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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02962
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 8/9/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02962
System ID: UF00084249:02962

Full Text






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The


Tribune


Life. Money. Balance both:


Volume: 103


.THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


PRICE 75c


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S ,r ...i


Police rualityc' ChPees o come


.Officers face court


over alleged beating


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
TWO officers are set to be
charged in connection with an
alleged case of police brutality
involving 27-year-old Desmond
Key, a New Providence man,
now described as "brain dead"
by his family as a result of the
attack.
This comes after the police
Complaints and Corruption
Unit completed its initial inves-
tigation into the incident last
week, handing the case over to
the Central Detective Unit to
TG Glover
school gets
clearance for
construction
to be resumed
By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Chief Medical Officer
has given clearance for con-
struction of the T G Glover
school where work was halt-
ed in early May after workers
fell ill to be resumed,
according to sources.
It has been determined that
sickness amongst employees
from construction company E
R Hanna ranging from stom-
ach cramps to rashes which
prompted the company's oper-
ation's manager to ask govern-
ment to halt construction and
investigate the future school
site, was due to "dust and


SEE page 12


determine if any charges should
be brought.
Mr Key was allegedly beat-
en in a police cell at the Grove
Station after he was picked up
by police for a "traffic obstruc-
tion" in early June. Once in the
cell, according to his grand-
mother, Verona Bastian, he was
allegedly beaten with a baseball
bat.
When The Tribune visited Mr
Key at Princess Margaret Hos-
pital's intensive care unit last
SEE page 12









A SPANISH Wells fish-
erman was killed yesterday
when he was run over by a
Florida registered speed
boat.
Brud Pinder, in his fifties,
was out fishing about 20
miles from the Northwest
Light when a 30-foot Scarab,
the "Intrepid", ran over his
small vessel. The accident
happened about 10.30am. It
is reported that the Scarab
was powered by four 250hp
engines.
The US Coast Guard was
called and picked up the
injured man, flying him to
Nassau. He reportedly died
SEE page 12


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* HAITIAN national
Juslin Barochin finally
makes it to the front of
the long line yesterday
at CR Walker.
(Photo: Felipe Major/
Tribune staff)
* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
THE first day of the
Ministry of Immigration's
audit scheme attracted
dozens of people seeking
a final decision on appli-
cations submitted for per-
manent residency and citi-
zenship.
Amidst media reports
that the audit held at the C
R Walker High School
may have been a .thinly
veiled attempt by the gov-
ernment to detain and
repatriate illegal immi-
grants, many applicants
gathered at the school
grounds and quietly waited
to be processed by immi-
gration employees.
"The persons who have
come this morning have
not expressed that fear (of
deportation)," Minister of
State for Immigration,
Elma Campbell, told The
Tribune yesterday.
"We have had a con-
stant flow all morning
(and) we are happy to see
that persons have over-
come as it were, this per-
ceived fear. We have no
SEE page eight


Ministries on track to Paul McWeeney
won't be terminated
complete school airs as Bank of Bahamas
IN by ALISON LOWE o managing director
Tribune Staff Reporter


THE ministries of Works and
Education are on track to com-
plete all scheduled school
repairs in time for the August
25 return of teachers to public
schools, Minister of Works Earl
Deveaux said yesterday.
However, he admitted that
his ministry was forced to
"aggressively intervene" last
week after it became clear that
three schools, including Gov-
SEE page 12 0 MINISTER of
Works Earl Deveaux

Ellison Greenslade

returns luxury gift items


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
SHORTLY following discus-
sions with the Commissioner of
Police, Senior Assistant Com-
missioner Ellison Greenslade
returned the luxury items pre-
sented to him earlier this year as
tokens of appreciation for his
services. The gifts, which
include a jeep and two Rolex
watches, will be auctioned and


-- " ,' I '
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t.


the proceeds donated to vari-
ous charities.
This decision was the result
of public concerns about Mr
Greenslade's acceptance of the
gifts, which included a new 2007
Jeep Durango, two Rolex
watches, and two cellular
phones.
Reportedly. most of the items
were donations from corporate
SEE page 12


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
BANK of Bahamas chairman
Maitland Cates dispelled con-
cerns yesterday that Paul
McWeeney would be terminat-
ed as the bank's managing
director.
Reports of Mr McWeeney's
termination were circulated in a
bi-weekly paper early last week
causing alarm amongst share-
holders who have enjoyed sub-
stantial returns on their invest-
ment in the bank under Mr
McWeeney's stewardship.
The move, touted as a "polit-
ical witch hunt", claimed that
Mr McWeeney was being
moved because of his possible
"political affiliation". This tactic,
it was claimed, was seen by
many investors as government
attempting to dabble in the day-
to-day operations of the pub-
licly traded company an idea
that undoubtedly surprised, if
not shocked many investors.
While the Bahamas govern-
ment is the major shareholder,
many other investors in the
SEE page 12


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2 THURSDAYAUGUST 9, 2007


LOA NW


It has been nine months since police were asked to investigate allegations

of corruption at the Ministry of Housing. Now a respected ex-policeman has

condemned the force's lack of results and given his advice for success





Former senior officer slams



police housing investigation


POLICE have come under
fire from one of their own for-
mer senior officers for the way
they have conducted inquiries
into the alleged housing scan-
dal.
Retired assistant commis-
sioner Paul Thompson has
rejected police claims that they
are unable to carry on inquiries
because no-one has come for-
ward with information.
Yesterday, Mr Thompson
told The Tribune: "Police do
not wait for information to
come to them. They go out and
find it."
Now he has written to Com-
missioner Paul Farqhuarson


outlining the approach he
believes officers should have
made'in bringing allegedly cor-
rupt housing ministry employ-
ees to justice.
And he has sent copies to
both Minister of National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest and
Senior Assistant Commission-
er Ellison Greenslade.
Mr Thompson has told Mr
Farqhuarson that the investiga-
tion could still be properly con-
cluded if his suggestions are
implemented.
He added: "It is my opinion
that such methods of investiga-
tion would have exposed (the
housing employees in question)


as being corrupt or grossly neg-
ligent in performing their duties.
"If the latter was proven, they
could have been relieved of
their duties by the ministry."
Police inquiries began into
the Ministry of Housing after
The Tribune allegations by con-
tractors that government
employees were engaged in cor-
rupt practices at the expense of
poor home-buyers.
Shoddy workmanship, illicit
pay-offs and rampant
favouritism were among accu-
sations lodged against certain
contractors and officials.
Police were called in by PLP
Minister of Housing Neville
Wisdom, but their investigations
were said to have stalled
because of lack of evidence.
However, Mr Thompson has
told Mr Farqhuarson that the
investigation should have been
conducted differently, with
detailed examinations of all
homes affected by the scandal,
and interviews with all ministry
employees and contractors
under suspicion.
"Firstly, the investigators
should have visited all of the
houses, of which complaints
were received, either by the
ministry or the local media," he
told the commissioner.
"Other house owners with
complaints of defects in their
houses should have been
encouraged to come forward.
All of these persons should
have been interviewed and
appropriate statements record-
ed with all of the necessary
statements relating to payments
etc for acquiring the houses.
"Secondly, police photogra-
phers should have pho-
tographed all of the defects in


* PAUL Thompson


each of the houses of which
complaints were made.
"Thirdly, inquiries should
have been made for informa-
tion about the (the ministry offi-
cials) who were responsible for
the scrutiny of the work done at
each house and the eventual
taking over of the houses as
completed and the subsequent
handing over of the houses to
the owners.
"Fourthly, the contractors
responsible for building the
defective houses should have
been identified."
Mr Thompson believes con-
tractors and ministry employ-
ees should then have been
made to confront each other in
the presence of investigators.
"Having obtained all of the
above information the (ministry
employees) should have been
interrogated and shown the pic-
tures of the defects," he said.
"During the interrogation,
detectives would be in search
of evidence of gross neglect in


5 PAUL Farquharson


performing their duties and
responsibilities and any evi-
dence to suggest bribery and
corruption involving the con-
tractors.
"At some stage of the inter-
rogation, detectives may have
found it expedient to confront
the (employees) and contrac-
tors for joint questioning."
Contractors who contacted
The Tribune with information
said corruption became wide-
spread in the ministry during
former Immigration Minister
Shane Gibson's time in charge.
Though the minister himself
was not implicated, he was
blamed for presiding over a
ministry in which kickbacks and
bribery were allegedly rife.
Several owners of new low-
cost homes complained of poor
workmanship, including leak-
ing roofs and ill-fitting doors.
The Tribune was unable to
reach Mr Turnquest or Mr
Greenslade for comment yes-
terday afternoon.


OIn brief

Two end up

in hospital
following
shootings

TWO persons are in hos-
pital after shootings
overnight.
Around 3.35pm on
Wednesday evening, there
was a shooting at Key West
Street. The victim, who has
been identified as 21-year-old
Francisco Hanna, was injured
in the groin.
According to Chief Super-
intendent of Police Hulan
Hanna, he was attempting to
leave his home around
3.15pm when he was accosted
by a male who was known to
him.
He then engaged in a ver-
bal altercation with the man,
which reportedly resulted in
the man producing a gun and
opening fire.
"Mr Hanna was struck in
the groin area, and he is
presently at the Princess
Margaret Hospital where he
is detained in stable condi-
tion. The police are following
significant leads in this par-
ticular matter," CSP Hanna
said.
A second shooting
occurred around lam yester-
day.
Police were reportedly
informed of a an incident on
Charles Saunders Highway
by a motorist who witnessed
a tall dark man standing on
the side of the road firing a
handgun at a black Maxima.
Through "good police
work" Mr Hanna said, police
were able to find the vehicle
at Taylor Street in Nassau
Village.
Within the vehicle, the offi-
cers reported discovering 34-
year-old Garell Moss, aka
Garell Morris.
"He was found with gun-
shot injuries to his left
elbow, both thighs, and his
back. He was taken to the
Princess Margaret Hospital
where his condition is listed
as serious and possibly life
threatening. Investigations
are continuing in this mat-
ter," he said.


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THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ OA TRNEWHUSSAGUT9 00,PG


o In brief

American

fishermen

arrested at

Grand Cay
TWO Americans fishing in
the Bahamas were arrested and
taken into custody in connec-
tion with the alleged discovery
of a quantity of cra fish exceed-
ing the limit allowed for one
vessel.
Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming said at about around
6.45pm on Monday, a Northern
Bahamas Fisheries Inspector
along with Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officers were on
routine marine patrol when
they made the discovery off
Grand Cay, Abaco.
The officers reported that
the catch exceeded the legal
limit by 13 crawfish.
As a result, the men ages
58 and 31 from Fort Pierce,
Florida were charged by the
police with breach of the fish-
eries resources regulations and
released on bail in the amount
of $3,000 cash each.
They are expected to appear
at the Cooper's Town Magis-
trate's Court on Friday, August
10, at 10am.

Couple

accused of

marijuana

possession

A HUSBAND and wife from
Freeport were arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday on
a marijuana possession charge.
Sweyn Martin Campbell, 37,
along with Miciel Campbell, 35,
were arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel at court
eight in Bank Lane yesterday.
It was alleged that on Sun-
day, August 5, the two were
found in possession of a quan-
tity of marijuana which author r-
ities believed they intended to
Supply to another.
u According to the prosecution,
kJ it is alleged that the couple were
found in possession of 94
pounds of marijuana.
Both of the accused pleaded
not guilty to the charges and
were granted bail in the sum of
$50,000 with two sureties and
ordered to surrender their trav-
el documents.

Caribbean
urged to find
new sources
of energy
GUYANA
Georgetown
CARIBBEAN governments
should invest more in alterna-
tive sources of energy to help
them endure rising oil prices
and slumping export prices for
sugar, bananas, and rice, experts
said Monday at a regional con-
ference, according to Associated
Press.
"If we continue to import at
increasing prices and export at
reduced prices, we face eco-
nomic disaster," said Chelston
Brathwaite, director general of
the Inter-American Institute for
Cooperation in Agriculture in
Costa Rica.
The two-day gathering in
Guyana was organised by the
Inter-American Development
Bank, the Organization of
American States and other
agencies to encourage a region-
al policy on alternative energy.
About 93 per cent of the
energy consumed in the
Caribbean comes from import-
ed fossil fuels, said Edwin Car-
rington, secretary general of the
Caribbean Community trade
bloc. Power bills in the region
can be three times higher than
those in the US.
Carrington encouraged more
emphasis on wind, solar and
other alternative sources of
energy in addition to a recent
trend toward agro-fuels.


Share


your

news
Call us on 322-1986 and
share your. story.


TOICAL

iXERI".OR
FOIES ROLM


Whitney Bastian still tight-lipped



regarding his political future


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
DESPITE saying on July 27
that he would make an
announcement about his polit-
ical future by the end of that
month, former independent
MP for South Andros Whitney
Bastian is still not willing to
state his intentions either way.
However, yesterday Mr Bas-
tian did say that within the next
two weeks he would likely con-
tact the press about the mat-
ter. He explained that before
he makes any comments, he
has to make some further trips
to his former constituency -
one of which will be this week-
end.
Previously, Mr Bastian told
The Tribune that while he had
over 100 people already signed
up to follow him in whichever
political direction he chooses,
he was waiting "until I get
more than at least the persons
that supported me, and maybe
a little bit more."
This followed shortly after
Mr Bastian responded to
queries as to whether hlie was
set to alion himself with the
FNM as had been claimed in
some news reports- with the
words: "I will not deny tht "
Some might say his stae-
ments quite unambiguously
laid out the likely direction of
his move, should it occur. as
he also denied that the
organ3isation which he may be
aligning himself with could be
the PLP, saying: "I1 can't join
no PLP. I don't have no friends


in the PLP."
Mr Bastian used to be a
member of that party, but lost
the party's nomination for the
South Andros seat by a vote


of 15 to six at the Candidate
Selection Committee in 2000.
According to the former
independent who was top-
pled by PLP's Picewell Forbes


0 WHITNEY Bastian


in the May 2 election, winning
578 votes to Forbes' 1018, and
FNM candidate Marjorie John-
son's 473 when he does make
his announcement, he will be
accompanied by about 600
members of the South Andros
community who will align them-
selves with the political organi-
sation he joins.


If those who supported Mr
Bastian in the 2007 election did
follow him to the FNM, and the
FNM's support remains con-
stant, it is noted that the party
would have a slight edge in the
South Andros seat as Mr Bast-
ian and Ms Johnson's combined
support adds up to 1051 votes.


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
A FRENCH-Canadian man
was sentenced to four years in
prison yesterday after admit-
ting that he captained a vessel
which contained what local
authorities estimated was $2.5
million worth of cocaine.
Jean Pierre Gagnon, 61, of
Quebec, Canada, changed his
plea yesterday after initially
claiming to be not guilty to the
charges of possession of
cocaine with the intent to sup-
ply and importation of cocaine.
Gagnon, along with Jean
Claude Guindon, 57, who was
discharged and ordered to be
deported yesterday, were
arraigned on drug charges last
month at which time both
men had pleaded not guilty to
the charges against them.
Both men were arrested
onboard a 42 foot vessel off
Eleuthera on Friday. June 29
after local authorities discov-
ered 226 packages containing
508 pounds of cocaine in the
cabin of the boat named
Norois.
Aided by an interpreter,
both men had the drug charges
read to them again. There was
some confusion at first as to
why Gagnon had decided to


plead guilty to the charges.
Gagnpon, who speaks English,
told the court that he knew the
drugs were on the boat a day
before police made the discov-
ery. He claimed that while in'
the Dominican Republic, the
owner of the boat had asked
him to sail the vessel to Halifax,
Canada where a boat broker
was supposed to collect it.
Gagnon said that he did not
know that the drugs was
onboard the vessel when he
left the Dominican Republic
and had no intention of stop-
ping in the Bahamas although
he was forced to when the ves-
sel broke down.
Gagnon's attorney QC Hen-
ry Bostwick asked Magistrate
Carolita Bethel not to impose
the maximum sentence on his
client while taking into consid-
eration the fact that he had
pleaded guilty and had not
wasted the court's lime.
Mr Bostwick told the court
that the owner of the boat
could not be reached and that
the* owner had made no
attempts to inquire about his
property.
He said that Gangon was a
retired civil sen ant, originally
froin Canada, having served as
a cabinet assistant and had also


been a lecturer in geography
at a university there.
He said that Gagnon had
moved to the Dominican
Republic in 2004 and, being
adventurous, had been induced
by the owner of the boat to sail
from the Dominican Republic
to Canada.
Mr Bostwick told the court
that the entire ordeal has been
traumatic for Gagnon.
Magistrate Bethel took into
consideration the fact that
Gagnon had pleaded guilty to
the charges before the com-
mencement of a trial, as well as
the circumstances indicated by
his attorney, but also noted the
significant quantity of drugs
which could far exceed the
local estimate of $2.5 million
in Canada.
Magistrate Bethel sentenced
Gagnon to four years in prison
on the charge of possession of
dangerous drugs to supply, tak-
ing into consideration the sec-
ond count of importation of
dangerous drugs.
The prosecution offered no
evidence against Gagnon on
the two drug conspiracy
charges against him nor the
four charges against Guindon
who 'was discharged and
ordered to be deported.


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Bayparl Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:pritcharddesigngroup@coralwave.com


Man who captained drugs


vessel jailed for four years


I


EFFETIV AUGST 0TH,200


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


E1I ** --n" i6O I O ITOR


A FEW WEEKS ago a friend greeted us with
the remark: "You know I weep for Inagua."
She was referring to the lack of cooperation
Morton Salt company, which employs 60 per
cent of the island's workforce, seemed to be
getting from the union and a staff apparently
unwilling to cooperate with the company when
production stopped because unprecedented
rains closed its salt pans. Unable to provide
work, some staff had to be laid off temporarily.
She was also thinking of another time, and
another place when Bahamians, not appreciat-
ing their good fortune, turned on their sole
provider, sided with an "incompetent and waste-
ful" government, and assisted in the destruction
of their only source of income. For the past 20
jobless years the people of Alice Town,
Eleuthera have lamented their folly. Hatchet
Bay, hailed by the late Sir Lynden Pindling, as
"the greatest success story in the agricultural his-
tory of the Bahamas," failed in the hands ol
incompetent politicians who made it difficult
for its foreign owners to continue its operation.
In 1991, then Opposition Leader Hubert Ingra-
ham accused the PLP government in the House
of having murdered the once prosperous Hatch-
et Bay Farms "in cold blood and in broad day-
light."
At Inagua Morton Salt provides everything
for its residents brings all their supplies into
Mathew Town on its vessels and gives employ-
ment to most of its residents. At one time it
provided the island's potable water, which it has
handed over to the Bahamas government, and
is now negotiating with government to take
over the power supply, which it still provides for
the island. Morton Salt is gradually trying to
divest itself of some of its onerous responsibil-
ities to residents.
And, although it has now reached an indus-
trial agreement with the union on behalf of its
staff, the negotiations have not been easy. The
main issue keeping the two sides apart has been
productivity-related pay. The talks, said Glen
Bannister, managing director of Morton Salt's
Inagua operation, "probably shows the need
for more and better cooperation between the
union and management. We need to cooperate
more than in the past to get through difficult
periods like this."
He was referring to the unprecedented rain
and general weather conditions that closed the
salt pans, necessitating temporary staff lay-offs.
From March 13 to keep the staff employed
Morton transferred them all to maintenance
work. When maintenance had been completed,
supervisors found it difficult to find work for
them. The company's only option was tempo-
rary lay-offs. Morton encouraged employees to
take their annual vacations during this period,
"and offered to finance this by advancing a loan


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against accrued vacation pay. The staff grum-
bled. Some declined to accommodate the com-
pany.
Mr Bannister, pointing out that costs in salt
producing nations like Mexico and Chile, were
much lower than the Bahamas and production
much higher, said it was important for Morton
Salt to "contain the loss and encourage pro-
ductivity" to maintain its long-term presence
in Inagua. In an interview with The Tribune's
business editor, Mr Bannister hinted that the rel-
atively high labour costs and general operat-
ing cost environment in the Bahamas has
adversely affected Inagua's attractiveness as a
salt production location.
He said that Morton's costs were "three
times what they would normally be because of
the lack of salt production and keeping every-
body on."
-As long as we're productive and able to
compete in the global marketplace, you'll always
have salt production here," Mr Bannister said.
"Inagua is one of the few places in the world
where you can make large quantities of salt."
However, what Inaguans must remember is
that it is not the only place in the world. For
example, Mexico, where labour is much cheap-
er than the Bahamas, five million tonnes of salt
are produced in a year with the capacity to
increase to seven million- compared to
Inagua's annual production of 1.2 million
tonnes.
Mr Bannister pointed out the need for the
island's economy to be diversified so that
Inaguans will not be so dependent on Morton
for their employment and income.
The reason our friend was weeping for
Inagua was because Inaguans do not seem to
understand that unless their attitudes and work
ethic changes, the day could come when Morton
Salt will cut its ties with the island. "What they
don't understand," she said, "to them Morton
seems a large, multi-million dollar company.
But when considered in its global network those
millions might be only one per cent of its over-
all earnings." If that were the case, she rea--
soned, the company could cut off that one per-
cent, make it up somewhere else and never
look back at Inagua.
If Inaguans want a secure future, not only will
they diversify, but they should make every effort
to retain the provider of their "daily bread and
butter". Just look at the suffering of the people
of Alice Town when Hatchet Bay collapsed.
Also look at the misery suffered.at the closing of
the Royal Oasis. Don't forget that before a hur-
ricane damaged the hotel, the union gave the
company so much grief that after the hurricane
there was no incentive to reopen. Alice Town
still suffers, so does Freeport. Is Inagua the
next in line?


'Ingraham is in,





National Heal th





Insurance is out'


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUSJIURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCII, Publisher'/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(H[on.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


Morton Salt and future of Inagua


ance coverage; and those who
needed the comprehensive
protection of the National
Insurance plan will have to go
back to cookouts and begging
for donations to help pay their
medical bills when serious and
catastrophic illness hits mem-
bers of their family.
Now cast your minds back
to the introduction of Nation-
al Insurance in The Bahamas.
Do you remember the orches-
trated uproar against National
Insurance that was led by the
same elements who now so
determinedly oppose the
National Health Insurance
Plan which is proposed for
The Bahamas.
Now the National Insurance
Scheme has proven itself.
Bahamian history has shown
how badly that excellent provi-
sion for retirement benefits
and social welfare assistance
was needed in The Bahamas.
Time and the requirements
of the need for modern social
upgrades involved in the
growth of our nation will
prove wrong the present
detractors of the National
Health Insurance Plan. The
same forces which ensured the
triumnphal introduction and
success of the National Insur-
ance Plan years ago: that same
force, now greatly augmented
by population growth, will in


time ensure the successful
introduction in the Common-
wealth of The Bahamas of the
National Health Insurance
Scheme, which is so badly
needed in our country.
Consider these self-interest
groups as 'they stand shouting
on the beachhead of history,
posturing and gesturing in
their futile attempts to turn
back the relentlessly incoming
tide of the growing demand
for comprehensive modern
medical care for our people.
Let those who have the
commendable vision of state-
of-the-art medical care for our
people press on. Like Nation-
al Insurance before it, Nation-
al Health Insurance will come
to the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas because it is right
and today's circumstances
demand it.
The feckless souls who stand
at the beachhead of history
cannot stem or turn back the
incoming tide which relentless-
ly will .roll National Health
Insurance shoreward to our
Bahamas.
The age in which we live
demands it as a companion
measure to complement the
success of the National Insur-
ance Scheme which preceded
it and provided such an effec-
tive safety net for so many
Balhamians.

MR DORAL WEECH
Freeport,
Grand Bahama,
June 5, 2007.


EDITOR, The Tribune.
THE Bahamian people have
done it to themselves again,
Hubert Ingraham is in.
National Health Insurance is
out. When will we learn?
We knew, long before the
general elections of May 2,
2007, that a vote for Ingraham
and the FNM would be a vote
against the full implementa-
tion of a comprehensive;
National Health Insurance
scheme; yet we went to the
polls and elected Ingraham.
What will it take for us to
learn the fundamentals of life'?
This election may have set
us back 10 years with respect
to our health improvement.
"What we fail to realise is
that when we are out on the
streets trying to peddle $10
steak-out tickets to raise mon-
ey to pay doctors and hospital
and other medical bills.
Hubert, Brent and the others
- who don't need organised
medical assistance will be
somewhere relaxing and cool-
ing out; while you are burning
your heads, cooking steaks,
trying to save your mother's.
father's or children's lives.
From Day One when the
PLP brought the National
Health Insurance proposal leg-
islation the House of Assem-
bly, the FNM was against it.
Why were they against such
a fundamental and vital piece
of legislation?
Because all the insurance
companies were against it.
Because all of the descen-
dants of the former Bay Street
Boys and big business were
against it.
And because most of the
private doctors were against
it!
Now, ask yourself this one
question...Why would these
groupings be against this
health insurance plan which
will save many, many Bahami-
an lives'?
Because they are greedy and
care less whether you live or
die as long as they can
make and save money.
But why would Ingrahamn
and the FNM be against it vou
may ask'?
Well, these are the people
who give the FNM the cam-
paign money to vote Ingraham
back into office.
Now he will reward them by
throwing the PLP's Health
Insurance Plan in the garbage.
Hubert Ingraham and his
family don't need a National
Health Insurance Plan: he
probably has his private insur-
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Elections are over

EDITOR, The Tribune.
1 THANK you for granting me space to publish the follow-
ing:
ELECTIONS. ARE OVER!
E Everybody wants to win
L Living wishes bear no sin
E Even if you win or lose
C Cherish willows without blues
T Take the sweet or bitter bill
I Iron matters out don't kill
O Often tempers rear with flair
N Naughty minds should cease the smear
S Symbolic tantrums helped decide.
A And we know who lost and won
R Relish what has been achieved
E Exit wars and enter peace.
O Options yes, but no platoons
V Voice despair, but make no war
E Even if your wish is gone
R Record some sounds of axylophone.
Hallucinations should now cease (RIP).
Happy post mortem to one and all.
THIS IS MY PLEA

HUBERT T. SANDS
Nassau.
May 31, 2007.





LA CASITA
Ihe A rt of Island Living






'5*













I I I


liltdr !


I


1








VHE RIBUE THRSDA, AUUST 207, PGE


LOA6 NW


0 In brief

US Coast Guard


BGCSE results released to


fingerprints,
photographs

nterceptedsat schools, but not yet to media
sea as deterrent y


* SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

THE IU.S. Coast Guard
said Tuesday it has pho-
tographed and fingerprinted
more than 1,000 people inter-
cepted at sea in the past nine
months between the Domini-
can Republic ;and Puerto
Rico, in a bid to deter
migrants fiom attempting
dangerous sea voyages,
accoi ding lto) Asociated Press.
I thousands of Dominicans
sail the lough, 80-1mile Mona
Passage each .ear in hopes of
making it to the U.S.
Caribbean territory. It is the
only region so far where the
Coast Guard is testing the
database technology.
Since the initiative began
in November. t lhe guard has
collected photographs and
fingerprints of 1,1 L7 migrants,
including 70 who were taken
ashore for prosecution,
spokesman Ricardo Castro-
dad said. By checking the fin-
gerprints and photos against a
database shai ed with other
U S. agencies, authorities say
they also can catch criminals.
Migrants caught trying to
enter Puerto Rico illegally
could jeopardize visa appli-
cations and risk prosecution,
with more severe penalties
resei\ed fo those previously
deported.
On Monday the Coast
Guard intercepted a low-
slung, wooden boat that was
taking on water and found
that four of the 22 Domini-
cans aboard had attempted to
enter the U.S. illegally before,
officials said. All of them
were repatriated '1 uesday.


Officials
search for
illegal min
equipment
* GEORGETOWN,
Guyana


ers,
t


AU IFHORII IES have
seized earth moving
equipment and are hunt-
ing for unlicensed miners
in a gold- and diamond-
rich area where residents
have complained about
mercury-tainted water
and crumbling roads,
authoitiies said 'Tuesdav,
acco ding to Associated
Press. I
The miners left 20-foot
craters in the roads of the
jungle district of Mahdia,
near the Brazilian border.
said Bill Woolford,
Guyana's mines commis-
sioner.
Residents alerted
authorities last week that
water had stopped flowing
through pipelines.
Police and mines offi-
cers have seized six land
dredges and Woolford
said they are looking for
at least six more believed
to be hidden in the
jungle.
Gold is one of Guyana's
top exports, behind only
sugar and rice, but critics
say mining is destroying
the ecosystem and liveli-
hood of those who inhabit
the dense jungles.


the national exam is not set
to be forwarded to the media
until as late as next week,
officials at the BGCSE exam-
ination centre said.
Last year, the national
average was a D and in 2005
it was D+. Despite previous
disappointing results, mem-
bers of the educational com-
munity still feel the exami-
nations are a "worthwhile
instrument" in measuring
scholastic achievement in the
Bahamas.
"I think that the construc-
tion of the BGCSE exams
are worthwhile and it brings
uniformity to the taking of


exams for all schools and all
pupils, and it's largely
designed to determine what
[students] know and what
they can do," J Barrie Far-
rington, a member of the
Coalition for Education
Reform, said yesterday.
Mr Farrington added that
the exam scores are vital for
students who wish to pursue
higher learning.
He explained the normal
criterion for entry into a ter-
tiary institute is typically a
minimum of five Cs.
Admitting that he had not
seen the 2007 BGCSE
results, Mr Farrington


* By TANEKA
THOMPSON
THE results for the 2007
Bahamas General Certificate
of Secondary Education have
been released to the nation's
high schools, The Tribune has
learned.
However, an official report
detailing testing scores and
averages in the 26 subjects of

The Bahamas

not on US' red

palm mite straw

product list
THE Bahamas is not on the
United States' list of countries
from where straw products are
banned due to red palm mite
infestation, according to the Min-
istry of Tourism.
The ministry issued a statement
yesterday acknowledging that the
US has placed a ban on straw
products from 25 Caribbean coun-
tries.
It said the US Embassy in Nas-
sau has confirmed that the ban -
which includes nine other coun-
tries outside the Caribbean -
excludes the Bahamas.
This follows claims by local
straw vendors that cruise ship
workers were telling passengers
not to buy straw in the Bahamas
because of the red mite fears.
"Bahamian tourism officials are
working with the cruise lines to
ensure that accurate information
is disseminated to cruise passen-
gers." the statement said. The
ministry is also working with oth-
er agencies and U S Embassy offi-
cials to devise an appropriate
strategy to lessen the impact for
Bahamian straw vendors."
The ministry noted that on-
board cruise vessel warnings have
prohibited passengers from board-
ing cruise ships with live plant cul-
tures, particularly products creat-
ed from green palms that have
not been dried, as these have been
identified as a source of the red
palm mite parasite (raoiella indi-
ca), an invasive pest found in
coconut palms and date palms.
"The Ministry of Tourism is
advising cruise lines that the vast
majority of straw products from
the Bahamas are made from dried
palms, rather than the palms that
are still green. Additionally, they
are being informed that the red
palm mite has not been found
in the Bahamas," the statement
said.
It said that actions being taken
by the ministry as a result of the
fears include informing straw busi-
ness persons of the dangers of
using un-dried green palms to
make products, and encourgaing
them to work exclusively with
dried palms
"The Ministry of Tourism
remains committed to dispensing
complete ind accurate informa-
tion to guests and residents
regarding Bahamian straw prod-
ucts," the statement said.


refrained from weighing in
on the outcome of the exams:
"It's a little early to specu-
late, we have to see what the
results are, and not only the
results in respect of totality,
but being able to analyse the
results."
During a presentation at a
recent conclave for educa-
tion, Mr Farrington made a
shocking report in which he
stated that 80 per cent of
graduating students at poor-
ly performing high schools in
New Providence failed math-
ematics, with one third of
those students being "func-
tionally illiterate".


In spite of this, Mr Farring-
ton said he is weary of cast-
ing blame solely on the
nation's school system or the
government for the poor per-
formance of the nation's stu-
dents.
"We have a system that has
unfortunately deteriorated
more in the public schools
than in the private schools
[but] to turn around a.nd
point fingers and say who is
to blame, I think collectively
as a country that we have to
take responsibility for it and
see what we can do together
to reverse this unacceptable
condition."


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S donated to the Retired Police Association yesterday at Police Headquarters. Mr Rahming is chairman of the association.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 5


FHE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


FNM denies victimising civil service


SBy DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter


PLP accused of 'political mischief' after demonstration


FREEPORT FNM parlia-
mentarians on Grand Bahama


have denied allegations of vic-
timisation in the civil service
and accused PLP protesters of
creating "political mischief".
At a press conference at the
Prime Minister's Office in
Freeport, Marco City MP
Zhivargo Laing, Minister of
State in the Ministry of Finance,


responded to accusations made
by PLP supporters at a demon-
stration on Thursday.
He was accompanied by his
FNM colleagues Neko Grant,
Minister of Tourism; Kenneth
Russell, Minister of Housing
and National Insurance: Piner-
idge MP and deputy speaker of


the House Kwasi I'honpson,
and Senator Kay Smith, pai lia
mentlry secretalv in lie tinii
Minister's Of ice.
"We categorically deny ,,ii\
allegations that the governmiic ii
is "purging the civil service, 0i is
victimising anyone, said Mrvr
Laing.


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"We regard such allegations
as absolute lies being spewed
by those who ale intent on cre
,ting political mischicl, and
who are desperate to return to
their privileged perch at the
mouth of the government's
spigot
MI Laing has insisted that no
civil servant duly employed bn
the government has been dis.
missed by the FNM administi a
tion since it came to office onil
May 2
However, he explained that
a number of contracts issued
under the previous PLP gov-
ernment had expired and were
not renewed.
"Indeed, anyone remotely
faniliai with how the civil ser-
vice ol the Bahamas works will
know that there is a required
procedure for the removal of
any civil servant, one which in
most instances involves the
statutorily established Public
Service Commission
"The 21,000-plus civil ser-
vartts and their union know this
procedure, and know that they
have not been targeted by this
administration for any kind of
purging," said Mr Laing.
He said that the wearing of
paper bags on the faces of sup-
posed civil servants during the
protest was merely a "sturit" by
the PLP.
"Bahamians know . that
they are free to speak their
minds and their hearts in this
country now more so than ever
before." he said.
Mr Laing noted that the PLP,
in its desperation to hold on to
power, hired scores of Bahami-
ans just before the election.
Some persons were given
month-to-month contracts, or
in some instances, three month
and six month contracts for
employment, he said.
Mr Laing explained that it
was those contracts that had
expired, and that no financial
provision was made for the fur-
thuc employinment these persons'
in the civil service
I he minister also defended
the government suspension of


the $8 million school contract
at Heritage. which has been
insider IeCVIw.
Mli 1Iag 'slated that goiern
mient has delei mined that the
contracted price was "far out of
line" compared to the cost giv-
en by the Ministiy ol Public
Works. as well as bids submitted
by other credible conti actorl
lor the sale job
Building oilntractor Patrick
McDonaid, who led the PLP's
protest in Freeport, was initial-
ly awarded the contract for the
junior high school under the for-
mer government.
Mr Laing noted that the $X
million contract was 20 per cent
lower than what the Ministry of
Public Works estimated the
construction would be, and was
far below the othei bids at
around $13 million.
He added that the Heritage
School has many more amewi
ties than the school which is
being built on Faith Avenue in
New Providence.
"In the circumstances. the
determination was that it was
unlikely that the contractor
would bring that job in at that
price . and the government
determined that rather than
engage that process. it would
re-tender the job, and at that
time any qualified contractor
could bid on the job."
Mr Laing stated that the
FNM is committed "to return
order, control and common
sense to governance in the
country.
"Having come to office, it was
clear to us that in its desperation
to hold on to power, the former
administration sought to take
care of its cronies by recklessly
issuing out contracts and engag-
ing in excessive hiring even
while, in many instances. mak-
ing no financial or physical pro-
visions for those it sought to
hire.
"It is now our lot to bring this
situation under control in the
interest of prudent public man-
agei cLnt. Thai is what we are
doing and will continue to do,
he said.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


Archbishop says




Anglican Church




set for change


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Anglican church, one
of the Bahamas' most promi-
nent religious organizations, will
likely not exist in its current
form beyond 2008, Archbishop
of the West Indies Drexel
Gomez has predicted.
As the issue of homosexuali-
ty continues to loom over the
70 million-member church,
Archbishop Gomez this week
told fundamentalists at the
'Festival of Faith' gathering in
Bladensburg, Maryland, that he
feared liberal Episcopals and
revisionists will cause a split in
the worldwide communion over
same sex relationships.
Such a break could cut the
Bahamas and-the other poorer
Anglican provinces off from the
considerable financial resources
of the;US Episcopal Church.
However, Archbishop
Gomez said that financial con-
siderations cannot play a part
in this most important question.
"The (US) Episcopal Church
is the largest contributor donor
within the Anglican community.
We cannot end up hostage to
money. Some Africans have
said they won't take any action
if we become hostages to mon-
ey," he said.
Earlier this year, the Anglican
Church issued an ultimatum to
its US province, demanding that
they ban any further consecra-
tion of gay clergy and blessings
of same-sex unions.
The US Episcopal Church
has until September 30 to state
its stance on these issues and
produce proof that it will adhere
to the church's traditional prac-
tices as it concerns homosexu-
ality.
Attending the 'Festival of


Drexel Gomez says gay

issue may split communion


* ARCHBISHOP Drexel
Gomez

Faith' in Maryland this week,
Archbishop Gomez said that 12
African Anglican provinces
already put out a statement say-
ing that they could not attend
Lambeth in July, 2008 a con-
ference of the worldwide Angli-
can communion which takes
place every 10 years if those
bishops who consecrated the
openly gay Bishop Gene Robin-
son of the Diocese of New
Hampshire are invited
The religious web site
"virtueonline" reported that
Archbishop Gomez told his
audience in Maryland, that in
planning for the Lambeth con-
'ference, "we don't know who
is going or coming, but if there
is a large group who will not
attend it will change the struc-
ture and significance of the
Lambeth Conference."


