or 6.1
pei ent to $259.40 after clos-
ing its loan syndication, and
,kLain rose 9t) ents to $97.11.


IComptuter TechnicianI


MNiloni t Ltd., a leading business technology supplier
requires a computlei icchlliiltn.ii to. 1in ou Service Team.

* ELxperience in hardware, net \ orkiiig. Windows based
operating systems and soltw ai e.
* Professional certifications an advantage (A+, MCSA)
* Must have your owin triaspoirtation.
* Great career opportunity, training will be provided.
* Salary colniiiensuiate w ith qualifications & experience

No telephone calls I'lease iepl\ ui \\iiting \ la e-mail
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Computer T'eeh
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The housing sector still
appears far from recovery,
even in the high-end market.
Luxury homebuilder Toll
Brothers Inc. reported that its
third-quarter profit tumbled,
hurt by hefty writedowns and
higher-than-expected cancel-
lations. But the results were
not as bad as Wall Street had
anticipated, and Toll Brothers
rose $1.06, or five per cent, to
$22.15.


The dollar was mixed
against other major currencies.
Gold rose.
Crude oil fell 31 cents to
,$69.26 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
Overseas, Japan's Nikkei
stock average fell less than
0.01 per cent. Britain's FTSE
100 rose 1.81 per cent, Ger-
many's DAX index gained
1.02 per cent, and France's
CAC-40 added 1.83 per cent.


To dvptseinMe pfiz


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so call us on 322-1986
and share youi story


BUSINESS


INSIGHT,
For te stoies



behind j thenes


EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY

A leading Bahamian Development Company is seeking to recruit key positions for a wiorlici idl.s *iA
acre Resort Marina Development on Rum Cay. The project includes a hotel, a marina, marina 'i)lh ,
complex, condominiums, luxury estates and all associated infrastructure. Additional facilities. shall ,
be development of air transportation services.

In order to strengthen our team, we are recruiting for the following positions:

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

The successful candidate must have a solid track record of success and growth,

Responsibilities include:

Manage relationship with external auditors, banks and insurance companies
Oversee all accounting, financial reporting and compliance functions
Perform projections and financial analysis as requested by executive management
Oversee all accounting, financial reporting and compliance functions
Perform projections and financial analysis as requested by executive management
Be a proactive agent for change so that the company can improve its operations and prohts it
Manage, develop and mentor staff
Cash management

FINANCIAL ANALYST

The successful candidate will possess a Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or other related fields, and ?7
years of related experience. In this role the person will concentrate on the financial reporting, planni .
budgeting and projecting, for the corporate office.

Job Requirement
2+ years of corporate finance experience
Strong analytical and critical thinking ability
Solid understanding of accounting and finance theories and practices
Advance knowledge of Excel, Word, and QuickBooks Pro
Excellent verbal and written communication skills
Must be energetic, self motivated and flexible

MANAGING DIRECTOR

Key responsibilities of this position include:

Lead business development activities in assigned areas by initiating, building, and maintamiing
client relationship.
* Work closely with Directors and Project Managers in developing strategies to capture or expand the-
scope of services on the existing project.
* Monitor the progress of the development through periodic reviews of budget, scope, schedule anid
financial performance and work with the Project Managers to initiate corrective action when
needed
* Work closely with Project and Utilities Managers to deliver the project that meet the expec'tuun ,'
the clients
* Provide both leadership and financial management support to the project team.

The preferred candidate will possess:

* BS in Civil Engineering, MS preferred
* PE License required.
* 15-- years experience managing municipal water/wastewater projects
* Software skills- including MS Word, Excel, Power Point, MS Project Schedule, Access


PROJECT MANAGER

This person should have a minimum of 10 years experience with large-scale construe ion p ,'-
well as marina restoration. Must be familiar with all phases of construction; possess stron-g cot .n .
ing skills for commercial projects and manage a number of projects simultaneously.

Strong ability to communicate with clients, architects, engineers, subcontractors, supph''-r
and office staff.

Qualified candidates must have either a Civil Engineering Degree or a Construction Mana.ses t
gree. Technical skills to include; Microsoft applications i.e. MS Project, Word, Excel and Power i
Types of job will include site preparation, construction, roofing & marine work.


CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

The ideal candidate must be an energetic individual with knowledge of construction practice I'l l. pr'
son must be a self starter with good computer skills, organizational skills and attention to Jcltii. I i,'
Construction Project Manager will be responsible for the following key items:

* Budget Monitoring
* Schedules
* Estimates review
* Dealing with sub-Contractors
* Permit tracking
* Site Requirement
* Preparing shipping lists
* Issuing change orders
* Request for Proposals

Candidates must posses a "can do" attitude and be "team players". Excellent compensation p>'lka.e i.
offered.

For a confidential interview please submit your resume to island development I ~'hliioo.t on

PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS

I he closing date tor receipt ot application shall be Friday. August 31, 20t;


I








I UINSI T D


..* '.,


.. ,\vU ,^M'(t ^uf.;" 1^f

A1 ^&N\ a1zs Von'..rW & n AflCAWS !.Voc.
.Z 34. P.i 4 Po, N4 W,' e., ,,.


I larlboursidc


Marine YAMAHA


look ing for:
G(eiierator Mechanic/Mechanic
Helper
Please fax resume to:

394-7659 or 394-3885.


HIarbourside


is looking for
Persons with


Marine


knowledge


Generators, golf cars and


i lmane


industry,


must


of
the
be


familiar with inventory and stock
conttol.Must be computer literate.
Please fax resume to:
394-7659 or 394-3885








,, T \ "he omo,


Your lights will .
never
AI~ 0h;


Win ic


( IIMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
I< tIlE SUPREME COURT
, iiMiun Law & Equity Division


2006
CLE/qui/1039


IN THE MATTER of the Petition of ETHLYN ADDERLEY
AND
I 1L MATTER of the QUIETING of TITLES ACT of 1959
AND
IN I !IE IATrlTER of ALL THAT piece, parcel or lot of land containing
5.090 square feet of land being known as Lot Number Twenty-Four (24)
in Block Number Thirty-nine (39), Englerston Subdivision situate in the
Southern District of the Island of New Providence one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas as shown on the Nassau Master Plan of
the said Subdivision which Plan is filed in the Department of Lands and
Surveys in the City of Nassau in the Island of New Providence and demarked
b, Auxihliar Plan and marked "E.A." filed herein and shown coloured PINK
tiireun.
NOTICE
I he Petition of ETHLYN ADDERLEY formerly of Podoleo Street in the
Southern District of the said Island of New Providence but now of Pinewood
S;ardens Subdivision in the said island of New Providence in respect of:-
Al.l THAT piece, parcel or lot of land being Lot Number Twenty-Four
(24) in Block Number Thirty-nine (39), Englerston Subdivision situate
in the Southern Disctrict of the Island of New Providence one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas as shown on the Nassau
Master Plan of the said Subdivision which Plan is filed in the Department
of Lands and Surveys in the City of Nassau in the Island of New
Providence and demarked by Auxiliary Plan and marked "E.A." filed
herein and shown coloured PINK thereon.
E IIILYN ADDFRI.EY claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession
of the said land ifre from encumbrances and has made application to the
Supicrme Court in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of
I he Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have its title to the said land investigated
and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate
of I ille to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provision of the
uaid ,\ct
A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
lfollwiq g places:
(a Ilie Registry of the Supreme Court in the said City of Nassau;
, I lie ( chambers of Cooper & Co. Cooplaw House, 210 East Street.
\ ew Pi evidence Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioner.
Notice is hereby given that any person having dower or a right of dower or
an Advei sc ( laim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the lth day of( October, 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Pelitioner or the undersigned a statement of his/her claim in Ihe prescribed
lobun. veiiicd by an Affidavit to he filed thieiewith. Failure of any such
pci si to file and serve a statement of his/her claim on or before the 19th
doi of October. 2(107 will operate as a bar to such claim.
I)ited this 31st day of July, A.I).. 2007
COOPER & CO.
CI IAMBERS
Aoiirevs for the Petitioner
210 i ast Street
New Providence, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner


Japanese PM sets 2010 deadline to more


* By RAJESH
MAHAPATRA
AP Business Writer
NEW DELHI (AP) -
Japanese Prime Minister Shin-
zo Abe yesterday set a target
to more than double trade
with India to US$20 billion
over the next three years, and
both countries agreed to work
toward an early conclusion of a
free trade agreement.
Japan's economic engage-
ment with India lags that of
other major powers, which
have been more successful in
working with India, where the
economy is growing close to
nine per cent.
The past year has seen the
two countries work hard to
boost trade and investment
ties through such initiatives as
a free trade pact, or what is
called an Economic Partner-
ship Agreement, and Japan-
ese participation in large infra-
structure projects in India.
"We attach importance to
an early conclusion of a high
quality EPA," Abe told a
meeting of Indian and Japan-
ese business executives. "Our
bilateral trade should reach
US$20 billion in the next three
years."


Conre agreetowrk0twardearl

coclsion f-fee6tadeagremen


Two-way trade totaled
US$8.5 billion last year,
according to Japanese govern-
ment data.
Indian Commerce and
Industry Minister Kamal Nath
said he expects the agreement,
which proposes to make near-
ly 90 per cent of trade duty
free, to be concluded by the
end of this year.
Nath also said the Indian
government will work to
attract at least US$5 billion in
investment from Japan over
the next five years.
India received about
US$540 million in foreign
direct investment from Japan
last year. That was just over
three per cent of the total for-
eign direct investment in India
last year.
"We have had strong cul-
tural ties and bonds of her-
itage, but the economic com-
ponent of our relations has
been weak," Nath told a near-
ly 200-member business dele-
gation travelling with the


WANTED



ATTORNEY AT LAW for a growing Law Firm.
Must be self motivated, a team player with an ability
to work under pressure. Salary commensurate with
experience.

OFFICE ASSISTANT / MESSENGER: Must
have own transportation. Applicants must be well
groomed and have an ability to work with little or no
supervision.

Please apply to strombus65@vahoo.com




NOTICE


Take notice that the office of Lockhart
& Munroe will be closed for business
on Friday August 24, 2007 for the staff
fun day.


The Office will re-open for business
Monday August 27, 2007 at 9 a.m.


We apologise for any inconvenience
caused.


Signed: Management



A leading law firm with office located in Nassau and Freeport is
presently considering applications for the following position.





The successful applicant should possess the
following minimum requirements:

* Associates degree in related Computer Sciences
* Two or more years work experience in the industry
* Excellent working knowledge of Microsoft Office products
* Very good working knowledge of Windows 2000/2003 Operating
Systems
Experience with SQL a plus
Previous knowledge of law firm operations an asset

General responsibilities will include but not limited to:

Maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing hardware and software
Maintaining Network trustees and security
Maintaining system backups
Recommendation and implementation of new technologies
Liase and coordinate with various vendor-based projects/solutions

WE OFFER

A competitive salary, Pension plan, Health and Life Insurance and
other attractive benefits.

Interested persons should apply in writing to:

The Office Manager
P.O. Box N-7117
s" sau, Rahamas


Japanese leader.
Abe, whose trip ends Thurs-
day, has often pushed Japan-
ese businesses to look beyond
China and build stronger ties
with-India.

Talks
It was hoped his talks with
Indian Prime Minister Man-
mohan Singh would produce
major deals, but with both
leaders weak after political dif-
ficulties at home, no major
announcements were expect-
ed.
Abe and Singh were expect-
ed to reach an understanding
on how the Japanese could
participate in a US$90-billion
project to build a chain of
industrial clusters between
New Delhi and Mumbai also
called the Delhi-Mumbai
Industrial Corridor. The pro-


ject is intended to address con-
cerns among Japanese
investors about India's poor
infrastructure.
Abe said Japan was ready
to provide yen loans for such
projects. He said both coun-
tries are .also fleshing out
details of a currency-swapping
agreement.
A recent survey of Japanese
business leaders showed most
of them had no immediate
plans to expand in India
although they perceived it as a
top investment destination.
More than 50 per cent of them
cited poor infrastructure as the
main hurdle, the survey said.
Companies like Honda
Motor Co, Hitachi and Suzuki
Motor Corp. have recently
announced plans to expand
their Indian operations, but
have been cautious about the
size of new investments.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES CHERRY OF
MACKEY STREET, APT#2, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from
the 23RD day of AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that EMILIENE PIERRE of RALEIGH
DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within .wenty-eight days from
the 23rd day of AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

n .

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXSANDRIA INNOCENT
of P.O. BOX AB-20291, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day
of JULY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, STARIT
NOEL of Gana Circle, Elizabeth Estates, Nassau,
Bahamas intend to change my name to NOEL
DELANCY. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.




Needed
One male and female to do general cleaning.
Must have own transportation.

Please come in for Interview. At Athena Cafe
Bay & Charlotte Street
P.O. Box N-3669
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-1296/322-8833


YAMAHA


Inventory/Sales


:YLIU~LY~LI I- I-


--7


IA,/\t- 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


T ..--


THE tRIBUNE






THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE


than double trade with India to $20bn







.W
..





















before a meeting in New NOTICE SA
Delhi, India, Wednesday.
NOTICE is hereby given that YOLNA PIERRE-LOUIS OF
(AP Photo: Mustafa NASSAU VILLAGE, P.O. BOX N-4185, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, A multi facetted
Quraishi) is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and currentivnl r
.under


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BIASSOU JOACHIM OF BACARDI
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16TH day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, ANDREA SHORNEAL
MUNNINGS of Miller's Height, Carmichael Road, P.O. Box
CR-54349 Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my name
to ANDREA SHORNEAL ROBERTS. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write
such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.





MILES CAREER]

communications/consulting company that is
roing market expansion wishes to emplov


Citizenship, for registraiion/naiuraization as a cmzen oT i ne
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 23RD day of AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.


experienced commission sales executive. The ideal person
would have a minimum of three years in commission sales;
have their own private vehicle. We are looking for excellent
communicators that are driven. Candidates must have computer
skills and be able prepare public presentations on behalf of
companies clients.

A degree in marketing or business is preferred but not a must.

Persons interested should submit CV's and reference letters to:

DA#6282
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas
by August 30, 2007.


P.O. Box, F-42654
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Telephone: 242-373-9550 Fax: 242-373-9551
An upscale boutique resort featuring 93 elegant suites and 89 hotel rooms overlooking Bell Channel
Bay, Port Lucaya. 3 Pools & Sabor Poolside Restaurant & Bar.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
PELICAN BAY AT LUCAYA is seeking to employ dynamic, energetic and enthusiastic individuals
who enjoy working in the Hospitality Industry for the following positions;

EXPERIENCED PURCHASING/STORE ROOM SUPERVISOR
If you have extensive experience in Hotel Purchasing/Store Room Systems, then this is a great carccr
opportunity for you. You must have the following;
* At least three (3) years experience in Purchasing and Store Room Inventory Control supervision.
* Ability to deal professionally with local and international suppliers.
* Ability to effectively cope with and solve delivery challenges.
* Good computer, organizational, written and oral communication skills, along with a strong atcniiioni
to detail and follow-through.
* Ability to develop and implement policies and procedures related to Purchasing and Receiving.
* A self-starter with the ability to multi-task and be adaptable to change.
* Familiarity with Quickbooks preferred.
* Flexible work hours are required for this position.

Minimum qualification required; High school diploma, clean police certificate and supporting
documents.
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
EXPERIENCE RESERVATIONS MANAGER
CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
BREAKFAST SUPERVISOR
NIGHT AUDITOR
Applications are available at the Security Gate or e-mail hr@pelicanbayhotcl.coin. Decadlinc
is August 31, 2007. NO TELEPHONE CALLS PLEASE! Applications accepted in writing
only.
Pelican Bay at Lucaya is owned by Sundt AS, a private investment company based in
Norway. Pelican Bay is the only investment that Sundt AS has in the Bahamas. Sundlt .AS
also is the majority shareholder of Pandox, which is a specialized European hotel owning
company, that at the moment owns 38 hotels in Europe (8650 rooms). Pandox hotels operate
under well-known brands such as Scandic, Hilton, Radisson SAS, Crowne Plaza, Choice or
are independently managed.


PUBLIC NOTICE

TENDER FOR THE SCANNING, STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL OF DATA IN
ELECTRONIC FORMAT

Tenders are invited from duly qualified and experienced companies for the
provision of a scanning, storage and retrieval of data in electronic format solution,
for the Financial Intelligence Unit (the "FIU") a governmental agency
established by the Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000.

There are five (5) major elements expected from the proposed solution:

1. Security of Solution.
2. Storage and Retrieval of Imaged document.
3. Capturing of key information contained within documents and
associating the image with it.
4. Managing of Documents by case, and
5. Querying and Reporting of Information.

As part of the Tender process each potential bidder is required to sign a
Confidentiality Agreement before receiving the Bidding Documents. Failure
to execute the same will forfeit the potential bidder's opportunity to bid on
the solution.

Tender documents, which include Software Requirements Definition document
and other relevant information, can be collected between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00
p.m. Monday through Friday at the Reception Desk, Financial Intelligence
Unit, 3rd Floor, Norfolk House, Frederick Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tender for The
Financial Intelligence Unit's Electronic Document & Case Management
System" airmailed or delivered to:

Chairman
Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
3rd Floor Reception Desk
Cecil Wallace-Whiffield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017
Cable Beach, West Bay Street
Nassau, The Bahamas

All Tenders must be received at the above address by 5:00 p.m. on Thursday
27"' September 2007. All Tenders must be submitted in triplicate.

All persons who submit bids are invited to attend the opening of Tenders at the
Ministry of Finance, 3"' Floor, Cecil Wallace-Whitfield Centre, Cable Beach, West
Bay Street, Nassau, The Bahamas at 10.00 a.m., on Tuesday 2nd October
2007.

The Financial Intelligence Unit reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.


BUSINESS


i I


r-





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


iAS THE COLLEGE OF TI BAHAMAS


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


EDUgcawNG & TAmvNCBAMIANS


FALL SEMESTER 2007
Where to Go for Advisement & Registration
(All locations are at Oakes Field Campus)

From the list below, Find the name of the ...then go to 'this room for Advisement &
school offering your major... Registration

School of Business B30 (Room 30, B-Block)

School of Sciences & Technology T25 (Room 25, T-Block

School of Nursing & Allied Health Professions T4 (Room 4, T-Block)

School of English Studies English Chairpersons Office (A-Block)

School of Education Michael H. Eldon Building (RM 204 & 308)

School of Social Science Michael H. Eldon Building (RM 301 & 401)

LLB Programme LLB OFFICE (Moss Road)

Continuing Education & Extension Services Records Department (Portia Smith Building)

BTTC 7 (Room 7, Bahamas Tourism Training
Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute Centre)

School of Communications and Creative Arts A-13 (Room 13, A-Block)



Please bring the following documents with you to Registration (required for
Step 2):
1. Your acceptance letter
2. A copy of your BGCSE results

Applicants that have not received a letter (accept or non-accept) from The
College can collect them the Portia Smith Building on Tuesday, 21 Aug, and
Wednesday, 22 Aug.



ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION
Fall Semester 2007

DATES AND TIMES

I NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
Wednesday, August 22, 2007
8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

ADVISEMENT, REGISTRATION & BILL PAYMENT
Wednesday, August 22,2007, 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
ThMu 207, 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Friday, U t24, 2007, 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

Please bring the following documents with you to Registration (required for
Step 2):
1. Your acceptance letter
2. A copy of your BGCSE results

Applicants that have not received a letter (accept or non-accept) from The
College can collect them the Portia Smith Building on Tuesday, 21 August
and Wednesday, 22 August, 2007.






C
C FA :L"
Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday 22 Ausust 200 7

52 Mu-HI 52 K-Low Se,:u P PresoIous Close Tocaa s C.I.se Cr.,an.,u o ,an. ..:1 EPh L*.. P 1_'I led
1 78 0 54 Araco Matrkots 1 .w: l *. _,,' ':'U ,',', ,,:1 ,:, -u N f.1 C u' C
11.70 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.70 11.70 0.00 1.527 0.400 7.7 3.42%
9.41 7.50 Bank of Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0.00 0.733 0.260 12.8 2.77%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.048 0.020 17.7 2.35%
3.71 1.50 Bahamas Waste 3.71 3.71 0.00 0.279 0.060 13.3 1.62%
1.57 1.20 Fidelity Bank 1.57 1.57 0.00 0.064 0.040 24.5 2.55%
10.76 9.40 Cable Bahamas 10.75 10.75 0.00 0.949 0.240 11.3 2.23%
2.74 1.80 Colina Holdings 2.74 2.74 0.00 0.281 0.080 9.8 2.92%
15.15 10.99 Commonwealth Bank 15.10 15.10 0.00 1.190 0.680 12.7 4.50%
7.22 4.70 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.95 6.02 0.07 0.112 0.050 53.2 0.84%
2.76 2.20 Doctor's Hospital 2.31 2.31 0.00 0.281 0.000 8.2 0.00%
6.40 5.54 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0.00 0.804 0.240 7.7 3.87%
12.77 11.51 Finco 12.77 12.77 0.00 0.787 0.570 16.2 4.46%
14.70 13.50 FirstCaribbean 14.65 14.65 0.00 0.977 0.470 14.6 3.21%
5.62 5.18 Focol (S) 5.62 5.62 0.00 0.364 0.133 15.4 2.36%
1.OO 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.70 0.75 0.05 1,000 -0.415 0.000 N/M 0.00%
8.65 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
10.01 8.52 J. S. Johnson 10.01 10.01 0.00 0.946 0.580 10.6 5.79%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.125 1.485 13.9 10.17%
10.14 6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 6.00 6.25 6.00 0.000 0.480 NM 7.80%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0.20 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
41 00 d 1 OO ABDAB 4d1 00.13 43 0 1 00 .150 2 ,i0 90 6 :'. ..
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.234 1.485 12.6 10.50%
0.55 0.40 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.030 0.000 N/M 0.00%
52we-HI 52wk-L w Cl Fund Name F d 13NA V YTD'., LasI 12 l .Mo,.lh', DI. 1 Yiel :
1 3513 1 3031 Coltra Morey Market Fund 1 351263"
3.3402 2.9449 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.3402"**
2.7399 2.4415 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.739935"


Wheat leads



agriculture



futures higher,



while other



commodities



trade mixed


* By LAUREN VILLAGRAN
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -
Wheat prices climbed for a sec-
ond day yesterday, reflecting
strong worldwide demand and
strained supplies. Other agri-
culture futures tailed the grain
higher.
Elsewhere, energy prices
were mixed at midday after the
government reported invento-
ries of crude oil grew last week,
although gasoline stockpiles
fell sharply. Industrial metals
jumped on news of robust Chi-
nese imports, while precious
metals found support in a
declining US dollar.
The price of wheat contin-
ues to hover at a 10-year peak
on the Chicago Board of
Trade, with foreign buyers
unfazed by the high cost.
The US has sold roughly 86
per cent of what the govern-
ment expects will be sold in
exports all year far ahead of
the last year's pace, when the
country had sold just 27 per
cent at this time, said John
Roach of Roach Ag. Market-
ing. On Tuesday, Egypt said it
bought 240,000 tons of soft, red
winter wheat, augmenting the
country's recent buying spree.
"It's not like an 'Aha!'
moment," said Roach. "We're
digesting old news."
Globally, wheat stocks are
extremely tight after harvests
in several producing nations
were damaged by poor weath-
er.
The market also gained
momentum as futures for corn,
soybeans and wheat all topped
what traders call important
technical resistance levels ear-
ly Wednesday, meaning cer-
tain contracts crossed a price
threshold that can trigger addi-
tional buying.
"The professionals, includ-
ing the commercials and big
funds anybody who makes a
living doing this uses a tech-
nical system," said DTN ana-
lyst Gary Wilhelmi. "The test
for today is to see if we can
hold above those points."
Currently, those key levels
are $7.10 a bushel for wheat,
$3.60 a bushel for corn and
$8.40 a bushel for soybeans,
Wilhelmi said.
December wheat surged 21
cents to $7.25 a bushel.
December corn gained six
cents a bushel to $3.61, while
November soybeans added 14
cents to $8.45 a bushel.
Meanwhile, gold prices rose
as the US dollar receded
against the euro other major
world currencies, renewing
investor interest in precious
metals as a haven from infla-
tion.
December gold jumped rose,
$4 to $670.20 an ounce in mid-
morning trading on the New
York Mercantile Exchange,
while December silver gained
25 cents to $11.92 an ounce.
"Market focus has shifted to


Fed-watching and spectating
the unfolding credit and home
foreclosures saga," said Jon
Nadler of Kitco Bullion Deal-
ers in a client note.
Any move the Federal
Reserve makes on its bench-
mark interest rate Wall
Street is angling for a cut -
will have repercussions for the
US dollar. Higher interest rates
support a currency, while low-
er interest rates typically pres-
sure a currency lower. The cen-
tral bank is scheduled to meet
September 18 to discuss the
direction of its key federal
funds rate, which has been
steady at 5.25 per cent for
more than a year.
Gold often trades opposite
the dollar as investors seek a
safer haven for their funds.
The euro bought $1.3491 in
midmorning trading, while the
British pound fetched $1.9888.
In London, industrial met-
als advanced broadly after Chi-
nese trade data for July
released overnight supported
a view of strong demand for
all the base metals but zinc.
China exported more of the
steel-coating metal than it
imported in July.
Nickel, lead and tin led the
gains on the London Metal
Exchange.
Copper rose nearly two per
cent in London and Nevw York.
Nymex copper for December
added 6.1 cents to $3.226 a
pound.
Meanwhile, oil prices weak-
ened Wednesday after the gov-
ernment reported an unex-
pected build in crude stocks,
but gasoline prices got a boost
from a sharp draw on inven-
tories.
The Energy Information
Administration said crude
stocks grew by 1.9 million bar-
rels in the week ended August
17, bucking analyst expecta-
tions for a decline. Analysts
polled by Dow Jones
Newswires had forecast a draw
of 2.8 million barrels, in the
vein of the huge 5.2 million-
barrel draw of the prior week.
Gasoline prices rose, how-
ever, supported by a larger-
than-expected drop of 5.7 mil-
lion barrels in storage. Ana-
lysts had projected a slim
decline of 600,000 barrels.
October light, sweet crude
shed 43 cents to $69.14 a barrel
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange, giving up earlier
gains. Gasoline for September
delivery rose 1.18 cents to
$1.8755 a gallon.
Hurricane Dean regained
some power on Wednesday as
it headed toward landfall along
Mexico's Gulf coast as a Cate-
gory 2 storm.
Petroleos Mexicanos, the
state-run oil giant, evacuated
more than 18,000 workers
ahead of the storm and shut
down installations that produce
about 2.7 million barrels of oil
and 2.6 billion cubic feet of
natural gas a day.


1.2652 1.1886 Colina Bond Fund 1.265223"**
11.6581 11.1193 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.6581****
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price NAV KEY
52wk-HI Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid 5 Buying price of Collna and Fidelity
52wk Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fIdolity 10 August 2007
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price 30 June 2007
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 May 2007
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported eoarnnga per share for the Inst 12 rnths .. 31 July 2007
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the lost 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
jll ,soM C.sWa4 couN. g-;,]ein' s 77 / FOR MORE DATA a. INFORMATION GAU. (242) 394 .


ACCOUNTING FIRM
REQUIRES THE FOLLOWING:

Audit Manager required.


Audit seniors, 2 to 4 years post
qualifying audit experience.


Staff accountants, enrolled in
college, entry level accounting courses,
computer literate


2 Secretaries, Microsoft Office & Excel
experience required

RESPOND TO: P.O. Box N-8285. Nassau, The
Bahamas or pgomez@gtbahamas.net






,i ,...,, ,AU6Ubi 23, 2007, PAGE 15B


THE TRIBUNE


Dollar mixed,



gold higher



in Europe


LONDON (AP) The US
dollar was mixed against other
major currencies in European
trading yesterday. Gold rose.
The euro was quoted at
$1.3508, up from $1.3468 late
Tuesday in New York.
Later, in midday trading in
New York, the euro fetched
$1.3525.
Other dollar rates in Europe,
compared with late Tuesday,
included 115.04 Japanese yen,
up from 114.44; 1.2078 Swiss
francs, up from 1.2063; and
1.0603 Canadian dollars, down
from 1.0645.
The British pound was quot-


ed at $1.9843, down from
$1.9893.
In midday trading in New
York, the dollar bought 114.94
yen and 1.2062 Swiss francs,
while the pound was worth
$1.9920.
Gold traded at $659.80 bid
per troy ounce in London, up
from $657,30 late Tuesday. In
Zurich, gold traded at $659.10
bid per troy ounce, up from
$656.45.
Gold rose $1.00 in Hong
Kong to $657.65.
Silver opened in London at
$11.68 bid per troy ounce, up
from $11.62.


Commonwealth Bank

thanked for their

'tremendous support'


FROM page 1

Sands, Jr., president and CEO
of Commonwealth Bank.
"Patients at the centre miss out
on many significant events
because of hospitalisation, but
they need not miss out on
Junkanoo, thanks to the Sandi-
lands Junkanoo Parade."
"Dr Uanna Burrows, who is
responsible for the geriatric
ward, started the Junkanoo
parade 10 years ago with a
handful of staff members and
patients dressed in strips of
newspaper," explained Betsy
Duvalier, public relations man-
ager of Sandilands Rehabilita-
tion Centre:.
"Creating the costumes and
then participating in the
parade served as a form of
therapy for some of our sub-
stance abuse patients. It was


also some fun for our child
patients and a chance to mix
and mingle for our geriatric
patients. Some of our patients
used to participate in
Junkanoo so it's a wonderful
opportunity for them to meet
with our volunteers from the
major Junkanoo groups."
Duvalier said Common-
wealth Bank holds a special
place in the hearts of organis-
ers for their role in bringing
the event into being.
"Commonwealth Bank gave
us a significant contribution,"
she said. "We truly didn't
expect to receive what they
gave because no-one really
took note 'of what we were try-
ing to achieve. We really
appreciate them for caring
about us."
The Junkanoo Parade and
Family Fun Day will take place
on Friday, December 14, 2007.


The Department of Statistics Announces


The Release of Three 2006 Publications


, ..


~*'a


0 Gross Domestic Product at current and
constant prices for 2000 to 2006
0 Tourism contribution to the Bahamian
Economy in 2003 and 2004
I Analysis miand estimates are blxth included
Price: $10







'A '
(itrW4 1w ( iAUM4 NW" hIKt*









For Contact: Department of Statistics
New Providence: Clarence A Bain Bldg., Thompson Blvd.
Phone: 325-5606; Fax: 325-5149''


Grand Bahama:


Star General Insurance Bldg.
Phone: 325-7196; Fax: 352-6120


[0 Provides an overall assessment of general con-
sumer price movements in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and All Bahamas;
0 Miscellaneous related statistics e.g. Estimated
family expenditure and the purchasing power of
the 2006 Bahamian dollar;
D Average prices for selected items and years
(gasoline, food, housing, etc.)
Price: $10




Analyses the price changes of building materials
used to construct a "model house" in New
Providence and Grand Bahama
Price: $5









4 *4 S *' *~ t


4..,


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I..
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BUSINESS


mmmomommommow


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PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


THE TRIBUNE
-liI


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needs


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I,,,
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^^JftJM'ODAL ArHumcg^


The 11th

IAAF Championships
August 25 September 2, 2007
-- ~ ~ s a- "WE "W asi I m


Get detailed coverage by Brent Stubbs in The Tribune's Sports section.
Our veteran senior sports reporter will file stories directly from Osaka Japan!


Team Bahamas
Christine Amertil
Derrick Atkins
Trevor Barry
Christopher Brown
Timicka Clarke
Jackie Edwards
Laverne Eve
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie
Michael Matthieu
Nathaniel McKinney
Ramon Miller
Jacobi Mitchell
Avard Moncur
Leevan Sands
Sharmar Sands
Chandra Sturrup
Donald Thomas
Andrae Williams
Tonique Williams-Darling


Sponsors


116


Read firsthand accounts of our
Bahamian athletes participation i


* Men 100, 200, 400, 800 Metres
* Men 110 Hurdles
* Men High Jump
* Men Triple Jump


The


* Men 4x400 Metres Reli
*Women 100, 200 Metri
* Women Long Jump
* Women Javelin


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* --.R- qe'p"
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THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


Butler's runra1 mInuS & (1Jrmatorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas


MS. MARY
FERGUSON, 68

of John Road West of Hospital Lane
and formerly of Forbes Hill, Exuma
S" will be held on Saturday, August 25 ,
2007 at 11:00 a.m. at First Baptist
Church, Market Street. Officiating will
.-. be Rev. Dr. Earl Francis Assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel.
Interment will follow in Lakeview
_4' Memorial Gardens and Mausoleums,
John F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her Five (5) Daughters; Eulamae
Morley, Avanell Whyms, Madonna Evans, Jacquelyn and Blanche
Sears; Adopted-children; Tiffany and Mannix Barton, Bradley,
Eddie, Monique, Vanessa, Basil Jr. and Baswell Sears; Twelve (12)
Grandchildren; Stacy Dames, Valentino, Giovanni, Rashad,
Aleesha, Shafano, Shane, Shan'Mary, Jaamal, Ashley, Maneisha
and Mantaeo; Three (3) Sons-in-law; Cressel Morley, Garland
Whyms and Shawn Evans; Special Friend Basil Sears; Four (4)
Sisters; Martha and Leadoris Ferguson, Albertha Bullard and
Judymae Louis; Five (5) Brothers; Nathan, Rupert, Oswald,
Gladstone and William; One (1) Brother-in-law; Rene Louis;
Three (3) Sisters-in-law; Rachael, Caroline and Shelia; Forty-
seven (47) Nieces; Evelyn, Nelda, Etta, Simeon, Carla, Collette,
Erica, Nadia, Inegicka, Cynthia, Sandra, Katherina, Eserine, Unadell,
Shantell, Winifred, Norma, Iris, Kimberly, Laurette, Debbie, Levone,
Stephanie, Daphne, Jennifer, Sonia, Cleo, Nyoche, Nelly, Patrice,
Hilda, Althea, Lisa, Trenette, Sandy, Katina, Aileen, Monique,
Sophia, Lisa, Patrice, Linda, Colean, Palma, Idena, Nita, Carvette;
Forty-five (45) Nephews; Jessie, Tyrone, James Jr., Mario, Rodney,
Clement, Terry, Lawerence, Dwayne, Sterling, Tyrone, Emmit,
Wade, Hollis, Garvin, Remme, Orlando, Douglas, Ken, Dario,
Ezekiel, Bradley, Anthony, Bobby, Dion, Leroy, Nathan Jr., Arthur,
Dorneil, Jarred, Rupert Jr., Kelson, Kenton, Roosvelt, Oswald Jr.,
Austin, Christin, Omar, Ray, Vincent, Elvis, Elmore, Kevin, Sean
and Halson; Long Loved Employer; George and Barbara Ann Moore
and Family Step-mom; Rosalie Davis; Two (2) Aunts; Ellen and
Satara Bullard; One (1) Uncle; Earnest Smith and other relatives
and friends.

In lieu of flowers donation may be sent to the Kidney Foundation
of The Bahamas c/o P.O. Box-N-8202 Nassau, Bahamas.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral Homes and


Crematorium, Baillou Hill Road and Oxford Avenue on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.
until service time at the church.

- MS. DORIS
MINNIS, 90

of Regency Park and formerly of
S.. .Mortimer's, Long Island will be held
on Saturday, August 25th, 2007 at
10:00 a.m. at Holy Family Anglican
Church, Mortimef's, Long Island.
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Ernest
Pratt. Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are her
Two (2) Daughters; Carolyn Parris and Rosetta Edgecombe; Four
(4) Sons; David Dean, Peter Turnquest, Willard and Albert Monroe;
Two (2) Sons-in-law; Cleveland Parris and Luther Edgecombe;
Three (3) Daughters-in-law; Vendalyn Dean, Marian Turnquest
and Michelle Monroe; Twenty-five (25) Grandchildren; Diann
and Sr. Lt. Shone Pinder (RBDF), Velma and Sterling Thompson,
Shantell and Cedric Curry, Tyrone and Wayne Parris, Cassandra
and Dave Smith, Kevin Edgecombe, Jodell and Kevin Roberts,
Raquel and Obie, Peter Jr. and Wayde Turnquest, Brian, Maquelle,
Khia, David and Ambemique Monroe, Lerone, Rashad and Jessica
Monroe; Eleven (11) Great-grandchildren; One (1) Great-great-
grand-child; Chloe Moss; Two (2) Sisters; Bernice Minnis and
Mae Williams: Fifteen (15) Nieces; Monica Cartwright, Doreen
Turnquest, Rowena Miller, Eva Lightbourn, Mytlyn Watson, Geleta
Tumquest, Grace Beneby, Roslyn Brown, Hilda Rolle, Linda and
Arlene Adderley, Gloria Major, Elsie Minnis, Angela Watson and
Geneva Munroe Seven (7) Nephews; John Williams, Herbert Major,
Cedric Watson, James Adderley, Virgil Gray, Johnathan Cartwright
and Donald Watson and other relatives and friends including;
Margaret Munroe, Joycelyn McSweeney, McField and Pearline
Mortimer, the Treasures of Chyna Daycare Centre, Harriet Dean
and the Church of God of Prophecy Church family, Fr. Ernest Pratt
and the St. Michael's Church family, the entire South end community
especially the settlements of Mortimer's and Gordon's, Long Island
and others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral Homes and
Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Thursday from 11:00
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Friday in Long Island from 12noon until
service time at the church.