"The big question is how can
you have a meeting of the lead-
ers of the communion in one
place while refusing to address
the issues that are tearing the
communion apart and prevent-
ing the Anglican Communion
from moving forward," he said.
Archbishop Gomez said that
if bishops of Council of Anglican
Provinces in Africa and their 12
Primates do not show up to the
conference, it means that half of
the bishops representing two-
thirds of the communion will not
be represented.
"Nigeria alone has over 100
bishops representing 18 million
Anglicans. Kenya, Uganda and
Rwanda all have large con-
stituencies. That is why the
whole future of Lambeth is so
important. The decisions of
Lambeth represent the mind of
the communion. We are seri-
ously challenged by the present
situation," he told virtueonline.
Archbishop Gomez said that
he feels that the US Episcopal
Church's stance on the issue of
homosexuality "is not consis-
tent with God's agenda."
"In the church's long history
the uninterrupted consensus is
that physical intercourse is only
intended for man and woman
within marriage in a life long
commitment. Anything else is
contrary to God's will for
humanity. The grounds for the
church taking this stand is the
Bible and it is transparently
clear about homosexual behav-
iour," he said.


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BASRA fundraising gets going

with marathon and beach party


* THE BASRA 2007/2008 calendar will be an eye-popping one,
featuring beautiful local models in bikinis strutting their stuff on
beaches and other locales around Grand Bahama.
(Photo: Erik Russell, Keeni Media Ltd)


It's time once again for that
popular annual event the 37th
annual Bernie Butler BASRA
swim marathon and beach par-
ty in Grand Bahama.
Each year, the Bahamas Air
Sea Rescue Association seeks
to raise funds in two fun ways -
with the swim marathon and
beach party, plus the sale of a
locally produced calendar.
."The Bahamas Air Sea Res-
cue Association is a dedicated
non-profit voluntary organisa-
tion committed to saving the
lives of distressed seamen or
airmen in the Bahamas," said
the marathon organizers in a
statement. "They are supported
only by private donations and
therefore require your support
through their fundraising pro-
jects."
Aside from defraying the
costs of daily operations and
rescue efforts, this year BAS-
RA is seeking to purchase mod-
ern lifesaving equipment like
defibrillators.
In addition, they are looking
to the future where they can
have a permanent waterfront
base of operations with their
own building, on Grand
Bahama.
The swim marathon is two
miles long and encourages fit-
ness enthusiasts of all ages and
skill levels to come out and
swim from Our Lucaya to Coral
Beach.
"The general public is invited
to attend and take part in the
biggest beach party of the sea-
son, said the statement. "There


will be food, games, beverages,
and it's fun to meet up with
people you haven't seen in a
while. Of course, since it's a
beach party, it's also the place
for the girls to show off their
figures in the latest styles of
bikinis."
BASRA is using this to their
advantage with their fundraising
calendar this year, which will
be full colour with a bikini
theme.
Each month is sponsored by a
different business and the pho-
to layout for each month fea-
tures bikini-clad models pro-
moting the sponsor's business.
"The eye-popping pictures of
each month will ensure that
everyone wants to buy the cal-
endar, which will not be on sale
until the BASRA event on Sat-
urday, August 18," the state-
ment said.
The bikini calendar theme
was the brainchild of Barefoot
Marketing, who co-ordinated
the entire project. Sarah Kirkby,
President of Barefoot Market-
ing, and Leigh Termath worked
closely with Erik Russell of
Keeni Media, who pho-
tographed the entire project.
The first promotion of the
BASRA 2007-2008 calendar
will be on Wednesday. August
15, with a flotilla parade
through the streets of Freeport.
There will then be a beach
event attended by the models
on Saturday, August 18 at Coral
Beach, where calendars can be
purchased for the first time.


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THE TRIBUNE


S I


* LONG lines outside of CR Walker yesterday. (Photo: Felip Major/Tribune staff)
(Photo: Felipg Major/Tribune staff)



First day of Ministry of


Immigration's audit scheme


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FROM page one

enforcement people here from
our department, we have no
police here that has never been
our contention."
The crowd was a mix of Hait-
ian nationals, Haitian-Bahami-
ans, Jamaicans, Latin Americans,
among other nationalities, all
anxiously waiting with docu-
ments in hand for an end to a
long process.
Many applicants were opti-
mistic about the audit and the
government's effort to address
the innumerable outstanding
applications.
Michelet Paul, 27, told The
Tribune he felt the audit was a
"good exercise". Born in the
Bahamas to Haitian parents, he
has been waiting nine years to
be granted Bahamian citizenship.
"I put in my application (for
Bahamian citizenship) I think in
1998 and it was completed in
1999, and I haven't heard any-
thing yet," he said.
"Every time I went to immi-
gration they said nothing was
happening so I came here to find
out what was going on."
He added that an obstacle he
faced due to his lack of citizen-
ship are travel restrictions placed
on him in the absence of a
Bahamian passport.
The Tribune also spoke with


an applicant for permanent resi-
dency, a native of Costa Rica,
who wished to have his name
withheld. While "happy" the
government was taking steps to
address the backlog of applica-
tions, he admitted that it has
been a long process thus far.
"Well, I heard (the audit) was
about the permanent residency
situation...I've been living in this
country for the past 19 years and
I got all my documentation so I
came here to see what it is...I'm
hoping and waiting," he said,
also noting he applied for per-
manent residency in 2000.
Earlier in the week the gov-
ernment issued a statement clar-
ifying the process of the audit in
an effort to assuage mounting
public concerns, stating that it
was intended to "expedite the
regularisation" of persons apply-
ing for permanent residency or
citizenship within the Bahamas.
The audit is only open for those
persons who applied for perma-
nent residency or citizenship
before April 30, 2007.
It is a two-day process, with
today being last day at the C R
Walker High School from 10am
6pm. Audits are scheduled in
Grand Bahama and Abaco on
August 29 and 31 respectively.
"The primary outcome of this
audit is that we will be able to
deal with the applications in


many cases, long outstanding
applications, for persons who
have come out to remind us that
they have pending applications
that the department needs to
review," Ms Campbell said.
She added that the audit was
not going to be a regular practice
for the department of immigra-
tion, but simply a means to
address the density of outstand-
ing applications.
Applicants are asked to bring
along copies of receipts and any
letters from the Department of
Immigration.
"We're going to take that
information along with their date
of birth, their address (and) once
the audit is completed on Thurs-
day, we're going to return to the
office, pull those files, hopefully
move them forward so we can
bring a successful conclusion to
those applications," Mrs Coral
Colebrook of the Department ol
Immigration said.
"Because we are having audits
also in Grand Bahama and Aba
co at the end of this month, real-
istically we are saying to them
that if they don't hear from us
by the end of September (or)
October, that is if we don't call
them, they need to come in and
see us again. But we are hoping
that we are able to begin to get
decisions by the end of Septem
ber."


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Increased patrols pay off for RBDF


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reportei
FREF PURI Ro l
Bahamas Delencc Force patrols
in G iand ciahama ,ind Ill.
northelr iC egion are already
proving to bh very beneficial ini
the capituie o illegal immigrant,
and persons suspected col hcliy


L. "


in violation of fisheries laws.
OvCe thie past I ei' \ montih1s..
mlor lie eCtit palni ols andi
arrests ha\e been made -
thanks to sex eral extra Defence
Force olliceis being temnpoiar-
ily stationed ini -ireepoi i.
Last week 13 persons wereC
arrested in waters oft (irand
Bahama in connection with tlie


. -.. :-- - ..;: -

* DEFENCE Force and police officers searchnlig a Haitian sloop
in Nassau Harbour


Six charged with catching

undersize crawfish


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Six Bahami
an.s were auiaigned in the Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate's Court
on Wednesday in connection
with the illegal capture of
undersized crawfish in Grand
Bahama.
Appearing before Magistrate
Debbye Ferguson were Sidney
Williams. 43. uf Williams 1i o n
Nigel Sands, 38. of Arden I or
est: Allred Orantl. i ,f
BayshoiL Road,
West End: onttiutc w
48, ot West End, (. arlo l w)omp
son, 31, of Biaemer Circk and
Ricky Carroll, 41, of Poinciana
Drive, Freeport.
The men were changed wiiit
breaches of the Fishericse
Resources (J.urisdictioi;. aiu
Conservation) Act. ChapipLi
244.
It is alleged that on Augusi


3. the meni weLe lound off
Sandy C'av West End, in pos-
session oitl 0 undesizcd craw-
fish and three egg bearing craw-
fish that wie clipped.
Carroll and Thompson both
pleaded guilty to "possession of
undersized crawfish" and were
each sentenced to pay a fine ol
$500 or spend 60 days at Her
Majesty's Prison. Fox Hill.
Tonnie WYIlliams pleaded
guilty to 1- -Aon of clipped
egg-bealii fishh and was
sentenc,:a i a fine of
$1,200 it '- 'I lays at Her
Majesty's Pr, ;.
The prosecl'oii n withdrew the
similar cn.. :igauist Grant.
Sidney -Vtilllains and Nigel
Sands. both pleaded not guilty
to posscs','1.i of undersized
crawfish I
The, .vLc : ,'.i.uited bail in the
sum of t$.u0l) ,\\iih lto ureIties
each and theii case was
adl i t. i iU ,, ) ,n er 1I lor trial.


alleged discovery of undersized
clawfish. A niiiiber ol illegal
IIII inigi ants hil\ also been
app))clhei lcd.
Delcn 'e Force Sub-Lieu-
tenanllil ni1. 'bl1' clations olli
cCi Solia tfilleic could not be
reached for comment up to
press linei on Wednesday.
However, Ms Miller had ini-
tially said that plans were
underwa\\y Ito establish a peri-ma
nent Uelence i force base in
FiL'reportl to o\eCi the northern
eIC (i of the Countl-V.


It is undclrstood that two
Defcnitc I'ce ollicials Comi
iiiander c( lake anld c hilf Petty
olficel Biinly have been in
Cirand Bahana "-tryilng to get
things established iii Fceport I
A\ IDeence ic't ee ciilt is len l
poimaily slatlioncd al L[uciiain
Hliiii iii anld condtlucs daii!
pIallils.
Severe Il i l ali milliall \ess Is
allegedly found with nulei sized
Sll\\j h lis i |]| el lten tiiteleepC ted
in (ii ilid Hialhlv in i \ C l the
,weekeindI


The crawfish season opened
on August 1, and runs to March
31 next year. However, it is
against the law to harvest
undersized crawfish.
Michelle Knowles. a fisheries
official m Freeport, reported
that the minunumn harvestable


size for crawfish tails is l'i\e an
half inches.
"Anything caught undec lik
and half inches is consildei,
undersized. If they are caiclhm
whole crawfish the minimum,
size applies to the head. ':
said.


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All personal charge accounts have
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We apologize for any inconvenience
caused and lookforward to your
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Management


-


i THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 9


THE I HIBUNE
















Minister calls for renewed



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*SEC(URI1 Y at the airport has been discussed in the Senate


THE Bahamas must stay on
the "cutting-edge" of internal
tionally accepted security and
fire service standards if is to
remain a major tourist destina-
tion, according to minister of
state for immigration Elmna
Campbell.
She reminded the Sediate last
week that safe and secure aii
and seaports are not an option
but an imperative.
"Any decline in our securni
and fire standards could come
with consequences some quite
serious," Mrs Campbell said.
She noted that the Bahamas'
archipelagic configuration has
always made policing air and
sea holders a serious challenge
adding that the country's geo
graphical location between Cen
tral America. South America
the Caribbean and North
America also impacts "ou0111 need
lot good and coherent manage-
ment of our air and sea ports
"Our.proximity to the Unit
ed States is indeed an advan
tage for our service-based
economy, but it also'makes us
vulnerable to the use of iis air
ports and indeed seaports flo
illicit activities such as drug)
trafficking and alien smuggling
for which, most often, the ulti
mate destination is the United


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SELM A Campbell

operations at the airport in
recent times has been quite
impressive," she added.
Mrs Campbell said the gov-
ernment supports police efforts
to identify a space in the air-
port where they can maintain a
physical presence.
She said the government has
promised to take fully into
account the need for police a
office in the airport as the devel-
opment of the facility progresses.


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M \ M\ .i! to ,l, > n I luinun Krs tlrccs
I I' lu I i ui
P. 0. Box N713, Nassau, Bahamas
\\ .ill Alll \ IL.\ 1 i .il Is !\0 ,cll 'h ,, sI I lCed
fo iii 11f ii, i '. '. \ iI I, ciontactedl


States ol \j.i tca. M1s Camllp-
bell said W0e musi take eeCry
piecaution inth .- design Nind
tim a aiigeCieli r .iF i i. t. Uli ty
systems In p1)ro1.' ol rn minor
iile inuiaioii i pi l ( 1 L t ind,,n
Pindling I ltnit national A ipolt)
oti o) tilli it i cli \ "i
1M (. ( I iI ln.ll said Il. gov'-
etminlent sionmigly support is the
Roal Balliamas Polie.' FI nce in
all A)i l',11s In I.i L'1s to iiipitve
porliclng aindi ! in thi Bihi.tinas iiii!liiiit the
all ports
She said thal operations being
undertaken h\b various law
Sniorcemiit agencies the
police, the Depclitment of
Immigration and the C(ustoms
Deparlieint will all play a
vital role helping to secure the
Lynden Pindlin1 International
airport t
"We want to sec. the police
take determined, quick and
decisive action against crimes
and criminalit and 4 want
them to make thein presence
felt," Mrs Campbell said.
"The significant police pres-
ence in and around the Lynden
Pindling International Airport
accounts for the immediate and
decisive action that is taken by
police officers to thwart illegal
activities and to arrest and
hairge *liomw engage d in such
activities. I hle succt -s of police


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE






THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


LOA6 NW


Concern at road danger to youth


L *.


-:: VM A
^. jif -*-y V


* THIS photo, taken by a Tribune contributor, shows an unidenttied young boy sitting on a jetski
while it is being towed by a truck


M By ARTHIA NIXON
DRIVERS travelling from
Gladstone Road to JlK to
Prospect Ridge expressed out-
rage on Tuesday after spotting
a boy of about eight danger-
ously sitting on a jetski
attached to the tailgate of a
moving truck.
At around 11.30am, one of
the busiest times for industrial
vehicles on the road. large
semis, tractors and speeding
cars drove neaw and around the
jetskis as they bounced about
precariously.
Witnesses said the child held
on to the handle bars o1 the jet
ski and at one point even placed
both of his legs "suit saddle
style" as the i uck ii~ rowly
missed potholes while a man in
his late teens or early 20s was on
another jetski laying backwards
with his head on the handle
bars.


he potentially dangerous
scene t as caught on camera Is
a 7Tn rit, contributor who lhal
opened to hc in the area.
"My passenger pointed oun
what she thought was a child
and I laughed because I thought
no one could be that stupid with
traffic deaths climbing so high."
she said. "But sure enough we
got close to the truck and saw
him on the back. I did not want
to drive behind that car because
ni he fell off then I'd be in trou
ole it i hit him and not the per
son wiho put him there in thk
tirst place 'hat's child endan
gel ment
"-t people are dying when
they tall oftl jeskis in tie waltu
what 1 th hell makes lh m think
thai hain\ wouldd .ll :c ai
h iiin Ig Ihe 'spnili '.k ..i
tourist ( aitlin Hill. "Bahith i
ans die on the road becaiUe
traffic cops are being paid to or
nothing. No utn has on hei,


seal belts, kids mae never n cat
scals and does anyone in this
country know what the turning
signals are used for?
['he laws need to be tight-
ened even if it's just to pay fine:.
Paris Hilton can go to jail fo,
being drunk but that person dri
ves through with a kid on some
thing attached to a tailgate.
Ridiculous."
A third concerned witness
who lost her 14-year-old cousin
in t traffic accident last year
had tried to honk her hIrn iW
aILi act the attention of thet n,
ver of the truck in an effort to
have him move the child.
"We've been moving at about
40 miles an hour on this toad.'
she said. "I'm glad Ihe I ribinie
goi I le photos because it pioves
,i>tiiir.m 1 indeleitd>ti montt i utl .
S:0i .... 1 hope the pictulies
ic vo e' ne ds to he neld
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12. THURSDAY. AUGUST 9 2007


- ----- H HLOH C LNEWS


Ellison Greenslade returns luxury gift items


FROM page one

bodies in Grand Bahama and
i om officers within the
torce on Mr Greensladc's
transfer as Grand Bahama s
police chief to his new post in
Nassau.
The Tribune reported that
this action would have taken
place since late July.
However, Mr Greenslade
could not be reached for com-
ment up to press time yester-
Jay.
While the appreciation ban-
quet was held in Freeport with
the full sanction of Police Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson,
the acceptance of the gifts by
MAr Greenslade has been an
issue of much contention -
especially as the Police Act for-
bids serving officers accepting
'.ifts.
Following a number of press
articles on the issue, Mr
Greenslade said he felt that he
had done "nothing wrong" in
accepting the gifts.
"I'm amazed about what I'm
seeing in the press. I'm at a
loss," he said.
In fact, Mr Greenslade said
he felt that the uproar sur-
iounding the gifts was an inten-
tional attempt to "poison" his
reputation.
The gifts in question were
presented to SACP Greenslade
at a "farewell extravaganza"
for his appointment from Assis-
tant Commissioner of Grand
Bahama to Senior Assistant
Commissioner in New Provi-
,.ence earlier this year.
However, since then specula-
lion has been rampant about
the impartiality of the force and
the perception that officials
could be influenced in carry-
ing out their duties.
With this in mind, Chief
Superintendent of Police Hulan
Hanna addressed the media


Chief Supt Hanna
addresses media
C(HIEl SupcrintinJdcil
ol Policc Hul.in Hnn.i
.ddrcs,'c the media \-- -
lcrda\ .at police h -i i
quairers mcdij cenire
Tribih n ',ll
-y-' r3-3y- ^


yesterday at police headquar-
ters media centre.
Mr Hanna: "Ever mindful ot
the trust, between the public
and the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, the Commissioner of
Police met with Mr Greenslade
after the latter returned to
duties from vacation on Tues-
day, August 7, 2007.
"The public is advised that


Claim that (

victim of'poli
ELLISON Greenslade has fa
aimed at smearing his name. it
Inside sources said the senior
cess during his years in charge
by fellow officers.
The claim came from a police
low officers for the campaign.
"Greenslade is way ahead ofz
cessor to the commissioner," sa
"He is a better officer in ever
the streets to help his men. As h
to have enemies.
"And it is those people who d
sioner who are making life har


J W
/











as a result of discussions
between Mr Greenslade and
Commissioner Farquharson.
this matter has been resolved.
Specifically, all items have been
returned to the Royal Bahamas
Police Force for the purpose
of them being auctioned off
and the proceeds appropriate-
ly donated to charitable organi-
zations."


Greenslade is

ce conspiracy'

allen victim to a police conspiracy
was alleged yesterday.
officer, who was rated a great suc-
at Freeport, is being undermined
source who blamed ambitious fel-
all other senior officers as the suc-
aid the source.
ry respect, a man who gets out on
ieir apparent, though, he is bound
don't want him to become commis-
d for him."


Desert Trek
(Black, Brown)


Rusc Mast
(Black)


Paul McWeeney won't be
terminated as Bank of
Bahamas managing director

FROM page one

bank began calling the Ministry of Finance to
confirm the reports.
It is claimed that one major investor, with
over 10,000 shares in the bank, attempted to
sell the majority of his shares before the
rumours could be confirmed by the bank; caus-
ing a sharp decline in the value of the bank's
shares.
This investor, it was claimed, had to be
stopped personally by a high level official with-
in BISX for fear that a sell off would have fol-
lowed, would have caused a devaluation of the
shares of the bank, and possibly crippled the
institution.
A statement from Mr T Maitland Cates,
Chairman of Bank of The Bahamas Limited,
yesterday read as follows: "There is absolute-
ly no foundation whatsoever to the recent
rumour regarding the future prospects of Paul
McWeeney as Managing Director of the Bank
of The Bahamas Limited. Mr McWeeney con-
tinues to have the full confidence of the Board
of Directors and the major shareholder of the
bank (government of the Bahamas)."


FROM page one efforts by the t
ensure that th
ernment High, required some list of necessary
additional attention. sible so as to
"We had some caution pected delays c
lights," said Mr Deveaux, when principal
reporting on the outcome of a tors requested
meeting held with Education hoc basis -
Minister Carl Bethel last week occurred at soi
about the progress of the work. "We-avoided
' Of Government High, he they still piled
said: "It's a huge school and it's adding: "They
in bad shape." He claims that tors) as genera
after contractors went in it was which is okay,
evident that there was work to financial issue,
be done that was not planned exercise som
tor. that."
"You know when you get He said that
into August, if there are con- to ensure that a
cerns about having the parts in ing and electric
on time it would be an issue, addressed ar
but all of the supplies that will to, and he is
be needed will be in tomorrow. principals w
"The contractors (following) cause for corn
my own personal visit, Mr tember.
Bethel's visit and the indepen- "Principals
dent assessment by the project painting going
officers, indicate that Govern- want contracts
ment High will be done," he rooms or bang
said. and they really
Mr Deveaux said that despite ing toilets anc

FROM page one

mould" in the area entering the workers' sys-
tems.
According to a source, "there was a lot of fine
dust in that dirt and there was an extraordinarily
dry period...the people then ingested some of the
dust and the moulds and that caused some itching
and some respiratory complications."
This information was reportedly included in a
final report by CMO Dr Merceline Dahl
Regis on the matter, which was concluded this
week.
Tests done on the site.also revealed that there
was a "heightened" level of a certain toxic'sulb-
stance in some parts of the soil, said the source,
however it is alleged that the two doctors who
examined the affected workers concluded that
the presence of this substance had no effect on
those workers' medical status.
"The two doctors that examined people...didn't
find anything beyond the dust and the mould,"
said the source.
These doctors' assessment were subsequently
reviewed by Dr Dahl Regis, who reportedly
agreed.
Despite this, Dr Dahl Regis did order that all of
the soil from the school site be removed and tests
were done to ensure that "there was no long term
problem in exposing the children to it."
These concerns appear to have been alleviated


Police 'brutality

charges to come

FROM page one

week, where he has been since June 11th, he
looked thin, and one side of his face was still
swollen. While not confirming whether, as rela-
tives had suggested, Desmond was "brain dead",
doctors described him as "very ill."
His mother, Christine Key, said that follow-
ing the attack Desmond was seen throwing up
blood, and complaining of stomach pains. Doctors
said he was suffering from pancreatis, which could
have be caused by a variety of things, including
trauma from a beating.
Two officers were relieved of their duties, pend-
ing the conclusion of the investigation into the
beating, it was confirmed by Police Commission-
er Paul Farquharson last week.
Mr Key's family suggested last week that if
they do not see justice done in Desmond's case,
they will ask for Amnesty International the
human rights watchdog to get involved.
Yesterday, Chief Supt Glenn Miller said he
could not say when the officers would appear in
court.
However, he added that more information
would become available today.


wo ministries to
ey had as full a
y repairs as pos-
avoid the unex-
)f previous years
Is or administra-
repairs on an ad
this has again
me schools.
d most of it but
it on," he said,
use (the contrac-
1 repair people -
but it has some
s, so we have to
e control over
three priorities -
any leaks, plumb-
cal concerns are
e being adhered
optimistic that
ill have little
plaint come Sep-
don't mind some
on but they don't
ors in their class-
ging on the roof
would like work-
1 we're on track


for that and that was our chal-
lenge," he said.
According to Mr Deveaux,
his ministry is very pleased with
the pace of work at S C
McPherson school, and at sever-
al schools in Exuma, for which
the construction of a total of 36
classrooms were authorised to
handle an anticipated influx of
students.
While the works at the Exu-
man schools were never expect-
ed to be finished by September,
the new rooms at S C McPher-
son should be..
"The one at S C McPherson
was urgent because we needed
to accommodate 325 kids there
and if we didn't build those
classrooms it would've been
necessary for those junior high
school students to go into differ-
ent schools," he said.
The minister said that the
school repairs programme has
been his major focus for the last
two months, and will remain so
until teachers return to the
classrooms on August 25th, with
students coming the week after.


TG Glover School

as Dr Dahl Regis has given government clearance
to allow the school to be built on the site.
The results of the report follow numerous asser-
tions about the cause of the stoppage on work at
the site.
In a statement in June, Education Minister
Carl Bethel indicated that T G Glover would not
be ready for September and that it was uncertain
if the school would be built at the Horseshoe
Drive location because of concerns that the site
was "toxic" as a result of years of being used as a
dump.
In July, former minister of works Bradley
Roberts accused the FNM of, seeking to
"demonise the Christie administration...and to
put fear in the minds of parents, teachers, students
and the public without a shred of plausible evi-
dence" by stopping work on the site.
He claimed that the worker's health concerns
could be put down to "an infestation of monkey
tamarind" buried in the ground.
A day later, current Works Minister Earl
Deveaux rebutted such claims, saying that Mr
Robert's explanation for the medical problems
was farcical. He added that the government would
have been "irresponsible" to ignore the concerns
of the ER Hanna's operations manager as
explained in her letter.


NITY Fisherman

ENTIAL is killed

TAGES FROM page one
HAMASC on the way. Mr Pinder leaves
LHAMAS his wife, Rosebud, and two chil-
dren.
ANS There were four adults and
AN four children on the "Intre
pid", said Mr Abner Pinder
from Spanish Wells.
M After the accident the
Intrepid left for Chub Cay
with a gaping hole in its bow.
"'The Coast Guard respond-
ed very quickly to the SOS,
picked up the man and flew
him to Nassau but he died
en route.
"The police would not con-
firm the death," Mr Abner
Pinder said.


Ministries are on





track to complete





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- -r I











Bank partners l


with Crisis Centre .


for conference


COMMONWEALTH Bank
is partnering with the Bahamas
Crisis Centre as it gears up for
its 25th anniversary by hosting
the second Regional Confer-
ence of Caribbean Crisis Cen-
tres next month.
The bank will be joining the
organisation in its mission to
strengthen the ongoing work of
crisis centres and other social
agencies throughout the
Caribbean in the campaign for
greater awareness and advocacy
in confronting sexual violence.
Said William B Sands Jr,
president and CEO of Com-
monwealth Bank: "This is truly
a timely event as the Bahamas
has been reported to have the
highest incidence of sexual
crimes in the region.
"We are therefore pleased to
join the Bahamas Crisis Centre
as they celebrate 25 years of
tremendous contribution to our
nation by hosting the regional
conference."
According to director of the
Bahamas Crisis Centre, Dr San-
dra Dean-Patterson, Common-
wealth Bank's contribution
helps them in creating partner-
ships to confront sexual vio-

Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


lence in the Caribbean which
also happens to be the theme
of the conference.
"While sexual violence con-
tinues to plague our Caribbean
islands and is generally ignored
by populations at large, we plan
to increase our advocacy," said
Dr Patterson. "Several battles
have been won to various
degrees in our region but a
great deal more still needs to
be done. Evil exists when good
people do nothing so I know
that together we can stop sexu-
al violence."
Commonwealth Bank's dona-


tion will help to defray the costs
of the conference, including
travel costs for delegates from
the Family Islands and others
from around the region.
International participants are
expected from Antigua and
Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, the
British Virgin Islands, Cayman,
Cuba, Curacao, Dominica,
Grenada, Guyana, Haiti,
Jamaica, St Kitts & Nevis, St
Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad
and Tobago, Puerto Rico, the
Turks and Caicos and the U S
Virgin Islands.


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* COMMONWEALTH Bank partners with the Bahamas Crisis Centre as it gears up for its 25th
anniversary by hosting the second Regional Conference of Caribbean Crisis Centres this
September. Pictured I-r: Daria Bain, manager of the Plaza Branch; Gladys Fernander, senior
manager of financial and business planning; Dr Sandra Dean-Patterson, director of the Bahamas
Crisis Centre; and Denise Turnquest, vice president of mortgage and commercial lending.


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


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HG Christie opens new



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SUNSHINE and blue skies
blessed the opening of the
newest H G Christie office on
Great Guana Cay.
On Thursday, July 26, busi-
ness acquaintances, friends, vis-
itors and locals had a chance to
tour the new location.


The office is situated right at
the foot of the public ferry dock
in the Guana Cay settlement,
and the occasion caught the
attention of many passers-by
who stopped in to enjoy the
refreshments and meet many of
the H G Christie agents on


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By Appointment Saturday 11:00am 4:00pm
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Visit our Showroom & Office located at the Red Carpet Inn, East Bay Street


hand, including vice-president
John Christie who flew up from
Nassau for the event.
The new office is the fourth
to be opened in the Abacos by
H G Christie, and the company
said it is committed to bringing
a new level of real estate ser-
vice and professionalism to the
rapidly-growing island.
"We see tremendous poten-


tial in Guana Cay with a num-
ber of major developments
already underway on the
island," said John Christie, "so
we made the decision to estab-
lish a professional presence here
at this superb location.".
The office is managed by
Estate Agent Neil Aberle, who
has been with the company for
over four years.


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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

I VACANCY NOTICE I
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) invites applications from suitably qualified persons to fill the
position of ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING. The successful
candidate will report directly to the General Manager.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Candidates must have:
* a minimum of 15 years relevant professional experience at senior management level
* a track record of success in leadership and management
* an advanced degree in a field relevant to managing human resources or a combination of undergraduate degree
and experience.
excellent communication skills, conflict resolution and negotiation skills and demonstrate the ability to interact
comfortably with and effectively manage people
significant experience and success working in a large complex organization with diverse employees
OVERVIEW AND OBJECTIVES:
The successful candidate will be responsible for understanding the human capital needs of the Corporation and
how to optimize the human resource value provided to the organization. The objectives include:
* Preparing the current workforce for success in a cost-effective manner
* Anticipating and fulfilling the short and long term human resource needs of BEC
* Devising, planning and implementing HR strategies that will attract, develop and retain a qualified workforce,
which will result in the achievement of the overall business objectives of BEC.
Effectively communicating the vision of BEC both internally and externally
KEY ACCOUNTABILITIES:
" Develop and maintain employee records, in a confidential manner, that include all information necessary to
support the training, manpower planning, succession planning, compensation, benefits, and performance
evaluation programs for BEC
Manage employee training to support business productivity and continuity
Administer employee benefits in a cost-effective manner
Provide employee relation services to keep the workforce productive and motivated
Develop and maintain the manpower plan and succession plan
Assist the organization with employee needs analysis and recruitmclnt
Monitor the implementation of collective bargaining agreements, including reviewing recommendations for
engagements, promotions, transfers, discipline, dismissals
Assist the Labor Compliance Officer in industrial relations matters and participate in the collective
bargaining process
Create and manage BEC's public relations program and improve the impression of BE( with customers,
investors, and governmental authorities
Effectively communicate the mission and actions of BEC to all employees
Establish and maintain corporate policies and procedures relating to human resource management and
monitor compliance
Develop relationships with key external constituents, including the media, to ensure a positive message about
BEC is conveyed to the public
Develop, challenge, and evaluate subordinates
Communicate effectively with superiors, subordinates, and peers
APPLICATIONS along with resumes should be addressed to:
The General Manager
Executive Offices
BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
Blue Hill & Tucker Road
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
and marked
"Assistant General Manager-Human Resources & Training"
PRIVATE & CONFIDENTIAL
Applications must arrive at the General Manager's office no later than 4:00 pm Friday, 10th August 2007


Caves Village, the place for...


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


I





THE TRIBUNE

HBeau TlH|e







reig efta e


HISTORY-MAKING beau-
ty queen Aquelle Plakaris met
with tourism minister of state
Branville McCartney this week
to share ideas as she begins an
extended reign as Miss Com-
monwealth International.
Ms Plakaris made history
when she won the coveted title
in London in 2006, and now
the international organisation
has extended her reign for
another year.
Fellow Bahamian Rashanna
Thompson won the Miss Teen
Commonwealth International
title in the same year.
It was the first victory for the
Bahamas and the first time one
country won both titles.
While most pageants tend to
focus on the outer beauty of
contestants, the Miss Com-
monwealth programme
encompasses more, said Ms
Plakaris, whose unique beauty
has its roots in her mixed
Greek and Bahamian heritage.
"It's also about education, eti-
quette, talent and beauty," she
said.
Proving that beauty and
brains are not odd associates,
Ms Plakaris is pursuing a
degree in law and criminal jus-
tice at the College of the
Bahamas.
After her obligation to the
programme ends, she will study
political science and interna-
tional relations with hopes of
becoming a UN. ambassador.
Ms Plakaris is also enthusi-
astic about advancing her cho-
sen platform HIV/AIDS and
cancer awareness. Already, she
said, cancer has claimed the
lives of two close family mem-
bers.
Mr McCartney encouraged
Aquelle to go after her
dreams.
"It is very refreshing to see
one of our nation's young peo-
S ple doing something extraor-
dinary," he said. "This is an
example of what we can do."


* MINISTER of State for Tourism Branville McCartney with
Aquelle Plakaris


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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


" 4
, "


V.


live a little!
i ~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~-S.J' .. =,LII.. '.-',- 1..


Hi Mommy,
Dad dropped me
qaBY and did no
pull-ups. Help!
the spinae baby
to say more?


PS. Plea;
bag anym
text mes
pull-ups
U'll see
Urgnt.


se
ore
sag
ir
wh


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off to the Nur-
t pack enouf
He also packed
food. do I need


don' t let Dad pac my
i. Included in this
le is a photo of my
1 its present state.
iy this message is


' Justin
' f ~. '. -. P1. *,, '-',S 4 '-- iji m m' i ^ ., ____


.., ,. .- .- .. -. .. _.
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www.btcbahamas.com
Ph: 225-5282


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE


IT NTNLE


Ukrainian is world's tallest man,

Guinness World Records says


* KIEV, Ukraine
A UKRAINIAN man is the
tallest person in the world, beat-
ing a Chinese man who previ-
ously held the title, Guinness
World Records said Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.
Leonid Stadnik, a 37-year-old


former veterinarian, was mea-
sured at 2.57 meters (8 feet 5
inches) in 2006, Guinness World
Records spokeswoman Amar-
ilis Espinoza said in London.
Stadnik is more than 20 cen-
timeters (8 inches) taller than
the former titleholder, China's
Bao Xishun, who measured 2.36


meters tall (7 foot 9 inches).
Stadnik's growth spurt start-
ed at age 14 after a brain opera-
tion apparently stimulated his
pituitary gland.
He lives with his mother,
Halyna, in northwestern
Ukraine, taking care of the fam-
ily's house and garden.


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* KABUL, Afghanistan
PAKISTANI President Gen.
Pervez Musharraf pulled out
Wednesday from a council of
hundreds of Pakistani and
Afghan tribal leaders aimed at
reining in militant violence,
according to Associated Press.
Pakistan's Foreign Office said
Musharraf was canceling his trip
to Kabul because of "engage-
ments" in Islamabad. Pakistani
political analyst Talat Masood
said, however, that Musharraf
probably was responding to
recent U.S. criticism of Pak-
istan's counterterrorism efforts,
which has included suggestions
that the U.S. could carry out uni-
lateral military strikes against al-
Qaida in Pakistan.

Message
"He is trying to convey a
strong message to the United
States. There have been a lot of
statements coming out of Wash-
ington about violating Pakistan's
sovereignty and so on," Masood
said.
A U.S. State Department offi-
cial said the Bush administra-
tion was surprised and dismayed
by Musharraf's snub, particular-
ly after Karzai repeatedly
expressed satisfaction about the
meeting during a joint appear-
ance with President Bush on
Monday.
State Department Spokesman


Sean McCormack said it was
unclear if Musharraf could be
persuaded to reconsider.
"We'll see if President
Musharraf is able to attend any
portion of the meeting," McCor-
mack said.
The four-day "peace jirga,"
due to start Thursday, already
is being boycotted by delegates
from Pakistan's restive South
and North Waziristan regions
amid fear of Taliban reprisals.
The absence of Musharraf,
Pakistan's army chief and most
powerful figure, could further
undermine its effectiveness.
Pakistan's Foreign Office said
that Musharraf had phoned
Afghan President Hamid Karzai
to say he couldn't attend because
of "engagements" in Islamabad,
and that Prime Minister Shaukat
Aziz would take his place.
The idea of the jirga emerged
from a September 2006 meeting
in Washington of President
Bush, Karzai and Musharraf that
focused on ways to combat rising
border violence.
The Taliban, ousted by U.S.-
led forces in late 2001, have
stepped up attacks in the past
two years. The violence has
killed thousands, raising fears
for Afghanistan's fledgling
democracy. U.S. military and
Afghan officials say Taliban mil-
itants enjoy a safe haven in Pak-
istani border regions, particular-
ly Waziristan, where Washing-
ton also fears al-Qaida is


regrouping.
The 650 delegates 350 from
Afghanistan, and about 300 from
Pakistan will meet in an over-
sized tent in Kabul that was used
for the 2004 loya jirga that cre-
ated Afghanistan's post-Taliban
constitution. The delegates' main
focus will be security and ter-
rorism, but they will also talk
about economic development
and fighting drugs.
Taliban representatives are
not involved.
Mohammed Mohaqeq, the
No. 2 official for Afghanistan at
the jirga, was still optimistic
about its prospects because it
showed the two governments
were cooperating.
"From the Afghanistan side,
all the people who hold power
are participating," he said.

Tensions
Masood said, however, that
Musharraf's cancellation
revealed tensions between the
neighbors.
"It shows that the chemistry
between Karzai and him
(Musharraf) is so poor that he
wants to back out at the last
minute," he said. "Why call him
just hours before the jirga? I
don't see why he could not go to
Kabul for a few hours."
Critics also say those who
have real control over the vio-
lence are Taliban and their sup-
porters in the tribal belt and that
talks that do not include them
could prove to be futile.
"This is only a display, which
cannot produce the true views
of the Afghan people," Abdul
Ghafoor Haideri, secretary-gen-
eral of Pakistan's pro-Taliban
Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam party,
which runs the government in
Pakistan's North West Frontier
Province bordering Afghanistan,
and is also boycotting.
Afghanistan's delegates,
including tribal leaders, law-
makers, businessmen and cler-
ics, were decided on by a 20-
member commission approved
by Karzai. Pakistan's govern-
ment selected its delegations,
including senior officials, tribal
leaders and journalists.
One Pakistani delegate, who
will not be attending but request-
ed anonymity because he was
not authorized to speak about it
to media, said that in all about
100 of Pakistan's 350 delegates
are boycotting, including all of
the more than 60 Waziristan rep-
resentatives.
One elder from South
Waziristan, who didn't want to
be identified, said he and others'
would not attend because of
threats from Taliban and
because of the turmoil on their
own doorstep.
"Pakistan government wants
us to go to Kabul, but local Tal-
iban don't want us to do it," he
said. "We cannot offend these
Taliban because they will kill us
if we don't obey them."


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Afghan-Pakistan



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could struggle



for results after



Musharraf pulls out


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE








Animals removed from Endangered Species Act
-J .& "a *.IA 7 THIS 2006 photo provided by the Center For Conservation Biology At The College Of William And
*Air=- Mary shows a eagle chick which is a youngling of one of the three animals to be removed from pro-
tections under the Endangered Species Act in the last year. The three animals include the bald
eagle, the Yellowstone grizzly bear and the Great Lakes population of gray wolves. (AP)


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Brazil arrests alleged Colombian

drug kingpin wanted by the US


* SAO PAULO, Brazil
A TOP leader of Colombia's
biggest drug cartel, captured in
South America's largest city,
used profits from cocaine
shipped to the United States and
Europe to buy legitimate busi-
nesses and property around
Brazil, police said, according to
Associated Press.
Juan Carlos Ramirez Abadia,
who faces three U.S. federal
indictments on drug and racke-
teering charges, was arrested
Tuesday at a gated community
on Sao Paulo's outskirts in a
house with a gym, sauna, plasma
TVs and a huge swimming pool.
Authorities found nearly $1
million in various currencies c
stashed in the home.
The United States requested
his extradition from Brazil in
late June and shared informa-
tion about him with Brazilian
authorities, U.S. Embassy
spokesman Richard Mei said
Wednesday. He declined to say
I


... ...- .....
Si*a~'l -f a ,--- '




uSJ


if that information was crucial
for the capture.
Brazil's Supreme Court will
now consider the extradition
request, but that process could
take months or years.
Brazil does not extradite for-
eign criminal suspects if they
face a death penalty, but Mei
said the U.S. case against
Ramirez Abadia involves a pos-
sible life sentence and not the
death penalty.
Police said Ramirez Abadia,
44, arrived at least two years ago
from Colombia to oversee his
gang's Brazilian investments -
including cattle ranches, indus-
trial property, mansions and
hotels and underwent two
plastic surgeries to alter his
appearance.
"His deal was to stay away
from the drugs, so he could be
with the money that arrived in
Brazil," said Fernando Francis-
chini, the federal police agent
in charge of the investigation.
His Norte del Valle cartel


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emerged as Colombia's most
powerful drug gang after the
mid-1990s, and the U.S. State
Department in September 2004
began offering up to $5 million
for information leading to the
arrest of its leaders.
U.S. officials seek the extra-
dition of Ramirez Abadia -
nicknamed "Chupeta," or lol-
lipop in Colombian Spanish -
who is accused of shipping tons
of cocaine and ordering the
murders of police and infor-
mants in the United States and
Colombia,
Ramirez Abadia was sen-
tenced to 13 years in Colombian
prison in 1996 on drug traffick-
ing, racketeering and other
charges after turning himself in
to benefit from a Colombian law
that allowed him to avoid
extradition by admitting to his
crimes.
But the law did not exempt
from extradition anyone who
committed crimes after it took
effect.
Colombian police say he was
released from prison in 2001 and
then indicted along with other
members of the cartel in 2004
in a racketeering case in Wash-
ington federal court.
Ramirez Abadia's wealth
once reached $1.8 billion, but
he is believed to be indebted to
other traffickers, the U.S. State
Department said.
Francischini said police also
arrested Ramirez Abadia's wife,
another Colombian citizen and
10 Brazilians, and seized about
>$920,000 in various currencies.
Some of the money was found
in stereo speakers, Brazil's
Globo TV reported.
In all police served 22 search
warrants in six states and con-
fiscated drugs, guns, bulletproof
cars, jet skis and yachts, includ-
ing one said to be worth $1 mil-
lion.
The U.S. Treasury Depart-
ment listed Ramirez Abadia as a
"specially designated narcotics
trafficker" in 2000, freezing any
of his U.S. assets and forbidding
Americans from engaging in
commercial transactions with
him.
Globo TV said Ramirez Aba-
dia had one request of officers
who arrested him: Not to be
extradited to the United States.


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35


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


hL







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 21


ap.CANADIAN Prime
Minister Stephen Harper.
Mr Harper is expected to
SCanada's prime make an announcement on
the location of a planned
military deep water port lat-
m in ister er in the week. (AP)






Arctic in an effort




to exert sovereignty es
.- The Tribune wants to hear


M TORONTO

CANADA'S prime minister
on Wednesday began a three
day trip to the Arctic in an effort
to assert sovereignty over the
area, a week after Russia staked
a claim to the North Pole by
sending submarines, according
to Associated Press.
Stephen Harper is expected
to make an announcement on
the location of a planned military
deep water port later in the
week.
"The Russians sent a subma-
rine to drop a small flag at the
bottom of the ocean. We're
sending our prime minister to
reassert Canadian sovereignty,"
a senior government official told
The Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity because of the
sensitivity of the issue.

Significance
The visit has been planned for
months but has taken on new
significance after Russian sub-
marines dropped a flag last week
on the sea floor under the North
Pole.
The Russians claim the area -
and the resources it contains -
for themselves.
Five polar countries Canada,
Russia, the United States, Nor-
way and Denmark are com-
peting to secure subsurface rights
to the Arctic seabed. One study
by the U.S. Geological Survey
estimates the Arctic has as much
as 25 percent of the world's
undiscovered oil and gas.
Last month, Harper
announced that six to eight new
patrol ships will be built to guard
the Northwest Passage sea route


in the Arctic, which the U.S.
insists does not belong to Cana-
da.
U.S. Ambassador David
Wilkins has criticized Harper's
promise to defend the Arctic,
claiming the Northwest Passage
as "neutral waters."
Harper said last month the
deep water port will serve as an
operating base for naval ships
and will also be used for com-
mercial purposes.
"Canada has a choice when it
comes to defending our sover-
eignty over the Arctic.
"We either use it or lose it.
And make no mistake, this gov-
ernment intends to use it," Harp-
er said.
Harper pledged during the last
federal election campaign to
defend the Arctic, promising to
spend billions.
He might also announce a mil-
itary training center in the Arc-
tic.
"Our government has an
aggressive Arctic agenda," Dim-
itri Soudas, the Prime Minister's
spokesman, said Wednesday.
"Economic development -
unleashing the resource-based
potential of the North; environ-
mental protection protecting
the unique northern environ-
ment; national sovereignty pro-
tecting our land, airspace and
territorial waters."
The disputed Northwest Pas-
sage runs below the North Pole
from the Atlantic to the Pacific
through the Arctic archipelago.
As global warming melts the
passage which is only navigable
during a slim window in the sum-
mer the waters are exposing
unexplored resources, and
becoming an attractive shipping


route. Commercial ships can
shave off some 4,000 kilometers
(2,480 miles) from Europe to
Asia compared with the current
routes through the Panama
Canal.
Canada also wants to assert
its claim over Hans Island, which
is at the entrance to the North-
west Passage.
The half-square mile (1.3 sq.
kilometer) rock, just one-sev-
enth the size of New York's
Central Park, is wedged between
Canada's Ellesmere Island and
Danish-ruled Greenland, and for
more than 20 years has been a
subject of unusually bitter
exchanges between the two
NATO allies.

Helicopter
In 1984, Denmark's minister
for Greenland affairs, Tom
Hoeyem, caused a stir when he
flew in on a chartered helicopter,
raised a Danish flag on the
island, buried a bottle of brandy
at the base of the flagpole and
left a note saying: "Welcome to
the Danish island."
The dispute erupted again two
years ago when former Canadi-
an Defense Minister Bill Gra-
ham set foot on the rock while
Canadian troops hoisted the
Maple Leaf flag.
Denmark sent a letter of
protest to Ottawa, while Cana-
dians and Danes took out com-
peting Google ads, each pro-
claiming sovereignty over the
rock 680 miles (1,094
kilometers) south of the North
Pole.
Some Canadians even
called for a boycott of Danish
pastries.


': '






Candia Gibson, 26 Tameka Cash, 26
You are my sunshine, examples of what daughters should be loving and ,
compassionate, beautiful, honest, determined, independent sensitive and f
intelligent. I am very proud of you both love ya like a fat child loves cake! .
SFrom your Mother
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E U R O P E


STAR PRINCESS 12 DAYS
Greek Isles From Venice to Rome
October 16, 28, November 9
Visiting: Venice (Overnight) Dubrovnik,
Corfu, Katakolon, Athens, Mykonos, Rhodes,
Kusadasi, Santorini, at sea, Naples /
Capri, Rome. itineraryy in reverse order
Rates from: Oct. 16: US$1,714.00
Oct 28: US$1,414.00 Nov. 9: US$1,714.0
Additional: Taxes: US$ 304.24

CROWN PRINCESS 7 DAYS
November 3, December 29
Visiting: San Juan, at sea, Barbados,
St Lucia, Antigua, Tortola,
St. Thomas, San Juan. Rates from:
November 3: US$S470.00
December 29: US$1,230.00
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C O ST
DIAMOND PRINCESS 4 DAYS
September 15
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2 days At Sea, Los Angeles.
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STAR PRINCESS 12 DAYS
Egypt & Aegean Round Trip Rome
November 21
Visiting: Rome, Naples / Capri, Athens,
Kusadasi, Istanbul, Mykonos, at sea,
Port Said, (Cairo / Giza), Alexandria,
2 days at sea, Rome.
Rates from: US$ 1 514.00
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C A R I B B E A N
CROWN PRINCESS 7 DAYS
October 27, November 10, December 22*
Visiting: San Juan, St. Thomas, St. Kitts,
Grenada, Bonaire, Aruba, at sea, San Juan.
Rates from: Oct. & Nov.: US$ 470.00
December 22: US$1,230.00
'Order of ports may vary

A L S
DIAMOND PRINCESS 6 DAYS
September 23
Visiting: Vancouver, Victoria, Astoria,
At Sea, San Francisco, Catalina,
Los Angeles. Rates from: US$ 564.00
Additional: Taxes: US$ 194.35


ROYAL PRINCESS 12 DAYS
Holy Land
Visiting: Rome, Sorrento / Capri, 2 days
at sea, Alexandria, Port Said (Cairo / Giza),
Jerusalem (Ashdod), Nazareth / Galilee,
(Haifa), at sea, Kusadasi, Patmos,
Santorini, Athens.
Rates from: US$2,355.00 Inside
USS$2,555.00 Outside
Additional: Taxes: US$ 322.72

CROWN PRINCESS 7 DAYS
October 20,
Visiting: New York, 3 days
at sea, St. Thomas, Antigua, St. Kitts,
San Juan. Rates from: US$ 350.00
Additional: Taxes: US$ 205.49

A L A S K A
SUN PRINCESS 7 DAYS
August 19, 26 September 9
Visiting: Seattle, At Sea, Ketchikan,
Tracy Arm Fjord (Scenic Cruising), Juneau,
Skagway, At Sea, Victoria, Seattle,
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August 26; US$ 539,00 Outside,
September 9: US$ 489.00
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CROWN PRINCESS 7 DAYS
September 15, 22, 29- Oct 13,
Visiting: New York, Newport, Boston, Bar Harbor, St. John, Halifax,
at sea, New York. Itinerary in reverse order in some sailings.
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


Study finds Pacific coral reefs




dying faster than expected


THIS undated
photo released by
the Australian
Institute of Marine
Science, shows
dying coral on the
Great Barrier
Reef, Australia.
Coral reefs in
much of the Pacific
Ocean are dying
faster than previ-
ously thought,
according to a
study released,
Wednesday, Aug.
8, 2007, with the
decline driven by
climate change,
disease and coastal
development. (AP)


At any one moment

there are a million ways

to have fun.


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Bahamas and Panama.


* BANGKOK, Thailand
CORAL reefs in much of
the Pacific Ocean are dying
faster than previously
thought, according to a
study released Wednesoay,
with the decline driven by
climate change, disease and
coastal development,
according to Associated
Press.
Researchers from the
University of North Caroli-
na in Chapel Hill found that
coral coverage in the Indo-
Pacific an area stretching
from Indonesia's Sumatra
island to French Polynesia -
declined 20 percent in the
past two decades.
About 600 square miles
(966 square kilometers) of
reefs have disappeared
since the 1960s, the study
found, and the losses were
just as bad in Australia's
well-protected Great Bar-
rier Reef as they were in
poorly managed marine
reserves in the Philippines.

Widespread
"We found the loss of
reef building corals was
much more widespread and
severe than previously
thought," said John Bruno,
who conducted the study
along with Elizabeth Selig.
"Even the best managed
reefs in the Indo-Pacific
suffered significant coral
loss over the past 20 years."
The study found the
declines date much further
back than earlier estimated
and mirror global trends.
The United Nations has
found close to a third of the
world's corals have disap-
peared, and 60 percent are
expected to b':lost by 2030.
-7. ,?' !


The Indo-Pacific contains
75 percent of the world's
coral reefs and provide a
home for a wide range of
marine plants and animals.
They also provide shelter
for island communities and
are key source of income
with some valued as high as
US$270,000 per square kilo-
meter (0.4 square mile) of
reef, mostly from the bene-
fits of fishing and tourism.
"Indo-Pacific reefs have
played an important eco-
nomic and cultural role in
the region for hundreds of
years and their continued
decline could mean the loss
of millions of dollars in fish-
eries and tourism," Selig
said in a statement. "It's
like when everything in the
forest is gone except for lit-
tle twigs."
While the study didn't
examine the cause of the
decline, Bruno said he
believed it was driven by a
range of factors including
warming waters due to cli-
mate change. He also
blamed storm damage,
runoff from agriculture and
industry, predators like
fast-spreading crown-of-
thorn starfish and diseases
like White syndrome.
Bruno said the study
showed the need to better
manage reefs and prevent
threats such as overfishing.
But he acknowledged that
local measures will mean
little unless the world
comes together to reduce
greenhouse gases.
The Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change
in April, for example, con-
cluded that rising sea tem-
peratures from global
warming could result in the
Great Barrier Reef bleach-
ing orina anasuial basis arid
; r: ,1, : .


facing extinction by 2030.
"It is just one more exam-
ple of the striking, far
reaching effects of climate
change and our behavior,"
Bruno said of the link
between climate change and
reef destruction. "It is the
folks in North Carolina dri-
ving their SUVs. It is their
behavior that is having an
effect way out in the Indo-
Pacific."
Ove Hoegh-Guldberg,
director of the Center for
Marine Studies at the Uni-
versity of Queensland in
Australia, said the study
should put to rest any sug-
gestion that reefs like the
Great Barrier Reef are
untouched by "human pres-
sures."

Study
"This is a solid study that
produces mounds of evi-
dence that suggests reefs
are changing counter to the
untested and ungrounded
claims that it isn't happen-
ing, Hoegh-Guldberg, who
was not involved in the
study, said in an e-mail
interview. "The latter,
unfortunately, amount to
simple wishful thinking.
One has only to look at this
paper to appreciate how
slim these counter-argu-
ments are by comparison."
Bruno and Selig analyzed
6,000 surveys between 1968
and 2004 of more than 2,600
Indo-Pacific coral reefs for
their study which appeared
in the August issue of the
peer-reviewed journal PLoS
ONE.
The surveys tallied coral
cover, a measure of the
ocean floor area covered by
living corals.


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I








THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 23


THE TRIBUNE


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Some product availability may differ for Grand Bahama stores


-1 [


NEW: CITY MARKET SEAGRAPES
Also visit the ROSETTA STREET Location
PROUD WESTERN UNION SUB-GENTS


-I


I -fWE T


ro~Pt i;.


"J-.,


.*ufP'


0S











. NASA begins fueling


space shuttle Endeavour


for evening launch with



teacher-astronaut aboard

* CAPE CANAVERAL,chan
S80 per cent chance


li'.. -:. -. ::


i;4


WORKERS remove a sign that reads "GO ENDEAVOUR" Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007,
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., in preparation for Wednesday evening's schi
launch of the Space Shuttle Endeavour. (AP)


TIME TO PLAY


CHEVROLET OU
For All Life's Roads


SIDE!

A" .7. T"


I ~ ~


WITH good weather fore-
cast for launch time, NASA
fueled space shuttle
Endeavour in preparation
for a Wednesday evening
liftoff and the climax of a
two-decade wait for
teacher-turned-astronaut
Barbara Morgan, according
to Associated Press.
In 1986, Morgan was
Christa McAuliffe's backup
for the Challenger flight,
the shuttle mission that was
meant to send NASA's first
teacher into space. Morgan
was watching a few miles
from the launch pad when
the Challenger exploded
barely a minute into flight.
Many of the other educa-
tors who had competed with
McAuliffe and Morgan to
become the first teacher in
space were in Florida on
Wednesday to watch
Endeavour finally take one
of their own into orbit.
Morgan, 55, will be seated
on the lower deck in the
middle, the same spot where
McAuliffe sat 21 years ago.
"I think the great thing
about, it is that people will
be thinking about Chal-
lenger and thinking about
all the hard work lots of
folks over many years have
done to continue their mis-
sion," Morgan said last
month.
Wednesday morning,
NASA had nearly complet-
at the ed pumping more than
eduled 500,000 gallons of supercold
liquid hydrogen and liquid
oxygen into the ship's tank.
Forecasters gave NASA an
80 percent likelihood that
the weather would be
favourable for the sched-
uled 6:36 p.m. liftoff.
Among those on hand for
the launch, the widow of
Challenger's commander
called Morgan a role model
for students because of her
patience and perseverance
in following her dream.
"The Challenger crew -
my husband Dick Scobee,
the teacher Christa McAu-
liffe they would be so
happy with Barbara Mor-
gan. They'd be excited for
her, they'd be proud of her
and her following through
with the mission for the
teacher to fly in space," said
June Scobee Rodgers,


that weather will be

favourable for liftoff


founding chairman of the
Challenger Center for Space
Science Education.
The seven-member crew
is slated to spend two weeks
at the international space
station on a mission to con-
tinue construction of the
orbiting outpost.

Gyroscope
They will attach a new
truss segment to the space
station, replace a gyroscope
that helps control the sta-
tion's orientation, and deliv-
er 5,000 pounds of cargo.
If the mission is extended
from 11 days to 14 days, a
decision that won't be made
until the mission is well
under way, the astronauts
could add a fourth space-
walk to install protective
panels to protect the station
from debris.
Endeavour was initially
scheduled to lift off Tues-


day but was delayed for a
day because NASA had to
replace a leaky valve in the
crew cabin.
The astronauts assigned
to the mission included a
Canadian doctor, a chemist
who knows sign language
and is a former competitive
sprinter and long jumper,
and a commander whose
identical twin brother is also
a shuttle pilot.
Morgan, who in 1998
became the first teacher to
join the astronaut corps -
trained to conduct tasks on
a mission, rather than to fly
as a guest as McAuliffe had
planned is scheduled to
operate Endeavour's robot
arm and oversee the trans-
fer of cargo from the shuttle
into the station.
First lady Laura Bush
called her Tuesday to con-
gratulate her. While in
space, Morgan also plans to
answer questions from
schoolchildren.


>i flFDE ITY


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* Automatic Locking
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Nassau Motor Company Limited
Shirley St. P.O. Box SS-62135 Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 328-3908 Fax: (242) 323-7272
Website: www.nassaumotor.com


Fidelity is now inviting applications for a:

MANAGER, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Reporting directly to the Group CIO, the successful candidate will have
the following minimum requirements:
Bachelor's degree in Computer Science or related field
MCSE certified
Industry certifications such as CISSP or CCNA, would be an
asset
A minimum of 5 years experience in Systems Administration
preferably in a banking or other financial institution
Past experience in a management role
Proven project management skills
Must be able to work non business hours as required
Excellent written and oral communication skills

The successful applicant will primarily be responsible for managing the
overall IT functions of the Fidelity operations in the Bahamas and to
work in conjunction with the regional IT departments.
An attractive compensation package, including a comprehensive range of
employee benefits is offered.


Manager of IT
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Ltd.
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel (242) 356 7764
Fax (242) 356 4189
Email:- jobs@fidelitybahamas.com


I....

I.


LOTS FOR SALE

In the Berry Islands Bahamas, next door to Chub
Cay Development
Prime Estates Waterfront Lots

4 Lots 1.3 Acres $250,000 each
2 Lots 1A Acres $250,000 each
1 Lot 2.324 Acres $350,000

30ft roadway in place
Contact Ervin Knowles:
Phone: 242-393-0316
242-393-0011
Fax: 242-393-0940
Email: ervinknowles@yahoo.com
anguilla@batelnet.bs


i


-I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


I


h1







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 25


COMICSPAGEB


Tribune Comics

JUDGE PARKER ._____ __


APARTMENT 3-G

AS SHE LEAVES THE /ALL, MARGO'S BUT THERE'S SOMAE-
PA,4RA( ,f*OO RETL/UReA.. -THING ADOUvT ER COOL
GAZE AND 6OMUCG LITTLE
WHY AM I LETTIN G 5AILE THAT SAYS...


BLONDIE


MARVIN


i-r. MARVIN'S ZE.5-
ANNIVERSARY CO/ MINc
UP IN A FEK/ WEEKS, WE.
rHOULHT IT WOULD BE
FUN TO TAKE A LOOK.
AT OTHE/- MEMORABLEE
HAPPENING-S ACK IN iqgz.


NON SEQUITUR


v . .
TE R -


1C e. ~.ar v-- i. L, .
TI,




TIGER


I CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
9 Given an ingredient of beer and
whisky (it's game) (9)
10 Showed gratitude to for having
fended off attackers again (8)
12 Inside, love, there's a fastening
device (4)
13 Being married to an awful nag Was a
constant anxiety (6)
14 Feeling top-selling book should be
returned (7)
15 Does it leave things sweet and
dean? (5,4)
17 Guess I'll turn the key in
and open (9)
18 Section you copy to store in the
bank (7)
20 Claim, for instance, the woman is
holding it back (6)
21 Used to be about a run a minute (4)
24 Surprised, when one opened, to find
money inside (8)
26 Puts it on wrongly and one
attads (4,4)
28 Chances are rum's what it is (4)
29 When the time nears, gathering
round behind (6)
31 And on the ship there's a pirate (7)
34 Showing anger after I lost a boister-
ous game (9)
36 Learning, on arresting (7,2)
38 Playing with a frisking pom when
you call round (7)
39 When you fix the interior, it changes
things (6)
.40 You look through her (4)
41 I, having seen unleashing the dog in,
get anxious (8)
42 Absolutely depressed immediately
after (9)


DOWN
1 Devises, you suppose, over
a drink (6,2)
2 Let out to get water (6)
3 And when there's drink about, be
conspicuous (5,3)
4 Appear to put to shame (4,2)
5 I drop off the girt a big spender (8)
6 How you dismissed all brushes as
being the same? (10)
7 In the news, nothing to upset a
soldier (7)
8 Next day, the bee is flying about (6)
11 Flavouring also, I understand, goes
into it (7)
16 As before, left with a bang (6)
19 Ticked off, having classified as (5)
20 I put a notice outside for help (3)
22 The knack has returned to, once
more (5)
23 Having the edge over, in one
popular resort (6)
25 Attacking for being profligate (7,3)
26 As Monsieur said, he's from the
north (3)
27 Mix with, when you study
at class (7)
30 Leave out "setback" and "hoists" (8)
31 Face up to and they become less
belligerent? (4,4)
32 Is stowed up in warehouses and
banks (8)
33 Gives the impression that one
attacks physically (7)
35 Regret, having meant to turn left
beforehand (6)
36 Asks one please to feature the star
in the supplement (6)
37 Promise to get a painter in for the
building (6)


South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4AQ7542
VAQ96
+5
+103


WEST
48
V7 432
*AJ98
+Q 965


EAST
+ 10963
S-
*Q 104
+A J8742


SOUTH
+KJ
VKJ 1085
*K7632
4K
The bidding:
South West North East
1 V Pass 1 4 Pass
2 Pass 4V
Opening lead -- eight of spades.
Part of the great appeal of bridge
is that it offers an endless supply of
new situations in both the bidding
and the play. These situations may
necessitate doing something you
may never have done or even
thought of doing before.
This should not, of course, pre-
vent you from finding the winning
action. All you need to do is to keep
an open mind.
Take this case where South failed
to make his contract because he
could not bring himself to do some-
thing that went completely against
standard procedure. He reached four
hearts as shown, and West led a
spade. South eyed the lead of
dummy's first bid suit suspiciously,
and correctly decided that it was a
singleton.


This did not really bother him
much, since it looked as if at least 11
tricks five trumps and six spades
were there for the taking. But
things took a potential turn for the
worse after South took the spade
with the king and cashed the king of
hearts, on which East showed out.
This caused South to alter his ini-
tial plan. Since he was not about to
let West ruff one of his good spades,
he felt that his only real hope was
that West had started with a double-
ton spade.
So he drew three more rounds of
trumps and then led the jack of
spades, planning to overtake it with
dummy's queen. When West failed to
follow, there was no way South
could come to 10 tricks. He overtook
the jack with the queen, discarded
the king of clubs on the ace and led a
diamond toward his king. West won
with the ace, and South finished
down two.
There was a simple solution to
South's problem, but he failed to see
it because it required doing some-
thing unusual. All he had to do was
draw two more rounds of trump,
leaving a high trump in dummy, and
lead the jack of spades.
What could West do? If he ruffed,
the defenders could collect their two
aces, but dummy's spades and
remaining trump would take the rest
of the tricks. And if he didn't ruff, the
jack would win and declarer would
then draw the last trump to finish
with 11 tricks.
The winning play was not really
that difficult to find. All declarer had
to do was to keep an open mind.


AR


HOW many words of
four letters or more
can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms
ending In "s". no words
with initial capitals and


OR





IN


U


no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in
inkJet printer).


9 10



16 17

1920 2 22
23
I 2526

28 30 31 32

34 35 36 37

38 39 4

412


EASY PUZZLE


ACROSS
9 Butter substitute (9)
10 Enough, sufficient (8)
12 Shabby clothing (4)
13 Heavily decorated (6)
14 First letter (7)
15 Onlooker (9)
17 Therapy (9)
18 Nabs (7)
20 Of the face (6)
21 Region (4)
24 Estrange (8)
26 Maker of arrows (8)
28 Darker part of
twilight (4)
29 Frightened (6)
31 Sunshade (7)


34 Clumsy (3,6)
36 Completely
disorganized (9)
38 Regulate (7)
39 Cooks in an oven (6)
40 Brave man (4)
41 Household servant (8)
42 Comics (9)
DOWN
1 Food of the gods (8)
2 Sturdy walking
shoe (6)
3 Shakes, throbs (8)
4 Mend (6)
5 Grand (8)
6 Intentional (10)
7 Collide with (3,4)
8 Industrial protest (6)


Floatage (7)
Chucks (6)
Irritates (5)
Enemy (3)
Stinks (5)
Sacred beetle (6)
Amass (10)
Gave food to (3)
Move forward (7)
Impose
limits on (8)
Spectres (8)
Ball game (8)
Abbreviate (7)
English capital (6)
Grab (6)
Room for
manoeuvre (6)


SI I


CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Pass up 7, Suitable 8, T-nn-ed 10, Elis-e 13, P-ant 14. Rich 15, Pu-l1
16, Mug 17, Op.-us 19, Opal 21, Beethoven 23, Rose 24, O-pen 26, Dab 27, Left
29, Cars 32, P-elf 33, Verge 34, Figure 35, Coat hook 36, Prof.-it
DOWN. 1, Us-her 2, Civic 3, Jake 4, Pet-Al 5, Sent 6, Usef-UL 9, In love 11. LID
12, Shoes 13, Push off 15, Put 16. MA-n 18, Peeler 20, Pen-ce 21, Bob 22, O-pt.
23, RA-pier 25, Erg 28, Elect 30, Argo-t 31, See-k-s 32, Puff 33, Vote


EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS 4, Berate 7. Unstable 8, Gander 10, Stank 13, Jive 14. Tuna 15. Dune 16,
Ilk 17 Crop 19. Nice 21, Gratitude 23. Fees 24, Tree :.6, Wi 27 Prey "29 Aver
32, Deer 33, Alone 3,1, Parade 35. Discount 36. Versus
DOWN: 1, Burst 2. Asian 3, Bank 4, Begin 5, Rune 6, Treble 0 Avenu'e 11 Tug 12.
Nacre 13, Jupiter 15, Dot 16, Ice 18, Rasped 20, Ideal 21, Get 22. Try 23, Finale
25, Pen 28. Reeds 30, Vogue 31, Rests 32, Days 33, Arch


TODAY'S TARGET
Good 40; very good
b60; excellentV9
(or more).
Solution tomorrow.


dress


to *cnfiho


THURSDAY,
AUGUST 9

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
You've been the recipient of. great
rewards, but that doesn't stop you
from putting in continuous effort. This
week you are ready and raring to meet
any challenge that comes along.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
You hate being crass, but someone
owes you and you want them to pay
up. Finances are tight, so be sure to
budget for those emergency situations
that always pop up.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Let someone else do the driving
right now, Gemini. Sit in the back
seat, relax and enjoy the ride. You
deserve a nice break to watch the
scenery go by.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
You're flattered by someone's atten-
tion, but their intensity might make
you a bit self-conscious. Don't
underestimate how fabulous you are.
Bask in it a while.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
This week is right for one of your
famous expressions of personal
warmth. Your willpower can over-
come any negativity that comes your
way. Share the wealth with others.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
You have to learn that there are some
people who are dragging you down,
Virgo. Cut these people free and save
your energy for those who really care
about you.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
This week will be a breeze, Libra.
Friends are prevalent, there is no
shortage of activities to keep you
busy, and all eyes are on you. Turn
up the music and have fun.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Your boss has been on your back
and won't leave you alone. Since
you've been doing your job well,
more has been added to your plate.
Speak up before stress sets in.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Your spirits are good this week,
Sagittarius, and so is your luck.
See if you can upgrade it even
more. Capitalize on your good
.fortune at work and with friends.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll need a bit of humor to get you
through this murky week. Expect it to
offer a hum-drum, series of events.
See if friends can help pull you
through. Things will look better.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
It's time to accept that that list of
plans needs an urgent revision. New
prospects have made changes essen-
tial. You will be happy with the
results, Aquarius.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Your life is a bit chaotic, so retreat to
the background and use the noise
and confusion to assess things.
Later, you'll emerge looking great.


CE S by Leonrd:Barde


Viorel Bologan v Sergey
Karjakin, Aerosvit grandmasters,
Yalta 2006. Moscow's Aeroflot
Open is one of the premier
events in Europe, so the Ukraine
national airline decided to
follow suit at a Crimean tourist
resort. The organizers hoped
that Karjakin, 16, who at 12
became the youngest GM in
history, would add to his
reputation. The teenager
reached this diagram where
experts thought he stood
slightly worse-White's a4 pawn
looks more dangerous than
Black's at c4. Then, to
everybody's surprise, Karjakin
advanced c4-c3. What was
Black's idea?


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THETRIBUNENTERNATIONAfL NEWS


Leaders of North



Sand South Korea



to hold second



ever summit*

Kim Jong II to host Roh

Moo-Hyun in late August


* SEOUL, South Korea

THE leaders of North and
South Korea, capitalizing on
progress in shutting down the
North's nuclear program,
plan to meet later this month
for the second-ever summit
between the longtime foes,
officials said Wednesday,
according to Associated
Press.
North Korean leader Kim
Jong II will host South Kore-
an President Roh Moo-hyun
from Aug. 28-30 in
Pyongyang, North Korea's
capital, South Korean presi-
dential security adviser Baek
Jong-chun told reporters.
At the first North-South
summit in June 2000, Kim
met then-South Korean Pres-
ident Kim Dae-jung in
Pyongyang.
The two Koreas remain
technically at war since the
1950-53 Korean War ended
in a cease-fire, not a peace
treaty.
But since 2000, the coun-
tries launched a joint indus-
trial zone in North Korean
border city of Kaesong,
bringing together South
Korean know-how and cheap
North Korean labor. More
than 17,000 relatives split by
the heavily fortified border
between the countries have
met in tearful reunions, and
roads and rail lines have been
reconnected across the fron-
tier.

Relations
Kim Jong II believed the
timing was right for a second
meeting due to the state of
relations between the Koreas
and the improved regional
situation, South Korean
National Intelligence Service
head Kim Man-bok quoted
his North Korean counter-
part as saying earlier this
month. The South's spy chief
twice visited the North to
arrange the summit.
Steps to bring the Koreas
closer together have faltered
due to the latest standoff
over North Korea's nuclear
weapons ambitions that
began in 2002.
But the summit comes in
the wake of the first progress
on disarmament since the cri-
sis began, after North Korea
shut down its sole operating
nuclear reactor last month in
exchange for oil aid. The U.S.
and other regional powers
are negotiating with the
North on a timeline for the
communist nation to declare
all its nuclear programs and
disable the facilities.
The summit announcement
came as experts from North
Korea met with other coun-
tries in the truce village of
Panmunjom to discuss tech-
nical details of future aid for
denuclearization. The North
agreed at the talks Wednes-
day to move quickly on dis-
armament even if the aid
takes more time, South Kore-
a's deputy nuclear envoy Lim
Sung-nam said.
Pyongyang views the
nuclear issue as a dispute
with Washington, making it


North Korean performers

depict reunification
NORTH Korean students and per-
formers create the shape of the North
Korean flag during a scene depicting
reunification of the two Koreas during
the Arirang Grand Mass gymnastics
and Artistic performance at the May
day stadium in Pyongyang, North
Korea, Monday, Aug. 6, 2007. The
North Korean Arirang Mass Games is
the largest choreographed gymnastics
display in the world with over 100,000
dancers taking part in the perfor-
mance. The leaders of North and
South Korea will meet this month for
the second time since the peninsula's
division after World War II, the two
countries announced Wednesday,
Aug. 8, 2007, capitalizing on progress
in Pyongyang's nuclear disarmament
to revive their historic reconciliation.
(AP)


unlikely that the North-South
summit would achieve any
further arms breakthroughs
beyond a bland declaration.
North Korea has consistently
refused to engage South
Korea on the nuclear stand-
off during one-on-one meet-
ings between the sides.
On Wednesday, Roh told
security officials working to
organize the summit that it
would help "normalize inter-
Korean relations that have
stalled due to the North
Korean nuclear issue,"
according to his spokesman
Cheon Ho-sun. The South
Korean president added that
the meeting would also help
Pyongyang improve its rela-
tions with the international
community.
Kim Dae-jung won a Nobel
Peace Prize for his efforts to
engage North Korea, but the
achievement was tainted by
later revelations that South
Korea made secret payments
to foster the meeting. South
Korea insisted Wednesday
there was no wrongdoing this
time.
"The spirit of the upcom-
ing summit is reconciliation
and transparency," presiden-
tial spokesman Oh Young-
jin said.
Kim Jong II1 promised in
2000 to make a return visit
to South Korea for a second
summit. But Kim Man-bok
said Roh had accepted North
Korea's proposal for
Pyongyang as the venue.
Roh, a former human
rights lawyer who took office
in 2003, has repeatedly said
that he would meet Kim at
any time and there has been
persistent talk this year that a
summit was possible.
The conservative opposi-
tion Grand National Party
has been staunchly opposed
.to a summit, calling it a polit-
ical ploy aimed at bolstering
the embattled liberals ahead
of December's presidential
vote.
Roh is set to leave office
in February and has seen his
popularity plummet amid
perceptions he has bungled
handling of the economy and
security policies.
"At this point, there is
nothing to expect from the
summit," Grand National
Party spokeswoman Na
Kyung-won said Wednesday
in a statement.
South Korean citizens
questioned why Kim Jong II
had not fulfilled his promise
to travel to the South and
were divided on whether the
meeting would help reconcil-
iation with the North.
"It's humiliating that the
summit is going to be held in
Pyongyang, the capital of
North Korea, again," said
Son Jin, 88, a political
activist. "It's high time that
North Korea had to visit
Seoul."
Kim Bong-chon, a 62-year-
old businessman, said he
hoped the event was not just
for political gain.
"Nothing is better than
having regular meetings
between the leaders to rec-
oncile the relationship," he
said.