_ I ~- b~- ~3 -~O~--~c-P -


FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS ]






THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 3


SRltilbgrt iiliti t.


(~) ~


Mr. \Vc'ndel! G. Dean 11, u.s- -TJ.?i., Our Serices hInclu:
rn-." ,:l'fr. \ llint /.ili l I' .:. i [ ll l M I-rwiwl.llrd luntiil Sti.w-i ,
Cremation In'id Coun.elhn&g, Buri.l-4t-AN a
"1 ,,, W., Vurlidhtk Shling. L ..d aini Lung tLiann
llwIjitr'. lUU V J Di, Rmol MonunurpLa. On.lh, O,. uarn w and
'"WWy/o Tn?.t7 *a uan" '" W t% O


Emerald Memorial Servica for

MRS. FLORENCE LOUISE
"TITTA"
JOHNSON-BAIN, 78

Sof Staniard Creek Andros. Bahamas will
be held on Friday, August 24. 2o00 at
3pm at St. Matthew's Anglican Church.
East Shirley Street. Rev d Fr. Don
ilaynes will officiate.

The Radiance of this "Emerald of A
Gem" will always glow in the hearts
of her:
Three Sons: Benjamin Walks Sr. of California, Wellington Davis
and Ralph Butler;
One Daughter: Bethsheba Davis-Veitia;
One Adopted Daughter: Peggy Bain;
Numerous Grand Children Including: Lajuan Sr., Norrio,
Narae, Jonathan, Bennae, Christopher, Anthony, Benjamin Jr., and
Patrice Walks, Chajvan Smith, Rodino Sands, Wardley Woodside,
Wellington and Olivia Taylor, Oprah Braynen, Javon, Ebony and
Ashley;
Numerous Great Grand Children Including: Lajuan Jr.,
Bonita, Maladi, Zion and Malik Walks, Wardriqua Woodside, Calvin
and Chanjt6 Smith, Justin and John Junior Kemp;
Numerous Nephews and Nieces Including: Cedric and Lionel
Johnson, Shirley, Richard, Manny, Chester, Bert, Mary, Brindley,
Israel, Paul, John, Moses, Lydia, Nettie, Eva, Evelyn, Rebecca,
Elizabeth, Portia, Crystal, Rhoda, Deborah, Jay, Lalita, Shenell,
Gregory, Walter, Derek, Herman, Warren, Jefford, Juliette Christine
and Portia;
Grand Nieces Including: Monique, Shevonne and Sherelle;
Great Grand Nephews and Nieces Including: Jamal, Mycal,
Breanna and Desnia;
Two Brothers: Alfred and Salathiel Johnson;
One Sister: Janet Marshall;
Two Adopted Sister: Naomi Whyms and Maude Smith;
Two Sons-in-law: Daniel Coakley and Lazaro Veitia;
One Sister-in-law: Mae Johnson;
Many other loving family and friends including: Beatrice
Marshall, Gina and Ginae Nottage, Wilfred and Timothy Johnson,
Judy, Carla, Wendy and Dale.

Arrangements Uniquely: Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road.

Visit our website: www.emeraldrideemortuarv.coml view video tributes.
* "< .i, l ;, ;.t" '! O!c i."' :'''''lip '!hv lo v\ ;1!1(1 r '.''n ii s


FUNERAL DIRECTORS
"Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition."
7th Terrace, Collins Avenue (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 Nassau, Bahamas



MARY
PERCENTIE. 84

of #44 Watlins Street will be held
-"" ,-.,,, on Saturday August 25th at 2:00
p.m. at The Church of God of
Prophecy. Seven Hills. Officiating
| -C. will be Bishop Clarence N.
Williams assisted by Rev. Julian
Johnson. Rev. Rowena Fawkes and
S... Rev. Leona Fraser. Interment will
follow in the Sourthern Cemetery
Cowpen and Spikenard Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her son, John King Sr.;
grandchildren, John King Jr., Nicole, Stacy and Charles Forbes,
Tiffany and Sherwyn, SeePaul and Janet Knowles; great
grandchildren, Tarell, Takera, Elkin Jr. and Tashona Knowles;
sister, Elizaeth Petral Williams; special friend, Violet Clarke;
sisters-in-law, Eugina, Ruby and Jacqulyn Percentie and Olga
Higgs; brother-in-law, Anthony Percentie; nieces, Mary
McKenzie, Karen Antonio, Petral Margret and Harriet Williams,
Marina Miller, Portia Cartwright, Monica Flowers Margaret
Rolle, Flossie Percentie and Ann Russell; nephews, Paul
(Sonia), John (Delores), Gregory, Clifford (Diane), Clement
(Artis) Ricardo (Agatha), Williams, Newell, John, Steven
Percentie, David Williams, Frank Nixon, Ernestine and Sandra;
other relatives and friends inclduing, Bishop Clarance Williams
of Seven Hills Curch of God, Cathy Woods, Jack Davis,
Rebecca Rolle, Dorothy, Marshall, Dolly Davis, Earl, Deric,
Leslie Bowleg, Thelma Coral, Stephanie, Bernadette, Frederick,
Ozzie, Harold, Rev. Garnet King, Harrold King, Sam Williams,
Balda Campbell, Bradley Fowler, Myier Clark, Rudolph,
Author Jr., Paulette, Brenda Dorothy, Dwight, Ernestine,
Sandra, Ruth Outten, Octavia, Gladys, Firstina, the Gordon,
Johnson, Lewis, Dorsett, Williams, Campbell, King, Percentie,
Outten and Dean families.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at
Ferguson's Funeral Directors 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
hrom01 i pr.m, tln l service tine.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


Cebar rest funeral aome
DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street P.O.Box N-603 Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

1 I 1 :jJ. 4 N*


ALICE ELLEN
GRAY-JOHNSON, 72


a resident of Golden Gates
S#2 and formerly of
William's Town, Exuma,
Swill be held 11:00 a.m.,
Sunday, August 26, 2007
at The Hillview Seventh-
Day Adventist Church,
Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, New Providence. Officiating will be
Pastor Michael A.Smith, assisted by Pastor Leonard
A. Johnson, Pastor Eric D. Clarke and Pastor
Wendell R. McMillan. Interment will be made in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Cherished memories are held by her mother, Viola
Collie; one son, Dr. Eagene Gray: four daughters.
Peggy Sands, Alice Tinker, Tanya Miller and Violet
Stubbs; 11 grandchildren, Levardo, Raemond,
Chrislyn and D'Andre Sands, Jason and Brittany
Tinker, Laprea Saunders, Neville Miller, Deidre,
Tameka and Tamara Stewart; two great-
grandchildren, Makayla Bodie-Sands and Urielle
Musgrove; five brothers, Rudolph and Samuel
Gray, Godfrey; Isaac and Arthur Collie; four sisters,
Remelda Rolle of William's Town, Exuma,
Clarabelle Williamson, Lulamae Gray and
Gwendolyn Hanna; three sons-in-law, Pastor Errol
Tinker, Elder Roger Sands and Elder Neville Miller;
mother-in-law, Florina Johnson; four brothers-in-
law, Lionel, Preston and Leo Johnson and Vernal
Rolle; six sisters-in-law, Cora and Valerie Gray,
Jennifer Moss, Cynthia and Hazel Johnson and
Maxine Rolle and a host of other relatives and
friends.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects
at Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and
First Street, on Saturday from 12:00 noon to 6:00
p.m. and on Sunday at the church from 9:30 a.m.
until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


Yager Funeral ome & rematorium
Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUEA SERVICE FO[RU I.


Rock. Grand Bahama.


CINDY LAVERN
WILLIAMS, 42
of Providenciales, Turks Island and
formerly of Pinedale, Eight Mile Rock,
Grand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday, August 25, 2007 at 11:00
a.m. at Community At Heart
Tabernacle, Coral Road. Officiating
will be Pastor Joseph Hall, Pastor
Andrew Stone and Pastor Barry
Morris. Interment will be made in The
Harbour West Cemetery, Eight Mile


Left to cherish her memory are her mother lanthe Williams; two
children, Cinaed and Cinadyo Williams: four sisters, Loma Williams-
Been, Odette Williams-Knowles, Antionette Williams-Wallace and
Carmnen Elva Grant of Fort Lauderdale: two adopted sisters. Subusola
LaSalle and Cynthia Hall. our brothers, Ernest Jr., Stanley and
Derrick Williams and Ernest Crawley of New York. one adopted
brother. Anthony LaSalle: seven nieces, Cathadera Been. Tanajah
Kennedy. Charleighn Knowles. Brenae and lesha Williams. Timisha
Forbes and Folakemi Swain: eight nephews. Keovani Been. Adrian.
Rickeno, Drew. Jordan. Payton Williams, Audley Swain Jr., Christoff
Smelly; 13 aunts. Diane and Evelyn Grant, Ivy Morris Hall, Daisey
Leid. Zenniemay, Myrtle, Adella, Helene and Aiicia Morris, Vivian
Williams of New York, Louise Todd, Yvette Walkin and Olga
Wilchombe: 10 uncles Clifford Williams of New York, Clement.
Ural, Stafford, Joseph and Nathaniel Morris, Enos and Willis Grant,
Arthur Hall and Headley Forbes, one sister-in-law, Gean Williams;
two brothers-in-law, Charles Knowles and Alex Been: numerous
cousins, Renee, Vernon, Sandra, Iklyn, Sonia, Charles, Irene, Hudson,
Lloyd, Monique, Bernadette, Chico, Chiquita, Quinton, Conrad,
Breanna, Zennie, Jay, Wellington, Tabitha, Lecova, Quinton, Shervin.
Stephen, Iris Rigby, Yvette, Gomez, Freddie, Glen, Kelly, Ernest,
Gilbert, Eunece, Portia, Ambrose, Barry, Janet, Edith, Gleander.
Meoshi, Philip, Alicia, Bobby, Randy, Katy, Channel, Carmella,
Clifford, Claude, Robert, Christie, Ruben, Ester, Gloria, Margaret,
Joseph, Olive, Alice, Maurice, Maureen, Lynden, Deborah, Arthur,
Denise, Ivy, Sonia, Blair, Nichole, Natasha, Linda, Sindy, Demeka,
Shekera, Monique, Shervin, Shawnan, Shawandai, Philon, Evan,
Jane, Patsy, Douglas, Elva, Shawn, Philicia, Jason, Charlie, Norma,
Lyn, Mackey, Ronnie, Conrad, Lin, Desi, Joy, Rochelle, Neville,
Barbara, Tommy Walkin, Millon, Susan Eldon, Dolly Keith, Wendy
and Ritchie and many other relatives and friends too numerous to
mention.
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
and Crematorium, Queen's Highway, Freeport on Friday from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m.
to service time.










|lurti~s ^ial ^M4ffortuari

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020* Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

Las Rie 6o


F- .I ,r-.IN


A


PRESCOLA VIOLA
FERNANDER-STUBBS, 63

of Angel Road, Golden Gates #2 and
formerly of Long Bay, South Andros will
be held on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. at Faith
United Missionary Baptist Church, Blue
Hill Road South. Officiating will be Rev.
Dr. William Thompson and Rev. Dr.
George Kelly. Interment will be in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.


She is survived by her husband, Irvin
Stubbs; three children, Jeffery, Dion and
Shevaun; six adopted children, Bernard, Carolyn, Bethsheba, Dedree
and Keith Munroe, Anthea Gardiner and Jermaine Davis; three daughters-
in-law, Sidney Stubbs, Tanya Stubbs and Sheila Munroe; two sons-in-
law, Michael Bain and Kevin Gardiner; 15 grandchildren, Diargo,
Dania, Imani, D'Jenae, K'Shaun, Jedargo, Kaysha, Gavaun, Gavan,
Kelvano, Michael Bain Jr., Kiana, Kevan and Lamont, Dagmar and
Carson Munroe, Bernard Jr., Sasha and Bershell; mother, Ethel Florence
McKenzie-Fernander; two brothers, George Jr., and Adell Fernander;
five brothers-in-law, Hubert Rolle, Jenkinn Nottage, Fonswit and Clonius
Stubbs, Bernard Evans; one sister, Gloria Rolle; six sisters-in-law, Elva
and Vernita Stubbs, Mrs. George Fernander, Dolly, Mable and Pastor
Harriett Fernander; two uncles, Emperor and Ernest McKenzie; four
aunts, Cecilia, Louise, Jestina and Cleora McKenzie; numerous nieces
and nephews including, Brenda, Gwendolyn Moss, Ophelia, Ruth,
Katherine, Elva, Anita, Cardinal, Michael, Conrad, Valdez, Valden,
Valenti, Keith and Brian, Judy, Sharon, Sabrina and Barbara, Lynette,
Bernadette, Kevan, Trevor, Sheldon and Jason, Christine and Margo,
Tyrone, Shawn, Marvin and Perry, Ava McKinney, Valerie, Tanya
Stubbs, Nancy, Ian, Craig and Brando Stubbs, Edwin, Arthur and Horatio
Stubbs, Diedree, Erika, Shynika, Melony, Pamela Grant, Princess,
Phais, Joanne, Janice, Ellen, Marge, Marilyn and Prescillia, Dwayne,
Wayne and David Farrington, Sandra, Valencia Moss, Valentino Moss
and Kevin Davis; five godchildren, Kristi Lewis, James Munroe, Helena
Riley, Manda McKenzie and Nikki Smith.

Host of other relatives and friends including the following and their
families, Shirley Newbold, Mable Smith, Antrim and Eulamae McKenzie,
Arazetta Rolle-Cook, Idena McKenzie-Thurston, Rose Deveaux,
Antionette Bonaby, Wilton Stuart, Ignatius, Bradley, Dudley and Emperor
McKenzie Jr., Blossom and Annie, Drucilla Newbold, Paula Newbold;
Chester McKenzie, Rosemary Cambridge, Altamese Carey, Basil,
Leonard, Alphonso, Leslie, Fred and Oswald McKenzie and Rebecca
Kelly, Robert Farquharson, Owen Hamilton, Danielle Richardson and
Garvin Dean, Richard and Bessie Dean, Marilyn Munroe, the Butler,
Rolle, Kelly, Forbes and Sturrup; the community of Long Bay, Congo
Town and Driggs Hill, South Andros, Employees of Atlantis, Kerzner
International, Rev. George Kelly and family, Superclub Breezes, Trace
Security and Purity Bakery, Metropolitan Baptist Church family,
Bahamas Harvest Church family, The Golden Gates Neighbourhood
Community of Angel Court and Golden 'Gates Straight, Charles Vincent
Street community, Princess Margaret Hospital, doctors and nurses, the


Oncology Clinic and numerous other relatives and friends too numerous
to mention.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road
and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 12:00 noon until service time. ,


BERTRAM "OLD B" "PAPA"
CLAUDIUS JOHNSON, 86

of Golden Gates #2 and formerly of
Lovely Bay, Acklins will be held on
Sunday at 1:00 p.m. at Hillside Mission
Baptist Church, Independence Drive.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Lockwood
Deleveaux, assisted by Overseer
Randolph Deleveaux, Rev. Dr. Elkin
Symonette and Rev. Basil Johnson.
Interment will be in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.


He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Leona Johnson; four sons, Clarington,
Oswald, Asa and Wendall; two daughters, Audrey Johnson and Coldella
Sands; one son-in-law, Petty Officer Kendrick Sands -R.B.D.F.; three
daughters-in-law. Valerie, Bonita and Joy Johnson; two brothers,
Solomon Jr., and David Johnson of Gainsville, Florida; three sisters,
Nathalie Scavella, Eliza Ferguson and Mary Pratt; two brothers-in-law,
Huel Scavella and Jervis Pratt; three sisters-in-law, Corina and Evelyn
Johnson and Queenie Duncombe; 17 grandchildren, Lyndon, Clarington
Jr., Matthew, Anwar, Anton, Bertram, Taman Johnson, Welton Boyd,
Jake Cooper, Kenva, Kishanna, Kisandra Sands, Sharez Boyd, Ashia,
Janice, Tammy, Terry, Shenna, Shakeidra Johnson; eight great
grandchildren, Danielle and Megan Boyd, Julian, Nocell, Denise,
Calasia, Emmaunel and Jacob Johnson; numerous nieces and nephews
and a host of other relatives and friends including four adopted children,
Philip and Duvanna Morris, Michael and Juanita Brown, Hilda Johnson,
Rev. Lockwood Deleveaux and The Hillside Mission Baptist Church
family, The Morning Star Baptist Church Association, Abundant Life
Church family, The Golden Gates #2, Leeward Isle Way family, Anthony
and Lenora Gardiner and family, Janette Laing and family, The Robinson,
Barry, Pintard, Clarke, Rolle, Adderley, Seymour, Darville, Smith,
Boyd, Johnson, Sands, Woodside families, Carlos Valdez and family,
Randy Curtis, The Hon. Shane Gibson and family, Hon. Donald Saunders
and family, The Straw Vendors of Cable Beach Market West, the staff
of Male Surgical and Male Medical I and II, especially Dr. Grant-Taylor
and team, all of his special blood donors and his expecting daughter
and son-in-law, Jacquelyn Cooper and Jason Sands.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Cancer Society on
behalf of Mr. Bertram Johnson.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road
and Fifth Street on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., and at the
church on Sunday from 12:00 noon until service time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES







PAGE 6, THURSDAY,


Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026




kAglow and Toastmasters Group.