4e


, ,, -u07, PAGE 27


THE TRIBUNE











'1-a
a ~a 4-


- a


Given to Outstanding Wendys


-~ ~
4


The Executive Team of Aetos Holdings Limited

would like to extend congratulations to the Team

Members who were recently awarded Dave

Thomas' M.B.A. for consistently demonstrating

the values he lived by through their everyday

actions and behaviors.


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honour. M.B.A. recipients are recognized for

living Dave Thomas' values everyday in their

work for Wendy's and in their personal life not

just once or twice but consistently over time. The

recipients are role models and set a good example.

The M.B.A. honouree believes in taking care of the

basics of the business down to the smallest detail

living by a set of values honesty, integrity,

respect and generosity.



All of Dave Thomas' M.B.A. recipients
know how to live life with:


Integrity and honesty


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*0

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service with the Company


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bnrmflsfl!


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9,2007


SECTION


BUSINESS


business@tribunemedia.net Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Deputy PM


denies


Bay


Street 'conflict'


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
Deputy Prime
Minister Brent
Symonette yes-
terday dis-
missed claims
that he had engaged in a conflict
of interest by chairing a "secre-
tive meeting" to push for the
downtown shipping facilities to
be relocated to Arawak Cay,
saying the meeting with ship-
ping companies and Bay Street
retailers had dealt with a num-
ber of issues impacting down-
town Nassau.
Responding to allegations by
PLP Senator Jerome Fitzger-
ald, Mr Symonette told Tribune
Business that while he did
recently meet with Bay Street
merchants and representatives
from the shipping companies,
it was not to push any agenda


claims


* Final consultant's report on southwestern New Providence report due by September-end
Symonette says meeting he chaired did not push shipping facilities relocation
agenda, instead addressing downtown Nassau's short-term needs


for a port relocation to a specific
venue.
Rather, Mr Symonette said
the meeting discussed a wide
range of measures that could
improve downtown Nassau,
including parking, buses,
garbage and Bay Street's gen-
eral appearance, cruise ships
and the container port.
"We went through the whole
gamut of ways to improve the
downtown area, but the meet-
ing was not about moving the
container port to Arawak Cay,"
Mr Symonette said.
Mr Fitzgerald had told the
Senate that he was "shocked
and dismayed" to learn that the
meeting had even taken place,


* BRENT SYMONETTE


and that it was chaired by Mr
Symonette.
"The objective of the meeting
appeared to be to hatch a plan
to move the container port to
Arawak Cay. Needless to say,
this is a clear conflict of interest
as the Deputy Prime Minister,
either personally or through his
family interests, is an owner of
one of the commercial ports of
entry," Mr Fitzgerald said.
"Judging from the Deputy
Prime Minister's past perfor-
mance when it comes to con-
flicts of interest, (a reference to
Mr Symonette resignation as
chairman of the Airport
Authority), I am sure this con-
Icern was not one that he gave


much thought to when he decid-
ed to call and chair the meet-
ing."
"So here we have, in the face
of all of this empirical evidence
and research, the Deputy Prime
Minister of this country is
attempting along with his pri-
vate interest group to move the
container port to Arawak Cay."
However, Mr Symonette said
everyone at the meeting was
fully aware of his family's inter-
est, and that he had not pushed
any solution to the shipping
facilities relocation issue.
While the Symonette family
is the landlord for at least one
Bay Street shipping company,
Seaboard Marine, Mr Symon-


ette also denied that he had a
hidden agenda. He said the
meeting was only to discuss oth-
er measures that could be
implemented in the short-term.
"We are trying to improve
the downtown area, and I
attended the same type of meet-
ings before I become the deputy
prime minister," Mr Symonette
said.
"There was no conflict of
interest involved, and if there
was I would have excused
myself."
Mr Symonette said he had
invited all representatives at the

SEE page 5


'Divorce situation' Multi-million Raven project 'taking off'


gets nearer at the


S Port Authority


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
ATTORNEYS for the late
Edward St George's estate and
Sir Jack Hayward have "agreed
that this is certainly a divorce
situation", The Tribune was told
yesterday, as the two parties
manoevere to each buy out the
other's stake in the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) and Port Group Ltd.
Fred Smith, attorney for the
St George estate, said that dur-
ing Tuesday's in-chambers court
hearing before Supreme Court
Justice Anita Allen, Sir Jack's
wholly-owned British Virgin
Islands company, Seashells
Investments, filed a summons
in which it renewed its offer to
buy out the estate's stake.
Mr Smith said this was resist-
ed by the St George estate,
which "urged the court to deter-
mine" if Sir Jack's conduct had
been "oppressive", as alleged
by his clients, and if they were
the "innocent victims".
If the court so found, Mr


Smith urged it to order that Sir
Jack be compelled to sell his
stake the two parties are still
disputing his claim to 75 per
cent ownership, the estate say-
ing it is a 50/50 arrangement to
the St George estate.
While both sides sought the
court's approval to buy out the
other, Justice Allen did order
that that the GBPA's receivers,
Clifford and Myles Culmer,
after consultation with Ian Bar-
ry, the GBPA's chief financial
officer and financial controller,
issue equal dividends to Sir Jack
and the St George estate.
Justice Allen will hand down
her ruling on the ownership dis-
pute on August 17, and the two
sides are due back before her
in court on August 22 to make
submissions on the "oppression"
allegations, as this must be
decided before any order for
one side to sell shares to the
other is made.
Gregory Moss, Sir Jack's

SEE page 6


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A LETTER of Intent for the multi-mil-
lion dollar Raven Group project in Freeport
has been signed with the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) and Port Group
Ltd, marking a small but important first
step towards securing another major invest-
ment that should help drive Freeport's econ-
omy in years to come.
Sources familiar with the situation con-
firmed that a Letter of Intent had been
signed between the relevant parties for the
project "a couple of weeks ago", effective-
ly representing an agreement in principle
to proceed with the investment on which
"a lot of progress has been made".
The Tribune understands that an Envi-
ronmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for
the Raven Group project has been com-
pleted, with all parties in agreement on the


Letter of Intent signed for $250m Freeport investment

site plan and where the various properties in intention to attract the ultra luxury, high-end
a luxury hotel and residential real estate resort brand Aman Resorts as the resort
development will be located, operating partner.
However, much work remains to be done, The Raven Group is a publicly-quoted
so Freeport residents and citizens should property development company based in
not become overly-excited just yet. The pro- the UK, focusing on the upscale residen-
ject will require National Economic Coun- tial markets, and details concerning its pro-
cil (Bahamian Cabinet) approval, along with posed investment were revealed in affidavit
Central Bank of the Bahamas exchange by Sir Jack Hayward's son, Rick, that was
control permission, and the Raven Group filed with the courts as part of the Port
will also have to obtain all the necessary Authority ownership dispute.
construction and other permits from the The Raven Group was described as
Port Authority and other relevant agencies. "negotiating a high-end hotel and residential
Once everything is in place, the project is development" for Freeport, its proposal
likely to require several years to build out, then involving a 1,500-acre site that would
with infrastructure preceding the construc- be developed in'four phases.
tion of the actual physical buildings.
The Tribune first revealed the existence of
the Raven Group project last year, and the SEE page 4


No General exclusivity

for British American


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
BRITISH American Finan-
cial will not be the exclusive
agent/broker for Generali's
insurance products in the
Bahamas, the latter's Caribbean
regional director told The Tri-
bune yesterday, as it aims to ulti-
mately "expand and bring more
some innovation" to the
Bahamian market.
Jason Borrino said British
American Financial "will
become one of many, many bro-
kers. There's no exclusivity with
British American" when it came
to selling Generali's medical
insurance policies in the
Bahamas.
He explained that the
arrangement with British Amer-
ican Financial, which takes
effect from September 1, 2007,
will see Generali assume all the
underwriting risk "on all the
medical business".
"The majority is group med-
ical business, along with all
attaching life portfolios and
some individual health policies
written through brokers," Mr


New insurer promises
expansion and 'product
innovation' for Bahamas

Borrino explained.
General will assume around
500 group major medical poli-
cies, Mr Borrino added. The 16
British American Financial staff
who handled the administration
and claims processing for these
policies now transferred to Gen-
erali's operation, based at Higgs
& Johnson's former headquar-
ters, Sandringham House, on
Shirley Street.
"The plan is to expand the
business and bring some inno-
vation to the marketplace," Mr
Borrino said.
"I think product innovation
and improving the service in the
back office [will be one of the
main goals]. That is so impor-
tant to medical insurers."
Mr Borrino said the Registrar
of Insurance had approved Gen-


--I 'II
alt',
) d I lUG


SEE page 4


U ~U


Money Safe.
Money Fast.



at
Bank of The Bahanas
I N T E N A T I 0 N A 1,
On-fat


I I I I





THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


Ms. Klonaris, third from left, receives her Gift Certificate for $3,500 from
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Bitish American Financial appoints
Sen. Hon. Michael B. Halkitis, CFA
Consultant, Financial Se ces & Investments
l te he il lea d as iesm add=sor baesss a coatntrte to tr omrianlia of th
Cew to a N f ial sefa m fine. e wlH pie de estmeat suppo for thdidu &
C~a a osd lbiness f f PadFia l Pla g o e A chamwo t lai ofd the
CMpsfs me di fds a dl sra c s & serwict e s d to provide both insuce

fr. WWal as tlo f ftiWle for Ahe Adelaid Cosiluey P menSta
Skotati#a lf, re K tiy f aff rm21t2of 20O7, w heassifne IIeJA ofStao for
aimk e a a li Noa t ii mph on0a sd alle* twemno mea ias I
as ll d d UlBfBy eaws eida, biliei aseri as iairma oft l aam
ikalld O &Mir, a Cape ad Crmai td e l ibss asCapiwl F
In making the announcement Mr. I. Chester Cooper, President & CEO remarked "Before entering
politics Michael distinguished himself in tie Investment arena and is unquestionably one of the
brightest minds in the business, His talents and skills as a CFA will add significant value as we
continue our exciting evolution into a full service financial Services & Investments firm. Michael's
addi#on to our team will accelerate the launch of several exciting products & services providing
more asset protection and wealth creation opportunities for our clients. We are delighted to welcome
Mr. Halkitis to the British American Financial familY,


TA CAR


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BUSINESS^^^^^^^


II - --1-


it M ov% -- -


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Who makes the rules


and regulations


is vital


The question put to
me after last week's
article were quite
interesting. Some
persons agreed, while others
thought I was out of my mind
for suggesting that the old
adage, 'when you're dumb, you
dangerous' had any truth.
Well, as always, I try not to
define criminality without some
support for my position, even
though from time to time I do
go out on a limb and make
statements based on my obser-
vations and experience. As stat-
ed in last week's column, I have
seen the truth relating to the
high number of violent offend-
ers being at the lower end of
the academic scale. However,
this week I will offer another
perspective as it relates to my
position, which I feel will bring
balance and further expose this
problem that we call criminali-
ty.
Our world and life experi-
ence creates, for all of us, a cer-
tain type of reality that has it


own rules and regulations. We,
meaning those of us who live in
what we have determined to
be a modern, civilised society,
and are not readily prepared
to take a life, have accepted
rules and regulations to govern
our affairs. Likewise, the vio-
lent offender has accepted cer-
tain rules and regulations to
govern his/her affairs.
Believe it or not, there exists
a code of conduct that deter-
mines how the violent offender
should, and in some instances,
must respond. If not followed,
the potential for lifelong reper-
cussions is almost inevitable.
How can the young man
demand respect in his commu-
nity if he does not retaliate with
the same or more force? He
definitely cannot get the atten-
tion of ladies, who in my opin-
ion are his major motivating
factor, but that's for another
time.
Society, in its efforts to
reduce crime, must in my opin-
ion be prepared to walk in the


SSafe &
h Secure


shoes of these persons in an
effort to better understand the
way they think. It will not be
sufficient to lock them up and
throw away the key. We cannot
ship them to another country
and just forget about them. Our
community is very small, so
what we are asking and
demanding in many instances is
for us to forget about our
cousins, uncles and nieces. This
is highly unlikely, and com-
pounds the problem. On
numerous occasions I have had
to deal with suspects who I
grew up with and went to
school with. I recall that on
occasions, while being briefed
for a special operation where
the suspect was considered
armed and dangerous, the per-


son in question and I several
years earlier shared many
lunches while in high school.
For the record, they were
apprehended without any alter-
cations, to their and my relief.
Really, the crime problem is
not the police's problem. I do
not see police officers being
gunned down or stabbed to
death, nor the politician. This
brings me back to this unstated
code of conduct, as it may also
appear form a victim's stand-
point that they, too, are of the
same calibre and mind sent of
the offender.
Do we see lawyers, managers
and professionals stabbing and
killing each other? The rules
of engagement are different.
We may see an all-out war in
the courtroom between two
attorneys, who afterwards can
be seen plying a friendly game
of golf together. What makes
these professionals different is
not their education, but the
rules that govern how they
interact and how they relate.


This is not to say that profes-
sionals cannot be criminals, as
we see from cases of fraud and
embezzlement.
Is it not interesting that these
intellectuals, who do not com-
mit violent crimes, are the ones
who are making the formal
rules that govern our society.
This, then, makes for an unfair
system, as we rarely hear the
news media covering bank
frauds, but we certainly hear
of the armed robber getting
away with a few hundred dol-
lars. The same person is then
said by police to be armed and
dangerous, one who should be
approached with caution.
In their Crime and Human
Nature study, Wilson and Her-
rnstein discuss exactly these
variations of the rules, and how
they in fact determine what is
considered serious crime and
what is considered violent.
They find that what is per-
ceived to be criminal is
authored add ratified by the
social elite, who have lost touch


or never touched the lower
echelons of society. The term
'no one is hurt' becomes
painfully apparent when the
stealing of millions causes an
increase in service fees or event
the bankruptcy of the business.
It is the better understanding
of these variations that we need
to see more, and as stated in
last week's article, is all too
often observed by the offender,
which make us all liable.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss prevention and
asset protection training and
consulting company, specialis-
ing in policy and procedure
development, business security
reviews and audits, and emer-
gency and crisis management.
Comments can be sent to PO
Box N-3154 Nassau, Bahamas
or e-mail gnewry@preventa-
tivemeasures.net or visit us at
www.preventativemeasures.net


* LEON Williams, BTC's. .
president and chief i
executive, explained to I
the audience at British
American Financial's
Midsummer Night
School how technology
impacts their life.



(Photos: Wendell
Cleare)R





British American helps



on financial planning


BRITISH American Finan-
cial has staged its annual Mid-
summer Night School to assist
Bahamians with money man-
agement solutions, covering
issues such as will and estate
planning, financial planning
and investments, healthy
lifestyles, preserving the envi-
ronment and improving life
with technology.
Cecillia Cox, British Ameri-
can Financial's manager of
marketing, public relations and
business development, said:
"As we roll out new products
and move with technology we
want our clients to be there
with us."
Keith Major, British Ameri-
can's vice-president and head
of sales, advised the audience
on proper financial planning in
his session.
He outlined four steps for
financial planning, which,
entailed writing down financial
goals, prioritising goals, initi-
ating a plan of action, and
reviewing and updating the
plan, which he said will make


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


an individual financially inde-
pendent.
"Take your savings out first.
If you spend first and you save
the rest, you will always owe
interest. If you save first and
spend the rest, you will always
earn interest. Those people
who spend first will always be
working for those people who
save first," Mr Major said.
Addressing the fast pace of


today's technology, Leon
Williams, the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny's president and chief execu-
tive, said there was "no longer
a village, it is now global trib-
alism".
He illustrated this by telling
the audience that new tech-
nologies have made it easier to
create businesses over the
Internet.


* PHYLLIS Meeusen, senior
client relationship advisor at
British American Financial
(standing), and Michael Halkitis,
consultant for financial services
and investment at British Amer-
ican (sitting), were featured
speakers at British American
Financial's Midsummer Night
School.


uR rAL UAwHrSA

INDIGO
GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

A unique opportunity to own 5 adjacent lots in this quaint gated
community, each lot measures 60' x 130' zoned for 15 units.
Amenities include double tennis court and swimming pool. Was
$650,000 now reduced to $550,000 for quick sale.

LOT #70 HOPE TOWN-ABACO

Large lot less than 300' from the beach with partial ocean views,
priced to sell at $285,000.

ORANGE HILL
WEST BAY STREET

17.5 Acres Superb Oceanfront in the most desirable location on
the island. Ideal for a High-End Condo development or Class A
Office Finacial Centre. Offered at $8,000,000.

GILINGAM HOUSE MONTAGU

Class "A" Office Space Available!
Top floor comprises of 2,562 sq. ft. of leasable area and 1,108
2q. ft. of common leasable area totaling 3,670 gross square
feet. Lease is $32 per square foot with CAM charges being $12
pers square foot. This floor is being leased with partial office
furnishings.


Contact Kingsley Edgecombe
Ph: 242-424-4959
Email: kingsley@kingsrealty. comr


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency responsible
for regulating the Investment Funds, Securities and Capital Markets in the
Bahamas through its administration of the Securities legislation (the Investment
Funds Act, 2003 (IFA) and Securities Industry Act, 1999 (SIA), is seeking
candidates for the following position:

Programmer
Responsibilities:

* Assist with the design development and ongoing maintenance of IT
application systems within the Commission
* Identify ways to improve current software that will result in a better user
experience
* Add new features to current software and create new software applications
as needed
* Work independently or in a team environment to meet deadlines
* Research and fix problems and acquire new knowledge with little or no
supervision
Qualifications and Experience:

* Qualified programmer with a minimum qualification of a bachelor's
degree in computer science or related field or 5-7 years of programming
experience
* 2-3 years experience developing web
* Knowledge of IIS6 and SQL server 2005 essential
* Ability to write SQL statements and stored procedures is an asset
* Sound knowledge of web security using SSL encryption and building
secure applications
* Ability to work in Dreamweaver, Front page, Visual Studio or other web
design tool a plus
* Working knowledge of the securities industry and the relevant legislation
Competencies:

* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in HTML, VB/Java script, ASP.NET, SQL, SSL
* Must have ability to grasp new programming technologies and apply
new techniques to environment
A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. To apply, please provide
a resume to the attention of:
MANAGER CORPORATE AFFAIRS
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs
Applications should be submitted no later than August 15th, 2007


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 3B


THE TRIBUNE
















Si A



I I

4


GLINTON


I SWEETING


I O'BRIEN


COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
303 SHIRLEY STREET I P.O. BOX N-492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE I THE BAHAMAS
T: 242.328.3500 I F: 242.328.8008.1 www.gsolegal.com

GLINTON I SWEETING I O'BRIEN is seeking two qualified
Attorneys-At-Law to join the firm as Associates specializing in Real Estate
Law and Litigation, respectively.

Applicants should have strong academic records, particularly in
respect of their legal studies, be organized and diligent workers with sound
analytical and writing skills, and should have the personal skills
necessary for direct professional interaction with the firm's most
important clients. Two or more years experience is
preferred but is less important than ability and the right attitude.

Successful applicants will receive a highly competitive salary,
including full medical insurance and will participate in a generous
profit-sharing scheme. More importantly, the successful applicants will join
a thriving new practice in the early stages of its growth, and work in an
enjoyable and challenging environment while having the benefit of
careful and thorough training from experienced practitioners.

Interested applicants should deliver their curriculum vitas to our offices
in the Destinations Building, 303 Shirley Street, along with copies of all
degrees and certificates earned and at least two samples of written work
prepared by the applicants in either an academic or professional context.
All applications will be treated as confidential.









4' V




EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (the Commission), a
statutory agency responsible for the oversight, supervision and regulation
of the investment funds, securities and capital markets in or from The
Bahamas, invites applications from qualified Bahamians for the
following position:

Field Examiner
Responsibilities:
Conducting on-site inspections of entities licensed or registered by
the Commission
Assisting in the enforcement process addressing deficiencies identified
in the inspection


Qualifications and Experience:
Bachelor's degree in Accounting or Finance
1 2 years experience in Auditing or Public Accounting
Knowledge of the securities industry a plus.


Competencies:
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Proficient in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and Excel)


A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked "Private and Confidential"
to:


MANAGER CORPORATE AFFAIRS
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be received no later thanAugust 15, 2007


N~


* THE Bahamas Real Estate Association (BREA) recently held a course, attended by 40 BREA
members, that will lead to the CRS designation (Certified Residential Specialist) for licensed
Bahamian brokers and salespersons. The course was conducted by visiting lecturer, Gee
Dunsten. Shown are Larry Roberts (left), BREA president, and visiting lecturer Gee Dunsten CRS

(Photo: Roland Rose)




Multi-million Raven



project 'taking off'


FROM page 1


"It is expected that such a
development would create over
700 jobs in the local communi-
ty during construction, and
approximately 750 jobs upon
opening. It would involve
expenditure by the Raven
Group in excess of $250 mil-
lion for the early stages," the
affidavit alleged.
Separately, sources told The
Tribune that the upscale, bou-
tique hotel that Aman would
operate is likely to feature 60
units and 40 associated villas.
Aman is seen by many as the
ideal resort operator for the
Bahamas, as its position at the
upscale, five-star plus end of
the market will enable it to
charge room rates to compen-
sate for the high operating cost
environment it faces, while still
providing guests with the expe-
rience and value-for-money to
match.
Graham Torode, the Grand
Bahama Development Com-
pany's (Devco) president and
chief executive, did not return
The Tribune's calls seeking
comment on the Raven Group
or Morgan Stanley projects.
It is understood that Morgan
Stanley executives, and those
from three hotel companies


interested in being part of its
2,000-acre Barbary Beach pro-
ject, one of which is thought to
be Marriott, were in Freeport
at the weekend.
The project, which received
approval from the Government
earlier this year, is a 50/50 ven-
ture between Morgan Stanley
and Port Group Ltd, the for-
mer having acquired Devco's
stake.
Projected
The Morgan Stanley devel-
opment is projected to feature
hotels, entertainment facilities,
residential developments,
roads, infrastructure and sport-
ing facilities. It is anticipated
to cost "several hundred mil-
lion dollars" and could ulti-
mately prove to be Freeport's
answer to Atlantis and Paradise
Island.
Elsewhere on the Grand
Bahama investment front,
sources told The Tribune that
Ginn Clubs & Resorts had just
completed a $200 million
financing by its seed capital
provider, Philadelphia-based
Lubert Adler, using funds from
Credit Suisse and other
investors to finance the vertical
construction of bungalows, vil-
las and condos at its West End
project.
While Ginn's developments
in Florida are understood to


have seen lot and real estate
sales fall off in recent months,
the Bahamas remains relative-
ly strong thanks to the compa-
ny's targeting of the European
market, especially buyers from
Great Britain and Germany.
Associated Bahamian Dis-
tillers & Brewers, the over-the-
counter market listed vehicle
for investments by Sir Garet
'Tiger' Finlayson and his fami-
ly, is seeking to raise $18 mil-
lion in a private bond place-
ment.
Sources suggested the funds
raised will be used to refinance
the Finlaysons' Solomon's
Mines retail chain, which is said
to have been struggling for
some time.
The Tribune revealed earlier
this year how attempts to reach
a partnership agreement with
rival luxury goods retailer Dia-
monds International fell
through.
Solomon's Mines has been
seeking a partner who can offer
greater management expertise
for some time, previous talks
with international retailer,
Dufry, and others having also
fallen through.
Solomon's Mines and the
Finlayson family are said to be
keener on finding a partner,
rather than selling the retail
business they acquired in 2003-
2004.


No General exclusivity


for British American


FROM page 1


erali's entrance to the Bahami-
an market as a licensed insurer,
and the transfer of all the poli-
cies from British American
Financial, last year.
When asked why Generali
had chosen to enter the
Bahamian life and health insur-
ance market, Mr Borrino said
the company had previously
had a presence in this nation on
the property and casualty side,
at one time writing business


through Insurance Manage-
ment.
"Generali entered the Cay-
man market just over four years
ago. We had an enjoyable expe-
rience in the Caribbean, and the
Bahamas is a natural progres-
sion for us," Mr Borrino said.


"It was opportunistic. We
were looking for another entity
in the Caribbean, and were put
in touch with British American
because they were looking to
divest their health insurance


portfolio and focus on other
things. We got in touch with
them, and the deal was
arranged."
One insurance broker, who
requested anonymity, said of
General's arrival: "Hopefully,
with Generali in the market it
will improve the service out of
British American and make
them an alternative to place
business with."
In his June 25, 2007, letter to
affected policyholders, British
American Financial's president
and chief executive, Chester
Cooper, said the company had
decided to exit the group major
medical business and focus on
its core business individual life
and health insurance, and finan-
cial services and investments.
He explained that as part of
the agreement for Generali to
assume the group major med-
ical underwriting risk, plus
claims processing and adminis-
tration, "we are assured that
there will be no immediate
change in your benefits and
rights under the current con-
tract".
Mr Cooper said that "to
ensure continuity and a smooth
transition, we have co-ordinated
the transfer of your existing rep-
resentatives to Generali".


Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


_ _F


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE














Providence !" .





executive




passes Series


7


exam


PROVIDENCE Advisors' chief financial officer, Monique Davis-Cooper, passed the Series 7
examination in Fort Lauderdale after studying with the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute
(STI). She is pictured (right) with Providence Advisors' chief executive, Kenwood Kerr.


Deputy PM denies Bay Street 'conflict' claims


FROM page 1


meeting to address any com-
ments, suggestions or com-
plaints directly to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham.
He addedthat Mr Ingraham
had also addressed similar com-
ments raised in the House of
Assembly, and said that if Mr
Fitzgerald wished to malign his
character, he should not do so
behind the privilege protection
of the Senate.
Mr Symonette said the plan
commissioned by the former
Christie administration to deter-
mine the feasibility of a port
relocation to southwestern New
Providence at a site between
Commonwealth Brewer'v and


BEC's Clifton Pier power sta-
tion, should be completed by
Dutch consulting firm, Ecorys,
before the end of September
and that the Government was
awaiting that report.
Meeting
The Tribune also spoke to
another person attending the
meeting, who asked not to be
named. That person told The
Tribune that the meeting was
very productive in that Mr
Symonette detailed the prob-
lems the Bahamas and Bay
Street were experiencing in
regard to tourism numbers, the
Royal Caiibbean cruise line
pullout and the potential lor
other ships to lollowv
ThfAbel)s'ol the meeting \\ as
on ways to improN e the state of


Bay Street, such as garbage col-
lection, jitneys, cargo trucks and
crime, and to ensure that the
Bahamas did not lose its
tourism advantages, the source
said.
He added that even with a
port relocation, it would be at
least two to three years before a
suitable venue would be com-
pleted to facilitate such a move.
"So Mr Symonette was dis-
cussing things that we can do
in the immediate present that
would help to revive the area. It
was a very positive and pro-,
ductive meeting," the source
said.
The man also told The Tri-
bune that too much emphasis
ha, been placed on port relo-
at on. as though this was the
singular issue that should be
addressed.


He added that it was sad that
the truth about a positive event
had been distorted by someone
trying to gain political mileage.
Yet another source spoken
to by The Tribune said the
meeting did discuss "alterna-
tive venues" for the port other
than southwestern New Provi-
dence.
Source
The source said: "I know
Brent is very dubious about the
southwestern port, and that oth-
er alternatives should be con-
sidered. Brent doesn't seem
totally convinced that the south-
western site is where it should
go, even though a consulting
firm has done a detailed report
about the use of that site."
It is understood that Ecorys


has already presented a prelim-
inary report to a meeting of
business executives, at which
Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
works, was present. In his Sen-
ate presentation, Mr Fitzgerald
said planning firm EDAW had
considered several options for
the port facilities, which includ-
ed maximising the existing facil-
ities, and locations at Arawak
Cay; Clifton Point; the BEC
power Plant; Adelaide and
Coral Harbour.
According to Mr Fitzgerald,
EDAW concluded: "From their
review of all available data con-
cerning the proposed cargo
relocation and consolidation
project, the project team select-
ed the power plant site as the
preferred alternative. Relocat-
ing the port to the power plant
site would clearly meet the pro-


ject goals of increasing port
capacity, beautifying downtown
Nassau and alleviating traffic.
In terms of environmental
impacts, construction of a port
facility at the power plant would
minimize the impact to marine
resources to the greatest extent
practicable."
Shipping
Several sources, though, have
told The Tribune that a number
of shipping company landlords,
including Bethel Estates and
Craig Symonette, Brent's broth-
er, are unhappy about the pro-
posed relocation. Shipping com-
pany landlords earn money not
just through rent or leases, but
dockage/berthing fees and
throughput fees linked to ship-
ping container volume.


To advertise in The Tibune -


the #1 newspaper in circulation,


just call 322-1986 today!


THE WESTIN
GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND Sheraton
(irandBahanialsdand
OUR LUCAYA
Ou It I'LICAYA
Resort [IFSORT

EXCEL-LENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY

EXISTS FOR

Asian Chef De Cuisine/Asian Sous Chef
ThIS SLICCeSSful candidate will assist the executive clief and oversee
the dav-to-day Culinary operations of the Resort's Asian restaurant,
train and supervise staff and monitor food quality.

Position requires creativity ill Culinary, budgetary analysis capabilities,
11101-OLIgh knowledge in sanitation standards, applicable health codes
and xvriting menus with expertise in Chinese, Japanese and Korean
Cuisines a must.

A 111illin'11,1111 of' three to five years experience as an Asian Chef de
('LlIsIne in a resort or hotel with multiple food outlets and 500+
roorns. Bachelors or culinary degree from all accredited institution
preferred.
Asian Wok Cooks
Skilled in preparing all wok style, cooking, the successftil candidate
niList have a thorough knowledge and working experience in all forills
of Asian Cuisine. A minimum of two years experience as an Asian
chef in a hotel operation and culinary or apprenticeship prograin
preferred

We oflr exceptional pay and benefits.
RCSLI111CS should be forwarded on or before August 171", -1007 to:
Sharon. san dsr&,starwood hotel s.com or
Ei-mara.Wils(ibi)starwoodliotels.C-()M
Westin & Sheraton Grand 9-ahama Island Our Lucaya Resort
RO. Box F-425001, Freeport, Grand Bahama


PUBLIC NOTICE


DEFENCE FORCE RECRUITMENT EXERCISE


CORAL HARBOUR BASE (RBDF) The Royal Bahamas Defence Force is
presently conducting a Recruitment Exercise for persons in the Family
Islands. Applications can be obtained and returned to the Local
Administrator's Office.

The deadline for submission of Applications is 13th August 2007.

Applicants Should:
Be a Bahamian citizen
Be between the ages of 18-24 years
Possess a minimum of (5) BJC's or equivalent, including Math and English
with 'C' passes or above.
Obtain two character references and a Police Character Certificate.

Applicants are required to be successful in all the following:
A Psychometric Evaluation
Recruitment (written) Examination (Math, English and General Knowledge)
Physical Fitness and Swimming Tests
Vetting Assessment and Medical Examination
Interview Assessment

Emphasis for recruitment will be placed on candidates with:
Strong Character and leadership qualities
Desire to maximize potential in a disciplined environment
Willingness to spend time at sea
Willingness to conduct tour of duty at satellite base on a Family Island or
outside the Bahamas.
Good academic background
Proficiency in a second language
Proficiency in a musical instrument


Interested persons may contact:

Lieutenant Commander Gaye Major
Personnel & Recruiting Officer
Defence Force Headquarters
P.O.Box N-3733
Coral Harbour, New Providence


--~---------- I


THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 5B














Virgin America's inaugural





flights could mark beginning





of stiffer price competition


* By JOHN WILEN
AP Business Writer
NEW 1ORK (AP) --Just
as major alihncs are beginning
to return to piofiLabtlity after
cutting capacity to iower costs
and boost profits, Virgin
America entered the fray
Wednesday.
Virgin America's inaugural
flights, which could mark the
beginning of stiffer price com-
petition, will link its Sai Fran-
cisco hub with New York's
John F Kennedy International
Airport and Los Angeles.
The new carrier got a taste


of the challenges other airlines
face when its first flight out of
Kennedy Airport was delayed
due to the severe storms that
hit New York Wednesday
imoriing. Airport officials said
the storms caused flight delays
of up to an hour and a half and
much worse ground delays.
Virgin America's scheduled
10 am flight lifted off about
10:50, said spokesman Gareth
Edmonson-Jones. Onboard
were billionaire Richard Bran-
son and Chief Executive Fred
Reid, who was late arriving at
the airport.
Comedian Stephen Colbert,


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scheduled to attend a ceremo-
ny at the airport, didn't make
it.
"He was in a car for four
and-a-half hours and turned
around in the end," Edmon-
son-Jones said.
The airline, a brainchild of
Branson, plans to add direct
New York to Los Angeles
flights beginning August 29
and more routes later this year,
including service between
Washington's Dulles Interna-
tional Airport and the West
Coast. It will also fly into Las
Vegas.
Virgin America is offering
round trip fares of $278
between New York and the
West Coast. First-class round
trips start at $778.
Some airlines, including Jet-
Blue Airways Corporation,
have already been forced to
match Virgin America's econ-
omy fares, while other airlines
are offering even cheaper
fares.
"(The) last thing needed
now is another airline," said
Ray Neidl, an analyst at Caly-
on Securities. "(It) will have a
negative effect on pricing."
Others say the relatively
small number of transconti-
nental and California routes
Virgin America will serve are
already highly competitive and
in such demand that a few new
daily flights will hardly dent
other airlines.
Virgin America's 19 daily
US flights represent a minus-
cule percentage of the air sys-
tem's 10.3 million annual
departures.
"If you're going to start an


f



~ ~*-


M IN this photo provided by Virgin America, Fred Reid (right), CEO of the start-up airline Virgin
America, and Sir Richard Branson, Chairman of the Vfrgin Group, have some fun on the wheels
of a Virgin America Airbus A-320 at New York's JFK airport, on Tuesday, August 7, 2007. The air-
line made its first flight yesterday from New York's JFK to San Francisco, where the airline is based.

(AP)


airline, right now may be the
best time everybody's full
and there's limited ability to
competitively respond." said
Mike Boyd. a consultant whose
firm, The Boyd Group. is
based in Evergreen, Colo. "I
don't think it'll hurt anybody."
Most at risk from Virgin
America's competition is Jet-
Blue, the JFK-based low cost
carrier from whose playbook
Virgin America appears to be
stealing a page with its trendy,
plush styling and free in-flight
television.
Virgin America routes over-
lap about 10 per cent of Jet-
Blue's network, said airline
consultant Robert Mann, of R
W Mann & Company in Port
Washington, NY.
JP Morgan Securities ana-
lyst Jamie Baker estimates as


much as $220 million of Jet-
Blue's annual revenue, oi
about nine per cent of its $2.4
billion in annual sales. is at risk
from Virgin America.
.ietBlue spokesman Bryan
Baldwin said the majority of
JetBlue's business is flying peo-
ple from the Northeast to
Florida -- routes Virgin Amer-
ica has no announced plans to
enter.
Neithei JetBlue nor Virgin
America offer the lowest fare
on their shared routes. North-
west Airlines Corporation and
ATA'Holdings Corporation's
ATA Airlines both offer slight-
ly cheaper flights, according to
Web travel site Sidestep.com.
Othei airlines facing new
competition from Virgin
* America include UAL Corpo-
rations's United Airlines and


AMR Corporation's Ameri-
can Airlines, both of which
have more revenue at risk in
northern California, Baker
says.
The added flights could
increase congestion at airports
in New York and California
that are already experiencing
one of the worst summers ever
in terms of flight delays and
cancellations. But the addi-
tional seats might be welcomed
by passengers stranded by
delays and cancellations
because other carriers are sold
out.
Airline passengers increased
by 0.3 per cent in the year end-
ed in April, even though over-
all airline departures fell by 1.5
per cent, according to the
Bureau of Transportation Sta-
tistics.


'Divorce situation'



gets nearer at the



Port Authority


FROM page 1

attorney, submitted to the court an affidavit sworn
by Lena Hield, one of his associates that Sii Jack
would be in a position to travel back to Nassau "in
about a week", Mr Smith sa;d.
Mr Moss added that Sir Jack wanted to partic-
ipate in any future proceedings, as he sought a
court date on his client's attempts to overturn
the Port Authority and Port Group Ltd receiver-
ship.
Mr Smith said he had questioned Sir Jack's
inability to travel, pointing to a UK newspaper
and Internet report that showed Sir Jack had
attended a soccer match involving his club.
Wolverhampton Wanderers, at the weekend.
Mr Smith told The Tribune: "-The St Georges


are open to investor participation, and are open to
considering how best to effectively divest the reg-
ulatory functions of the group from the private,
commercial interests of the group.
"A new era has dawned in Freeport, and busi-
ness as usual is no longer possible. For Freeport
to move ahead, the owners of the Port Authority
Group of Companies, the Government and the
licensees must have a working partnership, and it
is only in that way that the potential and energy of
Freeport can be harnessed for its continued
growth.
"The estate of Mr St George is very concerned
about the future of Freeport."
Mr Smith said the Government had expressed
concerns about Freeport being controlled by one
family, and the St George estate understood these
worries.


Vacancy For The Position Of:






Core Responsibilities:

* Provides user support for the company's networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems that are
reported.
* Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and.
repairs to hardware, operating systems and application installations.
* Troubleshoots system and application problems, including issues
and servers.
*. Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.
, Assists with the implementation of new technologies and
information systems and the decommissioning and disposal of
old technologies.
* Assist with the administration of the company's networked anti-
virus and data back-up systems by checking that these systems
are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

* Advanced knowledge various Windows operating systems to
provide help desk support and to troubleshoot end-user and back
office systems.
* Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware
repairs and upgrades.
* Basic knowledge of networking, especially protocols in use by
the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network
issues.
* Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.,.
* Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.
* Associates degiee in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of
proven tch.ical supportt and network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualific nations G.-oup Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life Insi ancec; pension schenie.

Inteiresi.'ed pLrsons Ihold apply no later than August 17th, 2007 to:
DA 8128
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


TEACHERS WANTED

Tutors* Dance. Karate *Music

For extra curriculum classes for a new after-school center
Teaching small classes (5yrs-12yrs) twice a week

Call: Ms. Rolle 376 1809


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE








THE TIBUN THURDAYAUGUS 9,207,IPGES7


Flagship


Fidelity


fund delivers


13.4


per cent return


Bank & Trust yes-
terday said its Fideli-
ty Bahamas Growth
and Income Fund had gener-
ated returns of 13.4 per cent
for its investors during the 12
months to June 30, 2007,
exceeding the average 10.24
per cent annual return achieved
since the fund was launched in
February 1999.
With the Fidelity Bahamas
Growth and Income Fund hav-
ing generated an 85 per cent
cumulative return since incep-
tion, Michael Anderson, Fideli-
ty Merchant Bank & Trust's
president, said: "The Bahamian
equity market is robust, with
demand exceeding supply.
"Diversification can become
more of a challenge when the
fund produces such strong asset
growth. However, we contin-
ue to analyse the financial
reports from our leading public


companies to selectively choose
the most attractive stocks to
invest in. I am confident that,
barring any unforeseen cir-
cumstances, that the fund will
finish the calendar year 2007
in high teens," said Mr Ander-
son.
Since June 2003, the Fidelity
Bahamas Growth and Income
Fund has generated average
annual returns of almost 21 per
cent dueto the recovery in the
Bahamian equity market and
investor confidence.
The fund, which has assets
under management of more
than $34 million, has delivered
strong returns, Fidelity said,
apart from the period 2001-
2003, when the Bahamas was
impacted by post-September
11, 2001, bearish sentiment.
The fund is an open-ended
mutual fund listed on the
Bahamas International Securi-
ties Exchange, (BISX.) Sub-


For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

WINDWAYS HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary liquidation
"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
WINDWAYS HOLDINGS LIMITED is in Dissolution."
The date of commencement of dissolution is the 16th day of
July, 2007.

Anthony Dirk Lowes
Centurion House
Beresford Street
St. Helier, Jersey
Liquidator



Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES
ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MAXPRO PACIFIC LTD.
In Voluntary liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
MAXPRO PACIFIC LTD. has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 24th day of July, 2007.

Peter Pao
790, Portola Ter. Los Angeles
LA90042
Liquidator









WANTED
For growing medical facility. Strong
organizational skills and flexibility is a
must. Book-keeping skills or knowledge
of Quick Books Accounting is preferred.
Attractive salary and benefits offered.

Please deliver resume with references to
Grosvenor Medical Centre

(Ph#328-5550)


scribers can buy or redeem
shares each month at the post-
ed net asset value, and new
investors are accepted each
month, subject to their sub-
scriptions being received on or


before three business days
before month end.
The fund's directors are
Anwer Sunderji, Sir Albert
Miller, Barry Malcolm and
Lourey Smith.


Legal Notice
NOTICE

CALLA LILLY INVESTMENTS INC.

---


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of CALLA LILLY INVESTMENTS
INC. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)








Picturesque Art Gallery

Artwork or 5ahamian PhotograFph on
consignment in downtown art gallery


Contact:
Tel: (2+-Z) 1-+2+) or
(22z) 5Z5-A

Email: picturesqueart@gmail.com














Duties Include:
o Demonstrates technical marketing skills and
product knowledge
o Coordinate mass media advertisement
(Prints, Radio, T.V)
O Coordinate special events
o Accurate dissemination of special and seasonal
advertisement

Applicant Should:
College graduate with related experience in same
or similar position
0 Strong communication skills (both written and
oral)
o High level of creativity
o Highly motivated
o Resistant to stress
Flexible and decisive
o Transportation needed

Interested applicants should contact
the Human Resources Department on or
before:
Friday August 10th, 2007.

Tel: 325-2122
Fax: 356-7855


COMMONWEALTH OF THE THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law & Equity Division


2006/CLE/gen/01140


BETWEEN


Plaintiff I


ANVAR STRACHAN
Defendants


TO: HENRY TAYLOR

TAKE NOTICE that:

1. A Summos filed on the 27th of June 2007 has
been issued against you in the Supreme Court of
The Bahamas being Action No.
2006.CLE/gen/01140 by Almardo Burrows, the
First Defendant herein. The Hearing date of the
Summons is set for August 14th 2007 at 3pm in
the afternoon before Deputy Registrar Ernie
Wallace whose chambers is in the Supreme Court,
Ansbacher House, East Street North. Details of
the claim are set out in the Affidavit of Randol
Dorsett filed on the 27th of June 2007.
2. On the 8th day of August A.D., 2007 the Court
ordered that the Summons and Affidavit are deemed
to be served on you by this advertisement.
Otherwise this action will be struck out for want
of prosecution or dismissed under the inherent
jurisdiction of the court and/or under Order 19
rule 1 of the Rules of the Supreme Court, 1978.

Dated the 8th day of August A.D., 2007

Graham, Thompson & Co.
Chambers,
Sassoon House,
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue,
Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the First Defendant


RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada
NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:

"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land located
North Cox Street Fox Hill situated in the Eastern District on the Island
of New Providence one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Duplex Apartment consisting of (2)
Bedrooms, (1) Bathrooms.
Property Size: 6,245 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,450 sq.ft
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549,
Nassau, Bahamas and marked "Tender 1707". All offers must be
received by the close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 17th August, 2007.


H RBC
Royal Bank
of Canada

NOTICE

RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS


RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
"ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land being Lot #3A, Malcolm Allotment
situated in the Southern District on the Island of New Providence one of
the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a
Single Family Residence consisting of 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 5,446 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,079 sq.ft
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in a Mortgage
to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS LIMITED.
All offers should be forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed
to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau,
Bahamas and marked "Tender 1565". All offers must be received by the
close of business 4:00 pm, Friday 17th August, 2007.


HENRY M. TAYLOR

AND

ALMARDO BURROWS

AND


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE





THE TR


PAGE 8B. THURSDAY. AUGUST 9. 2007


"Your Bahamian Su ermarkets'



SUPER
VALUE
NOW ACCEPTING
11SUNCARD
The Bahamian Credit Card
QUALITY RIGHTS AND PRICES RESERVED


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y y A
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 9B


Softbank's profit soars


in the second quarter


* A CUSTOMER checks a mobile phone at a Japanese telecommunications and Internet services
company Softbank shop in downtown Tokyo on Wednesday, August 8, 2007. Profit at Softbank
Corporation soared in the April-June quarter to 25.13 billion yen (US$211.2 million; euro153.1 mil-
lion) on.the back its solid mobile phone business, the company said.
(AP)


Ig11~ fii F 4 ~ uII I-00 A 1


STONE 8 oz.
R CREAM..............$1.99
ADELPHIA Asst'd. Flavor, 8 pz.
M CHEESE...............$2.49
R VALUE, Asst'd., Gal
IT DRINK.............$2.39


PILLSBURY, Asst'd. Flavor 11.5 oz.
TOASTER STRUDEL ...........$3.59
PEPPERIDGE FARM Asst'd., 19 Oz.
LAYER CAKES......................$2.99
GREEN GIANT, Asst'd. Flavor 24 Oz
PASTA ACCENT...................$5.59


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VA


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tage S I Ie are


* By KRISTINA SHEVORY
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

THE Seattle office market
has made a spectacular recov-
ery in the last few years. As a
result many real estate
investors want to park their
money there. No one knows
that better than Alfred Clise.
His real estate investment
company, Clise Properties, is
selling a 13-acre parcel in
downtown Seattle that his fam-
ily cobbled together over 80
years. The land, amounting to
nearly seven blocks, now main-
ly occupied by parking lots and
low-rise office buildings, has no
asking price.
Still, there have been plenty
of suitors. Clise has fielded 69
requests for tours since he put
the parcel on the market in


June. It is the biggest piece of
land for sale in any downtown
in the country, brokers say, and
could sell for as much as $1 bil-
lion, according to an estimate
by Real Capital Analytics, a
national research and consult-
ing company.
The Clises, one of Seattle's
oldest families, won't sell to just
anyone. The buyer, if one
emerges by the family's Octo-
ber deadline, must have a
grand vision for the parcel a
development like Rockefeller
Center in New York or Canary
Wharf in London or the
family will not part with the
land. Family members say they
will not sell it in pieces.
"You really can do anything
you want with it" because it is
already zoned for a wide vari-
ety of uses, said Clise, chair-
man and chief executive of


Ggead Ful Gospde
Chapter One .
Author: Franmae L.Jhmson
.DaJ idety, Agnast24,7 Time: 7:30 pm
V| a Work@tHqHam*tuad &V R.V. TEL:(242) 361-3m5


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application has been
received under Section 42 of the Merchant Shipping Act,
Chapter 268 in respect of the ship "TUDOR STAR"
Official Number 728106 Gross Tonnage 9417, Register
Tonnage 5590 owned Star Reefers Shipowning Inc. with
its principal place of business a Ugland House, South
Church Street, Georgetown, Grand Cayman Island for
permission to change her name to "SUN GENIUS"
registered at the port of Nassau in the said new name as
owned by Star Reefers Shipowning Inc.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be
sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days from
the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 26th Day of July, 2007.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs



PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application has been
received under Section 42 of the Merchant Shipping Act,
Chapter 268 in respect of the ship "SAGA MERIT"
Official Number 716006 Gross Tonnage 30987, Register
Tonnage 14142 owned Merit Shipping Limited with its
principal place of business a Trust Company Complex,
Ajeltake Road, Ajeltake Island, P.O. Box 1405, Majuro,
Marshall Islands, MH 96960 for permission to change
her name to "MERIT" registered at the port of Nassau
in the said new name as owned by Merit Shipping Limited.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be
sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days from
the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 26th Day of July, 2007.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs


Clise Properties and the fourth
generation to run the company.
"It'll have a major impact and
reshape the city." A buyer
could put as much as 14 mil-
lion square feet of offices, con-
dominiums and rental apart-
ments on the parcel.
Seattle is now on every
investor's shopping list. This
year, the city was deemed the
best place in the country to buy
and sell office buildings in the
Urban Land Institute's annual
survey of real estate profes-
sionals. Office vacancies are at
a six-year low of 7.7 per cent,
and downtown landlords are
getting as much as $50 a square
foot annually, according to
Grubb & Ellis, a real estate
brokerage firm.
Booming trade with Asia and
a recovery in the job market
are the secrets behind the rosy
office market. Blue-chip com-
panies like Starbucks, Ama-
zon.com and Microsoft call the
Seattle area home and have
been steadily hiring thousands
of new workers and funneling
millions into the local econo-
my. Boeing demoralized the
city when it moved its head-
quarters to Chicago a few years
ago, but it still has extensive
production operations in the
area.
- The unemployment rate has
slipped by two percentage
points, to four per cent, in the


last few years, and Seattle
seems to be doing better than
ever.
"It's not just Microsoft and
Boeing," said Kelly Mann,
executive director of the Urban
Land Institute's Seattle office.
"It's Starbucks, Costco and a
wide array of small companies
that were started by people
from those corporations that
are driving the growth."
It is a big change from a few
years ago. Seattle's economy,
hammered by the tech bust and
a drop-off in jet orders after
the September 11, 2001 attacks,
was on life support. Computer
programmers, who had fielded
multiple job offers only a year
before, were suddenly out of
work. Tens of thousands of
people were laid off. Vacancy
rates for offices topped out at
18 per cent, rents sank to $26.30
a square foot and new con-
struction ground to a halt.
Then, three years ago, Seat-
tle emerged from its economic
deep freeze. Companies
resumed hiring, developers
started building and the port
handled record cargo ship-
ments. The recession, which hit
Seattle harder and lasted longer
there than elsewhere in the
country, was finally over.
The current construction
surge might eclipse the last one.
There are now 31 projects, with
more than 7.5 million square


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application has been
received under Section 42 of the Merchant Shipping Act,
Chapter 268 in respect of the ship "SARPIK ITTUK"
Official Number 8001294 Gross Tonnage 2183, Register
Tonnage 786 owned by NOVA CRUSING LTD with its
principal place of business at P.O. Box N-4755, Bay
Street & Victoria Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas for permission
to change name to "OCEAN NOVA" registered at the
port of Nassau in the said new name owned by NOVA
CRUISING LTD.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be
sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box N-
4679, Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days from
the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 4th Day of July, 2007.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs


PROPOSAL TO CHANGE A SHIP'S NAME

The Director of Maritime Affairs for the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, hereby gives notice that in consequence
of the owner's personal choice, application has been
received under Section 42 of the Merchant Shipping Act,
Chapter 268 in respect of the ship "CEC CHAMPION"
Official Number 728141 Gross Tonnage 6714, Register
Tonnage 2896 owned by CMI WESTOE LTD with its
principal place of business at Dockendale House, West
Bay Street, P.O. Box CB-13048 Nassau, Bahamas for
permission to change her name to "UAL CONGO"
registered at the port of Nassau in the said new name
owned by CMI WESTORE LTD.

Any objection to the proposed change of name must be
sent to the Director of Maritime Affairs, P.O. Box N-
4679. Nassau, N.P. The Bahamas within seven days from
the appearance of this notice.

Dated at Nassau this 4th Day of July. 2007.

Ken McLean
Director of Maritime Affairs


feet of space, on the books in
the city. In a previous con-
struction boom that ended in
2001, more than four million
square feet of office space was
built.
A zoning change that
occurred last year may help. In
April 2006, the City Council
allowed office, apartment and
condo buildings to go as high as
500 feet in parts of downtown,
up from an earlier maximum
of 360 feet. Clise's parcel sits
squarely in that section.
There are now 13 office
buildings, with 1.9 million
square feet, under construction.
Four of them have no signed
tenants. In the last nine
months, developers have start-
ed jockeying to get their build-
ings out of the ground first.
Some of these developers had
never put up office towers in
Seattle without signed tenants.
Vulcan Real Estate, a com-
pany owned by Paul Allen,
Microsoft's co-founder, was the
first to build; in November, it
began work on 2201 Westlake,
two towers with offices, con-
dominiums and ground-floor
retailing.
"Usually, it's the people who
go early who do well and the
people who are late to the par-
ty who don't do well," said Ada
Healey, Vulcan's vice president
for real estate. "We wanted to
be one of the first guys out of
the ground."
Vulcan's bet may pay off.
Little new space will open until
2009, and rents are expected to
soar as companies expand and
take more space. Beacon Cap-
ital Partners, a major owner of
office buildings nationwide.
which became the area's
biggest landlord when it bought
14 buildings from the Black-
stone Group in April, has been
pushing up rents in its building
as leases expire.
In the next few years. vacan-
cy rates are projected to bot-
tom out at four per cent. In
such a tight market, tenants are


being advised to renew their
leases or start looking for space
two years before their leases
run out. Amazon.com is said
to be seeking new space, bro-
kers say, and is looking for as
much as one million square feet
downtown.
"When you're out looking
for space with a. tenant, you
need to be ready to make a
quicl~ decision," said Peter
Truex, a senior vice president
at Colliers International in
Seattle.
Prices for buildings in Seattle
have soared, but that has not
scared off investors just the
reverse. In the last two years,
prices for office space have
climbed 60 per cent, to an aver-
age of $338 a square foot,
according to Real Capital Ana-
lytics. Just two weeks ago,
prices hit a record of $668 a
square foot when Tishman
Speyer Properties sold two
office buildings to BlackRock,
a New York investment firm.
Even historic buildings,
which are sometimes outside
prime locations and often lack
modern amenities, are attract-
ing intense interest. Ken
Alhadeff, chairman of Elttaes
Enterprises, his family's invest-
ment firm, received a dozen
bids for five buildings down-
town when he put them on the
market last fall. Some of them
are nearly a century old. They
are not ones, Alhadeff said,
that would usually attract insti-
tutional investors.
"We got 20 per cent higher
than we had anticipated only
six months earlier," Alhadeff
said. His buyer, Principal Real
Estate Investors of Des
Moines, paid $62 million.
Principal, which is the coun-
try's fourth-biggest institution-
al real estate manager, is look-
ing for more buildings in Seat-
tle. "We see the market as one
of the strongest in the coun-
try," said Rod Vogel, managing
director of equity production
at Principal.


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that .1, Karen Williams-Barlett
of Brigadoon Estates, the biological mother of GERALD
AUGUSTUS BARTLETT III, intend to change my son's
name to GERALD AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS-BARTLETT III.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLESS PETITPHAR
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEANMARIE JEAN BAPTISTE
CROOKED ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










To ade tis in M


,.a. GN-546,


MINISTRY OF MARITIME AFFAIRS & LABOUR



NOTICES


I I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007








THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 11B


Credit crisis


squeezes


many


US


borrowers


* By KIMBERLY BLANTON
Globe Staff
c. 2007 The Boston
Globe

A GROWING credit crisis
is prompting lenders across
Massachusetts to cut back sud-
denly on new loans, making it
difficult for even creditworthy
borrowers to get mortgages and
causing some home sales to fall
through at a time when the
housing market is already
slumping.
The most prevalent impact
in the Bay State so far involves
borrowers with good credit
now having trouble getting
jumbo mortgages loans above
$417,000' which are popular
in Massachusetts because of the
high price of housing.
Some .borrowers who would
have previously qualified are
now being rejected for jumbo
mortgages, while others are
paying higher interest rates,
mortgage bankers and real
estate agents said. Rates for
jumbo mortgages increased
more than three-quarters ot a
point over the past week. to
7.875 per cent, said Sushil Tuli,
president of Leader Bank in
Arlington. Meanwhile, rates on
mortgages below the jumbo
threshold, so-called conform-
ing loans, have held steady or
dropped slightly in recent
weeks.
Keith Shaughnessy, president
of Foundation Mortgage Corp.
in Littleton, said the mortgage
market "is moving right
beneath our feet. The new sto


'y is people with good credit
are not having a tough time
getting a mortgage."
The mortgage difficulties
come as two lenders, Aegis
Mortgage Corp. in Houston
and HlomeBanc Mortgage
Corp. ol Atlanta, Tuesday shut-
tered operations. On Monday,
American Home Mortgage,
one of the nation's largest
mortgage companies. filed for
bankruptcy.
Also Wells Fargo & ( o.,
Wachovia Corp., and other
major lenders said this week
they would sharply raise inter-
est rates on some mortgages or
no longer offer certain loans
because Wall Street investors
now perceive them as too risky.
National City IHlome Equity,
one of Massachusetts's biggest
lenders. also said it would no
longer offer some home-equity
loans.
In normal limes. Todd
Colvin, with his high credit rat-
ing, good income, and cash for
a five per cent down payment,
would have no problem getting
a unibo mortgage, said Rose
aiar) O'Neil, vice president of
Conway Financial Services in
Norwell, his mortgage broker.
But Colvin, she said, "got
caught in the crossfire of this
jumbo market."
Hired in February as director
of sales for Camlog USA, a
Braintree maker of dental
implants, Colvin is moving with
his family from Maryland to a
$665.000 home in Plymouth.
But he couldn't find a lender
willing to provide him with a


r '1
~ 8


jumbo mortgage because he
hasn I sold his Mai vyland home
yet even though he is confi-
dent ot making the payments.
"We were definitely anx-
ious," he said.
0 Neil eventually found
financing for the Colvins by
breaking the mortgage into two
pieces a $417,000 first mort-
gage and a second mortgage
for $21.3,000. He is scheduled
to close on the house later this
1mo t ii I

Mortgages

JI umbo mortgages have been
affected because lenders are
now concerned about any
mortgage that does not qualify
for sale to Freddie Mac and
Fannie Mae. two of the nation's
largest mortgage purchasers on
the secondary market. Jumbo
mortgages exceed the agencies'
$417,000 purchasing limits.
Such mortgages were 15 per
cent ol all mortgage loans
made statewide in 2005, the
most recent figures available,
compared with 10 per cent'
nationally, according to the
Mortgage Bankers Association.
The credit issues began
building early this year with ris-
ing defaults among borrowers
of subprime mortgages, but
have spread with stunning


speed ii recent weeks as finan-
cial firms abruptly refused to
continue investing in mortgage-
related securities or to provide
funding to some lenders.
Several mortgage company
executives have said they have
never witnessed such a sudden
cutoff in credit and analysts
predicted the drought and sub-
sequenti turmoil may contiFnue
for several months.
The credit issues helped fuel
wild gyrations in US stock mar-
kets in recem days and prompt-
ed calls from some Wall Street
investors for Federal Reserve
Bank officials to help soothe
the market by lowering interest
rates, which would provide
access to cheaper credit.
But Tuesday, the Fed's poli-
icy-making committee elected
to leave its benchmark lending
rate at 5.25 per cent. The Fed
committee acknowledged
financial markets have been
volatile, "credit conditions have
become tighter for some house-
holds and business and the
housing correction is ongoing,"
but concluded the situation
does not threaten broader
economy enough for it to low-
er interest rates.
The statement helped ease
fears on Wall Street, as stock
markets closed up after the
Fed's report. But it did not


Room+Rental Car....................$115.00 (per night)
Room (2 persons].....................$65.00 (per night)
Available Sunday- Thursday
with ticket & proof of travel
Rooms with Kitchenettes, Microwaves, Refrigerators.
A/C andl Cable Television. Swimming Pool Beach 300o
yards away. Bus stop outside.




www.orchardbahliamas.conm/orchardbahamas@gnmail.coin
Poolside Bar & Grill
with Wi-Fi Internet


A leading Construction Company-of
the mainland Exuma Cays has a




| JOB OPPORTUNITY



for a Quantity Surveyor.
Qualified persons please apply by contacting
telephone (242) 225 0850 or (242) 357 0155
between the hours of 8:00 am 5:00 pm
Monday thru Friday.


mollify the lending industry.
Fed officials "could've
helped the regional mortgage
lending environment had they
moved" rates down, said Kevin
Cuff, president of the Massa-
chusetts Mortgage Bankers
Association. The mortgage
market he added, is "in disar-
ray.'
In July, mortgage sales
plunged to $ii.2 billion nation-
wide from $41.6 billion in June
and $92 2 billion in May,
according to FBR Investment
Management, which tracks the
data. Another corner of the
market for prime borrowers is
drying up rapidly. A handful
of lenders have stopped issu-
ing so-called Alt-A mortgages,
which do not require docu-
mentation of incomes. The
loans are issued to borrowers
with high incomes and ample
savings who do not want to
reveal their finances for tax or
privacy reasons, brokers and
real estate agents said, as well
as to some borrowers with less
stable finances.
In a statement Tuesday
explaining its suspension of


Alt-A loans, Wachovia said it is
"becoming more difficult to sell
these mortgages" to investors
"as the financial markets con-
tinue to tighten."
The mortgage problems are
also cutting into home sales at a
time when real estate prices
and home sales are in decline.
Allison Horne, owner of
Dynamic Capital Mortgage Inc.
in Brookline, said one client
with $200,000 in savings wanted
to buy a $1 million home in
Boston's South End, but had
trouble lining up a mortgage.
The market turmoil "has
totally affected people's deci-
sion of, 'do I want to do this,"'
Horn said.
Terry Egan, editor in chief
of Warren Group's publica-
tions, said the mortgage mar-
ket's difficulties will delay the
recovery in Massachusetts.
"It's a very simple chain of
events," Egan said. "If you
tighten mortgage underwriting
standards, fewer people are
going to qualify for loans,
which results in fewer poten-
tial home buyers, which results
in fewer sales," he said.


Has two vacancy for an
Assistant Golf Superintendent

- Assists in supervision and coordination of the day to das acti\ itics of
associates engaged in preserving grounds and golf course turl in playing
condition. Position assists in ensuring guest and associate satisfaction is
achieved while maintaining the operation budget. Is nowledgc di
specialized, salt-water resistant turf a musI. experience with a Scottli,.h
styled links course preferred.
-Ability to communicate with Co-workers and Management team.
-Proficient with Microsofl Word and Microsoft Excelt
-Good communication skills.
-Willing to relocate to Abaco B3ahanuas.

Head Golf ProfessionaC

- Responsible for activities involved with the golfer's experience. Main
duty is to supervise the staff in a hands on via to ensue all guest need,
are met in a professional and polite manner.
-Ability to communicate with Co-"orkers and Management team.
-Proficient with Microsoft Word and Miciosof [\ccl
-Good communication skills.
-Willing to relocate to Abaco Bahamais.

Please send resumes to

Attn: Director of Human Resources
The Abaco Club on Winding Bay
P.O. Box AB20571
Marsh Harbour Abaco
Fax: 242-367-0392


NBIS


)IDEiS


C
CP FA L:


Pricing Information As Of:
AWedresdav. 8 Aucust 200 7_
BISA LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES '..I-IT ','WVF" BiS: BISX ALL SHARE INDEX CLOSE 1 846 35 / CHG -00 02 ,' %CHG 00.00 I YTD 17'0,16I VN 7 r
L. T C L .'. ',,." .: .,. i: T '.t,. ,.. C'a.i, .'-. EF5 i D. P1E Yield


178 -


Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benichmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Cclina Holdings
C-,lmronvwealth BF-rnk
Coitsol;.ated Wate BDfRs
Doctor's iHospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCarnbbean
Focol (S)
Freeport Concrete
ICD U tlit;es
J. S Johnsonr
Plernier Real Estate


52wk-ii 5zwk -Lc-.. Symbol __
14.60 12 27 B6JIanhoI. -supcrmf.kt
10 14 10.00 Caribbeati Cro-sings (Pref)
3.54 0.20 RND Holdings


28.00 ABDAB
14 00 Bahamas Supermaikets
0.35 RND Holdings


52wk-HI 52wk-Low


Fund Narnle


11 65
9 40
.1 d5
J.71
1.57
S10.75
:' 41


1 6,
9.40
0.8bt
3.71
1.57
10 75
2 65
15.15
7 22
2 31
6 20
12.76
14 65
5 18
0 70
/ Ab
9 9";
0I UU


Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid S Ask $ Last P1ico Weekly
1460 11 60 7 1FOO
6.00 b :1l ,i It )
0.35 0 40 U 20
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
41 0)0 44 00 41 00
14.60 1550 1400
0 45 0 55 0 45
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA V YTD'% Last 12 Months Div $


750
1.000


(I 0,~.OO NIM 000%


.:7. o:": 0 'O NP.M 0 00%
1.527 0.400 7.6 3.45%
0.733 0.260 12.8 2.77%
0.048 0.020 17.7 2.35%
0.279 0.060 13.3 1.62%
0.064 0.020 24.5 1.27%
0.949 0.240 11.3 2.23%
0.281 0.080 9:4 3.02%
1 190 0.680 12.7 4.50%
0.112 0.050 60.8 0.74%
0.281 0.000 8.2 0.00%
0.694 0.240 8.9 3.87%
0.787 0.570 16.2 4.47%
0.977 0.470 14.6 3.21%
.0,364 0.133 14.2 2.56%
-0.415 0.000 N/M 0.09%
0.411 0.200 17.6 2.76%
0.946 0.580 10.5 5.86%
1.167 0.600 8.6 6.00%
EPS i .,. $ PIE Yield


1 234 1.185 12.6 8.12%
0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.034 0.000 11.8 0.00%
S22.0 0000 194 000%
1 234 1.125 12.6 7.71%
0.021 0.000 26.2 0.00%
Yield %


1 3484 2998 Colan Money Markel Fund 1 3498410'
3 ,920 9 9449 Fc,, lity Bahamas G & I F' nd 3 2 c20"'
2 7399 2 4415 Colina MSI Prfoerred Fulnd 2 7.19935"-
1 2576 1 1820 Colina Bond Fund 1 257576"*
11.6049 11.1193 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11 6049'
FINDEX: CLOSE 834.93 i YTD 12.51% I 2006 34 47% .. ,, '
BISX LI S IA I- I UE> 1'. De. '' n 1 30 MA'K[ j r ,) 1 F ti 1 .ii.ndl vtid dJ Oy losing pc KEY
52wk-L *, -. >w. pi i; in fI-r t i2 e' \ "' '..' l | ; .: I itI. I in fl lli 20 July 2007
Previous i.tu,. Provious i,l ,y vui t(t d pIT-,e oli t, ally .oliu t t ,i, I.',., [ I,.t .I.t,., 1 -th..- i nt3r pli.e 30 June 2007
Today'. Clo'. CurrInt day's weighted prceo for daily .olueno Woekly Vol TI.dlny vo0une of the prior week 31 May 2007
Change Change in closing price from day 1o day EPS $ A ;cottt.iny's repoteo'I oarningis per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol NumbtI r of total shares trade today NAV N t A. ',-l V;.iIlI
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the lasl 12 months N/M Not Mu.Iningiul
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12n month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(S) 4-for-1 Stock Split Effective Date 8/8/2007
TO TRADE CALL COLINA 242-502-70 t1 / 1 FIDELITY 242-356-7764 / FOR MORE DATA &


ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE is accepting
applications immediately for the following positions:

1. A senior teacher for English Language and
Literature to teach upper level grades (10 to 12).

2. A substitute teacher for the months of September
and October to teach French and Spanish.

The applicant must have experience preparing
students for external examination subjects (example
CXC). The applicant is required to have a minimum
of a Bachelor's Degree, a Teaching Certificate and
at least three years teaching experience. Any person
having difficulty with the Roman Catholic teachings
need not apply.


Applications should be submitted in writing to:
The Principal
St. Augustine's College
P.O. Box N3940
Bernard Road
Nassau, Bahamas


Please supply a daytime telephone contact an email
address in your cover letter.


BUSINESS.


. .








PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


I


over


Fed statement


* By MADLEN READ
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) -
Stocks advanced Wednesday
as solid results in the technol-


ogy arena further soothed
investors a day after the Fed-
eral Reserve assured them the
economy should keep growing
moderately.
The Dow Jones industrial


average rose more than 100
points. The Nasdaq composite
index and Russell 2000 index
- which include technology
companies and small-cap
stocks made even sharper
percentage gains.
Computer network equip-
ment maker Cisco Systems Inc.
said its quarterly profit jumped
25 per cent and raised its rev-
enue forecast for the year. The
earnings report followed Time
Warner Telecom Inc.'s
announcement late Tuesday
that it posted a narrower sec-
ond-quarter loss than Wall
Street anticipated.
The upbeat technology
news, along with strong gains
in beleaguered financial and
homebuilding stocks, came a
day after the Federal Reserve
said that despite an increas-
ingly difficult credit environ-
ment, the economy should
keep growing moderately.
"Basically, the Fed's telling
us we're back to business as
usual," said John C Forelli,





Anyone interested in
forming or joining a
scuba diving club in
Nassau please email
your interest to
assanmcubadivers @coralwavemcom


* TRADERS move around the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
in the minutes before the closing bell on Tuesday.
(AP)


portfolio manager for Inde-
pendence Investment LLC in
Boston.
In early afternoon trading,
the Dow rose 113.48, or 0.84
per cent, to 13,617.78.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 17.01, or 1.15 per
cent, to 1,493.72.
The Nasdaq added 49.09, or
1.92 per cent, to 2,610.69.
The Russell 2000 index, bat-
tered recently due to credit
crunch worries, gained 23.16,
or 2.99 per cent, to 797.29.
"People are getting some
appetite for risk again," Forel-
li said.
'Bonds phltt neted a, st0'cks
rose. with the yield on the 10-
year Treasury note rising to
4.88 per cent from 4.7.7 per
cent on Tuesday. Investors
exited the government securi-
ties after the Fed's statement
Tuesday dashed hopes of a
rate cut, and on rumours that
Asian governments would get
rid of some of their US assets.
The Dow Jones industrial
average finished up 35 points
on Tuesday, ending the blue-
chip index's five-day streak of
triple-digit gains or losses.
The housing market is still
weak, which could keep Wall


Street nervous going forward.
Toll Brothers Inc.'s prelimi-
nary measure of fiscal third-
quarter revenue showed home
building revenue fell 21 per
cent. However, the company's
chief executive said he sees
housing demand increasing,
and the quarterly revenue esti-
mate of $1.21 billion was better
than analysts expected.
The financial and home-
building sectors big losers
in recent weeks saw large
gains Wednesday, suggesting
that investors see value in
these pummeled stocks.
Funds
Bears Stearns Cos., whose
collapsing hedge funds have
"beeh-a prime cause of jitters
in the market, rose 3.3 per
cent. Lehman Brothers rose
6.9 per cent, Citigroup Inc. rose
two per cent, and American
Express Co. rose 3.3 per cent.
California homebuilder KB
Home rose 6.8 per cent after
saying late Tuesday it used
cash on hand to repay $650
million in debt to rid its bal-
ance sheet of obligations. D R
Horton Inc. rose 5.3 per cent;
Centex Corp. rose 6.3 per cent;


and Pulte Homes rose eight
per cent.
After releasing their quar-
terly results, Cisco rose $1.78,
or six per cent, to $31.47. Time
Warner Telecom rose $3.57, or
21 per cent, to $20.30. Toll
Brothers rose $1.06, or 4.6 per
cent, to $24.01.
Meanwhile, the Nasdaq was
also helped by a stronger-than-
expected second-quarter prof-
it at Priceline.com Inc. The
online travel agent's stock
surged $11.98, or 18 per cent,
to $77.07. The dollar fell
against the euro and British
pound, but rose against the
yen. Gold prices rose.
Crude oil prices fluctuated
after the US Department of
Energy reported that crude
and gasoline inventories fell
last week.
Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by about three
to one on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume came
to 1.27 billion shares.
Overseas, Japan's Nikkei
stock average rose 0.64 per
cent. London's FTSE 100
gained 1.35 per cent, Ger-
many's DAX index rose 1.23
per cent, and France's CAC-
40 climbed 2.29 per cent.


Opportunities For Growth and Success

Ernst & Young, a leading professional services organization, is
currently seeking qualified candidates for excellent career and
leadership opportunities in our Risk Advisory Services (RAS) specialty
practice.

RAS provides comprehensive risk and advisory services through a
suite of strategic and industry-focused operational solutions that
help companies assess risk, monitor and improve controls within
their business processes. RAS currently seeks team players with
strong work ethic and excellent professional skills for various levels.