FRANCELIA LOUISE
BOSFIELD, 63

of Sea Breeze Lane and formerly of Ragged
Island will be held on Saturday 10:00 a.m.
at Abundant Lift Bible Church. Abundant
Life Road. Pastor Tom Roberts assisted by
other ministers of the Gospel will officiate.
Interment will be made in Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens. Soldier Road.
Left to cherish the memory of Francelia,
one (1) son, Patrick Bosjield Jr.: one (1)
daughter, Patricia Woods (Tonya) and her husband, Keith Woods
Sr.; siblings, Alfreda Hepburn, Mavis Coes of Orlando, Roceta Miller,
Horace and Edward Lockhart, Wallis Carey., Vivian Lockhart, Stephanie
Duncanson of Turks and Caicos and Milford Lockhart: in-laws, Percy
Miller, Lionel Carey, Blythe Duncanson, Celeste, Yvette, Beverley
and Emily Lockhart; grandchildren, Keimani Francelia Woods and
Keith Woods Jr.; nephews, Alva, Elliot, Vernon and Harvey Lockhart,
Burnell Hepburn Jr., Monty and Michael Ashby of Orlando, Paul and
Cyrus Miller, Sterling, Roosevelt, Edward, Craig and Charley Lockhart,
Don, Avery and Avala Lockhart, Amilcar and Eduardo Carey, Beryn
Duncanson, Corey, Ricardo and Calvin Lockhart and their families,
Emile and Elwin; nieces, Christina Ellis and family, Anna-Rosa Clarke
and family, Diana Johnson and family, Janice Miller, Deborah Wilson
and family of Ohio, Anthea Clarke and Family, Myrna Pierre-Louis
of Ohio, Nataki Beckford and family, Fayneta Smith, Yvette Morris,
Cassandra and Stacy Lockhart, Marina Bland and Family of Orlando,
Keffieann Battles and family of Tyler, Texas, Marlene McKinney and
family, Renathia Lockhart, Pallis, Alisa and Anya Lockhart, Dr. Chinyere
Bullard and Family, Brochelle Duncanson, Keishla and Vivianne
Lockhart, Monet and Makia and their families; uncle, Victor Lockhart;
aunts, Minerva Cooper, Prescola, Ruth and Naomi Lockhart; numerous
relatives and friends including, Valerie Lockhart, Frank and Ivy
Kemp, Harrison Wallace, Evelyn Wallace, Freddy Wallace, Dorothy
Strachan, Marileta Bethel, Genesta and Enid Lockhart, Sheila Curling,
Florinda Hepburn, Verlena Maycock, Helen Saunders, Maxine Wallace,
Hezron and Elva Moxey, Elaine Major, Joyce Taylor, Gloria Knowles,
Levon Moxey, Oraline Butler, Eric, Phil, Bert and Carnie Cooper,
Delores Bain, Hon. Leslie Miller, Glen, Haddon, Tyrone and Terry
Miller, Sabrina Pinder, Zoe Powell, Lester and Gil Maycock, Donnalee
Hilton, Cecil, Bursil and Perry Wallace, Beryl Mortimer, Brian, Percy,
Charley andWayde Wilson, Jacob and Kingsley Wilson, Fayceta
Wallace, Patsy McKinney, Jackie Wallace, Ricky, Horace, Cassilda,
Fay and Marva Wilson and Family of Cleveland, Ohio, Shirley Saunders,
Dolly Duncanson, Chena Gibson, Tony, Laverne and Robert Lockhart,
Lee Armbrister, Dr. Kirkland Culmer, Shirley Duncombe, Emmett
Munroe, Heloise, Miriam and Rolene Bridgewater, Calvese Rolle,
Lillamae Wallace, Pretta Burnside, the Ragged Island Community,
Oakes Field Community, and lifetime friends including, UWI Group,


Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


St MARINA NAZEL
F -^ k. DUNCOMBE, 72


of Plantol Street and formerly of George
Town, Exuma will be held on Saturday
1:30 p.m. at Zion Baptist Church, East
& Shirley Streets. Rev. TG. Morrison
assisted by Rev. Ulric Smith II and other
associate Ministers and Deacons will
officiate. Interment will be made in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK.
Drive.


She is survived by, four (4) children, Elaine Williams, Janet Culmer,
Pastor Raymond and Patrick Duncombe; fourteen (14) grandchildren,
Jeron, Jevone and John Williams Jr., Lerue, Laterio, Samantha and
Lashay Culmer, Ramone, Simone, Rashif, Hussein, Ashem, Ashantae
and Gabriella Duncombe; one (1) great-grandchild, Jaylyn Culmer;
two (2) daughters-in-law, Barbara and Rosetta Duncombe: three (3)
brothers, Berkley, Gerald and Rudolph Evans; two (2) sisters, Maria
Curry and Barbara Grant; one (1) aunt, Albertha Ferguson; three (3)
brothers-in-law, Hon. Neko C. Grant, MP., Minister of Tourism and
Aviation; Eugene Lightbourne and Jim Duncombe; two (2) sisters-
in-law, Viola and Ilsie Evans; nephews, Baldwin, Brent, Robert,
Vincent and Brian Evans, Ian and Desmond Curry, Neko C. Grant II.,
Sheldon and Krishner Adderley, Lysle and Laval Lightbourne; nieces,
Birgirtha Moxey, Laverne Edee, Monique Curry, Xhante Wilson, Rev.
Isla, Estella, Nikki, Patricia and Tanya Evans, Claire Green, Bernadette
Thompson, Kelly Evans, Nidra Carey, Yolanda Hilton, Nekcarla Grant
and Geanti Lightboume; other special friends and relatives including,
Ms. Arbrella Cambridge, Mr. Oswald Isaacs, Ms. Silvia Gibson, Mrs.
Nora Dorsette, Ms. Maud Lewis, Ms. May Miller, Ms. Patrica Campbell,
Ms. Colebrooke, Ms. Jessica Rolle, Ms. Alma Young, Mr. Jimmy Ford,
Mr. and Mrs. Glinton Major, Mr. Anthony McQuay, Ms. Rayann
Duncombe, Ms. Sandra Nottage-Sherman, Ms. Zerlene Ring, Ms.
Lease Strachan, Ms. Vanola Rolle, Dr. Farquhason, Dr. Parker, friends
and nurses at the Dialysis Unit, friends and neighbors of Plantol Street,
and many more relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church from 12:30 p.m. until
service time.


AUGUST 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 7


4-


rommonfuealttih funeral 'omee

Independence Drive Phone: 341-4055


CAPTAIN LEON
HEGELL ROLLE, 66

of Bennett's Harbour, Cat Island,
will be held on Saturday at 10:00
a.m. at Church of Gcd Dumfries,
Cat Island. Rev. Trevor Strachan,
assisted by Rev. Charles Dean and
other ministers of the gospel will
officiate and interment will follow
in The Public Cemetery. Bennett's
Harbour. Cat Island.


Precious memory are held by his wife, Margaret Adell Rolle of
Bennett's Harbour, Cat Island; nine sons. Basil. Patrick. Dereck.
Kirkwood, Kenneth. Daniel, Marc, Anthony and Christopher Rolle
of Freeport, Grand Bahama; four daughters, Bloneva and Saralee
Rolle, Monique Sintiel and Denise Paige; stepmopther, Minerva
Rolle of Bennett's Harbour, Cat Island; six sister, Mrs. Irene Bodie,
Mrs. Agatha Marcelle, Mrs. Verneca Ferguson, Mrs. Greta Knowles
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Edith Matta of New York and Camille
Rolle; five brothers, Rodrick, Kenneth, Berkely, Basil "Duckie"
and Philip Rolle; one step-brother, Hensil Strachan; 38
grandchildren, Thalita, Corazine, Vardo, Deon, Patricia, Deandrea,
Patrick Jr., Latoya, Leon, Fredrick, Dereck Jr., Thomazina, Thomas,
Christian, Paris, Jullian, Kevin, Erica, Dawyne, Kenneth Jr.,
Kennedy, Dia, Ryhan, Cameron, Daniel Jr., Daneisha, Peaches,
Nellie, Gracie, Christian, Andre, Ashley, Ashton, Antonio, Marcus,
Keno, Ashantae and Walter; three great grandchidlren; 40 nieces
and nephews; four daughters-in-law, Alicia, Dedrie, Stacy and
Edrina Rolle; two sons-in-law, Thomas Sintiel and Hugo Paige;
six sisters-in-law, Mrs. Viola Strachan, Mrs. Mary Charlton, Mrs.
Sylvia Munnings, Olivia and Agnes Farrington and Sheree Rolle;
seven brothers-in-law, Alphonso Bodie, Ivan Marshall Sr., George
Farrington of Zion Hill, Cat Island, Charles Farrington of Grand
Bahama, Brian Ferguson, Robert Knowles of Freeport, Grand
Bahama and Ramon Matta of New York.

Other relatives and friends include, Clyde Adderley, Nurse Jessie
Smith, Nurse Julie Mackey, James "Daddy Long Legs" Miller,
and Brian; the following and their families, Edgar Bonimy, Helen
Thurston, Edmund Rahming, Frederick Gomez, Donald Rolle,
Clayton Fernander, Mr. Philip "Brave" Davis, Member of
Parliament for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador, "Jay Star".
Wilton Brown and Peter Turnquest; and also Odette Wallace,
Crystal Rolle, Alton Major Jr., "Fish", The Ferry Boat Association,
the Rolle Strachan, Farrington, McDonald and Rahming families,
Leslie Ingersoll, and the entire communities of Bennett's Harbour,


Dumfries, Zion Hill and Strachan's Hill, Cat Island.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES, COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m. and at the church in Dumfries, Cat Island on Friday from
6:00 p.m. to service time on Saturday.



KEITH RICARDO
SOLOMON, 37

of Baillou Hill Road and Market
Street, will be held on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. at Lighthouse
i Church of God, Mahagony Street,
Malcolm Allotment. Bishop
,. SCarlton J. Stuart, assisted by
"i Minister Stanley Smith and
Rev.Theresa Burrows will
officiate and interment will follow
in The Southern Cemetery, Cow Pen and Spikenard Roads.

Cherished memory are held by four sisters, Olamae Taylor, Sheryl
Smith, Jerene Solomon and Tiffany Lockhart; three brothers, Deon
Darville, Wayde Solomon and Craven Lockhart; six aunts,
Missionary Christine Green, Irene Bradshaw, Alma Wellman,
Mary Lockhart, Idamae and Vemamae Solomon; six uncles, Roland
and Bishop Edward Solomon, Pastor Roderick Green, Everette
Miller, Harcourt and James Lockhart; 14 nieces, Shanique, Terah,
Alicia, Tamara, Shaniqua, Fallon, Lesley, Pretrelle, Deandra,
Danielle, Shuntel, Sharine, Breon and Miquel; 12 nephews, James
III, Lucas Jr., Bryan, Larvado, Lothario, Lawrence Craven Jr.,
Shannon, Deon Jr., Deontae, Javon and Brendon; two sisters-in-
law, Jacqueline Lockhart and Brenda Darville; three brothers-in-
law, James Taylor, Michael Smith and Lucas Armbrister.

Other relatives and friends include, Princess, Genesta, Jennifer
Evette, Linda, Portia, Charles Laroda, Jerry Rolle, Rev. Carlton
Stuart, Berkley Derick, Shanel, Andrew and Marilyn McKenzie
and the community of Baillou Hill Road and Market Street.

Relatives and friends may view the remains at THE CHAPEL OF
MEMORIES COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL HOME,
INDEPENDENCE DRIVE, on Friday from l:00 a.m. to 6:30
p.m. and at the church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service
time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR
















244 Market Street P.O. Box EE-16634
Tel: 322-2070 or 322-2072

FUNER~~~ALSRIEFO


DEACON IRWIN
DEHAVILLAND NEWTON. 60

of Bougainvillea Boulevard. South Beach

S 25th. 2007 at 10:30a.mn. at Mt. Tabor Full
Gospel Baptist Church, Mt. Tabor Drive:
Pinewood Gardens. Officiating will be
Bishop Neil C. Ellis, assisted by Pastors
Delton Ellis, Lorenza Clarke & Reginald
Cox. Interment will follow in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums. John
F. Kennedy Drive.

Left to cherish his memories are his Wife of 19 years: Elder Maxine
Newton; (6) Children: Tava, Ramona Scheneque, Deuel & Day than
Newton, Lynette Benoit & Charmaine Gibson; (7) Adopted Children:
Kevan & Angela McKenzie, Tiko & Stevan Brown. Kadar Fountain.
Dexter Riley & Shelly Kelly; (7) Grandchildren: Tava Jr., & Taraj
Newton, Raemond Pageot, Tavaun Ingraham, Ajanque Lightbourne,
Amber & Edward Benoit, Jr., (2) Sisters: Mother Lydia McKenzie &
Loretta Newton; (3) Brothers: Leonard "Noah" Newton of Mastic Point
Andros, Lester & Philip Newton; (1) Son-in-law: Edward Benoit. Sr..
Stepmother: Mother Louise Prosper; 12 Sisters-in-laws: Annie Newton
of Fort Pierce, Fla., Raphaletta "Pinkie" Newton of Mastic Point, Andros:
Marie Newton. Evangelist Modena McPhee. Ruth Williams, Zella
Symonette, Marva, Patricia, Astrid & Shirley Brown, Pandora Darville
of Eleuthera & Carolyn Darville of Thailand: (8) Brothers-in-law:
Bishop Robert McPhee, Alfred Williams, Kenneth Symonette. Sr.. Ralph.
Gregory, Dexter and Caregiver Ulis Brown & .lames Darville of Thailand;
Uncle & Aunt: Willard & Gwendolyn Newbold; Godchild: Kerol Alongo
of London, England; (60) Nieces & Nephews: Bishop Johnathan &
Laverne Ramsey of Connecticut. Humphrey & Vickie McKenzie of
Minnesota, Dillon & Desiree McKenzie, Judith & Glen Cleare. Margaret,
Brinka, Sophia, Donnalee, Larry, Victor, Vincent, Vickie. Juliette. Charlene.
Mary, Felecia, Chaavis, Lakeisha, Leslie; Lisette, Rodgerlee, Philippa.
Bequesa, Darlene, Maldarene, Stephanie, Damica, Carlson, Johnathan.
Sabrina, Tarssie, Yapheth, Vanwright, Clarence, Errol & Debbie Newton,
Raymond & Carla Newton, Kenise & Kenneth Symonette, Jr., Mechelle
McPhee, Moleka Thompson, Densil & Robyn Rolle, Shawn & Yvette
McPhee, Veronique Knowles. Rashad Brown, Vernita, Itilia, Alfred,
Yasmin & Kenneth Newbold; Cousins including: lona Williams. Edgland
& Stephanie Newbold, Andrew Newton, Autry Newbold, Miriam Braynen.
Wendal Newton, Rozena Newton Duncombe. Melba, Caleb, Roston &
Charles Newton; Best Friends: Pastor Charles & Mother Geraldine
Williams, Servant Elijah & Patricia Gardiner, Servant David & Mrs.
Ramsey, Elder Gaetano & Doctor Therese Bonamy of Marsh Harbour.
Abaco; Other relatives and friends including: Bishop Neil & Elder
Patrice Ellis, Pastor Delton & Elder Anna Ellis and the entire Pastoral
Staff; Chief Servant Kenneth Clarke and the Board of Servants. The


entire Leadership and Membership of Mt. Tabor Full Gospel Baptist
Church: Rev. Stafford & Deloris Munnmngs, Jennifer & Bradley Braynen,
Elder Donnalee Hilton, Eunell Rolle. Rev. Patrice Rolle, Pauline McAlpin,
Vemie Rolle. Jacinth Taylor, Godfrey McAlpin. Derek Johnson, Goddie
Francis Edgecombe. Stephanie Clarke, Milton & Mary Saunders, Gene
(Sparky) Fountain, Jackie Hall, Una Evans, Bridgette Allen-McPhee &
the Stewarding Department of Atlantis Resort. Dr. Kevin & Tameka
Bowe. Dr. Clyde Munnings, Nurse Margaret Rodgers, Nurses Bodie,
Bain. Farrington & Seymour of the South Beach Health Centre,
Neighbours: Mrs. Firstina Gibson. the Musgrove, Brown & Thurston
Families.

Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Home on Friday, August 24th
from 12:00 noon to 6:00pm and on Saturday from 9:30am at the church
until service time.


THOMAS WILLIAMS, 81

S of Palm Beach Street will be held on
Saturday. August 25th, 2007 at 11:00a.m.
at Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley
Streets. Officiating will be Pastor T. G.
Morrison, assisted by Rev. Ulric Smith
"- II. Interment will follow in Old Trail
-, Cemetery, Old Trail Road.

SLeft to cherish his memories of 61 years
', of marriage are his devoted Wife: Anna
Williams: (1) Son: Patrick Williams: (1)
Brother: Steven Williams; (1) Sister:
Elizabeth Ferguson, (2) Grandchildren: Patrick Jr., & Kendra Williams:
(1) Sister-in-law: Ethel Williams: (11) Nieces: Adrianna, Clothilda.
Victoria. Helena, Ulna, Betty, Jacklyn. Nyoka, Cynthia. Elizabeth &
Ieanna Brown: (3) Nephews: Roosevelt Williams. Hastin & John Brown:
(1) Aunt: Edith Walkine: (1) Daughter-in-law: Ketrice Williams: (1)
Niece-in-law: Linda Brown; (1) Nephew-in-law: Charles Wilson: A
host of grand nieces and grand nephews: Other relatives and friends
including: the Taylor, Delancy & Davis families, Dr. Wilson Strachan.
Willamac, Edna Bain & Family, Janette, Dede, Craig, Tiny, Kevin.
Florabeli, Thelma, Ruthmae, Monique, Kenneth. Joel, Freeman. Dr.
Franklin & Dedra Walkine, Francena Clarke. Hilda Wilson & family,
Jeffrey Cox & family, Karen, Deandra, Rev. Dr. Lockwood Deleveaux
& family, Rev. Elkin Symonette & family. Rev. T.G. & Mrs. Morrison
and the church family of Zion Baptist Church. Doctors & Nurses of
Trauma Room, Accident and Emergency, PMH and the entire community
of Palm Beach Street.

Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Home on Friday, August 24th
from 12:00 noon to 6:00pm and on Saturday from 10:00am at the church
until service time.