Requirements:
To qualify, candidates must have:
* a bachelor's degree in accounting, finance, business or a related
field
* a minimum of 18 months of related audit/compliance or applicable
business experience
* Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) or Certified Public Accountant
(CPA) certification desired; non-certified hires would be required
to become certified.
* strong analytical, interpersonal and communication skills
* demonstrated integrity, values, principles, and work ethic
* proficiency with MS Office

Please apply, with resume, to:
Human Resources Partner
Ernst & Young
On re Montague Place
3ru Floor
East Bay Street
P.O. Box N-3231
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 242-502-6090
Email: info.ey@bs.ey.com


* Accounting records in bad shape?
* Need financial statements for the bank?
* Need a business plan and financial proposal prepared?
* Need business licence preparedicertified?
CALL US WE CAN HELP
* Business Start-Up Assistance/Consultations
* Compliance Commission Examinations
* Construction & Contract Accounting
* Small Business Customized Accounting Packages
* Computerized-quickbooks-Setup-Training
* InventoryMaterials Controls Handbook ...... $35
* Sample Business Plans (NewiExisting Businesses)


A .il
Business Seminars Registration $35
(Materials and Refreshments)
* Starting & Managing A Business Oct. 27 @ 10am
* Inventory, Materials Controls Oct. 27 @ 2pm
Businesiie14c T. SpeeIt.':;. ;:'

TEL: 325-7313 or 322-6000 Fax: 323-3700



Small Busmess Consultants


GN 551








THE PRICE CONTROL ACT,1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) () REGULATIONS, 2002

The public is advised that prices as shown in the Schedule for DIESEL OIL,sold by SUN
OIL LIMITED (SHELL), and Diesel OH., SOLD BY TEXACO LIMITED will become effective on
Thursday August 9,2007

SCHEDULE

A.O..muMWOLSUESIUNG MAIMUMa
PRICE PER U.S GALLON RETAIL SELLING
.. .......... PRICEPERU.S.
PLACE ARTICLE MMUM MAIMUM GALLON
SUPPLIERSn'PRICE DISTRIWUTOS*
$ PRICE $
S

NEW PROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREIG H T
SUN OIL LIMITED DIESEL OIL 3.48 3.48 3.67
TEXACO BAHAMAS DIESEL OIL 3.39 3.39 3.58
LIMITED
GRAND BAHAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEPORT)
SUN OIL LIMITED DIESEL OIL 3.36 3S2 3.71
TEXACO BAHAMAS DIESEL OIL 3.27 3.43 3.62
LIMITED

ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
& ELEUTHERA
SUN OIL LIMITED DIESEL OIL 3.49 3.65 3.84
TEXACO BAHAMAS DIESEL OIL 3.40 3.56 3.75
LIMITED

ALLOTHER NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLANDS
SUN OIL LIMITED DIESEL OIL 3.50 3.65 3.85
TEXACO BAHAMAS DIESEL OIL 3.41 3.56 3.76
LIMITED


HARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY


Wall Street rises on





Cisco earnings, relief




THURSDAY, AUGUST 9,2007, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE


/ /


HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS
PROUDLY RECOGNIZES OUR TOP

SALES AND MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES
FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE


Antonio Miller
Sales Executive
(In House)


lan Gilbert
TO. for Al


Shanendon Cartwright
Sales Executive for At


Julian Gomez
Explorer Representative


Ethan Adderley
TO.
(In House)


Maxcine Roberts
Marketing Vacation Services
Coordinator


Gustaf Hernqvist
Action Counselor GI


gj


HARBORSIDE

RESORT
AT
ATLANTIS
THE ATLANTIS VACATION CLUB


------ - -


-**.:2


./


/

\


II II I II III


-


:






PAGE 4B, HURSAY, UGUS 9, 007UHEITIBUN


Dollar


lower,



gold up in



Europe


LONDON (AP) The
United States dollar was
mostly lower against other
major currencies in Euro-
pean trading Wednesday.
Gold prices rose.
The euro traded at
$1.3808, up from $1.3763
late Tuesday in New York.
Later, in midday trading in
New York, the euro fetched
$1.3806.
Other dollar rates in
Europe, compared with late
Tuesday, included 119.58
Japanese yen, up from
118.69; 1.1941 Swiss francs,
down from 1.1948; and
1.0472 Canadian dollars,
down from 1.0543.


The British pound traded
at $2.0388, up from $2.0241.
In midday New York
trading, the dollar bought
119.71 yen and 1.1945 Swiss
fragcs, while the pound was
worth $2.0360.
Traded
Gold traded in London at
$675.00 per troy ounce, up
from $669.30 late Tuesday.
In Zurich, gold traded at
$673.80 per ounce, up from
$668.75. Gold rose $1 in
Hong Kong to close at.
$670.55. Silver opened in
London at $13.10 per troy
ounce, up from $13.07.


GIBSON, RIGBY & CO.

Counsel andAttorneys-at-Law Notaries Public



ANNUAL FUN DAY


The Chambers


of Gibson,


Rigby & Co. will be closed on
Friday the 10th of August 2007
for the company's annual Fun


Day.


Our offices will re-open


on Monday the 13th
2007 at 9:00a.m.



Nassau Chambers
East Bay Street Shopping Centre
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas E

Tel: 393-6000
Fax: 393-7000


of August


Exuma Chambers
George Town
Queen's Highway
Exuma, The Bahamas

Tel: 336-3485
Fax: 336-3487


Hot Midwest weather


fuels higher so


ean


prices as agriculture




futures jump broadly


* By LAUREN VILLAGRAN
AP Business Writer
, NEW YORK (AP) Soy-
bean prices jumped Wednes-
day on the Chicago Board of
Trade as traders bet that triple-
digit heat in a key United
States growing region could





-NIGT

For he sorie


damage crops.
Supply concerns also hit the
energy market, where a report
showing surprising declines in
the nation's crude oil and gaso-
line stocks prodded prices
higher, though crude prices lat-
er fell back. Precious metals
prices also climbed, while base
metals were mixed.
Agriculture futures climbed
Wednesday, led by strong
gains in soybeans as hot tem-
peratures threatened the
southern US Corn Belt, where
much of the nation's soybean
crop is concentrated. The heat
comes during the crop's critical
pollination stage when soy-
beans prefer more moderate
temperatures and some mois-
ture. Meanwhile, demand for
soybeans is running high.
"A lot of the beans are
under stress right now, and


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that TAMORA PIERRE OF ST.
JAMES ROAD AND KEMP ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of AUGUST, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ESPERANCIA VALSAINT
OF OXFORD AVENUE, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


traders are shifting focus in
that direction," said Jim Ger-
lach, president AC Trading Co.
in Fowler, Ind.
Traders are also looking
ahead to a key report due out
Friday from the US Depart-
ment of Agriculture, which will
estimate the size of the coun-
try's corn and soybean crops.
Growth in the ethanol industry
has driven demand for corn up
sharply this year and, with
farmers having switched more
of their land to corn to capture
high prices, soybean supplies
are under pressure, too.
"Barring an extremely bear-
ish crop report Friday, you're
probably looking at the market
moving higher into harvest like
it has the last two years," Ger-
lach said.
Soybeans for November
delivery picked up 13.25 cents
to $8.76 a bushel. Corn and
wheat followed soybeans high-
er.
Meanwhile, energy traders
pushed oil and gasoline prices
higher immediately following a
government report that
showed a surprising decline in
gasoline stockpiles. Oil prices
changed direction at midday,
slipping back slightly.
The Energy Information
Administration said oil inven-
tories dropped by a larger-
than-expected 4.1 million bar-
rels in the week ended August


--I


3. Gasoline stocks also fell -
bucking market expectations
- by 1.7 million barrels. Ana-
lysts had projected a two mil-
lion-barrel draw on crude
stocks and a build of one mil-
lion barrels of gasoline, accord-
ing to a Dow Jones Newswires
survey.
The country's rate of refin-
ery utilization fell to 91.3 per
cent from 93.6 per cent after
six straight weeks of increas-
es. Analysts had expected to
see continued increases.
Light, sweet crude for Sep-
tember delivery fell 35 cents
to $72.07 a barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
Gasoline futures gained 0.48
cent to $1.949 a gallon.
Elsewhere on the Nymex,
gold prices advanced $3.90 to
$686.20 an ounce, while silver
and platinum prices also rose.
The US dollar dipped against
major world currencies. A
declining dollar can sometimes
act as a boost for gold, as
investors shift assets to safer
havens during periods of infla-
tion.
Overseas, industrial metals
prices were mixed on the Lon-
don Metal Exchange, with
declines evident in nickel and
copper. Zinc prices climbed.
In New York, copper for Sep-
tember delivery fell 5.65 cents
to $3.45 a pound on the
Nymex.


To advertise In DThe nti e

lm fi nuenuiM n in &ipn aliei


Um wI I .ulWpulu Ii WE


jUSt call 322-1t986 today!


"Meeting the needs of advertisers
and readers motivates me to do
a good job. The Tribune is
my newspaper."
IESTIHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
.#4e w Z4# ^/%4 W ^^'


...-.p- ~.


Government Notice

Ministry of National Security


GN-550


NOTICE OF RESULT OF CONTESTED ELECTION
LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION

South Abaco Constituency, Polling Division 2
Man-O-War Cay
of The Hope Town District

DECLARATION OF RESULT OF THE POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that on the taking of the Poll in the above mentioned election
which was contested, the following were elected as Council Members for the above
mentioned District.


Candidates
Surname


RUSSELL

SWEETING


Other names
In Full


Roy Vernon

Frederick Andrews


Occupation
and Address


Mechanic, Man-O-'War Cay

Fisherman, Man-O-War Cay


AND NOTICE is hereby given that the numbers of the votes cast for the several
candidates in the said election were as follows:


Candidates
Surname


Other names
In Full


Votes
polled


ALBURY Christopher Brian 72

RUSSELL Roy Vemon 84

SWEETING Frederick' Andrews 96


Date: 2nd August, 2007

Sign: Cephas Cooper
RETURNING OFFICER


--


I


-~-- ~-~


VBU?,~X~i-~


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 16B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007.


'wi


r


When an accident happens, it's .-.,


* 5i


there with you. First Response will I 1H
accident assistance programme avai abl

One call to 32-FIRST dispatches First
scene where trained profession ra'-"
and take full control of the situat :
the repair.

Plus ambulance service, if ~eq'.i ,
transportation home.


We're there for you, everyday, 365 days a year.

First Response is available free and at no additional cost to
insured through authorized agents of Bahamas First C,'"

Want to know more? Call your Bahamas First authorize' a:


A Scott Fitzgerald Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T: (242) 356-5709

Andeaus Insurance
Broker Co. Ltd.
T: (242) 323-4545

Bethel Thompson Agency
T: (242) 394-7251

CARIB Insurance Agency
T: (242)322-8210

CMA Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T: (242) 393-6735


Someone is
: is the only
,. a :'mas.


r : ~van to the
S .;, uroc'"sing
Seo te end of


'v hicles are
S :;pany.


Colina General Insurance
Agency
T: (242) 325-3809

Confidence Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T: (242) 323-6920

General Brokers & Agei'
T: (242) 322-1871

Moseley Burnside
Insurance Agency
T: (242) 394-8305

N.U.A. Insurance
Agents & Brokers Ltd,
T: (242) 328-5992


First Response operates from 8:00am to midnight daily and is available in New Providence ny.
Bahamas First Holdings Limited. It is contracted to provide on location accident service ad i
clients of Bahamas First General Insurance Company.


for


['







Thursday. August 9th, 2(07





PAG 2,TUSAAGS ,207TETIUEOIURE


LAKEVIEW
GARDENS &


MEMORIAL
MAUSOLEUM


I


- W
-,~- ..- ........' ....

LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL
Gardens & Mausoleum
JFK Drive, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-7244 Fax: (242) 323-7329
Email: lakeviewmemorialgardens@coralwave.com


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

IN LOVING MEMORY OF I


Dorothy "Gara" Dorsctt
May 18th, 1925 August 9th. 2004
We miss your smile and we miss your joy.
We miss your hugs and long to smell your
perfume.
We sit in church and hope to hear you singing,
We look over at your pew,
And see your graceful image in a heavenly hue.
Our dinner table is just not the same,
We try to imitate you but, it's all in vain.
You have been gone three years now,
Our emptiness and sorrow is still much a
bound.
We take comfort in knowing,
You are in a better place.
You have one on to claim your great reward,
And find an everlasting peace,
Together with the Lord.

Loving memories are cherished by The Robinson and
Dorsett Families


George Robinson Sr., children: Brenda, Beverly, Violet.
Gregory, George Jr., Eugene, Loretta, Jacquelyn, Yvette
,and Linda, sister Ruth and a host of grand children,
family and friends including Francis and MuriiA


SI



* ~ -


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 3


C


- jor /he la/e


Ve. the family of the late Virginia Miriam Curry. extend our
heartfelt. sincere appreciation and gratitude to you our
many relatives and Iriends for the numerous expressions
of love and sympathy bestowed on us during our time of
bereavement. Your prayers, visits, gifts and calls were all a
source of comfort to us.
Special Thanks to Pastors: Dale Moss, Stephen Greene.
Terrence Forbes, Minerva Pratt & their families; Patricia
( E idward Bethel & family: Briteley Ferguson & family:
Francita Cooper; Euricka dolle; Dorothy Coakley; Pearl
bethel; Winifred Williamson; Kelly ( Angela urrows &
family; Bishops: Mallory Lightbourne, Samuel Alleyne & their
families; Margarine Pigby & family; the entire Collie
family of Freeport: Prince & Zilpha Mackey & family; Edna,
Sandra & Antoine Cunningham; Annamae Kemp; Beula
Sands: Juila Davis; Derek Moss; Kernita Sands; Daniel
Cornish; Church of God of Prophecy: Shirley, Earnest &
East Streets; New Covenant Baptist Church; Mr. & Mrs.
Gilbert Llyod & Staff; The Staffs of Government Printing
Department, South Beach Clinic, Her Majesty's Prison and
PMH Private Medical Ward; Nellie at Barbie's
k (Salon; Governor-General the Hon. Arthur
Hanna & Mrs. Hanna; the Hon. Perry Christie
and the Progressive Liberal Party;
Ron O.Pinder & the PLP Marathon Branch and
;I the Staff of Butler's funeral Home.


/
A r;


May God richly bless an d sustain all of you

The lanmilv


~s~------ --*lc-e~-I~I"~~I~LY~s~---'~M1F------(L


'%.


I






PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


In Lovina enlmo of t he late


der?*


Holland G. 1Smith
NM1a 15, 1923 August 8, 1t)73

He lii es in the hea rts and mnemnor ofi' ife, Dolores
Children: C' ntliia, GarN, Renee, Jud' Kent;
sisters Lucille Bain, Rosalie Dillette, Eftie Saw er,
brot her: Amb, Irose and mianf other family
: members and friends


t. '..'., _ _-.'_____-.








"No act of kindness
no matter how small is ever wasted"

DENNIS

P .. WELLINGTON
SANDS
19146 2100'7





Few losses are as painful as the death of oiueone -ou I, %e To all inh..-,, pei .,,m .o I,,
showed compassion during our unie of bereaement. %-.e sinm.rel\ ,', ih.nl. .,u \our
outreach to u. through phone call. cards. flowers., wreah. a:nd imeal ,reic moils appreciated.
Mous of all, the time you took to visitwith us and coney lo\e. wvannih arid rc.pet'. gaxe
u. strength w hen Ae were emotornally ,keak For all this and iu'.rc. IC say hank vou'
Special thanks to Mr Pedro N Ferguton and staff of Eai.t Sunrse Mortu.ars. Monsignor
Preison MoNFs. Fr Noel Clarke a.id the members of St. Anselm Roman Catholic Church,
MNi Ellen Daniels and the lacults and student body of St. Thomas More Catho'lic SchooL,
member-, of Pareni, TeacherT' Association of St Thomas More Catholic, Brent & Cry.stlJ
Fergu-un. Ms- Shandles Williams. Mrs. Eugenie Rolle, Mrs. Paula Emmanuel, Mrs.
Yasmin Adderle). Mrs Charlene Marshall. Mr Duke Kerney, Mrs. Elaine Jones, Mr.
knthony Slorr, Mr. Carl Johnson. Mr. David Rahming. Mrs. Ambrosine [ngraham, the
Cameron Street family. the entire Bain & Grants Town and Kemin's Circle Communitie.
May God continue to bless you!
Mrs. Janet Sands (wife)
_____________________________________________..._ .: .*


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT

CHARLOTTE MELSAY
RAMSEY-JOHNSON

Home- Going Celebrations for the life of
Charlotte Melsay Ramsdy Johnson, Aged
II. 95 years. Service at: New Mount Freedom
Baptist Church, Lowe Sound North Andros
Sunday 12th August, 2007 at 11:00 am Offici-
ating: Rev. Dr. E. John Newton. Assisted by:
Rev. Samuel Fowler and other MInistries of
Religion. Interment will follow at the Lowe
Sound Public Cemetery.

Treasured memeories of this gem will forever be remembered by her chil-
dren: Deacon Mitchell and Elkano "Smooth" Johnson, Mrs. Sheilamae Rolle
and Mrs. Sarah Evans, one stepson,. Herbert Johnson of Chicago Illinois,
one daughter-in-law Minister Maude Johnson: ten grandsons, Brad Baldwin,
Mickey. Deacon Dominic Johnson of Boston Mass, Ron and Elkano John-
son, Anthony, Andrew, Harold, and Elvis Rolle, Ron and Elkano Johnson.

Nine grand daughters. Jandilee Jenny Curry, Cherilee. Cheraice "N&c-
lie", Larissa "Chris", Peggy Johnson and Linda Gaitor, Sharon Mat-
tile of Seattle Washington Maria Beneby, and Darlene McKenzie.

Five grand daughters-in-law, Barbara, Jan and Kenria Johnson, Laurie,
Ledera and Tracey Rolle.

Three grand sons-in-law, Deacon Wendell Gaitor, John Matille of Seattle
Washington and Lawrence Mckinney.

Thirteen great grand sons, Montez and Jamaal Curry and David Archer,
Antwoine Russell, Sylvaughn Armbrister, Laterrio, and Claude Gaitor,
Anton, Lorenzo, Lacarrio. Elvis Jr., Andrew Rolle Jr., and Ron Johnson Jr.

Six great grand daughters, Aaliyah Johnson, Pethera and Adore Gaitor,
Sheila and Jonel Mattile and Elvanique Rolle.
Fourteen nieces, Elvia Bowleg, Rev. Claretta, Zelda, and Max-
ine Campbell, Deaconess Beulah Lafleur, Rhoda Miller, Lenor
Evans, Mary Russell, Patsina Lee, Minervia Russell, Urina Ev-
ans, Erma and Monica Evans, Rose Roberts and Francine Russell.

Six nephews, Rev. Albert Campbell, Rendell, James Miller, Stanford John-
son, James Miller amd Hilton Evans.

Great grand nieces and nephews to include, Rev. Neville, Phillip, Albertha
and Sidney Campbell, Veronica, Maude, Selwyn, Darren, and Vincent, Evans,
Clarice and Charlene Forbes, Meltese Carey, Doramae Rolle, Nigel, and Laf-
leur, Eva Peet, Maria and Rev. Rudolph Bowleg, Zoe and Patrice Evans. Pat-
ty and Elrinis Miller, Loxwell Russell, Billy Evans and Marianna and Oneal
Johnson. Lovely Rahming, Jerry. Janice and Eugene Campbell. Duke. Pres-
ton and Rebecca Moss. Melvina. Paula ani Rus-ci! ;'

Other relatives and friends, Mrs. Hazel Sargeant an J family, Marinette Evans
and Clara Simmons and family, Mrs. Eliza Griffin and family, the Gould
Family, Rev. Minervia and Deacon William Prat and the Church of God
of Prophecy family, Conch Sound Andros, Eunie Marshall and family, Curl
Lewis and family, Rev. Mother Prudence Rolle and family, BTC Marketing
Dept., Constance Evans and family, Jakey Russell and family, Rev. E. John
Newton and the Mt. Freedom Baptist Church family, Rev. Philmore Rus-
sell and the Mt. Olive Baptist Church family, Rev. Ifill Russell and the Mt.
Calvary Baptist Church family, Rev. Samuel Fowler and family, Rev. Audley
Fowler and family, James and Estelle Rolle and family of Bimini, Geneva
Oliver and family, Duke and Sabrina Moss and family, Mina Marshall and
family, The Hon. Vincent Peet, the staff of Barbie's Beauty Saloon, the com-
munities of Red Bays, Lowe Sound, B.A.R.C. and Nicholl's town Andros.

Viewing will be held at Kurtis Memorial Mortuary on Robinson Road on
Friday 10am 6pm and on Sunday from 9am to service time at the church in
Lowe Sound North Andros.






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


Cebar Crest f funeral tome
DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street P.O.Box N-603 Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

.NR ,R FOR


DAVID
SIMMONS, 40


'- a resident of Wilson Tract,
.j south will be held at
2:00p.m., on Sunday, 12th
August, 2007 at New
Englerston Seventh-day
S.- Adventist Church, East
,_/ tStreet. Officiating Pastor L
Sewell and Elder A. Hannah.
Interment will be held in the Southern Cemetery,
Spikenard and Cowpen Road.

Cherished memory are held by mother, Clara Evans
Simmons; brother, Herbert Simmons; sister, Merline;
nephew: Keith Kemp; nieces, Lashanda and
Simonique Simmons; aunts, Merline Lillian
Simmons, Marinetta and Constance Evans; sister-
in-law, Wendy Brown-Simmons; cousins, Bishop
Arnold Josey, Herbert Porter, Henry, Alvin, Harry,
Gary and Kenneth Butler, Anthony Duncombe,
Christopher Evans, Austin and Rodney Albury,
Culbert "Buster", Sammy and Jeffrey Evans,
Benjamin and Michael Munnings, Rubin Holbert,
Lorinda, Brenhilda, Deborah, Laramae, Sarah, Ann,
Lorraine, Christine and Prenette Butler, Paula Sands,
Brenda Albury, Sharece Evans, Stacey Burnside,
AInora Sands, Susan Sands Adams and Renee Sands,
Gaynell and Vernita Evans, and a host of other
relatives and friends including Linda, Marvin,
Quinton, Lynette Duncombe, Christine, Corneil and
Cornelius Barr, Jr., Joan, Krystal, Lawan and Tarief
Evans, Ashquel and Lana Duncombe, Unie Campbell
Marshall and family of Lowe Sound, Andros, Dr.
Joseph Evans, Benji and neighbours of Wilson Tract,
South.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Cedar Crest Funeral Home, Robinson Road and First
Street, on Saturday from 12noon to 6:00p.m, on
Sunday from 10a.m to 12noon and at the church
from 12:30p.m until service time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 5



Yaoger Funeral ome & Crematorium
Queen's Highway
RO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301


LAVAR CAREY, 22
a resident of #33 Pine Forest
Subdivision, Holmes Rock, Grand
Bahama will be held on Saturday,
11th August, 2007 at 12noon at Mt.
Zion Baptist Church, Jones Town,
Eight Mile Rock. Officiating will be
Rev. Lindy Russell and interment
will follow in the Harbour West
Cemetery, Eight Mile Rock.


Left to mourn his passing and treasure
his memories are his parents, Kingsley Carey and linda Moxey;
step mother, Dale Carey; step father, Frederick Hepburn; three
brothers, Lakhal, Lashad and Craig Carey; grandmother,
Shirleymae Saunders; adopted mother, Paula Frith; nephews,
Malachi and Devaughn Carey; six aunts, Shantel Moxey, Roselyn
Ramsey, Joanna Musgrove, Angie Munnings, Bertha Curry and
Gloria Basden; seven uncles, Frederick Carey, Mark Green, Police
Sgt. 752 Anthony Moxey, Michael, Roger, Ricardo and Harcourt
Moxey; five grand aunts, patricia King, Florence Rolle, Olga
Hanna, Creva Carey and Dorcus Mitchell; three aunts-in-law,
Rosemary and Shemeka Moxey and Gloria Carey; one step aunt,
Roselande Dean; four uncles-in-law, Wango Musgrove, Lloyd
Carey, Audley Basden and Wendwood Munnings; four grand
uncles, Solomon Mitchell, Daniel, Clifford and Stephew Moxey;
two step uncles, Alan Munnings and Maxwell Dean; seven
brothers, Frederick Jr., Theron, Deangelo, Keano, Maxwell Jr.,
Jimmy and Joel; special friend, Teekah Cooper; godfather, Clement
Beckford Jr. and Nelson; numerous cousins including, Rogernika,
Antonesha, Alyiah, Rojernae, Roshanique, Deahja, Rodesha,
Dinage, Roger Jr., Sergio, Anthony Jr., Hakeem, Lyntanique,
Antonio, Jamela, Mary, Tito, Gai, Kahi, Libby, Patrice, Nikita,
Nadia, Clifford, Jennifer, Lisa, Tammy, Benny, Kevin, Meoshe,
Rashad, Keshan, Lavanda, Samantha, AJ, Xonovia, RJ, Rendwood,
Renagello, Avion, Katherina, Antoinette, Fran, Xavera, Sheena
and Jewell Rolle, Tavad, Kareem, Keno, Opal, Tangie, Arther,
Jennifer, Bettyann, Miriam, Ann, Jessica, Maryann, Julie Ann,
Niska, Marica, Cindy, Cora, Stacey, Dornell, Margaret and many
more and a host of other relatives and friends including
Management and Staff of Urban Renewal, Management and Staff
of Paradise Cove and the Community of Pine Forest, East End
the Class of 2004 St. Georges High and the Basketball Team.
Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway, Freeport from 12noon
until 6pm on Friday and at the church on Saturday from 10:30am
until service time.











Yager Funeral -iome & Crematorium
Queen's Highway
RO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724 Fax: 351-3301



Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
|_IDAVID LEON & Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday from 12noon until
|, rI rmsTl cwt 6pm and at the church on Saturday from 10am until 1:30pm and


a resident of #333 Dominica Ave.,
Freeport will be held on Saturday
11th, August, 2007 at 3:30pm at
Tabernacle Independant Baptist
Church, Settler's Way, Freeport.
Officiating will be Pastor Alphaeus
Woodside and interment will follow
in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park,
Frobisher Drive.


Left to cherish his memories and mourn his passing are his wife,
Anita Louise McIntosh; six sons, Robert, Alfred, David Jr., Anthony
and Carlton McIntosh and Pastor Dave Williams; four daughters,
Princess Williams, Monique "Joy" Barthel of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,
Julie Capron and Karla McIntosh; two adopted daughters, Patrice
and Patricia Wilson; seven grandsons, Cochise and Renaldo Parker,
Cathlin Clarke and Mark McIntosh of Ft. Lauderdale, Anthony
"Sanchez" Capron, Kieron Nairn and Demetrius McIntosh; seven
grand daughters, Marquisha and Anita "Baby sis" McIntosh, Ebony
Adderley of Ft. Lauderdale, Shadee, Quintessa and Salena Williams
and Davinee Capron; two great grand sons, Aliandro Russell and
O'Brien Parker; one brother, John McIntosh; one siser, Alvira
Pritchard-Rolle; one son-in-law, David Capron; two daughters-in-
law, Bettymae and Maria Williams; grand daughter-in-law, Berniece
Parker; nine sisters-in-law, Mary Grant of Antigua, Adlaide "Dottie"
Dvugnol, Phyllis Rigby, Patrica Bishop, Caronet, Martha, Symone
and Willimae Harris of Providenciales and Ivy McIntosh; eight
brothers-in-iaw, Charles, Princie, Preston and George Harris, Joseph
Rigby, Maxin Dvugnol of Providenciales, Vernon Grant of Antigua
and Donovan Bishop of Jamaica; twenty four nieces, Gwendolyn
Rigby and Marilyn McIntosh of Miami, Florida, Dorlene Poitier
of Abaco, Vernell Swain, Tishka Pritchard, Sonia McIntosh,
Shervoine Roker, Margaret Burrows, Terricita Hanna, Jeletha
Dames, Princess and Hetti Harris, Lydia Capron, Maria Cash,
Rachel Walker, Morna Tiara, Barbaralee Rolle, Kizzy and Tiffany
Harris, Jeniene Higgs, Nickara, Indira, Lana and Vernitta Harris of
Providenciales; thirty seven nephews, Roy Williams of Ft.
Lauderdale, Sherlin, Frankie, Carl, Steve and Carrington McIntosh,
Joseph, Ned, Zendal, Marvin, and Ernie Pritchard, Terrence and
Charles Cox, Jimmy Forbes, Princes Dames, Charles Cash, Bradley
Delancy, Rico Rolle, Melbourne Smith, Kiptino Stubbs, Colvis and
Chris Williams, Rodney and Ron Rigby, Rudy, James and Wellington
Smith, Ryan Wilson, Elliot Johnson, Quincy, Brandon, Garret,
Jimmy, Hikey and Ricky Harris of Providenciales and Kevin
Schlander and a host of other relatives and friends.


at the church from 2pm until service time.


JOYCELYN VERONICA
GIBSON, 52

a resident of #74 Rum Cay Place,
Hawksbill and formerly of Seymour's,
Long Island will be held on Saturday
at 1pm at the church of God,
Hawksbill, Grand Bahama. Officiating
will be Bishop Godfrey Green, assisted
by Minister Michael Gibson and
interment will follow in the Grand
Bahama Memorial Park, Frobisher
Drive.


Left to cherish her memories are her sons, Samuel Rolle and Kevin
Moss; three daughters, Jacquely and Lynette Rolle and Maxine
Moss; parents, Willard and Hilda Gibson; one grand son, Anton
Lightbourne; six grand daughters, Raydyah, Malyah, Sonaria,
Alexus, Danetta and Dontily; three brothers, Leroy, Cyril and Shorn
Gibson; seven sisters, Angela Major, Helen Pratt, Pauline Cooper,
Paula Steel, Cathlene Higgs, Elizabeth Dixon and Gaynor Gibson;
six brothers-in-law, Phillip Major, Stephen Pratt, Gary Cooper,
Steve Steel, Cardell Higgs and Jeffery Dixon; two sisters-in-law,
Dianne and Marchell Gibson; seven aunties, Rosa, Rowena, Mody,
Ophela of Long Island, Martha, Louise of Nassau and Florine of
Freeport; three uncles, Ruban, Wilfred Adderley and Dixon of Long
Island; twelve nieces, Starlene, Chiqta, Nicola, Cassie, Kerry,
Vonnel, Leandrea, Rhonda, Stephine, Shenika, Shonell and Shondira;
eight nephews, Dino, Stephano, Willard Jr., Phillip Jr., Deangelo,
Jevez, Dion Jr., and Renaldo; five grand nephews and seven grand
nieces, special friends including, Maxwell Moss, Samuel Rolle Sr.,
Gloria Taylor, Beatrice Stubbs, Virgina, Shavonne and family,
Esther, Mildred, Dianne Lundy and Karne Ferguson and a ahost of
other relatives and friends including, Senator Frederick McAlpine
and Freeport Fellowship family, Bahamas Customs The Community
of Hawksbill, the Club Fortuna Staff and doctors and nurses of the
Rand Memorial Hospital.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
& Crematorium, Queens Highway on Friday from 12noon until
6pm and at the church on Saturday from 11:30am until service
time.


IVAL.LI~ A V.PIJAA .J


,I-


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007










Yager Funeral Home & Crematorium
Queen's Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 Paging: 352-6222 #1724 Fax: 351-3301



Rosemary and Bertram; and a host of other relatives and
VIOLA PATRUNIA friends including, Mr and Mrs Ben Ferguson, Lucien Hall,
SMOSS, 67 Female Medical, Doctors Forbes and Rolle Out Patients,
Ambulance Dept. and R.M.H. and Hawksbill Clinic and
of #85 Abaco Drive Hawksbill, Community.
.... :', Grand Bahama and formerly of
rtn Td.h ama and f l Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yaget Funeral
??;* the Turks and Caicos Islands will
S h n Saturda A st th Home and Crematorium on Friday from 12noon until 6pm
b b be held on Saturday, Augustfrom 1am unti 12noon and at the church
:d7.: and on Saturdav from 10am until 12noon and at the church


2007 at 2pm at Emmanuel
Missionary Baptist Church,
I Eleuthera Drive, Hawksbill.
Officiating will be Bishop
Benjamin Ferguson and interment will be made in the Grand
Bahama Memorial Park, Frosbisher Drive.

Left to cherish her memories are her husband, Patrick Moss
Jr.; five sons, Patrick Jr., Stanley Sr., David Sr., Jonathan Sr.,
and Michael Moss Sr.; two daughters, Mrs Theresa Reckey
and Ms Laverne Moss; one adopted daughter, Brendalee
(Kim) Hemmings; two brothers, Stanley and Wellington
Musgrove; two sisters, Ann and Evelyn Musgrove; four
brothers-in-law, Moris, Victor, Maxwell Augustine and Rev.
Vincent Moss; six sisters-in-law, Rosemary and Minerva
Musgrove, Joan, Dorothy, Althea and Thomasena Moss; one
son-in-law, Ivan Reckley; three daughters-in-law, Andria,
Ellen and Geline Moss; thirty-four grandchildren, Shinika
and Ivan Reckley, Keishneil, Kylene, Sadat, Bradley, Angel,
Kinj, Keyantee, Samantha, Stanley Jr., Semone, Samolia,
Standria, Stanton, Standre, Shondre, Deandria, Sherika,
Monique, David Jr., Candice, Davenique, Davonya, Cassius,
Stacey, Jamain, Zekia, Jonathan Jr., Steffon, Shemar, Whitney,
Gregory and Michael Jr.; eleven great grandchildren, Bennique,
Benjamin, Theria, Destiny, Dynasty, Denaro, Tiffany, Tavion,
Stanley III, Avery and Keshaune; numerous neices and
nephews including, Mervin, Michelle, Tasha, Shenique,
Dominic, Michael, Portia, Cleo, Anastasia, Anthon, Patrice,
Princess, Jerome, Rhodriques, Anthony, Judy, Dwayne,
Karsten, Kathleen, Katie, Sharon, Kenneth, Kelson, Wellington
Jr., Denise, Karen, Monique, Kenneth, Cansina, Samantha,
Donney, Sterling, Gladstone, Kenneth, Michelle, Ricardo,
Pedro, Tito, Kathie, Anthony, Ann, Brenda Danahue,
Cassandra, Marsha, Debbie, Maxine, Kevin, Joycelyn, Carolyn,
Angela, Glen, Jerome, Andre, Ethel, Rochelle, Joy, Basil,
Samuel Jr., Gary, Randy, Luther, Sherry, Pops, Albertha,


from 12:30pm until service time.


MYRTLE EDNA
KNOWLES (NEE MAY),
94

passed away peacefully at the
home for her son "Chappy"
Knowles on Wednesday, August
8th, 2007 after a life loving and
faithfully lived.


She is survived by her son and
daughter-in-law, Neville "Chappy" Knowles and Mary Ann
Knowles; two granddaughters and their husbands, Tabitha
and Robert Nabb, Tara Ann and Alphonzo Munnings; three
great-grandchildren, Alec and Eric Nabb and Mateo Munnings.

Funeral service will be held on Tuesday, 14th August, 2007
at 1 lam at Calvary Bible Church, Sargent Major and Cromwell
Drive, Freeport. Officiating will be Pastor Hartley Thompson
and interment will follow in the Grand Bahama Memorial
Park, Frobisher Drive.

Friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home and
Crematorium on Queen Highway, Freeport on Monday from
12noon until 5pm.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made in her memory to
Calvary Bible Church.


- I


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 7


:THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


S.-. .




. . ..
I









'PntrttWss CM raf ffivirtuari

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020* Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761
Las Ries or


HAMANIES
CARLINN" "HYMENIS"
ROBINSON, 76

of Sea Grape Grand Bahama, will be held on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. at Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, Sea Grape,
Grand Bahama. Officiating will be Pastor Paul Mullings.
Interment will follow in Harbour West Cemetery, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama.

He is survived by his wife Monica "Louise" Robinson;
sons, Robert "Robbie" Robinson, Henry "Low" Robinson,
Allan "Stove" Robinson, Branford Robinson and Dejon
Robinson; daughters, Debra Butler, Janet Swaby, Deidrie
Lightbourn, Carolyn Robinson, D'Neisha Robinson and
Vernette Robinson-Sterling; sisters, Jappie Lightbourne,
Flaxie Outten, Elizabeth Hanna and Carlos Henfield:
brothers, Albert, Alton and Milton Robinson; grandson.
Scorpio Robinson Sr., Donvitto, Jacobi, Shantano, Ramon,
Rashaad "Mado" Butler, Kevin, Hilton, Deandnee,
Winchester, Indeo, Tori, Corderre, Cameron, Allan Jr.
Robinson and Jerome Deveaux; adopted grandson, Cordel!
Bain; granddaughters, Erica Robinson, Kamille, Kimberley
and Shandavera Robinson, Marlo Nicholls, Phillis Swaby.