- -R


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007






THURSDAY. AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 9


244 Market Street P.O. Box EE-16634
Tel: 322-2070 or 322-2072

FUNERAL SEVC O


HELEN LOUISE
FULFORD, 59

of Joan's Height will be held on Saturday,
August 25th, 2007 at 12:00noon at New
Lively Hope Baptist Church. Jerome
Avenue. Officiating will be Pastor Shelton
Higgs, assisted by Rev. Lavardo
Duncanson Rev. James Pennerman &


Rev. Hilbert Flowers. Interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Left to cherish her memories are her
Husband: Stanley Fulford; (5) Daughters:
Renee Rolle-Williams of Inagua, Marva
Roberts, Fredericka Fulford of Eleuthera, Advilda Rolle & Yolanda Cleare;
(10) Grandchildren: Latina & Latika Collie, Latanya Dawkins, Precious,
Elizabeth, Juliette & Willis Newchurch; John Musgrove, Jr., Winston Cleare,
Jr. & Maleah Scott, (2) Great grandchildren: Sean Coleby & Devon Ferguson,
Jr., (2) Brothers: Franklyn & George Munnings; Mother-in-law: Bernice
Thomas of Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama; (4) Sons-in-law: Samuel Williams
of Inagua, Andre "Blood" Roberts, Antonik Rolle & Winston Cleare, Sr., (3)
Brothers-in-laws: Godfrey Fulford of Turks Island, Franklyn Durham of
Eleuthera & Harold Been; (3) Sisters-in-law: Eva Moxey & Annie Tucker
both of Grand Bahama & Ella Missick of Turks Island; Numerous nieces &
nephews including: Sidney, Terry Rudolph, Keith Christopher, Denise.
Monette, Vanessa, Natasha, Ruth & Joycelyn Curtis, Dale, Lillian, Nicola,
Bradley, Alfonso, Patricia & Rose Munnings; Eva, Marsha, Stephanie. Shonae.
Arnie, Juanita, Dwayne & Ricky Fulford, Lorenzo, Ted, Frankie & Latheria
Durham, Andy & Lloyd Stubbs, Creighton, Quinton, Vernon & Drexel Moxey,
Tamara Litton, Cheyenne Dames, Jamal & Lavardo Been, Spencer, Darold,
Ranny, Ruth, Betty, Nancy, Barbara, Sharon, Inez, Carl & Michael; A host
of other relatives and friends including: Nelson Moxey, Emmanuel Missick,
Judy Mortimer & Family, Fleater Smith & Smith, Dawn Whylly & Family,
Laroda Turnquest'& Family, Isula Stuart & Family, Ethel Charlton & Family
of Freeport, Victor Hutchinson & Family, Roscoe Davies & Family, Edith
Beckford & Family, Hariette Cooper & Family, Henry Thurston & Family,
Ophelia Brown & Family, Mr. Lewis Dawkins & Family, Mr. Rolle & Family,
Beatrice Davis & Family, Alice Smith & Family, Maryann Campbell & Family,
Ms. Dolly & Family, The Williams & Family, Mrs. King & Family, Management
& Staff of D'Albenas Agency, Paulette & Pauline & Family, Sam Mcintosh,
Rip Rolle & Family, Mr. David Knowles & Family, Mr. James Knowles &
Family, Isadora Johnson & Family, Marissa Weech, Edward Gardiner, Emma
Poitier, Pastor Lamont Saunders and Kingdom Come Ministries & Family,
Doctor Eugene Gray & Family, Doctor Winston Sweeting & Family, Doctors
& Nurses of Female Medical I, Officer & Members of Modern Free &
Accepted Mason, Security Staff of the Ministry of Education, Management
& Staff of BEC especially the Cashier's Department, Pastor Trevor Stubbs,
Pastor Feaste & Family, Rev. Carla Culmer and the Wesley Methodist Church
Family, Pastor Robert McPhee & Family, Pastor Shelton & Mrs. Higgs and
the New Lively Hope Church Family and the Joan's Height community.
Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Home on Friday, August 24th from
12:00 noon to 6:00pm and on Saturday from I 1:00am at the church until
service time.


ewt Kema >4lumiid


FREEPORT
11-A East Coral Road, P.O. Box F-42312
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 Fax: (242) 340-8034


FUNERA SERVE FO


JOHN THOMAS
BROWN, 76


of Kool Acres, will be held on
Saturday, August 25th, 2007 at
11:00 a. m. at Holy Family
Catholic Church, Robinson
Road. Officiating will be Fr.
Kendrick J. Forbes. Interment
will follow in the Catholic Cemetery, Tyler Street.

Left to cherish his memories are his Wife: Eulamae,
Five Daughters: Ivy Campbell, Mary Roberts, Linda
Victor, Mavis Davis, and Ruth Vilorio, One Son:
David Livingston Brown, Four Sons-in-law: Ira,
James, Victor and Silvero, One Daughter-in-law:
Lauramae, Seventeen Grand Children: Sheena,
McLisa, Fanon, Felicia, Julian, Wesley, Donesha,
Simon, Chakara, Chrislee, Deandra, Shari, Winston,
Anastacia, Angelica, Kenton, and Kelly, Step Mother:
Nivian Hall, Eleven Great Grand Children, Five
Brothers: Raymon Lloyd of Baraterre, Exuma, Cecil,
Bob, Leanard and Franklyn Hall, Six Sisters: Marie,
Tiny, Natalie, Carolyn, Sandra and Portia, other Family
Members and Friends include: Randolph, Predensa
Anderson, Tyrone Bootle, Anthony, George, Emily,
Francita, Lucy, Neka, Issie, Fay, Annie, Londa, Fay,
Annie, Cheryl, Dora, Della, Samuel, Eneas, Trigger,
Christie, Darrold, Roxanne, Doug, Roslyn, and Robert
all of West Palm, Florida, William Anderson of
California, Teaka, Tonya and Crystal, Frankiemae,
Keon and Glen of Florida, Daylinda, Coleen. Glender,
Cleopatria, Nicole, Cini, Daylase, Sherry and Martha,
Pearl Gloria, Edith, Celest Angelo, and Godfrey of
Freeport, Niven, Vincent, Teddy, Cinque, Cecil Hall
Jr., Decicco, Elvin, and Robert Higgs.

Viewing will be held in the "Serenity" Suite at Restview
Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson
and Soldier Roads on Friday fomn 10:00 a. m. until
6:00 p. in. and then again at the church on Saturday
from 9:30 a. m. until service time.


>*


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES











l andg, fa"MO mg 6


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


FUNERAL SEVCEO


MR. GARRED ANTHONY
DEGREGORY, 41


I'"' OF #17 WEST HEIGHTS, BOOTLE
BAY AND FORMERLY WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA, WILL BE HELD
ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2007 AT
1:00 P.M AT ST. MARY MAGDALENE
ANGLICAN CHURCH, WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING
WILL BE PASTOR FRANK HAGAN,
ASSISTED BY FATHER STEPHEN
GRANT AND CO-PASTOR KEVIN BROWN. INTERMENT WILL
FOLLOW AT THE WEST END PUBLIC CEMETERY, WEST END,
GRAND BAHAMA.


Left to cherish his memories are his loving and devoted Wife: Tamara,
(1) Daughter: Garnika DeGregory (5) Sons: Miguel, Garred Jr., DeAngelo,
Antheo and Matthew DeGregory, Parents: Maxwell and Lovise DeGregory
(2) Sisters: Agnes Rolle and Maria Degregory, (6) Brothers: Donald,
Maxwell Jr., Jerome, Dave and Romeo DeGregory and Rodney Carey,
Mother-in-law: Ms. Julimae Johnson, Sisters-in-law: Theressa, Charlene,
Adean of Abaco and Jamis DeGregory, Lakeisha King, Tameka and Aldeka
King of New Providence, Brother-in-law: Fulton Gladstone King f New
Providence, (10) Aunts: Iris Culmer, Inzelet Bowleg, Alice Bethel, Arnette
Hernandez, Aremilda Nairn, Katherine Forbes, Jennie Huyler, Verlene
Pinder, Eunrice Moss, Estella 'Essie' Barr-DeGregory, (6) Uncles: Hilton,
Elvis and Jackson Bowleg, Jeffrey Bowleg of Delray Beach, Florida,
Harold DeGregory and Wellington Williams (5) Nieces:Christa, Janae,
Ulean and Davon DeGregory and Quitel Bethel, (9) Nephews: Ronaldo
and Oliver Rolle, Nevin, Dave Jr., Demetrius, Rodriques and Kendrick
'Ego' DeGregory and Shyon Adderley, Godparents: Mrs. Minuw of New
Providence and Pastor Lorn Wilchcombe, Godchildren: Selekiah Johnson
and Ethan Hepburn, (9) Aunts-in-Law: Janet, Brenell, and Beronica
Bowleg, Ernestine Johnson, Doretha Smith, Roberta Deveavx, Leaona and
Maureen Taylor all of New Providence, (8) Uncle-in-law: Addison Culmer,
Hubert Huyler of New Providence Antonio Hernandez, Raymond Pinder,
Prince Brice, Dudley and Renaldo Taylor of Acklins and Nelson Johnson
of New Providence, Grandparents-in-law: Claygon and Yvonne Taylor
of Acklins, and a host of other Relatives and Friends including: Pastor
Frank Hagan and the School of Prophetic Ministry, Bishop Rosevelt
Rolle and Family, Father Stephen Grand and Family, Dr. Gerald
Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. Tracey Rolle and Family, Darren Poitier and
Family, Hon. Obediah Wilchcombe, MP for West End and Bimini,
Mr. David Wallace and Family, Charlie 'Softy' Robbins, Gladstone
'Moon' McPhee, Lincoln 'Coach' Forbes, Stephen 'Chief' Gunn, Mr.
Xavier 'Bozo' Colton, Hanzel Collie, Ministry of Education, Principle,
Staff and Students of West End, Holmes Rock Primary, Eight Mile
Rock, St. Georges', High School and Alpha Omega School, Management
and Staff of the Rand Memorial Hospital and West End Community
Clinic, Magistrate Debbye Ferguson, West End Sporting Association,


r


Grand Bahama Softball and Basketball Association and the Graduating
Class of EMRHS 1985.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "SERENITY SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, RAND BAHAMA ON
FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 12:00 NOON, AT THE WEST END
PRIMARY SCHOOL FROM 1:00 P.M. TO 6:00 P.M., AND AT THE
CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 9:00.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


LLOYD WASHINGTON
LAING, 63

OF YORK, NORTH CAROLINA, AND
FORMERLY OF SMITH' S POINT,
GRAND BAHAMA WILL BE HELD ON
.: SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2007 AT 2:00
P.M AT ST. JUDE'S ANGLICAN
CHURCH, SMITH'S POINT, GRAND
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE FR.
CURTIS ROBINSON. INTERMENT
WILL FOLLOW AT SMITH'S POINT
CEMETERY.

He is survived by his loving Wife: Mary Love-Laing; (6) Daughters:
Sandra Laing, Marilyn McPhee, Marsha Laing, Jennifer Hinton, Katie
Laing of New York, South Carolina and Yvonne Adderley; (3) Sons:
Walter, Larry, and Godfrey Laing; (14) Grandchildren: Bianca Strachan,
Casmere Maycock, Keiron Laing, Karina and Kaliyah McPhee, Chevez
Lewis, Michael Jr. and Amhad Hinton of York, South Carolina, Shawn,
Shavanindor, Shavonnia, Shavanta, Shawanta and Angel (3) Sisters:
Selva Cooper, Eudene Heild and Mizpah Young; (2) Sons-in-Law: Edwin
McPhee and Michael Hinton Sr. (York, S.C); (3) Sisters-in-law: Joyce
Love (Mason), Dorothy Ellis and Joan Hoage; (4) Brothers-in-law:
Solomon Heild Sr., Gladstone Young, Otis Love (Cora), James Rawlinson
(Cynthia) (1) Aunt: Rejoina Ross of Chicago, Illinois; Numerous Nieces
and Nephews, Godmother: Ms. Vickie Delancy; Numerous Godchildren:
Kristen Floyd and Janet Henfiey; Other Relatives and Friends including:
Mary Hanna Laing and the Hanna family, Roland "Chappie" Bartlett and
family, Berlene Wildgoose and family, the Martin family, the Rolle family,
Shirley Chisholm and family, Carl Rolle family, the Smith Family, Tex
Cooper and family, Jeff Mader and family, Fletcher Mclntosh and family,
John Williams and family of York, South Carolina and the entire Mader
Town and Smith's Point Community.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "PERPETUAL SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM LIMITED,
I11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON
FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M. AND AT THE CHURCH ON
SATURDAY FROM 12:30 P.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007












4C an Wemah44nm Awued
FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNEAL SEVC O


WELLINGTON 'LINKY'
4;e SWEETING-PINDER, 32

OF JONES TOWN, EIGHT MILE
ft. "ROCK WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2007 AT
12:OONOON AT MT. ZION BAPTIST
+. CHURCH, JONES TOWN, EIGHT
MILE ROCK, GRAND BAHAMA.
OFFICIATING WILL BE
REV.LINDY RUSSELL.
_- INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW AT
THE HARBOUR WEST PUBLIC
CEMETERY, BARTLETT HILL, EIGHT MILE ROCK.

He is survived by his Wife: Lakeshia, (1) Son: Wellington, Jr., (1)
Daughter: Bre Johnson (2) Step-Sons: Deangelo and Antonio, (1)
Step-Daughter: Kenesha Fergusson, Mother: Rudell Swain, Father:
Arlington Pinder, (4) Sisters: Leaquesha and Stacey Swain and Harriett
Bain, Rose Roberts, (6) Adopted Sisters (7) Brothers: Daniel Stuart,
Edwin Green, Arlington, Jr., Othniel, Clifton, Leroy, Sidney Pinder,
(9) Adopted Brothers, (8) Aunts: Sandra Smith, June Knowles, Alice
Higgs, Lina Ferguson, Esther Laing, Christine Swain, Lizna Culmer
and Clemetina Pinder (7) Uncles: Edward, Johnny and Nathan Saunders,
Coley and Austin Swain, Joseph Sweeting and Hilton Pinder, Mother-
in-law: Sophia McLeod, Father-in-law: Alvin McLeod, (1) Brother-
in-law: Supt. Alexander Roberts, (3) Sisters-in-law: Lorna, Shirley
and W/Sgt Terecita Pinder, (1) Adopted Aunt: Beryl Knowles, (3)
Grand Aunts and (2) Grand Uncles, (14) Nieces: Reneka Laing,
Tiffany, Clefphene, Deandrea, Aquala, Royann, Alicia, Shabana,
Dominique, Arlisha, Mekieand Sydriqua Pinder, Shamyra Davis-Gray
and Krista Davis (5) Nephews: Bruce Walker Jr., Sheldon Lightbourne,
Clifton Jr., Leroy and Shaquille Pinder, Godmother: Karen Smith and
a host of other Relatives and Friends including: Vincent Butler,
Lewis Astwood and Family of Washington, D. C., Doreen Martin and
Family, Lois Jones and Family, Idelia Romer and Family, Washington
Bain and Family, Christopher Gibson and Family of Seattle, Washington,
Gene Duncanson and Family, Mrs Joyann Stuart-McIntosh, Apostle
David and Lady Miah Williams and the Healing Voices from Healing
Hand Ministry, Rev. Lindy Russell and the entire Family of Mt. Zion
Baptist Church and the Staff at the Rand Memorial Hospital .

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "IRENIC SUITE" OF
RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM
LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND
AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY FROM 11:30 A.M UNTIL
SERVICE TIME.


MEMORIAL SERVICE


ARCHALET 'ARCHIE'
.... '.- O LOWE, JP, 73

OF #147 POINCIANNA DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA AND
FORMERLY OF THE CURRENT,
ELEUTHEA WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 2007 AT
j 3:00 P.M AT THE KINGDON HALL OF
JEHOVAH WITNESSES, COMET
ROAD & MIDSHIPMAN, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL BE BRO. JOSEPH
THOMPSON CREMATION WILL FOLLOW.

He is survived by his loving Wife: Ongeal 'Angie' Lowe; (4) Children:
Jeffrey, Anthony, Florinda and Diahann; (2) Adopted Daughters:
Lavonda and Anastacia; (16) Grandchildren: Aisha, Jamal, Andre,
Angelica Lowe, Anastacia, Adrian, Anthon, Antoinette, Arlene, Andrea,
Deandra, Deandre, Andreka and Aliah; (19) Great Grandchildren:
Denzil, Mauricio, Yaranique, Flonique, Tavanique, Patrick, Kiano,
Tesha, Tanjae', Deangelo, Deshawn, Jeremy, Kadisha, Anesha, Alicia,
Adrian Jr., and Astria; (1) Sister: Monica Dean; (2) Brothers: Edward
(Jackson) and Cyril Lowe; (2) Sisters-in-law: Virginia and Janet
(Viola) Lowe, (1) Brother-in-law: Talmadge Dean; (1) Aunts: Ada
Kelly Deveaux; Numerous Nieces and Nephews: Lewis Hudson,
Vena and Grand Wolfe, Yvonne, Terry, Vonette, Antoinette, Capacine,
Erica, Billy, Portia, Betty, Rodney, Walter, Linda Dino, Alvinia,
Chantal, Schreal, Dyan, Dancy, Shan, Kimmy, Jay, Derrick, Bianca,
TerryJo; Numerous Cousins including, Dorothy Taylor, Erma, Jenny,
Arnette, Burey, Denise, Rodrick, Oswald, Stepahnie Marble Davis
from Detroit, Margaret Edward of Florida, Linda and Cyril Higgs of
New York, Leroy and Laura Higgs of Atlanta Georgia; Other Family
and Friends, Emily Kemp, Mildred, Brian and Hilton Kelly of Current
Island, Kermit and Joiesel Williams, Terry and Dorothy Goldsmith,
Willie "Love", Rev. George Culmberbatch, Alma Segovia, calvin
Neely, Doswell Coakley, Mario Donato, Russel Franks, Ruben Gibson,
Cecil Thompson, Hon. Perry Christie, Henry Kellman, Staphanie Curry,
Vasti Kemp, Sen. Pleasant Bridgewater, Irma Johnson, Harriett Johnson,
Cleo, Marcus, Dorothy, Mr. and Mrs.Charles Sweeting, The Swann
Family, and a Host Of Other Relatives, Friends and Party Affiliates.

PERSON WISHING TO SIGN THE BOOK OF CONDOLES MAY
DO SO AT THE "CELESTIAL SUITE" OF ,RESTVIEW
MEMORIAL MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A
EAST CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON
FRIDAY FROM 10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHURCH
ON SATURDAY FROM 1:30 P.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 11






PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

DET F4TCE O


.........' "".. . ". '. .. ..


MR. URBAN 'ERVIN'
LIVINSTONE COOPER, 66

OF WEST END, GRAND BAHAMA, AND FORMERLY
OF WATER CAY, BAHAMAS DIED AT THE RAND
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 17. 2007.

He is survived by his Wife: Ruthamae Cooper; (4) Daughters:
Daphne Cooper-Hanna, Latera, Lateria and Andre Cooper:
(7) Sons: Talmadge, Cambridge, Terrance Sr., Norman, Erick
Sr., Drexel and Kevin Cooper; (16) Grandchildren; 2 Sisters:
Annie Lewis and Joyce Davis; (1) Brother: Hilton Cooper,
(1) Son-in-law: Keith Hanna, (2) Daughters-in-law: Christal
and Sharon Cooper and A Host of Other Relatives and
Friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED
AT A LATER DATE.


MRS. ROSE-ANDREE
PIERRILUS, 41

OF #2 COLUMBUS DRIVE. FREEPORT. GRAND
BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF ST. MARC. HAITI DIED
AT THE RAND MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ON FRIDAY,
AUGUST 17. 2007

She is survived by her Husband: Arnold Ande>on Pierrilus,
(2) Daughters: Rose Lanue Sauna and Marie Hore Dafree
Pierrilus, (4) Sons: Wadly Tepson, John Nocore, Jaqueson
and Kendy Pierrilus, Mother: Sessell Josph, (2) Sisters:
Germerne and Madelaine Simeus, (4) Brothers: Yonel, Jaque,
Arnout and Almando Simeus and a Host of Other Relatives
and Friends of St. Marc, Haiti, Miami, Florida and Freeport,
Grand Bahama.


FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED
AT A LATER DATE.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


U""-~~-~----~-l\\\\~Yln\\\~...\l~~\~..~\


c


_ ~










iEenwritt 'S J funerntl PDxmw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


CARNETTA VIOLA
JOHNSON-
STRACHAN, 83

a resident of Imperial Park. \vill be
held at St. Francis Xa\ier Cathedral.
East Hill Street. on Saturday at I 1:00(
a.m. Officiating \\ill be Fr. DaxidI
Cooper, assisted bv Monsignor Alfred
Culmer and Fr. Glen C. Nixon.
Interment follows in Lakevieiv
Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.


-...- Cherished memory are held in the
hearts of her eight (8) children, Lorraine
Hepburn, Gertrude Rolle, James Strachan. Solomon Strachan, Maria
Strachan, Deborah Koment, Kevin Strachan and Anthony Strachan: one
sister, Gertrude Delores Johnson; one son-in-law, Jay Koment: (18)
grandchildren, Gregory Fernander, Therese (Terez) Hepburn. Lynette
Hepburn, Patrell Hepburn, Elrod Hepburn Sr.; Anthony Rolle (Tony
Seymour Jr.), Anwar Rolle, Sophia Rolle, Marcia McPhee, Carlene
Parnther of Georgia, Lisa Strachan and Michael Strachan, Lameont
Strachan, Alcott Wilson Jr., Anthonique and Anthony Tereeves Strachan
Jr., Kristin Strachan; two (2) grandsons-in-law, Pastor Sterling McPhee
and Neal Parnther of Georgia: one granddaughter-in-law, Ginger Hepburn;
(19) great-grandchildren, Kenton Taylor, Kristen Hepburn, Elrich Walker,
Elrod Hepburn Jr., Shalom. Chairo and Charris McPhee. Anthava,
Bravante, Antonio, Angelo Travier and Anthony (T.J.) Rolle. Armani
Rolle of Rosedale. New York, Kayla and Jordon Parnther of Georgia.
Keniesha and Gia Hepburn. Sanaa Gardiner: seven (7) nieces. Grace Mac
Kemp, Mary Magdalene Armbrister, Ollie Mae Johnson. Gloria Johnson.
Barbara Johnson and Sharon Johnson, Andrea Adderley and Brenda
Banks; seven (7) nephews. Cosmo Kemp. Herbert Kemp. Ronald Kemp
Bertam Kemp, Edward Johnson, P. Anthony White and Ron Banks of
Canada; grand-nieces and nephews, Cyprian, Michael. Peter and John
Kemp, Ernestine and Vernette, Bethel and Geneva Johnson, Keith Roberts.
Diane, Linda, Carl, Michael, Edward, Teddy and the entire family of
Mary Magadalene Armbrister, Elizabeth (Betty), Maria Theresa, Margaret
and Osborne Kemp, and the entire Kemp family, the entire Gilbert family
of Ross Corner, Petrona Johnson and family and Carolia White John and
family of Virginia; friends and relatives, Mrs. Lillie Koment of New
York, Mr. Alcott Wilson Sr., Ms. Barbara Harvey; godchild, Mrs. Frances
Rex, of New Jersey, Mrs. Sonia Cox. Mrs. Patricia Knowles-Jervis, Mrs.
Delores Knowles-Sherman and family, The Carey, Gibson and Johnson
families of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, Michelle Knowles, Agatha Rodgers,
Miriam Johnson of New Jersey, the entire Gibson Family of the late
Herman Gibson, the entire family of the late Mrs. Jessie Bowen, the
family of the late Ena Caine of New York; god-brothers, Mr. Andrew
Curry Sr. and Mr. Garth Curry; god-sisters, Mrs. Jackie Malcolm of
Freeport and Mrs. Eloise Brown of New York, Rosie Reckley, Herbert
"Bertie" Baker Jr., Sylvia Baker, Mr. Cyril Baker and family, Mrs. Sylvia
and Mrs. Marie Rahming and family, Mrs. Iris Smith, family of the late
Lois Wilson and family, Dr. and Mrs. Curtis C. McMillan and family,
Mrs. Gertrude Clarke and family, Mrs. Jill Smith and family, Mr. Michael
Cartwright and family, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Cleare and family and a host
of other friends too numerous to mention, special thanks to, Monsignors
Preston Moss and Alfred Culmer, Fr. David Cooper of Freeport. Fr. Glen


('. Nixon. lUr. Kendrick .1. Forbes, Fr. Anslem Russell. Eucharistic Ministers
of I tll\ l:inil ( C'htuIch. D)r. John Godcl, Mr. Eric Butler and Mrs. Edith
(O)utlcni. 'he RcLI IsurrectC I Church lainil, :ind St. Francis Xavier Church
tlamilx Dr. i (anna .lagadeesh, Nurse Caroline Heastie, Alvicia (Winsome)
N lotris and Naomi Pierre (Caregivers). The staff of BaTelCo. MedDentCo..
aMinis trx Of Works. Scotia Bank, Esso (Exxon-Mobil)

Ilriends ma\ pa\ their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home. Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


F.

I


MAURICE KENNEDY
McKENZIE, 40

a resident of Claridge Road, will be held
at Maranatha Baptist church, Abraham
Street off St. James Road, on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Pastor
Alfred Smith and Pastor Gary Sweeting.
Interment follows in Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.

Left to cherish his memory are his
children, Maurice III and Crystal
McKenzie; sisters, Valperga, Maurica
Hidy McKenzie and Christiana; brother,


Lowell, stepmother: Ellen McKenzie of Ft. Lauderdale. Fla: nieces, Vashti
and Jenia: nephews. Saintel. Timothy, Mark. Kenton. Torron. Shanendor
and Michael: uncles. Terry. Shervin and Larry Clarke. Theodore Taylor
Sr., Clifford Ferguson and Rupert Smith: aunts. Helen Taylor. Patricia
Ferguson, Veronica Clarke. Christiana Thompson of Harbour Island.
Madrica Mackey of Miami. Fla.. Maryann Smith. Almeda Campbell of
Arthur's To\wn, Cat Island. Evelyn Stewart of Palmetto Point. Eleuthera
and Doris Durham: other relatives and friends including, Louise Sands
and Addie Culmer of Palmetto Point. Eleuthera. Prescola Stewart of
Tarpum Bay, Eleuthea,. Benjamin and Violet Stubbs and family of
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Samuel and Richardo Young and families.
Theodore and Debra Tavlor .r. and family. Joseph and Linelle Scavella
and family, Vincent and Christine Basil and family, Marvin and Betty
Taylor, Sean and Tonya Ferguson and family, Daron Taylor. Leslie and
Jeremie Ferguson, Pedro Charlton, Gino Smith, Jason Clarke, Julie
Mackey and family of Dumfries, Cat Island, Brenda Cooper and family
of Palmetto Point, Eleuthera, Sheila Deveaux and family, Alvin, Anushka
and Cheryl Mackey, Kayren McPhee and family, Robert Rosefield of
Minneapolis, Minnesota, Paul, Shelly, Janet, Anastacia and Rubyann
Smith, Elbert Thompson, The Campbell family, Janet and Melvin, Thomas,
Mark Adderley, Terry Smith, Terry Rolle and family, Tyrone Dean,
Management and Staff of Strachan's Auto Body, The Joseph family of
Culmersville, Daphanie Laing and family, Mr. McPhee and family. Tyrone,
Ms. Karen Bowe and family, Glen Miller and family, The Germain family,
Mrs. Andrea Rolle, Ms. Michelle Brown, Mrs. Julia Munroe and family,
The Rox family and the Pastor and Members of Maranatha Baptist Church.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral I Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 on Fridav and on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


__ __ I_


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES









Pleunwrittle's Junrrat ^Dimte
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


MR. MERCUS LOUIS,
70

S."I a resident of Barcardi Road and
-- formerly of Port Au Paix, Haiti.
will be held at Ebenezer Baptist
Church, Lazaretta Road, on
I Saturday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Rev. Loura Papolote.
Interment follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard
Roads.

Left to cherish his memory are his children, Angella, Iviania,
Lavinia, Claudette and Michelet Lecaire and Henry Raymonvil;
grandchildren, Merline, Roodson, Gaby and Junior Lecaire;
Yamiley Nestor, Vanessa and Mildred Mezidor, Tavary and
Tiffany Raymonvil; Dorothy Melenda Decius, Hilary and
Ronaldo Decius, Ronald, Alex and Ricardo Mezidor; brothers
and sisters, Duval Joseph and wife and Mirabeau Michel and
wife; numerous nieces, nephews cousins, in-laws and friends
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday
and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon and at the church
from 1:00 p.m. until service time.


MATRIARCH
MADGELYN IRENE
SHALL, 82

,* a resident of I st Street the Grove
and formerly of Turks & Caicos
Island, will be held at Zion Baptist
Church, East and Shirley Street,
on Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Officiating
will be Rev. T.G. Morrison,
-assisted by Rev. Howard
--.-- Hamilton, Rev. Newton Hamilton,
Associate Ministers, Deacon and
Evangelists. Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her husband, Israel Hall Sr.;
sister, Dr. Annest C. Hamilton Rappel; 8 sons, Deacon Israel
Hall Jr., Edwis, Ashton, Wellington, Cleveland, Simeon,


Timothy and Gregory Hall; I daughter, Lana Hall-Forbes;
adopted daugthcrs, Ruth Paulman, Agnes Pratt, Pearline Phifer,
Elmira Evans; adopted sons, Daniel, Samuel and Hilgrove
Hall; son-in-law, Deacon David Forbes; daughters-in-law,
Angela, Susan. Albertha, Sheral, Elaine and Coralee Hall;
adopted daughters-in-law, Almada, Amelia ahd Altamease
Hall; adopted son-in-law, Rev. Caleb Evans; brother-in-law,
David Hall; sisters-in-law, Angelette Hall, Leonie, Geraldine
and Dorothy Hamilton; aunts, Alvesa Forbes; aunt-in-law,
Winifred Winnie Forbes; nephews, Arthur, Royal, Joseph,
Kevin, Rev. Fr.; Roland, Rev. Newton, Rev. Howard, Elder
Anthony, Timothy, Arnold, Richard, Rev. Reuben, Ryland,
Max and Philip Hall; Livingston Hamilton, Nathaniel Rappel
and Milton Rawles; nieces, Rev. Helena Hamilton-Smith,
Cynthia Rahming, Rev. Daphne Hamilton, Janet Claude,
Gwendolyn, Aphrodite Cooper, Althea Grant, Annes Armbrister,
Nicola and Nerissa Hamilton, Rosie Williams, Millie Rawles,
Isilda, Lane, Betty and Rachel Hall; other relatives and friends
including, Donald and Maglyn Hamilton and family, Simeon
Hamilton and family, Curley Hamilton and family, Sherlock
Hamilton and family, Leslie Jr. and family, Claude, Ella
Lightburn, Clifford, Ivy Williams, Jeffrey Hall Sr., Herbert
Forbes, Carl and Betsy Ferguson, Jesma Rigby, Sheila Albury,
Nina Philips, Annes Walkine, Harding Simmons, Morris
Simmons, Felix Walkine, Whitney Hamilton, Edward and
Mary Sweeting, Marjorie Hall, Clarita Forbes, Althea Forbes,
Cosygan Forbes, Mae Musgrove, Dorothy Forbes, George
Hall Sr, Veronica Hall-Hamilton, Rev. Shirley Smith, Shirley
Hall-Bonimy, Sonia Cox-Hamilton, Constance Green-Hall,
Carlon Forbes, Rev. Benjamin Williams, Lucile Lightbourne,
Loraine Phillips, Willamae Greene, Marcus Forbes, Headley
Forbes, Alicia, Florita, Whitlene and Dorcas Dean, Evan.
Blythe Bailey, Eden Greene, John and Alice Lightboumrn, Sandra
Hall-Gray, Carolyn Hall-Knowles, Stephen Hall, Gina Taylor,
Josephine Forbes-Hall, Suzy Forbes, Yvette Hamilton, Nella
Hamilton, Eustus "Brother" Outten, Kingsley Outten, Clinton
Outten, Mamie Outten, Gladys Williams-Smith, Debbie
Symonette, Muriel Symonette, Millie Symonette, Louise
Williams-Clarke, Donna Colbert-Forbes, Timothy Forbes,
Cleaver Wiliiams,Willamae Symonette, the Bostwick family
(Nicky, Eulie, Bernard and Brian), the Edwards family, Frankie,
Stanley,Nita, Ruthmae, Donnette, Evena, Nadeen, Raymon,
Lillian Taylor-McKenzie and family, Hon. Cynthia "Mother"
Pratt and family and a host of others relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. on Saturday
and on Sunday from 10:a.m.-12:00 noon and at the church
from 1:00 p.m. until service time.


j


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


DEATH ANNOUNCEMENT
For

Mr. Thomas Ryan
"Shaggs"
1952-2007








i



Service held at Our Lady's Catholic Church
Deveaux Street
Time: 3p.m. Friday August 24th, 2007
Left to cherish his memory are his three (3) children, Tiffany, Richard
and Patrick Ryan; two (2) adopted-children, Stephanie and Marcus
McKay; five (5) grandchildren, Marcia Troyann and Marley Troy
Deveaux, Rashad, Ria and Rashann Ryan; one (1) son-in-law,
Marcian Deveaux; one (1) daughter-in-law, Shantel Ryan; three (3)
brothers, Patrick Herbert, William D'Arcy and Thimothy John Ryan;
three sisters, Marjorie Anne Savarese, Mary Lucia and Juilia Marie
Ryan; two (2) uncles, John and George McKay; five sisters-in-law,
Constance, Ginger, Paulette and Michelle McKay and Betty Dames;
three (3) brothers-in-law, Charles Savarese, Rodney and Perry
McKay; seventeen nieces and nephews, Shawn, Morgan and Jamie
Ryan, Carla and Carlton Demeritte, Kenton Corduroy, Shameka and
Churton Dames, Bruce Johnson, Disiree, Kenneth and Brain Ingraham,
Keithra Pinder, Chris Wells, Teange and Anastacia McKay and Tafari
Thompson; Special Friends, lan Brown, Tyrone "Goat Man", Kara
Dean, Carlos and Kayna Small, Julia Thompson, Bettyann Skinner,
Roy Fox, Patircia Davis, Peter Halle and Staff of Advance Documents;
other relatives and friends including, Donna Roberts, Eulalee
Simmons, Glady's "G" Bethel and Renee Pinder.
Special Thanks: Nurse Johnson of Dialysis Unit, The Nurses of Male
Medical II (PMH), Doctors Parker and Serville.
May he rest in peace!


There will be no viewing


THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007, PAGE 15



f t

for the late


ANGELA E.
MONCUR-DAVIS
'Don't gqneve for me, for now I'i fire
I'm foll/o'inq the palth God laid for me.
I took .His hand itwhen I heard -Ris call.
I turned my back and left it all.

I could not stay another day,
to lauih, to love, to work or pray.
'Tasks left undone must stay that w'ay,
1 found tiat peace at the close of day.

If imy partinq hias left a void,
M Then fill it with remembered Im'.
*Perhiaps iv lime hlias SCemetd all too 1rief,1
'l)on't lenqllien it now., witli undue qin,
-Lift up v.'our hearts, and share wifth me
(otid wanted mie no'w. .'He set me "Free.

Sadly missed by her children. Ryan,
Poinette, Sheria, Derek, Sheenie and Carla;
grandchildren, and a host of relatives and
friends.

1-er memories will forever live
on in our Hearts.






PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 23, 2007


Vaughn 0. Jones
MEMORIAL CENTER
"Honoring the memories of loved ones"
INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED



1 CYRIL CARL
ROLLE, 87

of Redland Acres and formerly
of Rolle Town, Exuma will be
held on Saturday at 1:00 p.m.
at the Church of God of
Prophecy, Soldier Road.
4 '_ Officiating will be Pastor
Samuel Moss assisted by other
Ministers. Interment will follow in Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

He is survived by his wife; Olive Hazel Rolle;
four sons: Lorenzo, Bernard, Anthony and
Freeman Rolle; three daughters, Sheila, Patricia
and Eunice McCartney; step mother, Esther
Rolle; three brothers, Cecil, Roy and Obediah
Rolle; two brothers-in-law, Javis Glinton and
Sidney Young; five sisters-in-law, Myrtis Forbes,
Gwendolyn, Jenniemae and Sandra Rolle, Betty
Young and Hortence Glinton; twelve grand
children including, Maxir McKinney, Simon,
Keith, Margo, Marco, Darren, Lorenzo, Stacey,
Crystal, Jeffernique, Anthony and Gustave; six
great- grandchildren, numerous nieces and
nephews, numerous grandnieces and nephews
and a host of other relatives and friends.

Viewing will be held in the Legacy Suite of
Vaughn 0. Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road
and Primrose Street on Friday from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m. again on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to
11:00 a.m. and at the Church from 12:00 noon
to service time.

Wulff Road and Primrose Street,
Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 24 Hour Emergency
434-9220/380-8077


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


A MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR









k



4 r








i Charles William Pinder, aged 80

Nassau, Bahamas Will be held on Friday August 24th,
2007 at St. Anselm's Church, Fox Hill at 4:15 p.m.
Charles is survived by his daughter Julie Ann Kimble, son
William Charles Pinder, Granddaughter Laura Kimble,
Grandson William Dylan Konek of Wichita, Kansas. Aunt ,
Miriam Pinder Roberts, Son-in-law Richard Kimble,
Sisters: Freda Pinder Thompson and Sylvia Zervas of
Baltimore Maryland, Sister-in-law Geraldine Pinder,
SNephew: Michael Pinder, Bryan Pullias, Nieces: Precilla
Gillett of Texas, Cathy Zervas of Texas, Celeste Pullias of
Texas, and Crystal Zervas of Maryland. Grand Nephews:
Simeon Wagner, Dimitri Wagner and Brandon Pullias,
Renee, r Simone Roth and Patricia Pinder.
He is also survived by large extended family and all of his /
good friends too numerous to mention by name, The
Coral Harbour Sunday Group, the Dowdeswell Street
Group, the Mr. rs Group and the morning swimmer's at
Goodman's Bay.
The family would like to thank all the doctors, nurses Er
staff of The Princess Margaret Hospital, Nassau, for the
attention and care shown to him during his sickness.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Bahamas Air
Sea Rescue Association (BASRA) P.O. Box SS 6247, Nassau,
in memory of Charles W. Pinder.