Jerusha Cooper, Stephanie Sawby, Shyanna Robinson,
Rakaya Butler, Odesha Jones, Asia Copeland, Shakira
and Shandera Robinson, Tara Whithead, Jeniel Jones,
Loushanda Robinson, Shaneiqua Smith, Sarafina
Robinson, Donnel Butterfield; great grandsons, Wesley
Young, Radhad and Scorpio Jr. Robinson, Julius Nicholls,
Kennedy Cooper Jr.; great granddaughters, Shadavia
Robinson, Janae Decosta, Versace Nicholls, Deazure
Nicholls and Celina Robinson; aunt, Lelia Robinson;
uncles, Orthneil and Livingston Robinson; brothers-in-
law, Joseph O'Brien, Eustace Outten Sr., George Hanna,
Llewellyn Henfield and Ralph Lightbourne; sisters-in-
law. Alice Robinson and Victoria Robinson; son-in-law,
Philip Swaby; daughters-in-law, Olga Robinson, Angela
Butterfield and Denise Robinson; nieces, Carolyn Ewing,
Shena Williams, Barbara Outten-Poitier, Linda Outten-
Nathan, Patrice Johnson, Carolyn Barr, Sylvia Hanna,
Paulette Robinson, Paula Smith, Laurna Williams, Carolyn
Pickstock, Brenda Ariza, Elizabeth Rolle, Nicky
Wallace,Christina Henfield, Eulease, Vochelle Ferguson,
Judy Robinson and Tamara Jones; nephews, Eustace
Outten Jr., Kirkland Hanna, Carlin Hanna, Terry Hanna,
Rudolph Hanna, Kenneth, Waldy, Keith and Tarino
Lightbourne, Antone, Chuck, Sandy, Max, Andrew and
Felton Robinson and Kevin Henfield; host of other
relatives and friends including the following and their
families, Aeroleta Robinson-Lightbourne, Maxwell,
Alphaeus, Larry, Robinson, Esther Williams, Saveletta
Harvey, Rose Williams, Marjorie Taylor, Ronica Bain,
Garnell Weech and Gardenia Fox. Special thanks to the
doctors and nurses on the Medical Ward at The Rand
Memorial Hospital, The Community Nurses from The
Eight Mile Rock and Hawksbill Clinic, Pastor Mark A.
Smith and family and the members of Dimenion
Community Church.

The body will repose at Russel and Pinder Funeral Home,
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama on Friday from 1:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from
10:00 a.m. until service time.


_ ___ _; __ I-


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








iurtism ^flcinurta 4ortuar

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020* Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761
LastBRites F or


EVELYN DEVEAUX, 83


of Washington Street and formerly of Ramsey, Exuma,
will be held on Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at Transfiguration
Baptist Church, Market and Vesey Streets. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson assisted by
Rev. Basil Johnson Interment will be in Lakeview
Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.

She is survived by nine children, Chester, Anthony,
Bertram, Ann, Donna, Janet, Dion, Yasmine and
Dwight; two sisters, Gloria Brown and Florine
Deveaux; adopted children, Hendrick Nairn, Henry
Curry, Lamount Turner, Sleepy, Henny Poitier, Theresa
Lamm and Doral Bain; son-in-law, Steve Morrison;
daughters-in-law, Alfred and Tanya; brother-in-law,
Alfred Brown; grandchildren, Hovie, Jason, Roberto,
Monique, Sheldon, Sharado, Aniska, Sheneka,
Leshawn, Abraham, Lil Freddie, Shade, Dwight Jr.,
Ryan and Lawrence; great grandchildren, Lorenzo,
Huel, Jason Jr., Isaiah, Bertram, Aalyah, Jeffrey, Jaden,
Isabel, Alexandra, Roberto Jr.; nieces, Nora, Dianna,


- -- ----- ---- -- --------`--- ~e -` -I I II


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 20C7, PAGE 9


T.HE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


H


Shirley, Sandra, Theresa, Ingrid, Nyoka, Virginia,
Judy Sandra, Chardra and Lexie; nephews, Charles,
Victor, Godfrey, Albert, Prince, Ben Therefus, Arizona,
Larry, Alfred, Patrick, Lionel and Jimmy; numerous
grandnieces and nephews and a host of other relatives
and friends including the following and their families,
Geleta Clarke, Glen Smith, Lawrence Rolle, Mavis,
Clifford and Mar, Janet Goffee, Elva Hart, the Dawkins,
Lamm, Yvonne Bethel, Melva, Pasty Rolle, Maggie,
Hermaine and Velma Thompson, Lilly Rolle, Anita
Pickering, the Thompsons, Rosemae Miller, Gweneth
Paul, Bethsheba Malcolm and Rose Newman, also
the families of the late Dora Deveaux, Clothilda Poitier
and Ethel Bowe; Evelyn Bullard and Ida Panza; the
families of, Florence Kemp, Petrona Petty, the late
George Humes, Carolyn Morrison, Ethlyn Bain,
Ramona Smith, The Washington Street, the Bains,
The Seventh Day Adventist Church Transfiguration
Baptist Church Freeport Branch of Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Kelly's Freeport Branch, Social Services,
Ministry of Education, BPSU, NCTU, Prince Hall,
Eastern Stars, Mary Johnnie, Gertrude, Dorine and
Ralph, Shante, Tiny, Rochell, Carvet, Peter, Sylvia,
the Communities of Ramsey and Mt. Thompson,
Exuma, Joe, Margaret, Ms. Albury and family, doctors
and nurses on Female Medical I, Althea, Evert,
Waynne, the family of the late Kim Lloyd, Berdina
Taylor, Louise Taylor, Vandetta Mooreshead, Lila
Wood, Eunice John, William Campbell, Roase and
Estella King.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary,
Robinson Road and Fifth Street on Friday from 11:00
a.m until 6:00 p.m., Saturday from 10:00 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. and at the church from 2:00 p.m. until
service time.





PAGE. 10. THURSDAY. AUGUSf 9. 2T007


LUmrt"te S funeral l
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
FUNER~~~ALS R IE FO


STEVEN ELDRIDGE
BROWN, 57


a resident of Dumping Ground Corner,
will be, held at St. Paul's Baptist Church,
Blue Hill Road and Bias Street on Saturday
at 10am. Rev. Dr. Robert Colebrook,
assisted by Pastor Van Brown, Rev.
Kenneth Bain and Rev. Emmett Johnson
will officiate. Interment follows in the
Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He is survived by his brother, Pastor Van
G. Brown of Tulsa, Oklahoma; sisters,
Beryl, Coral Dean of Bimini, Lily Brown-
Dean, Nicola Cash of Bimini, Harriet
Ferguson of Whymss Bight, Eleuthera,
Ernestine Deveaux; sister-in-law, Beryl,
Edwina and Lilamae Brown; brothers-in-
law, Gary Cash and Norward Dean;


nephews, Ricardo Woods, Theo
Duncombe, Dennis, Tracy, Van Jr., Randon,
Sidney, Van, Gerard, Romeo, George,
Sidney "Bubba" and Don Jr. Brown,
Michael Bubb Jr. and Nicolas Cash; nieces,
Natalie" Sweeting, Carlisa, Jaime, Natasha,
Maxine, Verna, Nadia, Harmony, LaDawn,
Nikita and Tasja Brown, Tamika Bowleg,
Monique Eneas, Jerelin and Corey Dean-
Francis, Nichelle Roberts, Courteney Cash,
Adria and Michaelia Bubb-Johnson, Zina,
Sakina, Sasha and Lashanda Deveaux;
numerous grand nieces and nephews
including, Dequito, Frankieanne, Dion,
Dequido, Alexa, Chante, Nivard, TaNage,
Ashley, Dominique and Derenika; aunts,
Morley Kemp, Vera Rolle, Shirley, Lurlene,
Angela and Catherine Cooper, Estelle
McDonald, Agnes Thompson and Maria
Ferguson; uncles, Cleophas, Thomas,
Salathiel, Nehemiah and Robert Cooper;
numerous cousins and other relatives
including, Ruby Roker, Andrea Adderley,
Sheila Beneby, Bradley Cooper, Chief
Inspector Cleophas Cooper, Brenda Cleare,
Linda Mortimer, Rev'd Rudolph Cooper,
Neville and Captain Patrick Rolle.

Friends may pay their respects at
Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market St.
from 10am-6pm on Friday and on Saturday
at the church from 9am until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIE









Eminteritte' s Junrral "m
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


CENTENAIRE
CHERILUS
DEBRUNE, 57


a resident of Royal Palm
Estates off Cowpwn Road,
formerly of Anse-sa Foleur
Haiti, will be held at Bahamas
International Church of Christ,
Hillside. Plaza, Thompson
Blvd., on Saturday at 11am. Pastor Phillips and Pastor
John Baptiste will officiate. Interment follows in
Lakeview Memorial Gardens.

Lef to cherish the joy, smile and brilliance that one
encounter when in her presence is her beloved husband,
Mericene Debrune; one son, Dino Risque; four daughters,
Micheline Bellefort, Odette Marc of Miami, Florida,
Kerland (Kay) Joseph and Sandra Outten; two sons-in-
law, Wilkins Marc of Miami, Florida, and Randy Outten;
two grand sons, Kevin Jr. Fox and Tristan Marc of
Miami, Florida; two grand daughters, Ariel Marc of
Miami, Florida and Randajah Outten; one brother, Hilaire
Cherilus; one sister, Consolia Cherilus; adopted children,
Gella and Gertha Jules; step children, Yvana, Daniela
and Yves Joseph; six nieces,Franchese and Marie Jules,
Jesline, Chelda, Angela and Shenika Cherilus; five grand
nieces, Iranie Valcin, Erica Lilly, Brittney, Christina,
Annette Jules; three grand nephews, Kende Travis and
Juvence Jules; one aunt, Charlisma Pierre; one uncle,
Toussaint; six nephews, Nelva, Wilfred, Wilfren, Elijah,
Marc and Marco; cousins, Yfousa, Luckson, Wilson,
Yves, Leonielle, Toussaint, Tedilia, Martilia and Siltame;
two god sons, Noel Joseph and Luckinson Piette;
numerous host of relatives and friends, Violet and Frank
Simone and family, Mem Fernando and family, the staff
of Grand centrals, Dr. Carole and team, Mem Charlot
and family, David and Barbra Fox, Illanise Milfred, Elva
and Horese Manning, Swamine Victor and family, the
staff of Nubian Styles AKA as her girls. The Bahamas
International Churchof Christ.

Friends may pay their respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, 162 Market Street from 10am 6pm on Friday


and on Saturday at the church from 10am until service
time.

SCAMELETTA
MAJOR, 95

a resident of St. Vincent Road,
formerly of Simms, Long Island
will be held at St. Bede's
Catholic Church, Sutton Street,
on Saturday at 10 a.m. Rev. Fr.
Alain Laverne Willo officiate.
Interment follows in Old Trail
Cemetery, Old Trail Road.
Survived by her six sons, Lawrence, Finley, Charles,
Joseph, Leroy and George Major; one daughter, Audrey
Major; one adopted daughter, Evangeline Ford; one
sister, Pearl Wallace; two brothers-in-law, Harold Major
and Clarence Wallace; five nieces, Maris, Louise Pinder,
Carolyn Thompson, Gwendolyn Green and Elsie; two
nephews, Lester Wallace and Pastor Anthony Carroll;
four daughters-in-law, Stephanie, Corline, Lavern and
Judy Major; thirty-six grandchildren, Hennessy Darville,
Nyochi Russell, Marlon, Bruno, Franchot, Gerchan and
Reiko Major, Eletha Major, Yvette Paul, Dwayne, Patrice,
Typhanie and Tamarrah Major, Charlene, Allison and
Sharlon Major, Teisha, Teno, Anwar, Cerano, Ken,
Sheldon, Raquel, Omar, Corsheiko, Tamika Major and
Ginger Jordon, Rio, Delano and Kera Major, Shaynee
Steffon, Lavron and Leah Major, Azura, Corey, Brindisa
and Greg Major Castello family of Harold Major,
Livingstone Major and family, James Major and family,
Frederick Armaly and family, children of Mervin Major,
Antoinette, Hester, Leviticus, Lynden, Larry and Mario
Major and the Carrolls; thirty-six great grandchildren
and seventeen great, great grandchildren, relatives and
friends, Shirley Clarke, Patricia Moxey, Majors,
Rutherfords, Ethell McPhee, Oralee McPhee, Anya
McPhee and Arnold Paul.

Friends may pay their respects at Demerittes Funeral
Home, 162 Market St. from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on Friday
and on Saturday at the church from 9 a.m. until service
time.


- -- I----


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








Semeritt e's uJerul HIm
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
FUNERA SEVCEAO


JOHN OBRIEN
BRICE, 52


a resident of Elizabeth Estates, will be held
at St. Peter's Baptist Church, Andros
Avenue, on Saturday at 11 am. Pastor David
Butler will officiate and interment follows
in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his fond memories, three
daughters, Laurita Brice Forbes, Judyann
Brice Bain, Tamara Dorine Brice; one
adopted daughter, Tobby Yvette Rolle; one
son, Tario Taman Brice; eleven
grandchildren, Frendria Wallace, Savannah,
Jay Forbes, Tristain Bain, Rosjohn Bain,
Savannah Bain, Frederick Green, Naima
Green, Kesha, Taiza, Gemmy, Machal and


Terrion; six sisters, Vernice O'Brien,
Curlene O'Brien, Margarette Bonaby,
Maria Rolle, Rosemary Lundy and
Catherine Brown; four brothers, Anthony,
Fred, Alexander (Brice) and Kenneth
O'Brien; four brothers-in-law, Wilobert
Bonaby, Fox Thomas, Hearthy Lundy and
Eric Rolle; sister-in-law, Vergie Obrien;
two nieces-in-law, Tina O'Brien and
Claudette Whymns; host of nieces and
nephews including, Lanetta Thomas,
Garfield, Keith, Densel, Elise, Romana,
Ramon, Kadeisha, Ariel, Garfield Jr.,
Shonell Moss, Eyvette, Douglas, Nadine,
Donell Rolle, Kimberley, Brian, Canez
and Wilbert Bonaby, Crystal, Kendra,
Tiffany, Kavania, Kevin Jr., Catherine
Gibson, Sandra, Patricia, Arthur, Ugena
Lowe, Amanda Lowe, Alexandria Lowe,
Octave and Shaneque O'Brien, Shantell,
Denise, Talisa Whymns, Tina, Zria Moss,
Whymns, Lanece Dickinson, Denise,
Deron Whymns.

Friends may pay their last respect at
Demeritte's Funeral Home, 162 Market
Street on Friday from 10am 6pm and on
Saturday at the church from 10am until
service time.


---


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007







iemueritte's j JunrraI 4hxmw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
FUNEPA SEVCSFR


^ CECIL ELDON
GRAY, 68

a resident of Market &
Hay Streets, will be held
h at Zion Baptist Church,
East and Shirley Streets
on Saturday at 10 a.m.
Rev. T.G. Morrison Assisted by Rev.
Anthony Sampson and associate ministers
will of officiate. Interment follows in the
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memory, 2 sons, Frizzell
and Leroy Gray; I brother, Wilson Gray;
4 sisters, Nathalie Bodie, Joyce Mitchell,
Gracie Gray Brown and Louise Johnson;
5 uncles, Evangelist L.H. Brown, Arthur
Brown, Hartman Brown, Frank Clarke and
Edwin McPhee; 3 aunts, Idell Brown,
Joanna Brown and Hattie McPhee,
numerous nieces, nephews and other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their respects at
Demerittes Funeral Home, 162 Market St.
from 10 a.m. on Friday and on Saturday
at the church from 9 a.m. until service
time.


MEMORIAL SERVICE


for
CRAIG MOSS,
38


.... ..- a resident of Mt.
_:. e--- Pleasant Village, will
be held at Demerittes
Funeral Home, 162 Market St. on Saturday
at 3 p.m. Brother Anthony Greene will
officiate.
Left to cherish his memory; mother, Agnes
L. Jones; father, Hartwell Moss; step-father,
Michael Jones Sr.; step-mother, Virginia
Moss; 3 brothers, Michael Jr. and Mark
Jones and Brian Moss; 3 sisters, Arnett
Richards of New Jersey, Anika and Nikita
Moss; grandmother, Carolyn Clyde of
M;mi Fla., 2 uncles, Montgomery McKay
of Little Rock Arkansas and Keith Clyde;
3 aunts, Mary McKay, Albertha McKay
and Margarite Dean; grand-aunt, Merlene
Rolle; 2 sisters-in-law, Vanessa and Latasha
Jones; 2 brothers-in-law, Lee Richards of
New Jersey and Quincy, a host ofrelatives
and friends.

Arrangements by Demeritte's Funeral
Home, 162 Market Street.


- -- -- -- I---


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





n.PAG3 .iFD-"-" '(,v ",\ ",.-. ;- ,
; ";- : ~ r ii .' L-J,'- .. ;-.>- 'J. i.5 1^_, .. :. ^


i^.- | PRFSTON
"'c BASDEN, 45

of Summer Haven. South
Beach will be held on
.Saturdav i 11th August. 200'Q
1:00 o.m. at New Free
Com-muitMy Holiness Baptist
S Church. Mralcolm Road WXesi.
if'_":"______ Officiaiman will be Past. I
Stanley Ferguson assisted by
other Ministers of Religion. Interment will follow in
the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by his father, Percy Basden; step father,
Winston Knowles; four daughters,Precious Basden.
one son, Tameko Basden, one step son, Andrew Clarke
four sisters, Princess Pinnock, Millie Reid, Shirley and
Yvonne Basden; two step sisters, Lucille and Janice
Knowles; two sisters-in-law, Caroline and Michelle
Basden; five brothers, Julian, Montgomery, Darren,
Rudolph and Jason Basden; one step brother, Winston
Knowles Jr; two brothers-in-law; Winston Pinnock and
Kevin Reid; numerous nieces, Candy, Shanelle, Vanisha,
Rudeisha, Katyann, Daria, Niki, Vonya, Ebannee and
Jenean; numerous nephews, Rudolph Jr., Leslie, Breyon.
Kenoe, Carrington and Jason Basden; grand children
Breyon and Akeem Green: aunts. Mary Jane Hepburn,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Calvin Williams of Miami
Florida: two grand aunts, Yvonne Pratt and Patricia
Omela; uncles, Thomas Basden, Wesley Forbes of
Texas, Lewelyn Forbes, Simeon William of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Calvin Williams of Miami and numerous
cousins as well as a host of other relatives ancd friends,
including; Della Charles and family, The Brown family,
The Smith family, The Woodside family, The Kemp
family,The Joshua and Humes family, lonna Louise
and family; Free Community Holiness Baptist Church.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Rock of Ages


from ::;.-. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
I ror'-. !2 noon until service time.



LARISNA
S'DEROSE, 46

of Minnie Street, will be heid
on Saturday, August 11, 2007
at 1:00 p.m. at Victory Baptist
Church, Minnie Street.
Officiating will be Pastor St.
Louise Antone, Interment will
follow in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen adn Spikenard Roads.

She is survived by three children, Likenson Derose,
Frismel Louis and Junette Victoriem; three
grandchildren, Kenjir, Kino and Wyclf Derose; mother,
Gesila Vilava; father, Licaisse Derose; one sister, Anasia
Derose; three uncles, Gene, Jilme and Vilama; two
aunts, Amantine and Yayante; nieces and nephews
including, Manilia, Elsie, Aromic, Examene, Vilama,
Tania, Tikelene, Ume Gilbert, Sacha, Nadia, Varirose.
Tison, Agentine, Alina, Evie, Damas, Willy, Jeffery.
Wesly, Rolyn, Bernard; three brothers-in-iawv. Asinfard.
Afrandieu and Degene and a host of other friends and
relatives including Sliodie. Vilama. Seraman. Ttossi.
Wilson. Fillipe. Jeanine. Variantide. Rosette. ine
Maleonce. Tineque, Soliver. Tison. Zo. Vaiede. Heline.
Amelia, Elaine, Juliette, Varie, Ume Tivor. Tate, Rose,
Ume Timor. Getride. Ume Willy, Apressa, Stevo, Fertile,
Zamor, Charles. Noradieu, Lavius. Tidole. Apredieu,
Gorges and Roger.

Friends may pay their last respects at The Rock of Ages
Funeral Chapel, Wulff Road and Pinedale on Friday
from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the
church from 12:00 noon until service time.


_


T, ':_ iBUNE h UA .-.





(->--* -UR5 A" A G 9. 2 P2 r;5 E


':


VERLENE AVIS
BROWN-NOTTAGE, 74


of Wilton Street and formerly of Arthur's Town,
Cat Island will be held on Saturday, August 11,
2007 at 10:00 a.m. at St. George's Anglican Church,
Montrose Avenue. Officiating will be Rev. Fr. G.
Kingsley Knowles, assisted by Rev. Dr. Roland
Hamilton. Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.

She is survived by her three sons. Harry Murphy,
Rudolph and Craig Nottage: four daughters, Marsha
Dean of Freeport. Grand Bahama, Deborah
Baptiste, Christine and Sharon Nottage, 24
grandchildren, Prez, Lakeisna, Accasio Sr., Tamika.,
Shaneka, Candice, Donya, Marvin, Darven, Takoa,
Ebony, Michael, Kayara, Garcia, Rambo,
Kayshelda, Kimberley, Cruzel, Esther, Cruz,
Craignesha, Donna, Avery of Miami, Florida and
Tami Dean of Freeport, Grand Bahama; great
grandchildren, Odderley, Anthony, Fabian, Lamika,


A:.x. L .n. J Laea, As-eia, Sneawn
and Jovan: ve broher-s: four sisters, eight nieces,
13 nephews: two uncles. Hartman Moncur of Cat
Island and Vincent Moncur: one daughter-in-law,
Charlene Murphy: two sons-in-law. Hezekiah' Dean
of Freeport, Grand Bahama and Walter Baptiste;
ibr sisters-in-law, Pastor Eltames Smith. Minister
Ru.m ae Gibson. Olga Duncan. Pandora Miller,
Evangelist Lurina NottaLe of Miami, Florida and
Uris Nottage, two brothers-in-law, Pastor Isaiah
Nottage and Deacon Orlando Nottage of Miami,
Florida and a host of other friends and relatives
including the following and their families, Carmon
McPhee, Frank, Christopher and Trudy Miller and
Marina Pratt; Helen Smith, Barbara Bain, Neville
Smith, Marina Forbes, Balda Campbell, Cyprianna
and Tyrone Strachan, Dereoka Nottage, Daniel
Duncombe, Wayne Cleare, Cardinal Rolle, Fabian
Sherperd, Kevin Hughes, Gregory Butterfield,
Pastor Wellington and Christine Maycock, Joycelyn
Bolden, Barbara Richard and family, Christine
Williams, Damian Adderley, Hon. Perry G. Christie
and family, MP Frank Smith and family Philip
McKenzie and family, Jennifer and Debbie Kemp,
Yvonne Bevans, Patricia Dupuch, The Guild to
the Sick and Needy. The St. George's Arnglican
Church fam I Man- station Aspotolic Ministry
and the entire Cuime,:-\viive Community. A host of
other friends and rela .ves too nuit-erous to i: mention.

Friends may pay their last respect at The Rock of
Ages Funeral Chapel, Wulff Road and Pinedale
on Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on
Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service
time.


_ I __ __


7 ,.: ,c> , ,






PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


,.,li Orm a. i

Mr. Wmdel I G. Dean 1I, i,, rrvices includes:
S' ' ,i I 1 I I ',, I .. '.. I 'D
.- '/ S j J I h, ,, -: L,' J'* '* ** *I*." '. "* ..r" l "lJ i i r '. j1


Te1:,11242! 393-6367

' .' .- ~ : -, -f -- *.- *


* ('ell. 1e: 4 457- 1986


Sardonyx Funeral Service for


Mr. Alfirdo Antonio "Ali"
Smith-Johnson Sr., 30
of #04 Judy Lane, off Horseshoe Drive,
Oakes Field will be held on Saturday,
August 11, 2007 at 11 am at Temple
Fellowship Ministries International, Davis
Street Oakes Field. Bishop Kirkwood R.
Murphy, assisted by Pastors Kevin Grant,
Arlington Williamson and Demico Munroe
will officiate and burial will be in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.


t' The Radiance of this "Sardonyx of A
Gem" will always glow in the hearts of his:
Wife: Ann Marie Brown-Johnson;
Two Sons: Alfirdo Jr. and Juston;
Five Daughters: Alyandri, Shanique, Anliyaa, Krystal and Joan;
Mother: Ruthmae Bain;
Father: Jeffery Smith;
Step Father: Irvin Bain Sr.;
Four Brothers: Irvin Jr. and Tyson Bain, Lavarason and Jasette Smith;
One Sister: Ayana Smith;
Grand Mother: Nathalie Rolle;
Seven Uncles: Hubert, Joey, Jeffery and Bruce Johnson, Fred Bain,
Nelson Cartwright and Runell McKenzie;
Twenty Aunts: Karen Turnquest, Stephanie Cartwright, Linda and
Indiana Ferguson, Leona, Cynthia, Vanessa, Denise, Sandra and Margaret
Johnson, Judy Smith, Patricia McKenzie, Brenda McKinney, Rhona
Davis, Jac':ie Bain, Carol-:' Levearity, Joyce Reid, Mandy Mackey,
Catherine Dorsette and Michelle;
Seven Grand Uncles: Arthur and Prince Johnson, Philip Ferguson,
Osbourne, Leo, Stanley and Neville Finley of Miami, Florida;
Five Grand Aunts: Shirley Ferguson, Edna, Stephanie and Gwendolyn
Johnson and Stephanie Kemp;
Numerous Nephews Nieces other loving family and friends including:
Temeka, Joey, Tien, Nathan Turnquest, Jamal Balfour, Vardo Cartwright,
Tina, Tiny, Paul, Tanya, Omar, Kenny, Anthony, Linda, Suzie, Dennis,
Pat, Mark Ethan, Cutell, Walter, Freda and Edward Cleare, Fred, Mr.
and Mrs. Steven "Bula" Pinder, Deashia, Rosemary Hart, Simms, Debbie,
Stephanie Kemp, Keva, Shorranda, Shandia and Lavanya.
The body will be viewed in the "Emerald Suite" Emerald Ridge Mortuary
& Monument Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday, August 10,
2007 From 1pm to 6pm and on Saturday, August 11, 2007 at Temple
Fellowship Ministries International, Davis Street Oakes Field From 10am
to Service Time.
Visit our website: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video tributes,
sign guest book and send condolence, sympathy, love and memories.


& (r1matornm
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Fueal Sevc For


MR. SAMUEL JOSEPH
FERGUSON, 70

of Rose Street, Fox Hill will be
held on Saturday, August llth,
2007 at 11:00 a.m. at St. Mark's
Native Baptist Church, Romer
Street, Fox Hill. Officiating will
be Rev. Dr. Carrington Pinder
Assisted by Rev. Warren
Anderson, Rev. Theodore
Thompson and Other Ministers.
Interment will follow in the
Church's Cemetery.


Cherished memories will forever linger in the hearts of his
beloved dedicated and faithful wife of 51 years Mrs. Essie J.
Ferguson; Six (6) Sons; Rodney, Samuel Jr., Pedro, Gary,
Dwayne and Jason Ferguson; Eight (8) Daughters; Marilyn,
Penny, Jane, Kimberley and Tami Ferguson, Cheryl Moss,
Vanria Culmer and Keva Wood; Adopted-children; Elder
Theodore Rahming, Alexstine Clarke (niece), Marsha Sassar,
Jewelann Bethel, Toni Curry (nephew), Ann Woodside,
Charmaine Ferguson, Olive Mackey, Gregory Roberts, Trevor
Brown, Trevor Pratt and the Rose Street Boys; Thirty-six (36)
Grandchildren; Six (6) Great-grandchildren; Nine (9) Brothers;
Eric and Joe Davis, Augustas Rahming, Alexander Stuart,
Edward Ferguson, George Ferguson of Ohio, Godfrey Ferguson
of Fort Lauderdale, George Coakley of Miami, Florida and
Lawrence Jersey of New Jersey; Eight (8) Sisters; Barbara
Ferguson, Eugenia Thurston, S' 'ron Ferguson, Gertrude
Dorsett, Patricia Davis, Mavis Roker, Jane Storr and Maria
Storr of Vera Beach, Fl.; Three (3) Sons-in-law; Patrick Moss,
Martin Culmer and Lennis Wood Sr.; Four (4) Daughters-in-
law; Judy, Dianne, Nicola and Claudine Ferguson; One (1)
Aunt; Miriam Pratt; One (1) Uncle; Wendall Pratt; Nine (9)
Sisters-in-law; Lydia Rahming, Celeste Lockhart, Dian Shawna
Davis, Albertha Rahming, Mavis and Gwendolyn Ferguson,
Audrey McKinney, Sheila Coakley of Miami, Fl. and Priscilla
Coakley of New Jersey; Three (3) Brothers-in-law; Henry
Thurston, Lawrence Roker and Harry McKinney; One (1)
Grandson-in-law; Numerous Nieces and Nephews and a host
of other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers' Funeral Homes
and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Friday from
10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m.
until service time at the Church.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FUNERAL DIRECTORS
"Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition."
7th Terrace, Collins Avenue (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 Nassau, Bahamas



ESTER JOANNA
1,1 BECKLES, 93
of#114Wulff Road and formerly of Knowles',
Cat Island will be held on Saturday August
11th, 2007 at 11 am at Ebenezer Mission Baptist
Church, Charles Vincent Street. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette assisted by
other ministers. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens
She is serviced by her children, William "Andy"
and Winston Beckles, Antoinette "Net"
Turnquest-Murphy, Mildred "Millie" Bosfield,
Millicent Pratt and Linda Johnson of Miramar
Florida; extended children, Mario Donato,
Ernest Thorn, Merrill Dorsett, Oldorphe
Bonhomme, Sandra Carey, Tyrone Johnson, Mother Leanna Laing, Agnes Burnside,
Dr. David Brown and Marjorie Langley (care giver); son and daughter in-law, David
Pratt and Emerald Beckles; 45 grandchildren, Gia Cartwright, Lanza and Hope
Miller, Dereck and Andrea Grant, Lorna and Kimo Pratt, Audley and Merrilen
Hepburn, R/C 799 Lamorn and Annouch Armbrister, DeAngleo and Ebony Moss,
Van and Nyoka Moss, Craig and Janet, Dayton and Lisa, Georgette, Patick and
Michelle Tumquest, Anthony, Damon, Jamal, Winston Jr., Terio, Kelecha, Rhondrickia,
Nickevia, McAilstar, Cordero and Patrice Beckles, Mary, Jarmaine and Jeron Johnson,
George McGibbon, Sandra Davis, Gabrielle Jean-Baptiste, David Pratt Jr., Joseph
Davis, Kevin Rolle, Jannette Turnquest, Corporal Janet Darling and Kimble Rolle;
3 sisters, Leen Moncur, Gracie and Monette King; 46 -great grandchildren, Egan,
Kristen, Damien, Mario Jr., Damon Jr., Kamel, Kimo Jr., Conra, Candice, Tanya,
Courtney, Miracle, Christian, Craig Jr., Natalli, Lynden, Patrick Jr., Patronette,
Dayvon, Dayton Jr., Tyrisa, Michael, Daytonique, Calvin, Lynee, Horatio, Mikhail,
Reshmi, Ria, Jermaine, Ferrell, Jaimi, J'Kari, Jacinth, Leonardo Jr., Favor, Donesha,
Jariah, Winterly, Perry, Vanria, Akintino, Van, Conlan, Chinyere and Kahja; brother-
in-law, Hartman Moncur; sisters-in-law, Gertrude Powell, Agatha Beckles and Leana
King Nieces including: Enid Ingraham, Marguita Small, Eureka Watson, Alice
Muncur, Gladys Roberts, Cynthia, Nora, Etherly, Pearl, Winifted, Albertha, Willamae,
Rose, Diann, Icelyn, Dolly, Andrea, Aloma, Edris, Lillian, Louise, Margaret, Delores,
Emily, Jacqueline, Jennifer, Valencia, Jacqueline, Ingrid, June, Judy, Brenda, Liette,
Emily, Gwenith, Melvern, Ann, Esther, Angela, Branetta, Sybilene and Eulease;
nephews including, Godfrey, Simeon, Sydney, Mackey, Edward, Cephas, Phillip,
Sydney, Newell, Kerlin, Clement, Hansel, Arnold, Michael, Paul, Eric, Gary, Joseph,
Lyle, Lans, Tyrone, Barrington, Denis, Cedrick, Phillip, Cyril,.Leslie, Delvin, Jeffrey,
Anthony, Steven, Phillip, Alexander and Charley; numerous other relatives and
friends including, Rev. Dr. Elkin Symonette, Bishop Lawrence Rolle, Clement
Ferguson, Steven Higgs, Patricia Deveaux, Charmaine Ferguson, Christine Bethel,
Dr. David Brown, Marcia Cargill, Inez Carey, Everlyn Woods, Beulah Davis, Ralph
Rolle, Firstina Hepburn, Yvonne Stubbs, Brunetta Sherman, Ruby Byer, Rev. Dr.
Audley Hepburn, Ruthnell Robinson, Margaret Hepburn, Ozel Miller, Joycelyn
Cooper, Myrtle Stubbs, Yvonne Stubbs, Coralee Sturrup, Keva Farquharson, Basil
Sands, Ruth Johnson, Egan Cartwright, Floabell Penn, Laura Hart, Margaret Major,
Doreen Patton, Mary Nairn and their families the King, Beckles, Rose, Watson,
Bowleg, Penn, Small, Seymour, Moncur, Boyd, Wring, Dorsett, Deaveaux, Bain,
Ebenezer Mission Baptist Church family, The Sterling Foundation family, International
Deliverance Praying Ministries family, The Church of the Nazarene family, the
Moorse Lane Family, Dr. Christine Chin, Nurse Carolla Wright, Nurse Jolly, and the
Staff of Private Medical & Female Medical II of the Princess Margaret Hospital.
The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at Ferguson's Funeral Directors,
7th Terrace Collins Avenue on Friday fron 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday at the
church from 10 a.m. until service time.


103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
P.O. Box EE-17228
Telephone: 328-4900
Fax: 328-4903 Cell: 456-9062, 436-3586


*aFUNRA NNUCEET O


Interment will
Tyler Street.


MODE
EDOUARD, 35

of West Street and
formerly of Trou-du-
Nord, Haiti will be
held on Saturday at
10:00a.m. at Our
Lady.'s Catholic
Church, Deveaux
Street. Officiating will
be Fr. Eugene Kaze
follow in Catholic Cemetery,


Left to mourn her -passing, mother,
Idamone E. Edouard; her siblings, Jean
Philome, Kennedy Cox, Frankly, Jean
Jeamson, Fritz Cox, Ketty BienAime,
Edouard, Gusline Stenoa Cox, and
Marjorie Cox; sisters in-law, Alice, and
Keishell Cox; a host of other relatives and
friends including, Deliverance Jean Gilles,
Jeanise Jean Gilles, Jeanvi Jean Gilles,
Delide Jean Gilles, Marie, lima, Edelene,
and Pierre, Etienne, Louis Belle Riye, the
Edouard, Etienne, Jean Gilles, Lambert,
Frito Joseph, Bruno, Bien-Aime, Stenor,
Louis, Bruitus families and a host of many
other relatives and friends too numerous
to mention.

Viewing will be held in the State Room of
Jones Brothers Morticians, Mt. Royal
Avenue and Talbot Street on Friday from
10:00a.m. until 6:00p.m. and at the Church
on Saturday from 9:00a.m. until service
time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 17












SVaughn 0. Jones


MEMORIAL CENTER

"Honoring the memories of loved ones"

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED


FUNERA ANNO~I~SIJiUNCEl WMENTS


AGATHA ROLLE, 57
of Ethel Street, Montell Heights, and
formerly of San Salvador, will be held
on Friday August 10th, 2007 at St.
Cecilia's Catholic Church, Coconut Grove
| Ave., at 1:45 p.m. Officiating will be
oiB "Father Simeon Roberts. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.
| Cherished memory will forever be
remembered in the hearts of her eight
children, Maxwell II, Alonzo, Monique,
Jason, Jermaine, Lorraine, Giovanni, and Geovannia; eight great
grandchildren, Maxwell III, Precious, Jamal, Jermaine and Romeo Rolle,
Antonia Knowles, Miguel Black and Tamika Pitterson; two sisters, Sarah
Storr of San Savador and Drothy Major; seven brothers, Ednal Thompson
of San Salvador, Ezra, Earl, Epraim, Patrick, Superintendent Matthew
Davis and Rev. Leonard Davis of Sarasota Florida; two uncles, Carol and
Robert Lightfoot; nieces and nephews, Merlene, Karen, Dr. Bernadette
Braham, Rainy, Ernest, Dr. Sharon Thompson, Ednal Jr., Darren, Kara,
Earlene, Andre, Shanchia, Shannon, Siana, Sherwood, Gerad, Shannardo,
Dante, Deon, Deidreann, Denise, Rekiel, Glenda, Nadia, Lateria, Caswell,
Eleanor, Ann, Linda, Lynette, Pedro, Minister Ricardo Davis, Sharon,
Natasha, Petterson, Jefferson, Cleophas, Esther, Pastor Jonathan Knowles
and Jennifer Storr; god mother, Sister Agatha Hunt; two daughters-in-
law, Veronica and Tiffany Rolle; mother-in-law, Inez Rolle of South
Andros; ten sisters-in-law, Martha, Sharon, Carlise, Rose, Christina Davis
of Sarasota, Florida, Lilymae Thompson, Velma Williams, Sandra Bartlett
of South Andros, Cassiemae, Doretta, Ivy Rolle and Alice Cunningham;
three brothersin-law, Litfield, Stephen and Luther Rolle; numerous cousins
including, Dr. Rickey Davis and family, Wilton Davis, Blanche Butler,
Marina Laing, Laveme Pop le, Eloise Bubsy, Barbara Russell, Judy Forbes,
Pandora Mackey, Nethelane Newny, Elsa Munnings, Rosemary Gibson,
Wendell, Garth, Gregory King, Rudolph, Colbert, Eddison and Warren
Newry, a host of other relatives and friends including, Barry White and
family of Jamaica, Antonio Knowles and family, Jermaine Wallace and
family, Anton Moss and family, The Gladstone Farm family, Pastor Roy
Burrows and The Vision of Hope Church family, The Virgil family, The
Williams family, The Forbes family, The Storr's family, The Smith's family,
The Lightfoot family, The Butler family, The Rolle family, The Nairn
family, The Montell Heights Community, The Minnie Street Community,
The Staff of Nassau Stadium, The Staff of Female Surgical I, The Gayne
Ward of Princess Margaret Hospital and others too numerous to mention.