V. : .' .








The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 23, 2007 PG 17


Let's Talk: Embrace your dreams


* By REVEREND DEON
SEYMOUR-COX
Universal Truth Ministries

This is a three part series
Last week we suggested that
it was important for you to
surrender the traditional
approach in addressing the
truth of your relation with "I AM"
and recognize that what you aligned
the 'I AM' with defined your ability to
deal with the real you Spirit.
Remember I said there where three
aspects to your being. "All of your
mind serves as a resource that must be
used in reaching and embracing your
dreams!"
The next part of you is called 'the
soul'. In our teaching, Christian
Metaphysics, soul is 'total conscious-
ness'. Consciousness simply means
awareness. Your soul is comprised of
total awareness. In new thought we
teach Super-Conscious (another term
is the Christ Mind). This is the part of
our awareness that knows that it
knows, that it is one with God. Paul
puts it this way, "Let this mind be in
you that was in Christ Jesus".

FLOOD, from 22

the others do, but this one thing I do
know which is: the flood gates of
evil in the spirit realm have been
opened over the Bahamas through
its idolatrous God tourism and
the demonic vehicle of religion.
Combine the two and we've got reli-
gious tourism like many of the other
"ism religions" of the world -
Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, etc.
In II Chronicles 18:5, Ahab, King
of Israel, gathered his religious lead-
ers together concerning a national
matter. These were the religious
leaders/false prophets who would
only say that which was pleasing to
the King. In verse six, Jehoshaphat.
King of Judah, asked King Ahab, is
there not a true prophet of the Lord
that we might inquire of Him:
besides these flakes, fruits and nuts
you've got here that is the false
prophets.
This kind ot article and message
will always rain on the parade of the
country's leaders who are having it
their way. Proverbs 14:12 says, There
is a way which seemeth right unto a
man, but the end thereof are the ways
of death.
This word "way", in the Hebrew
is: derek, deh'-rek; which means a
course of life, a mode of action, a
conversation, a custom, a journey
and a path. As educated and as spir-


The next phase of mind is
'Conscious'. The conscious phase of
mind is where you reason, where you
choose, select, judge. It is also known
as the intellect.
The third phase of mind is the 'sub-
conscious'. The sub-conscious is the
seat of the feeling nature. Here is
where memories, past experiences.
moods and attitudes are held.
Most people are aware of the con-
scious mind, but few people are aware
of the subconscious. Psychology
knows about the sub-conscious. The
super-conscious, on the other hand, is
purely spiritual. M6st people being
unaware of the super-conscious do not
use it, therefore the spiritual rarely
comes into our experience because we
are unaware of it. It is consciousness
that becomes form.
The conscious mind is pivotal and
has the ability to pull from the 'Race
Conscious'. When I say Race
Conscious I am not referring to your
ethnicity or the human race. Any
thought or belief that has ever been in
the universe is what I refer too. Some
people call it the Akashi records.

itually anointed as the leaders of this
country claim to be, it's obvious that
the path they have chosen to take
this nation is leading to death and
destruction.
The Bahamas doesn't have to be
like a sky diver who jumps out of an
air plane thousands of feet in the air.
Then as he's descending to the
ground he's got this burning desire
to get back into the plane after dis-
covering faults with his parachute.
We are going the wrong way. I
don't care what the Caiaphas. the
Annas or the Nicodemus' of todav
say as they dine at Pilate and
Herod's table: we are going the
wrong way. Like Isaiah. Jeremiah,
Elijah, Elisha. Ezekiel, and Micaiah,
I'm not looking for recognition.
favors or h1ind-outs or to be
a.ceptecd into the good old boys fel-
lowship: therefore I'm free to speak
as the Loid directs me too. Let's
close the flood gales, we're going
the wrong way.

Join Pastor Brendalee and I
along with the family of Kingdom
Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,
every Sunday morning @) 10:30am
and Thursday nights (@q 7:30pm at the
Bishop Michael Eldon High School
Auditorium for more of God's pow-
erful word. For questions or com-
men ts contact us via e-mail:pastor-
mallen@(avahoo.com or Ph.225-
3850/441-2021.


Whatever you call it, Ecclesiastes puts
it this way, there is nothing new under
the sun. All is located in the here and
now.
So if the conscious mind pivots it
has access to all this material, some of
it is in accordance with Truth, most of
it is not. It is from this material that
you form your beliefs and mental pat-
terns that are impressed in the sub-
conscious.
Now the sub conscious does not
evaluate anything you send it. It is pas-
sive, it's like a tape recorder (some-
times called the tape recorder of the
mind) it picks up everything. You can-
not tell the sub-conscious. 'only take
this' it does not know how to, it takes
in everything. That's why we teach
that you must be careful what you
think and what you feel because it is
going to be 'pressed out' in the sub-
conscious mind, and here is what hap-
pens. The sub-conscious mind will
work it out in your life and your
affairs. What is going on the outside is
simple a projection of what is going on
in mind.
Now the conscious phase can also
pull (or chooses) from the super con-
scious mind, the reason it does not is


because it does not know that it is
there. Most people don't know of that
resource and hence don't use it. Most
people think that their thoughts mas-
ter them, rather than them being the
master of their thoughts. So they don't
realize that there is a place in their
mind where the ideas of God can
come in and set up a new reality for
them.
It is this deliberate use of the avail-
able resources of the mind that deter-
mines what one embraces.
This is the three fold nature of man
that must be firmly planted (under-
stood and used) in mind in order for
each man to embrace his dream and
really live. Just think about it!
Until next week...

77T Universal Truth Ministries is a
Bible-based mnuistry for thinkers. We
are a teaching ministry and we invite
you to join us in our classes. Our sum-
mer semester began on July 30. Please
call 393-9460 for information on how
to register for classes. Join us for
Sunday service any Sunday at 10:30am
in the Dewgard shopping Plaza. Visit
our bookstore any day from 10am to
4pm.


ALEX FACTORY CUTS


26 years Experience


Just in time

Back to Sch
5 Barbers for fast easy

Visit us on
#32 Roosevelt S
off Jerome A
(3 Buildings down fr
I Toya's Typing Scho


Appointment/House C


394-1 70


--..,


for
001
ool
service


street
ve.
om
1o)


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calls



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PG 18 Thursday, August 23, 2007


RFLI~~ION


The Tribune


Husband's dream carries grieving




widow to warden service ministry


* By JERRY HARKAVY
Associated Press Writer

LINCOLNVILLE, Maine (AP) Personal
tragedy set Kate Braestrup on her path to ministry.
Her husband, Maine State Police Trooper Drew
Griffith, was killed in 1996 when a truck slammed
into his cruiser about a mile from home, leaving
Braestrup to raise their four young children by her-
self.
Although he was 15 years from retirement.
Griffith's long-term plan was to attend seminary
and pursue a second career as a minister. Braestrup
took on that dream and went on to become chap-
lain of the Maine Warden Service, helping people
who find themselves in the midst of sudden tragedy
not unlike her own.
The 45-year-old Braestrup shows up at the scene
of drownings, snowmobile crashes and search-and-
rescue efforts for hunters and hikers lost in the
woods, comforting survivors and sometimes the
wardens themselves.
She calls what she does "a ministry of presence."
Or as she writes in her new memoir, "Here If You
Need Me," (Little Brown, $23.99). the job
"requires me mostly to just show up, shut my
mouth and be."
A trim, vivacious woman with curly brown hair
and gray-green eyes, Braestrup said her entry into
the clergy and law enforcement was an outgrowth
of her husband's death. "I didn't ask for the experi-
ence and I wouldn't wish it on anyone, but it hap-
pened and it became something you could turn into
a blessing," she said.
Religion had played little part in Braestrup's life
while growing up in Washington, D C. Her father,
a journalist, was nominally Lutheran but didn't
attend church; her mother was, at most, agnostic.
When she and Griffith were married by a
Methodist minister in the Roman Catholic chapel
at Georgetown University, her alma mater, "it was
the first overtly religious service I actually partici-
pated in."
Two years after her husband's death, Braestrup
entered Bangor Theological Seminary and went on
to be ordained as a Unitarian Universalist minister.
During her studies, she gravitated to law enforce-
ment, riding on patrol with members of various
police agencies as part of an independent study of
the spiritual dimensions of police work.
Instead of landing a police job, Braestrup was
hired six years ago by the warden service. As one
who doesn't hunt or fish, she had only a limited
idea of what wardens did and wondered why they
might need a chaplain.
"I might have asked the same question folks so
often ask of me: What does a warden chaplain do?
Bless the moose?" she wrote.
Braestrup is only the second member of the
Maine Warden Service to hold the post of chaplain.
Wardens are usually first on the scene at drown-
ings, hunting accidents, snowmobile crashes and


* THE Rev. Kate Braestrup poses at her home in Lincolnville, Maine. Braestrup, who works as a
chaplain for the Maine Warden Service, recently published a memoir titled "Here If You Need Me."

(AP Photo: Joel Page)


searches for lost hikers in Maine's vast backcoun-
try, and they had pushed to get a chaplain, she said.
"They said the people at the scene deserve a
higher standard of care than we can give them,"
she recalled. "They created this. I happen to fill it
at the moment, but this is their thing."
Several other states have chaplain programmes,
but Maine and Delaware are among a handful that
have a chaplain on their staff. Some rely on chap-
lains from other agencies, such as state police or
sheriff's departments.
Although she is not a sworn officer and carries
no weapon, Braestrup delights in the uniform she
wears when headed out in the field.
Her green warden service jacket and cap are
embroidered with the word "Chaplain." Under the
high-buttoned collar of her black shirt, she slips a
piece of white vinyl a Roman collar of sorts that
also identifies her as clergy, but that she can easily
pop off when dealing with a non-Christian or some-
one who has had a bad experience with religion.
Although she works full-time, her schedule can
be erratic. There are days when she's summoned by
cell phone and transported by float plane and four-
wheel-drive vehicle to a remote search-and-rescue
site in the North Woods.
Other days may find her providing counseling
and pastoral care to wardens after emotionally
wrenching encounters. The dive team, whose grim
task is to search for bodies that may have lain unre-


covered for weeks or months, is a particular focus
of her work.
"We dive in flood-stage rivers, we dive under the
ice, we dive in cold, dark waters," said Captain Joel
Wilkinson, the team's leader. "Kate provides the
liaison to the family that allows the divers to focus
on the job at hand."
In addition to serving as a buffer for distraught
friends and relatives, Braestrup meets with team
members after they've completed their dives to
talk through the experience and help them deal
with the stress that accompanies their work,
Wilkinson said.
She also does educational work, instructing war-
dens and police about how to perform death notifi-
cations and deal with grieving survivors.
Braestrup's own life, meanwhile, has taken a new
course.
She has remarried and now lives in Lincolnville
with her husband, Simon van der Van, her four
children and his two.
And yes, she did on one occasion bless a moose.
It happened when she was in Presque Isle and
arrived at the scene of one of Maine's all-too-fre-
quent car-moose collisions. The motorist was
unhurt, but the big animal was mortally injured.
At the driver's behest, Braestrup placed her hand
on the moose as it raised its head and then died.
"I said this little prayer, and then I thought, 'Oh
my God, I just did last rites on a moose!'"


-I-I ii I r


c







The Tribune RELIGION


------ ---- ......


Thursday, August 23, 2007 PG 19


Uprising Conference with


'Make It Massive' theme


With our community now flooded
with negative forces, it is especially
important for us to give priority to
an agenda that promotes the build-
ing of youth. In this vein, Bishop VG Clarke and
the Calvary Deliverance Church are constructing a
grand platform for youth, deemed the Uprising
Conference (see some of flyer above) August 29-
31; with the year's theme, "Make It Massive".
This gathering will feature and promote a pre-
mier youth product comprising of local and inter-


national parts. This has become an anticipated
event that is marked by diversity, comedy, urban
dance, cinematic presentations, powerful perform-
ances and a fresh approach to youth ministry.
The spoken word will be delivered by Minister
Riceno Moncur of Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church and Pastor Clifford Smith. Guest
artists will include Isaac Blackman of Trinidad &
Tobago, Christian Massive, DJ Counsellor, Mr
Lynx, Landlord, Simone Beneby, Little Saints in
Praise and many more.


Pre service activity on August 31 will feature
"Charlie the Bahamian Yellow Man", who has
mesmerized and evangelized scores of youth with
his puppet rendition.
The conference will close with our 3rd Annual
Prayer and Praise rally. Praise, prayer and declara-
tion for their success will be the focus as they enter
a new school year.
This event starts August
29-31 at 7:30pm nightly


'1~





-I



A


I'


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PG 20 Thursday, August 23, 2007


RFI I(,UC~hN


The Tribune


Becoming a child of God


* By REV ANGELA C BOSFIELD PALACIOUS

Truly I tell you, unless you change and become
like children, you will never enter the kingdom of
heaven. (Matthew 18: 3)

This is yet another one of those
"upstream" statements to challenge us
to not allow ourselves to "go with the
flow".
All of our lives we dream of being grown-up
enough to do the things we want to do. As chil-
dren, we dream of the day when we will turn our
own key in our own door, be able to jump in a car
and just leave the scene, be free to buy what we
like with our own money and not have to answer
to a soul. Independence, freedom, self-determina-
tion, privacy, authority, adult status, and power
seem light years away when we endure the
"oppression" of adolescence.

People

For some people, religion may be the same kind
of "bondage", enslavement to church services,
Sunday School, moral living, and putting others
first. They can't wait to be able to lie in on a
Sunday morning, play golf or go to the beach all
day, "shack up", sleep around, or just indulge in
whatever is the latest fad. Becoming an adult
means out-growing God, and such childish
dependencies and accountabilities to a family or
faith community.
The message from Our Lord, it is quite clear.
There is freedom without license in dependence
on God, there is blessing in responsible loving and
living, there is no fear where the sustaining grace
of God sets our boundaries. This childlike trust in
the wisdom, presence, provision and protection of
God is the exact opposite to the childish self-indul-


gence, self-centredness, and selfishness of those
who are too immature to see the benefits of spiri-
tual maturity.
It is one thing to be old enough to drive, vote,
marry, conceive, work productively as a team play-
er, and quite another to drive safely, vote intelli-
gently, marry wisely, conceive with planning, par-
ent responsibly, and use one's gift creatively to
build rather than destroy society.

Sacrifice

God's children know how to sacrifice, save,
spend. lend, give and borrow with extreme cau-
tion.
Money is a gift from God, given back generously
to God, with guidance from God in the use of the
remainder.
They know how to speak the truth in love, to
bless rather than curse, to pray with rather than
prey on, to seek to maintain healthy loving rela-
tionships.
Committed and faithful children know how to
confess faults and sins immediately, receive absolu-
tion, feel forgiven, and move on to a life-time of
faithful restitution and reconciliation, wherever
possible.
This call to obedience is perfection in progres-
sion, holiness in human limitation, spiritual har-
vests even where gift are scarce and drought seems
permanent.
What a relief it is, in the final analysis, to not
feel responsible for the successful outcome of all
of our decisions, because obedience may mean
failure in the eyes of the world, as the cross of
Christ seemed to all who viewed the crucifixion. If
pleasing God is more important than impressing
the world, we will know for ourselves how sweet it
is to be changed into one of God's precious chil-
dren.


Living life God's way


FROM page 23

and that's where Jesus comes in.
Many of us are filled with bitterness
and malice and we need to get over
them, that's where Jesus comes in.
In Philippians 4:23; 13-23 it states: I
can do all things through Christ who
strengthen me. We need not take on
the world, leave that to Jesus. When
some people are under stress they
drink or spend money they do not
have, but take a dose of Jesus, he said.

Rev Beckles outlined four princi-
pals that we were to remember.
1. Jesus can change our hearts. If


we believe in the man Jesus we ought
to become like him, not only talk it
but live it. When he said that I was
reminded of what St Thomas Aquinas
wrote years ago, "We must become
what we eat, so if we believe that
Jesus is truly present in the Eucharist,
every time we partake of it we then
become that which we have eaten,
Jesus Christ."
2. Jesus can change the way you
think. Rev Beckles said truth does not
make good stories, we prefer when
someone embellishes an incident or
an event and it becomes more inter-
esting. It is not in church that we
become Christians, it's when we get


up everyday and do the same route
schedule, and not allow others to pro-
voke us, or when we refuse to give in
to our desires, but we let Jesus take
full control of our lives.
3. Jesus will change your desires.
Once we recognize that we were
made to honour Jesus and know that
he is working in us at all times, then
he can change us. If mankind was to
realize that we are here for God's
pleasure and not our own, once we do
that we will bring benefit to God
through serving him.
4. Jesus can empower us. He can
change and strengthen us today.
Being in a religion or a Church does


not make us Christian, being in a
faithful relationship with Jesus does.
He can change our outlook in life, it is
through Him that we are empowered.

It is evident that Life Community
Church is on the right track. The hos-
pitality of the people was remarkable
and the humble disposition of the
pastor was Christ-like. I came from
that service with a number of
thoughts in my mind. Like Pastor
Beckles said if we want to go to heav-
en we must chose our path now. No
one can pray or put you into heaven.
only you can do that by living a life
that is pleasing to Jesus.







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 23, 2007 PG 21


An


'evening of music'


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.* ..


* ALL Saints Steel Pan members are shown during St Matthew's Anglican Church's noon Mass


Norwegian Christians, Muslims adopt declaration

on right to covert between the religions


OSLO, Norway (AP) Two important Christian
and Muslim groups signed a joint declaration yes-
terday supporting the right to convert between reli-
gions without fear of harassment as a basic religious
freedom.
The Church of Norway Council on Ecumenical
and International Relation and the Islamic Council
of Norway, which have met regularly since 1993,
said they believe this is the world's first such joint
declaration by national religious organizations.
"As far as we know, this is the first time that a
church and representative national Muslim organi-


station have jointly acknowledged the right to
covert," said Olav Fykse Tveit, secretary general of
church council. "By issuing this declaration we
hope to contribute to the international process on
this important matter."
Registered
About 85 per cent of Norway's 4.7 million people
are members of the state Lutheran Church of
Norway. There are about 72,000 registered
Muslims.


"We reject and want to work against violence,
discrimination and harassment due to a person
wanting to convert or having converted from one
religion to another." said the declaration, signed by
Tveit and Shoaib M Sutlan, secretary general of the
Islamic Council.
Sultan said conversion between Islam and
Christianity was uncommon in Norway, "but it is
still important to establish this important princi-
ple." Under many interpretations of Sharia, or
strict Islamic law, conversion from Islam is forbid-
den, and can have serious consequences.


RELIGION_


An "Evening of Music" featuring the All
A Saints Anglican Church Steel Pan
Ensemble from Trinidad will be held on
Sunday, August 26, at Spm, at the St
Barnabas Anglican Church, Wulff and Baillou Hill
Roads. Also appearing will be the Anglican Youth
Ensemble, the St Barnabas Concert and Marching
Band, and other local artists.
The event is part of the local celebrations in com-
memoration of the 45th Independence of Trinidad &
Tobago.
The Steel Pan Ensemble is in Nassau for its first
youth pilgrimage, headed by Major Horace
Grannum, pilgrimage coordinator.
"Our Rector, Canon Berkley was very selective in
the destination choice for this first pilgrimage, and
the Bahamas was chosen because of its vibrant youth
ministry, and also because it is part of our Province.
We are here to learn from the young people as well
as to share our skills through pan music. We believe
that the spiritual and social interaction will be a
means of us developing a closer relationship with
God and each other" Major Grannum said.
The 14 member group is comprised of 11 pannists,
and three adults, including Pat Adams, band leader;
Tressa Lawrence, treasurer and Mr Grannum.
Father Enrique McCartney, Anglican youth direc-
tor. said the group is here to engage in a spiritual and
cultural exchange through music and ministry.
"The trip has been in the making for several
months and a number of activities have been planned
to make it a meaningful cultural and spiritual experi-
ence." said Father McCartnev.
Joining Father McCartney on the local planning
committee are Kavylen Jervis, Claudette Aliens.
Tiffany Hall and Canon Neil Roach.
In addition to the concert on Sunday evening, the
group will perform at:
St Matthew's and Holy Cross Anglican Churches,
the Ignishum Youth Conference. August 23 25
Holy Trinity Anglican Church, and at St George's
Anglican Church on Monday, August 27 at 10am
This event is a special concert for the elderly and
residents of Children's Homes.
The group returns to Trinidad on Tuesday. August
28.


I







PG 22 Thursday, August 23, 2007


The Tribune


The flood gates


* By PASTOR MATTHEW
ALLEN

Tourism, the Bahamas' God, and our
pride and joy. Let's do all we can for
tourism because as it's been said by
various leaders of this country,
Governmental, civic and religious: "if America
closes its doors to the Bahamas, we're through."
I often wondered how such a statement could
be made by leaders of a so called Christian
nation. Then one day Father Yahweh showed me
how and why. We pride ourselves in saying that
the Bahamas is a Christian nation and as we
know Christianity is among the leading religions
of the world. Religion and the traditions of men
were and are some of the greatest opposition to
Ycshuixwv Messiah and His teachings.
Neivere in the teachings or savings of
,,i',: otd He ever call His followers
S-: is. t rather He called them disciples:
i,,. ;-e disciples ot I is teacihings.
C, : i,, i. ig difference hCetween a reli-
gio,., eisoil and a disciple. Religious beliefs sa\
that ritsian is a Christ-like person. whereas
thl \\koud of ahnweh says in 11 Corinthians ::17.
77T( c ',,re, if any man be in Christ. It, is a /iew
crt'litire: old things are passed atlwav: holdl. all
thin,,'s are become new.
A i Lie disciple of Yeshuwa doesn't have to try
and be like Him because he knows that the Spirit
of Yeshuwa is already in him. Watch this scenario
and see where you fit in!
If you're a person that needs blood for a life or
death operation, would you want the doctors to
give you something like blood or do you want
real blood? Well, this same principle applies spiri-
tually also. The enemy is not subjected to
Christians because they just want to be like Christ


i;lther than being in Him.
R< hg1ious Christians can only talk about the
power of Yeshuwa's blood whereas disciples oper-
ate and walk in His power. The enemy has swung
this nation once again: the Government and
church leaders are happy as they celebrate and
promote their religious tourism agenda.
Now, let's not forget that tourism is the
Bahamas' God, it's bread and butter. Don't get
mad at me for telling the truth, because you know
that's how it's viewed and promoted. Again, it has
been ignorantly said by the leaders and experts of


this country that "without tourism the Bahamas is
through."
So as a Christian nation we've opened our
doors to religious tourism and at this stage we're
excited about the groups that are coming in and
calling on the name of Jesus the Christ, and that's
good. But what are we going to say to the other
religious tourist groups that are coming to cele-
brate their gods, groups like: the Baha'i Faith,
Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam,
Jainism. Judaism. Shinto. Sikhism, Taoism, Vodun
(Voodoo). Then there is also the Neopagan
Religious Faith groups like: Asatru, Druidism,
Goddess Worship. Wicca. Witchcraft, Scientology.
Satanism: the Church of Satan. Hare Krishna.
Santeria and many more.
These are all religious tourists whom the enemy
has waiting patiently for this opportunity.
Disagree all you want but remember this, the
hardest spirit to drive out is the one you invited
in. This country is ,seeing and reaping the affects
of these Cvery\ same principles even todav as i
speak.
I lave \ou Cever soppeu to consider how is it
that \\ itth the amount of churches \ve have
il:ounelihout the Rahamas. the many conferences
,i::i seminars that are held in these islands and
hec ones we .ltlend abroad, yet the crime and
murder rate continues to increase.
I am the least of the least. at the very bottom of
the barrel, as a matter a fact I'm not even in the
barrel when it comes to being an educated reli-
gious leader in this country: compared to the bish-
ops, apostles. prophets, doctors, etc: and for this I
thank Father Yahweh.
The Greek and Hebrew I might not know as

SEE FLOOD, page 17


THE public is invited "to join
United Faith Ministries International
for its "In Hot Pursuit" Conference
2007, with four prophetic-filled nights
of blessings!
Date: Monday, August 27 -
Thursday, August 30
Time: 7pm nightly
Midday Session @ Thursday,
August-30

Anointed Speakers include:
Apostle Trevor Banks, Florida
Apostle H Daniel Wilson,
Chicago
Dr Rita Twiggs, Texas
Dr Jennifer Deveaux, Bahamas

Venue: Summerwinds Plaza,
Tonique Williams Darling Highway
Interested persons may contact the
church at tel: 328 3737 or e-mail:
ufm@bahamas.net.hs for more infor-
mation.


N* ***

Mt Moriah Baptist Church,
Farrington Road, presents:
"I Have Called You", a teaching
on the church ministry.
Date: Wednesday, September 12
and Thursday, September 13
Time: 7:30pm
Guest Facilitator: Pastor Deanza
Cunningham
There will also be a 'Take'Me
Back'-Concert
Date: Friday, September 14.
In other news from MI Moriah, an
ordination service will be held for
Deacons Godfrev Ellis and Dencil


Kerr
Date: Sunday, September 16
Time: 3:30pm

Bring the whole family for this great
teaching event and then come and
journey back in time and reminisce on
the "good ole days" of the 80s and 90s.
The public, family and friends are also
invited to share in the ordination serv-
ice. For more information interested
persons may contact the church @(
323.2747 or 322.3185.
l'l :k: ;i ,l; :|!

Mount Olive 13aptist Church.
Meadow and Augusta Streets


Sunday Morning Worship: 11am
Sunday Evening Worship: 6pm
Wednesday Mid-Week Worship
7pm
Pastor C B Moss and the members
of Mount Olive welcomes the public to
attend any of these services.


Back to School Parade Church of
God of Prophecy, Shirley Street:
Under the theme, "Stand up for
Jesus, Children Stand Up", the
Church of God of Prophecy, Shirley
Street, in conjunction with the Kemp
Road Urban Renewal Project, will
be hosting a Back to School Parade
and Church Service:
Date: Sunday, August 26
Time: 5pm
Guest Facilitator: Carnetta Ferguson
The parade will leave St Margaret's
Church at 4pm.


nFllzn


IB~bb- ~ ~ I 0018,9111M NWWM 1N --- 1N @_ -Nu fflim~


church notes


R~I IC=IC~N








The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 23, 2007 PG 23


Running the race


* By JAMES MOULTRIE

"I have come to light
a fire on earth. "
(Luke 12:47)

These days we have wit-
nessed a strange but excit-
ing phenomenon: the phe-
nomenon of running.
It is quite common to see ten or
even twenty thousand people taking
part in the New York or Boston
Marathons and other cities around
the world. We have our own
marathon races here which one day
might become famous. Can't you just
see the Bahamas Marathon attracting
runners from around the world? It's
something for the Ministry of
Tourism to consider. Of course there
has been a fitness craze for years now
and people are running for health
reasons all over our country and our
world.
But if you were to run in a
marathon, would you find it easier on
your own or with others?
An athlete who is running alone
before an empty stadium is not likely
to give his/her best. But in a stadium
full of cheering fans, he/she strains
every nerve and every tissue and


every resource beyond his ordinary
capacity. They derive strength from
seeing themselves surrounded by
other runners. But when our focus is
not so much on winning the race of
life but in finishing the race, we see
other "runners" as companions
rather than competitors. We see


other runners as supporters. This
enables us to draw strength from
their example.
What hinders runners in a race'
Any kind of injury or weakness.
Also, lack of motivation can sap our
strength and desire. When we are
motivated we are willing to make
huge sacrifices in practicing hard, get-
ting enough rest, dieting, in effort.
etc. Marathon running is not about
winning. The race is what counts.
Running the marathon is itself the
event. Everybody wins. What maters
is the participation, the engagement.
And by participating, runners are
helping others through their exam-
ple.
But it is not just in running that
people draw strength from compan-
ionship. The author of the letter to
the Hebrews exhorts his readers to
persevere in their faith journey,
regardless of the cost. He says that
they should draw strength from the,
great cloud of witnesses" who have
gone on before them, (Hebrews 12:1-
2). He is referring to the saints of the
Old Testament who have run the race
before them.
Christians are conscious of being
part of a holy chain of witnesses
which stretches back to the Apostles.


In the struggle to be faithful, they
have always turned to the inspiring
examples of prophets, witnesses and
saints. We draw hope and courage
from the heroes of the faith, who
remained faithful in spite of the fact
that they did not see the promised
fulfilled in their lifetimes. And, like
marathon runners today, we experi-
ence weariness, fatigue, and a sense
of failure and futility, but we say,
"Don't give up".
As we run the race of life and faith
we would do well to recall that it is on
Jesus that we must keep our eyes. His
faithfulness brought Him to the cross,
and after that to glory. He is an exam-
ple greater than the entire cloud of
witnesses of the Old and the New
Testaments. The message is clear:
Like our Master Jesus. we Christians
must be ready to struggle against the
obstacles on the road to eternal life
with God. It is not a solitary struggle,
but one we can make together. We
are running together in the greatest
race of all.
What race are you on? A race to be
great, to be rich, to be popular? Or
are you on the marathon of life on
the road to eternal life? Be careful
which race you choose, for each has
consequences.


Living life God's way


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

THIS past week I had the privilege of attending
Sunday morning service at Life Community
Church in Freeport Grand Bahama. The Lutheran
Church might have been around for hundreds of
years, but this one was extremely contemporary
both in its structure, style of music and worship.
The sanctuary was simple yet spoke of holiness,
music was charismatic yet devotional.
The pastor, Rev Cedric Beckles, is obviously a
man well read and well bred. He wore not clerical
robes, yet demanded respect. His message was sim-
ple, yet it invited you into deep contemplation. His
method was one where he taught, instead of
preached, yet there was not doubt that God was
speaking through him. He thanked the officers and
members of the Free National Movement, who
were worshipping with them. He admonished them
to always be mindful that they are servants of the
people, and not the other way around.
Governments are established by God and are
answerable to Him. There is a need for all elected


and appointed politicians to truthfully display the
qualities of integrity and honesty.
The first statement he made caught us all by sur-
prise: "we do not see the relevance of .lesus in our
world today". He stated that many people were
more comfortable with the historical and ancient
Jesus instead of Jesus the Christ. He made a conm-
parison to what was going on in the US, about
defective toys and toothpaste which were being
recalled. There was a flaw in the product, so that
was dealt with, just like there was a flaw with man
who fell in the garden and God had to deal with
him. God decided not to recall us, instead he sent
his only son Jesus, to redeem mankind.
Mankind was placed on this earth for the pur-
pose of pleasing God, so his son Jesus would watch
over them. Jesus does not guarantee that all will be
smooth sailing all the time, but Jesus does save us
from a life of heart aches. Pastor Heckles noted the
fact that both Governments. past and present,
asked for the Church's help. The ancient word must
change us, he said, it is the Church not the
Government who has the medicine to change


man's life. and that is Jesus. He is the only one who
can change human hearts: he is the one who can
free us from addictions.
It was interesting how Pastor Beckles compared
having Jesus in one's life to having a limp. The
character on House, the television show, walks with
a limp, he said. "I wonder how many times while
they are producing the show, the director has to
shout 'cut, you did not walk with your limp'." The
congregation chuckled at these comments.
Rev Beckles said further that once you have a
permanent limp, whether through a birth defect or
some accident, you do not get rid of it. So it is for
the Christian who has Jesus, he is always with you.
He chided parents, about the examples there
were giving their children. You cannot have chil-
dren obeying and observing the Christian princi-
ples if the parents themselves are not. The chal-
lenges of this world are strong: we need to find
someone stronger than we are to overcome them

SEE page 20


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'Thou shalt pay the pastor!'


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

When it comes to scruti-
nizing today's pastors,
reverends, ministers
and priests one of the
ongoing arguments continues to be
whether or not the holder of that
office should be rich. Should the
good reverend be strutting around in
a $600 suit? And is there really a
need for them to be driving around
the city in an S-class Mercedes-Benz
when a Toyota Yaris would do just
as well? And what about those lav-
ish homes, some even financed on
church salaries? The affluence seems
very unnecessary in many cases.
But is it wrong?
Terence Pinder. youth pastor at
Calvary Bible Church. Collins
Avenue, said there is nothing wrong
with a pastor having wealth from the
church. Quoting Galatians 6:6, which
admonishes those who receive
instruction in the Word to share of
all good things (money too) with the
one who instructs him, and I
Timothy 5:17-18, which says that the
elders who rule well should be
counted worthy of double honour,
especially they who labour in the
word and doctrine, Pastor Pinder
noted that the Bible itself teaches
that pastors and teachers should be
taken care of by their flock.
There is further evidence even in
the Old Testament to support this
position. In Israel not only the
priests, but also the Levites were to
be supported through a system of
tithes, some given in the form of
produce, some in the form of curren-
cy. The priests also received a por-
tion of most of the offerings that
were made to the Lord. (See espe-
cially Leviticus 5:13; 7:6-10; Numbers
18:20-32; Deuteronomy 4:22-29; and
Amos 4:14).
Then in I Corinthians 9:1-14, Paul
vigorously defends this right in great


"Should the good
reverend be strutting
around in a $600 suit?
And is there really a need
for them to be driving
around the city in an S-
class Mercedes-Benz when
a Toyota Yaris would do just
as well? And what about
those lavish homes..."
Petura Burrouws


detail. Although he personally chose
not to make use of it from the
Corinthians (and worked also him-
self in support of his ministry), he
did obtain financial support for that
ministry from others as well, most
notable the Philippians. Paul
applauds their godly efforts in
Philippians 4:14-19, and notes that
such things are well-pleasing to God.
So based on biblical days, support-
ing the pastor financially is really
nothing new. But the danger occurs
when pastors begin to see the min-
istry as a means to make money.
"The problem comes in when pas-
tors are in it to make money...There
are times when pastors sees how
other pastors are benefiting finan-
cially from their churches, then there
comes this jealousy or pride that
they want the same things. And they
encourage Iheir members to give
more money so that they canll
achieve the same things the other
pastor has," Pastor Pinder explained.
Calvary Bible church h pays Pastor
Pinder a set salary which is deter-
mined by the board of Deacons.
This structure seems reasonable
since, in my opinion, Pastor Pinder
approaches his position like an actu-


al job and is available to members of
the church on a regular basis. His
office hours, from 8:45am 4:45pm.
are adhered to. and his cellphone is
available for people to reach him
within those hours.
It makes sense then, that the
priests and Ilevites in the Old
Testament whose entire lives were
dedicated to serving (od directly,
could be given 2ifts. It is understand-
able then, \\hy Timothy 5. \would
say that t lhe elders who ruled well
should be counted worthy of double
honour. especially they who labour
in the word and doctrine. But what
about those pastors and teachers
who are being paid handsome
salaries vet are not available to the
needs of their members, and simply
only wear the title of pastor without
the actual work of the pastor being
done?
When it comes to a pastor's priori-
ties, Pastor Pinder believes that
many past's get so caught up inl
being busy or working on their next
project that thev forget to be avail-
able to their congregation. While it
is good to do things within the com-
munity, and internationally. Pastor
Pinder noted that if the pastor is
neglecting his own church members,
then he should check his priorities.
While he personally doesn't feel
pressured to live up to any particular
image of whal a pastor should be in
terms of how he should dress. or
what type of car he should drive.
Pastor Pinder does believe that such
pressures do exisl in the Bahamian
community, leading many pastors to
believe 1hal they must live up to a
particular image.
I1 nfk'ortuinaelyc, by pastors feeling
the need to fit :i particular mold,
there is no example heing set for
younger ministers in thlie Christian
faith.
For one recently ordained minis-
ter. who asked not to be named, pas-
tors do not need to feel as if they
must have great wealth, or look the


part of some international, televan-
gelist preacher.
Referring to the life of Paul.
hailed as one of the most profound
evangelist in his day., the minister
noted that Paul was a humble man
who knew what it was like to be
both rich and poor. Paul said. I know
what it is to be in need, an1d I know
what it is to have plenIt, I have
lctirnlii thie v scret of beinl conttent in
i/iny at tid eveI' stilnatioln, whether well
/'fd or hungry. whether living, in plen-
ty or in want (Philippians 4:12).
Paul expected either extreme but
saw neither \wealth nor poverty as
crucial to his well-being.
From his observations though. this
young minister has concluded that
many popular pastors. even some
who are not very popular, do not
haxe Paul's attitude concerning
wealth. These leaders have a twisted
perception of what it means to be a
pastor as it relates to wealth.
"A lot of them feel like they have
to live up to the image of a pastor.
They have to drive the big
[Mercedes] Benz. They believe they
have to live to a certain standard in
order to be viable as a pastor. If they
don't look the part, they believe that
they are not living the prosperous
life," lie explained.
However flamboyant or modest a
pastor chooses to be, it may serve
him/her well to consider that wealth
can be a major obstacle. There's no
wonder Jesus himself warned. Wuaich
out! He on your guard against all
kinds 'f greed; a man's life does #not
consist in the abundance of his pos-
sessions. (Luke 12:15)
There's also no wonder that Paul
would tell Timothy. For the love of
imonei is a root f :al kinds o"f eiil. (1
Timothy 6: 10). or continue in this
warning: Coiniuind those who are
rich in this present world not to be
arrTogalit nior to put their hope in
wealth, which is so uncertain, but to
put their hope in God. (1 Timothy
6:17)


4.<)


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