Viewing will be held in the Legacy Suite of Vaughn 0. Jones Memorial
Center, Wultl Road and Primrose Street on Thursday from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m. again on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and at the church
from 1:00p.m. to service time.


THELMA CLEAR, 60
of West End Ave, and formerly of Hatchet
Bay, Eleuthera, Funeral Service will be
held on Saturday August 11, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at Arrow of Deliverance
Church, Cox Way off East Street South.
Officiating will be Pastor John Henry
Innis assisted by Rev. Rhodrick Brown.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.


Cherished memory will forever be
remembered in the hearts of her children,
Tanya, Tomeco, Terez, Tekenia and
Terrence; two brothers, Charles and Carl Cleare of Miami, Fla.; two
adopted sisters, Mary Stubbs and Dianna Morley; two aunts, Doreen
Cleare and Olivia Bowles; two sisters-in-law, Alfreda, and Rose Cleare
of Miami, Fla.; seven grandchildren, Bradley, Latoya, Aaron Jr., Greganique,
Meagan, Ashton and Kyra; nephews, Carlos, Osea, Michael, Aaron,
Norman, Pari mer, Kelsey, Garvin and Theo Cleare; neices, Sonia, Carla
and Lucretia Cleare of Miami Fl, Bridgette Seymour, a host of other
relatives and friends including, Brenda Munroe, Kendrick Hepburn, Sybil,
Perry Stubbs and family, Michael Major and family, Alan, Ernal and
Willard Cleare, Coral Johnson, Patricia Darville, Rose Dean, Sandra,
Coreen, Beverley and Jean Bowles, Megnola, Laura Stubbs, Rhoda
Munnings, Mercina Stuart, Allan and Solomon Stuart, Willamae Newbold,
Elva Stubbs, Gloria Neely, Stephanie Johnson, Ednamae Rolle, Mizpah
Hall, Andre Curry, Dr. Dario Curry, Glen Colebrooke, Ruthmae Rolle and
Staff at Aunt Mae's Daycare, Staff at The Mendian School, Pastor John
H. Innis and Arrow of Deliverance family, Bay View Villa family, Hon.
Branville McCarthney M.P., Staff of Trace Security, Loretta Collie, Joan
Mackenize, Mrs. Martin, doctors and nurses of the Intensive Care Unit,
Pastor and members of Southwest Cathedral Church of God.
Viewing will be held in the Legacy Suite of Vaughn 0. Jones Memorial
Center, Wultl Road and Primrose Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00
p.m. and at the Church on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to service time.


Wulff Road and Primrose Street, Opposite Studio of Draperies
Telephone: 326-9800/1 24 Hour Emergency 434-9220/380-8077


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 19


KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



David John Pinder, 48


of Dodge Road, Nassau,
The Bahamas will be held
at The Chapel Of Love,
Kemp's Funeral Home
Limited, Palmdale Avenue
and Bradley Street,
Palmdale, Nassau, on
Friday, 10th August, 2007
at 4pm.
Pastor Matthew Sweeting
will officiate.


David was pre-deceased by his father, Windfield
,John Pinder and his step father, Harold Eldon. He
is survived by his mother, Susan Anne Eldon;
brother, Gregory Pinder; sister, Michelle Lightbourn;
uncles, Hilbert Pinder, Leslie Cartwright and Barry
Barrett; Aunts, Agnes Knowles and Diane
Cartwright; Cousin Bruce Pinder; sisters in law,
Germaine Pinder, Linda, Janice and Catriona Eldon,
Nieces, Raquel and Amanda Pinder, Christy
Lightbourn; Nephew Dylan Lightbourn; Brothers-
in-law, Richard Lightbourn, Johnny Treco, Billy
Sands; step brothers, Rick, Chris and Roger Eldon;
step sisters; Nancy Treco, Cheryl Sands and Susan
Saunders; special friends and relatives, Stephen
Cartwright, Anthony Cancino, Ronnie North, Steve
Kemp, Bill (Cracky) Saunders, Patrick
Grammactico, Lil Bill Albury, Sean and Brent
Cartwright, Kristin Williams, Crab and Diane, B.B.
Pinder and many other friends and relatives.
The family would like to thank Dr Christine Chin,
the nurses and staff of The Princess Margaret
Hospital, Nassau for the attention, kindness and
care that was given to David during his time in
hospital.
In lieu of flowers the family request donations to
be made to the following organizations; Teen
Challenge or BASRA.


lammonfmuenalt u neral "-ame

/ Independence Drive Phone: 341-4055
FUEA SRIC FOR


HOSANNA
JONASSAINT, 20


of Marsh Harbour Abaco
and formerly of Port Du
Paix Haiti, will be held
on Saturday 10:00 a.m.
Sat Carmichael
Evangelical Church
Carmichael Road. Pastor Wilney Joseph
will officiate and interment will follow in
the Southern Cemetery Cow Pen and
Spikenard Roads.

Precious memory are held by, her husband,
Ivgner Brave; mother, Yvonne Jonassaint;
father, Paytil Pierre; 4 sisters, Filomene,
Eltha and Elnicka Pierre and Licita
Jonassaint; 2 brothers, Alberto and Amayel
Jonassaint; 2 nieces, Fhslie and Yolette
Dbxex; 1 nephew, Valentino Dbxex; 1 aunt,
Annie Julian; 2 uncles, Naket Grnis and
Sedrlas Ilziclir; 1 cousin, Wilbert Blnrnd;
friends, Natasha Jonassaint, Grseh Natasha,
Max Higgs, Philip, Peter, Samuel and Ellen
Senat and Wilson

Relatives and friends may view the remains
at THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES
COMMONWEALTH FUNERAL
HOME INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on
Friday from 10:30-6:30 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to service
time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007

BETHANY'S EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIAL TRAINING

(B.E.S.T. INSTITUTE
An affiliate of Bethany Baptist Church
The following vacancies exist at B.E.S.T. Institute to be filled for the
new school year which commences September 2007.

One DRIVER
between the ages of 35 and 50 years for 20 + seater school bus
must hold a valid driver's licence
must own a vehicle
must produce police record, letters of reference from your pastor and
previous employer

hours: 6:00 am to 8:30 am and 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm
wages: $10.00 per hour

Three PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
with certificates/diplomas from a reputable teacher's training college
possess a Bachelor's Degree in appropriate discipline
must have a minimum of 5 years teaching experience
produce a letter of reference from previous employer and church
pastor
provide the names of two referees with telephone numbers and
addresses

Knowledge of Music, French and/or Spanish will be an asset.

One INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TEACHER with the ability to teach
Remedial Reading
qualification, experience and requirements as per primary teachers

Salary: $22,800 to $26,400 per annum-commensurate with
qualifications and experience.

All applicants must be a practising Christian of the Baptist Faith; must
be of exemplary character and reputation, enthusiastic, self motivated
and tolerant, have a genuine love for children and be prepared to
demonstrate good work ethics.

Teachers must be willing to engage in extra curricular activities.

Applications should be addressed to the Board of Governors,
B.E.S.T. Institute, c/o Hope Hamilton, P.O. Box 498, Providenciales,
Turks and Caicos Islands, B.W.I. or fax to 649-941-5118, Email:
bethany(tciway.tc
Telephone contact: 649-941-5632/4803 or 649-946-4921


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



EAST SUN RISE MORTUARY


"A New Commitment To Service'



KIRLEN WALTER
WILLIAMS, 58
of Elizabeth Estates and formerly
of Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera
will be held on Sunday at 10 a.m.
at Living Faith Seventh Day
Adventist Church, Old Trail Road.
Officiating will be Pastor Lynden
Williams assisted by Dr. John Carey.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road.
He is survived by his wife, Anna
Williams; 4 sons, Brian, Wayne,
Adrian and Travis Williams; 2 daughters-in-law, Kiris and Shantell
Williams; 3 grand-daughters, Adrianique, Adrienne and Brean Williams;
4 sisters, Jacqueline Mackey, Pauline Rolle, Dolly Petty and Joycelyn
Colebrooke; 3 brothers, Fred, Calvin and Ivan Williams; father-in-law,
Edward Thompson; sister-in-law, Helen Hall, Maria Saunders, Virginia
Thompson, Joan Sturrup, Georgina Antoine, Marilyn Gilbert, Jennifer,
Julie and Ruby Thompson, Theresa Dumont, Robert Rolle, Anna
Rahming, Gloria Simmons, Rosie, Williams, Ellen, Karen, Latoya and
Faye Thompson; brothers-in-law, Lorenzo Gilbet, Fritzroy Antoine,
Edward, Eugene, Brian, Edward "Bowe", Andrew, Francis and Kikita
Thompson; Jeffrey Hall, Peter Rahming, Richard and Nathaniel Rolle,
Brent Petty and James Simmons; numerous nieces and nephews
including, Gordon, Samuel Jr., Dwayne, Keith, Stephen and Marvin
Mackey, Eddison and Ulric Williams, Curtis Colebrooke, Richard,
Roscoe, Julian, Kennedy and Byron Rolle, Fred and Jason Petty,
Jamal Wallace, Shelton Hall, Kino and Kevin Thompson, Christine
Jones, Cleo Spence, Marilyn Nagee. Margaret Beneby, Barbara Mackey,
Miriam Gardiner, Deniece, Justina, Rosanna, Natasha and Erica
Williams, Roxanne and Michelle Rolle, Clarice Decosta, Stacy and
Monique Petty, Gwendolyn Smith, Brittany, Sherkita, Royanne and
Tia Antoine; other relatives and friends including: Dionne Poitier and
family, Joseph Forbes and family, Bishop Sterling Moss and family,
Bishop Swann and family, Pastor Gladstone Thurston and family, The
Miller family, Baker and Baker Construction Company, Philadelphia
Seventh Day Adventist Church Family, Gambier Church of God
family, Church of God of Prophecy, Elizabeth Estates family. The staff
of Oncology Clinic and The staff of Male Medical I of the Princess
Margaret Hospital.
Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, #27
Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and at
the Church from 9 a.m. on Sunday until service time.






24 hrs E g Seri












Bethel Brothers Morticians

o0 / TTelephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


ORA MARY RAMSAY, 78
of #6 Petticoat Lane will be held on
Saturday 11:00 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral, West Hill Street. Monsignor
-a Preston A. Moss will officiate. Interment
: '* y will be made in the Catholic Cemetery,
.Infant View Road.
She is survived by her brother, Sylvester;
sisters, Paula Carey and Teresa Bligh;
brothers-in-law, Edward Carey and Keith
Bligh; nephews, Peter, Greg, Kendal,
Michael, Walter, Stephen and Sylvan
Ramsay, Paul Carey and Neil Bligh; nieces, Jean Duncombe, Patrice
Evans, Carmen Burley, Andrea Payant, Lauren Ramsay. Clare Rahming.
Deborah Pearce, Cheryl Ramsay, Karen Rolle. Marvette Collie, Monique
and Erika Carey: numerous grand and great grand nieces and nephews;
very special friends including, Mrs. Norma Thurston and family, Mrs.
Paula Mitchell and family, Mrs. Valencia Smith and family, Ms. Sybil
Spence and Family, Ms. Cynthia Gibson and family, Ms. Michelle
Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Gomez, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Archer
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Curry and family, the Legion of
. Mary, the Sisters of St. Martins Monastery, Sisters of Charity. the entire
Parish of Chancery Offices of St. Francis Xavier Cathedral and Clergy
of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of the Bahamas.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


JIMMY PHILLIP "Uncle Phil"
LOZAIQUE, 64

of #58 Colony Village andformerly of
the Colony of Seychelles will be held on
Saturday 10:00 a.m. at St. Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill.
Monsignor Preston Moss will officiate.
Interment will be made in Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.


Cherished memory will forever linger in
the hearts of his dedicated, faithful and
loving wife Hyacinth: six (6) daughters, Mieka Russell, Lebronia
Lozaique, Paulette Reckley, Paula Lozaique, Latoya Higgs and Kyrene
Lozaique; four (4) sons, Bronson, Philip Jr., Wayne Lozaique and James,
Oliver; mother. Deodat; step-father, Marcel Mathiot; seven (7)
grandchildren, Rhomeko and Kerhon Russell, Alexander, Seekcy and
Sherelle Sherman, Ashton and Aloa Higgs; two (2) great-grandchildren,


four (4) brothers, Gilbert, Eric, James and Yvon Mathiot; two (2) sisters,
Madeline and Marie Mathiot; two (2) aunts, Letmie Maria and Leonie
Jeanne; numerous nieces and nephews including, Christopher, Brigitte,
Cecile, Jean Paul, Franco, Versna, Chantaniella, Josemie and Veronique
Mathiot, Lecreche Mackey, Dashante, Elcott, William, Kenneth, Arnold
and Shawn; three (3) sons-in-law, Rhon Russell, Meldon Reckley and
Ashton Higgs; six (6) sisters-in-law, Evelyne and Jennifer Mathiot,
Linda Bamboche, Joyce Williams, Loann Evans and Adeline Armbrister;
two (2) brothers-in-law, Stafford Williams and Denny Evans; two (2)
aunts-in-law, Joanna Armbrister and Inez Rolle; one (1) uncle-in-law,
Joseph (J.D.) Armbrister; other relatives and friends including, Pamela
Lozaique, the Armbrister, Dorsette and Edgecombe families, William
Bull Armbrister, Dr. Gerassimos and Staff, Nancy Knowles, Lily
McIntosh, Andrew Pennerman, Retired Prison Officers Joseph Harris
and Mr. Williams. The St. Anselms Church Family, Fr. Delano Archer,
Fr. Ormand Wright and the Epiphany Church family, Fr. Athma Budhu
and the St. Gregory Church family, the Dunmore Street family and the
North and South community of Cat Island, and other relatives and
friends too numerous to mention.

Friends may.pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians on
Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service; time.


I IVY VIRGINIA
KNOWLES, 86
X 1 of Mount Royal Ave. and Ludlow Street
and formerly of Millerton, Long Island


9 '.

/

\


will be held on Friday 10am at St.
George's Anglican Church, Mount Royal
Ave. Rev. Fr. Kingsley Knowles, Rev.
Fr. Delano Archer and Rev. Fr. Roland
Hamilton will officiate. Interment will
be made in Woodlawn Memorial
Gardens, Soldier Road.


She is survived by: four children,
Bertram, Louis, Elizabeth and Bernadette;
grandchildren, Randy, Richard, Lambert, Darin, Dionne, Vanessa,
Allyson and Kelly; great-grandchildren, Troy, d'Nae, Joshua and
Marcus; daughters-in-law, Barbara, Ernestine and Marjorie Knowles;
nephews. Richard, Jeffrey and Julian; nieces, Cynthia, Dianne, Teresa
and Terry: sister-in-law. Norma Griffin; and a host of other relatives
and friends including, Sandy Knowles of Miami, Florida, Michael
Knowles of New Jersey, Margaret Davis of Miami, Florida and Vernita
Knowles of Florida.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians on
Thursday from 1 lam to 6pm and on Friday at the church from 9am
until service time.


- ----


THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


F





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 2007


III


&:V.B K


iAl


11viI


lIIt


In


1IA


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


FIFU







The Tribune


RFI I(~I~IN


Thursday, August 9, 2007 PG 23


Trinity Broacasting etwor





takes over the Holy Land


* By TRAVIS REED
Associated Press Writer
ORLANDO, Florida (AP) Jesus Christ is cruci-
fied and resurrected here six days a week.
Snarling Roman soldiers whip and drag him, and
somber audience members watch. Some quietly weep
at a pageant bloody and cruel.
It is the grand finale at the Holy Land Experience,
and not the attraction most tourists envision in an
Orlando vacation. Just miles from Walt Disney
World, Universal Orlando and SeaWorld in this city's
overstimulated tourist corridor, Holy Land has in its
six years of operation aimed to recreate Jerusalem of
Biblical times.
It is often referred to as a "Christian theme park,"
but the park offers lectures, not rides, making it feel
more like a trip to church. Its officers prefer to call it
a "living Biblical museum" and until last month, the
nonprofit operation was troubled. Management
changed hands, its founder left and attendance was
flat. But suddenly, a saviour appeared.
Trinity Broadcasting Network, a California-based
Christian empire with 12,500 worldwide TV and
cable affiliates, took over Holy Land and its estimat-
ed $8 million mortgage. Both are non-profit organi-
sations, so Trinity describes the deal as a "marriage"
rather than a purchase, saying little money changed
hands.
Already, ticket sales are up 25 per cent, owing to
mentions on the new parent's broadcasts, and an
expansion is planned. It will include new shows, a
general freshening and a new Trinity television stu-
dio, where movies and TV shows will be filmed and
furnish even more publicity.
"We believe that the way this came together it was
designed by God for us to continue the way we need
to," park president Tom Powell said. "I don't think
the end result is because of anything any person did.
I think it's the end result of what everyone here was
asking for."
Holy Land previously had almost no advertising
budget, relying on word-of-mouth testimonials and
tourists who happened to drive by.
The park has a scriptoriumm," an opulent-looking
building with an enormous collection of rare Bibles
and artifacts. Powell said it is the largest of its kind
outside the Vatican.
Other stops include a scale model of Jerusalem, an
exhibit on the Dead Sea Scrolls and a model of the
garden tomb where Christ was supposedly buried.
Vendors and actors wear head coverings and bil-
lowing cotton rags, and gift shops sell Bibles and
other Christian items. Among them are a genealogi-
cal map linking Adam to Jesus, handbags, necklaces
and T-shirts. It also sells yarmulkes and menorahs -
a nod to its founder.
The attraction opened in 2001, the vision of a New
Jersey preacher who came South to expand his reach.
It was controversial because the Rev Marvin
Rosenthal is a Baptist born Jewish, and now consid-
ers himself a "Hebrew Christian" or "Messianic
Jew." That means he believes Jesus is the Messiah,


* LES Cheveldayoff portrays Jesus during a performance of the Crucifixion in front of a somber
audience at the Holy Land Experience, a Christian-themed attraction in Orlando, Florida.
(AP)


contrary to traditional Jewish beliefs. Some local
Jews were upset he was creating an attraction, and
their conflict made international news when the park
started.
"We were given tremendous promotion by the fact
that there were a few voices that didn't want to see us
open the facility," Rosenthal said. "Consequently, the
media got wind of that and I wound up being on most
of the networks. Good Morning America, Good
Night America, Good Afternoon America, The
O'Reilly Factor. I had people coming from Russia,
from Israel, from South America, from Europe. Out
of that event we received what had to be many mil-
lions of dollars worth of publicity."
Rosenthal left Holy Land two years ago, saying it
was simply time to move on. He now runs a
Clermont-based ministry called Zion's Hope and has
no contact with the park.
Trinity didn't intend to get into the Biblical attrac-
tion business, but was looking for an Orlando loca-
tion for a new TV production studio, chief of staff
Paul Crouch Jr said.
Now the organisation will build it at Holy Land,
and could make TV and movie filming a part of the
guest experience.
"We can use the Holy Land Experience as a back-
lot, almost like Universal Studios does. It'll be a
faith-based version of Universal Studios," Crouch
said. "We can shoot movies there, we can do con-
certs, we can do TV shows."
Holy Land's offerings change regularly, many of
them outdoor shows. Recent performances range
from The Ministry of Jesus, a 15-minute act where


Christ heals a blind man and inspires a tax collector,
to a 30-minute Southern gospel concert and the res-
urrection itself.
Audience members are encouraged to participate.
Jesus walked among them with a wireless micro-
phone, calling children and picking one up. Excited
parents with digital and disposable cameras crept for-
ward as their kids fidgeted and kicked at sand.
Lisa Bell, 42, husband David Bell, 50, and their
two-year-old son came from Ripley, Tenn., after see-
ing Holy Land on Trinity. She said they didn't consid-
er attending the other parks.
"Oh no. Jesus was just holding him," Lisa Bell said,
nodding to her sunburned son. "He knows who Jesus
is."
The park relies heavily on donations from benefac-
tors, foundations and visitors slipping money into
boxes scattered around the park. Ticket sales doesn't
cover costs.
Admission prices have risen from less than $20
originally to $35 to $40 today. .
Powell said not all visitors are Christian, and some
have never even been to church before. Fourteen
Hindu monks passed through the other day, he said.
Crouch says he thinks of Holy Land as a ministry,
not a theme park.
"When I went there for the first time about six or
seven months ago, I didn't go there to be entertained
and I didn't see a theme park taking place. I saw peo-
ple praying for each other, I saw Bible studies going
on, I saw teaching going on," he said. "At the end of
the day, I felt like I had gone to church, not just gone
to Disneyland."


II I I







PG 24 Thursday, August 9, 2007


RFLIC~ION


The Tribune


'Smart children with


social


By YVETTE M JOHNSON
Certified Counselor
Bahamas Association of
Christian Counselors


IS your child experiencing anger, self
doubt, frustration, and pressure concern-
ing his or her education? These emotions
are typical of the intelligent child who is
experiencing difficulties in school.
Negative attitudes permeate and contami-
nate both the classroom setting and the
home. In the midst of this confusion, all
stakeholders are quick to lay the blame.
Parents blame students or teachers and
teachers blame parents and students. No
one pauses long enough to press to the root
of the problem. This article is designed to
aid parents, students and teachers alike in
the discernment of the root cause of failing
grades and other school problems.

Through my tenure of providing
academic training, I have wit-
nessed that smart children who
encounter problems in school
usually excel beyond measure in the arts,
athletics, or interpersonal skills. They also
tend to demonstrate proficiency in math-
ematics or science.
As a matter of fact, I was on business
this past week when I walked into the
Royal Bank of Canada where I came face
to face with a gentleman who looked
quite familiar to me. We exchanged cor-
dialities and at once felt the alma mater
spirit. Yes, we both attended the same
high school many, many years ago.
The memory of this student painted a
vivid picture of a once meddlesome stu-
dent, one prone to misconduct and in a
nutshell a school misfit. This student was
notorious for immeasurable menaces. A
few decades later and here I am in the
thick of business at Royal Bank, gripped
with the immense knowledge that this for-
mer school menace is now a practicing
gynecologist. The average child today,
confused and misunderstood, battered by
school bureaucracy and mauled by angry
parents, can be tomorrow's professional.
Intelligent children who encounter
grave school problems vary in profile. I
have experienced students who have
tremendous conceptual power but have
not developed reading, writing and
spelling skills. I have also had the oppor-
tunity to work with students who have
superior strength with words but are terri-
bly confused by numbers. Some of my stu-
dents have demonstrated the artistic abil-
ity of Amos Ferguson but they were frus-
trated by mere academics. The difference


ems'


between the peaks and the valleys is both
uncomfortable and frustrating for the stu-
dent.
Failure, like any other negative, is quite
easily identified. This is the very reason
why uninformed adults have a difficult
time honing in on a student's talent and
strength. Parents often focus on what the
child cannot do.
For too long masses of students experi-
ence gross frustration when school is the
subject. They dread the thought of enter-
ing the campus or worse, having to sit in a
class while draped in anguish. Intelligent
children who are experiencing school
problems need the full support of
informed adults to aid them in the acqui-
sition of relative skills in learning.
Teachers, counselors and parents must
also commit to protecting the talent, cre-
ativity and power of the smart child bom-
barded by school problems.
Last year, I had the privilege of working
with a young and ambitious student
named Kenton. For many years Kenton
was considered a slow learner. However,
he was blessed to have a homeroom
teacher who was loving and compassion-
ate. Daily she worked with Kenton and
found that he was a gifted artist.
When ^students in his class were
instructed to write character sketches he
was not able to perform the same task,
but suggested that he could draw the main
characters of the novel being read by his
class. It was at this time that his teacher
witnessed his artistic ability. His drawings
tell the story with such colourful majesty.
He is detailed and those who view his
endeavors are sensuously gripped.
Kenton is indeed a gifted artist.
This year, Kenton has the motivation to
excel, he is applauded for his strength and
he is receiving additional help for his aca-
demic shortcomings. More importantly,
Kenton is daily encouraged. He now car-
ries a broad smile of esteem and he is on
his way to his first art education.
Is there a Kenton in your life? Perhaps
there is. You can play a role in helping
that child to survive school and enjoy the
learning process. In our next article, we
shall discuss the various methods of assist-
ing intelligent children who encounter
school problems.

For more information interested per-
sons can contact the Bahamas Association
of Christian Counselors at 364.9127 or e-
mail bacc@mail.com. They can also check
out www.bacc.cjb.net or visit them at
Galilee Corporation Centre, Joe
Farrington Road, Box EE 16-527.


* BISHOP V GENE ROBINSON


'I think we need each other,' says

first openly gay Episcopal bishop


* By The Associated Press

LONDON (AP) The
first openly gay Episcopal
bishop, whose 2003 consecra-
tion has moved the Anglican
fellowship to the brink of
schism, says he remains hope-
ful Anglicans can stay togeth-
er.
"I think we need each
other," said New Hampshire
Bishop V Gene Robinson, in
an interview with The Times
of London, published July 27.
"We need to learn and grow
with the presence of each
other. I think it would be a ter-
rible loss to all of us."
The Episcopal Church is the
United States province of the
-world Anglican Communion.
Theological conservatives are
demanding that the American
church pledge by September
30 not to consecrate any more
gay bishops or face losing full
membership in the commun-
ion.
In an attempt to ease ten-
sions, Robinson and Bishop
Martyn Minns, who leads a
network of breakaway conser-
vative Episcopal parishes,


have not been invited to a
once-a-decade gathering of
the world's Anglican bishops.
The meeting, called the
Lambeth Conference, is set
for next year.
Still, Robinson said, "I have
great hopes that I will be offi-
cially included in some way or
another."
"It's not over," Robinson
said. "I have great hopes that
a way can be found for me to
be present and for the most
conservative provinces of the
Communion to be present."
Some conservative
Anglican leaders in Africa and
elsewhere are considering
boycotting the assembly.
Separately, in the United
States, the conservative
Diocese of Pittsburgh has cre-
ated a Web site asking parish-
ioners to weigh in on whether
they should leave the
Episcopal Church over its lib-
eral drift. Pittsburgh Bishop
Robert Duncan, a leading the-
ological conservative who
opposed Robinson's eleva-
tion, said he'll step down if the
diocese ultimately decides to
stay.


R I CZA Q hi


J I






The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 9, 2007 PG 25


'The Church




as the Body




of Christ'


Bible scholar, has this
beautiful illustration of
the relationship between
Christ and the church.
Suppose a great doctor discovers
a cure for cancer. Once that cure is
found, it is there. But before it can
become available for eve., one. it
must be taken out to the world.
Doctors and surgeons must know
about it and be trained to use it. The
cure is there, but one person cannot
take it out to all the world; a corps of
doctors must be the agents whereby
it arrives to all the world's sufferers.
That precisely is what the church
is to Jesus Christ. It is in Jesus that
all people and all nations can be rec-
onciled to God. But before that can
happen they must know about Jesus
Christ, and it is the task of the
church to bring that about. Christ is
the head; the church is the body.
The head must have a body through
which it can work. The church is
quite literally hands to do Christ's
work, feet to run upon His errands,
and a voice to speak His words.
The identity of Christ with the
church was the first lesson that Paul
learnt in his life as a Christian.
Before his conversion Paul, then
known as Saul, saw Christians as a
bunch of infidels deserving of death.
When Christ appeared to him in a
vision as he rode to Damascus to
persecute the Christians there,
Christ's first words N wei-':

me?" (Acts 9:4) The voice came
from heaven, so how could Saul be
persecuting Christ on earth? Paul
then understood that the heavenly
Christ and the earthly church are
one and the same thing. What you
do to the church you do to Christ.
The vision on the way to
Damascus taught Paul that even
though Christ was already enjoying
divine glory with the heavenly
Father, it was still possible for him to
suffer through the suffering of
Christians. That is how Paul came to
the realization that the church is the
body of Christ.
When he says in today's second
reading from the letter to the


Colossians that "in my flesh I am
completing what is lacking in
Christ's afflictions for the sake of his
body. that is, the church"
(Colossians 1:24), he does not mean
that the suffering of Christ by which
he redeemed us was deficient. He
only meant to underline the fact that
so long as Christians are suffering
persecution in this world, Christ was
still suffering, in his body, that is.
When we realize that Paul wrote
this letter from a Roman prison
(verse 4:3) where he and other
Christians were still being persecut-
ed for their faith, then we see why
he understands their suffering as
Christ's ongoing suffering. When
Christians suffer, Christ suffers.
Paul says of the church, "I became
its servant according to God's com-
mission that was given to me for
you" (verse 1:25). For Paul, being a
servant of Christ and being a ser-
vant of the church are one and the
same thing. There is no separating
Christ and the church. What you do
for the church you do for Christ.
There is a funny game in which
people are asked, "If you were a
fruit, what fruit would you be, and
why?" Some say they would like to
be a mango, delicious and irre-
sistible; others that they would love
to be an apple, hard but good for
your health, and yet others a cactus
fruit, thorny on the outside, but deli-
cious in the inside.
Today, we could play a similar
game. If you are thlic body of Christ,
what part of Christ's body are you?
Are you Christ's feet bringing him
to other people, like the Eucharistic
ministers bringing Holy
Communion to the sick?
Are you Christ's hand wiping
away the tears of the afflicted or
helping to put a roof over the head
of the homeless? Or are you Christ's
mouth announcing Good News to
the poor? As a church we are
Christ's body. As an individual,
what part of Christ's body are you?
What are you contributing to the
well-being of Christ in his body, the
church? Each of us is invited to
answer this question for himself or
herself today.


E BISHOP SIMEON HALL


CuSrChlDt$JjTi


NEWS from New
Covenant Baptist
Church

RETURNING from his fourth
mission to Africa, Bishop Simeon B
Hall, pastor of New Covenant
Baptist Church, has been invited to
be the guest speaker when the Royal
Faith Chapel of Nigeria meets in
their Annual Session, August 17 29.
Bishop Hall will be the guest of
Bishop Henry Sailu, who has visited
the Bahamas on several occasions.
A creative, compassionate, multi-
talented individual, Bishop Hall
begt "hin ;-
has A.,:. 'ioonmed ii, ...
ist, social activist and community
leader. Speaking of his preaching
gift. Bishop Hall said, "The grace of
God which has come to me has not
been in vain." I Corinthians 5:10.
Bishop Hall's strong social con-
science and public advocacy has
placed him on the cutting edge of
Bahamian community life. Always
ready to shine a spotlight on the ills
and difficulties facing society, Bishop
Hall is also quick to offer prayerful
guidance and suggestions to bring
the community into a right relation-
ship with God and with their fellow
man. He is a man that has never
flinched from proclaiming, either
through his sermons or in the media,


what he believes.
Having preached in South Africa
on two occasions and once in Ghana,
Bishop Hall said of his upcoming
visit to Nigeria, "Africa is not only
the ancestral homeland to black peo-
ple, but it is the cradle of all civiliza-
tion."
Bishop Hall invites prayers from
the Christian community as he trav-
els to Africa.

For more information on this trip
call 393.3946.



CURSILLO NEWS

Saturday, August 18 ----- Annual
Fellowship
Picnic at the Usual Adelaide
Cabana.

Friday Evening, October 5 -------
Annual Thanksgiving Service
Saturday, October 6 --
Conference (Venue to be
announced)

Cursillistas are reminded of the
ongoing 20th Anniversary Pledge.
Forms are available for those who
had not yet made their pledge.


- ~I I





PG 26 Thursday, August 9, 2007


RELIGION


The Tribune


'...But where sin abounded,




grace did much more abound'


M By PASTOR MATTHEW ALLEN

Romans 5:20: "But where sin abounded, grace
did much more abound."

As we cry out against the many crimes
and sins that we're facing everyday
as a nation despite how dismal
things may look the enemy will
never have the final say as to the direction this
nation takes.
There is a war that's raging the kingdom of
darkness versus the kingdom of Light.
A great level of ignorance is displayed when
persons would believe or say that the church is
failing. I agree that the church will continue to
have its challenges and struggles due to the fact
that there is an enemy who will stop at nothing to
disable and discredit the church. The enemy has
deployed some of his greatest weapons (spirits)
against the church: the spirits of division, strife,
confusion, envy, competition, pride, arrogance,
etc.
As these spirits are allowed to manifest within
the church it sends a false message to the world
which the church is suppose to influence by the
word of God. Therefore I will forever cry out
against this anti-spirit that has lured and deceived
many saints into a maintenance mind-set rather
than a dominion mind-set.
Religion has erroneously taught Christians over
the years to fight for their church and religion,
whereas disciples that are in right relationship
with Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus Christ), know
whose they are in Him and who He truly is, there-
fore they need not fight for the church.
Watch this!
In Matthew 16:16-18, Peter got a revelation of
who the Messiah truly was and as a result of that
revelation the Messiah said to Peter (v 18) and
upon this rock I will build my church; and the
gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
I am all for the church, but what I am against is
the arrogant, prideful spirit in which many reli-
gious leaders are operating and that they have
been set on pedestals by their followers and the
religious community; this is the subtle act of idol-
atry. This is the anti-spirit that's at work within
the churches of today which gives way to every
evil work to take place in this country. James 3:16
states, "For where envying and strife is, there is
confusion and every evil work".
The demonic spirits, the criminals and the com-
mon people of society were never a problem for
the Messiah to deal with. His problems were
always with the religious synagogue rulers/lead-
ers. Whenever the Messiah encountered a demon-
ic spirit, He drove that spirit out; He didn't
scream, hoop or hack it out nor did He break out
in an unknown tongue as the religious folks do.
The Messiah commanded the spirits to "sit
down, shut-up, or get out" and they obeyed Him.
If Yeshuwa Messiah was to walk the earth todav


* MATTHEW ALLEN


as He did back then, He would be faced with the
same religious spirit in most of our synagogues
(churches). As it is in the natural, so is it in the
spiritual. In what is called the Lord's Prayer, in
Matthew 6:10, Yeshuwa said, "Thy kingdom
come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heav-
en".
The sin factor will always be an issue to deal
with; but where sin abounded, grace did much
more abound. As a people, the quotation of per-
ishing for the lack of knowledge is evident in
many areas of our society. In listening to the
many religious seminary graduates with their
degrees and certifications it is quite obvious that a
number of them know the word of God, but what
is also most obvious is that they really don't know
or have a true relationship with the God of the


'"


word.
How can I make such a statement? Well, I'm
glad you asked. Watch this! For years religious
leaders have rested on the acronym of GRACE
(God's Riches At Christ's Expense). This
acronym may not be incorrect, but as good as it
sounds it is certainly incomplete. Religion and
tradition of men will always limit and put restric-
tions upon those who will adhere and rest in
them. Here's what Yeshuwa said about tradition
in Matthew 15:6, "Thus have ye made the com-
mandment of God of none effect by your tradi-
tion".
In John 1:14, the Bible speaks of Yeshuwa
being full of grace and truth. This grace is not the
acronym God's Riches At Christ's Expense. In
the Greek the word grace is: charis, khar'-ece;
which has several meanings, including divine
influence.
Yeshuwa Messiah was a man of great influence
and He has given His disciples the same authority
and power to do even greater than He did. The
church leadership of today is failing miserably in
making disciples of Yeshuwa because they are to
busy producing Christians and seeking member-
ship unto themselves. Therefore they lack the
ability to influence our young men and women to
live the victorious Godly life. Church leaders are
busy seeing who can construct the biggest build-
ing, preach the best or get on the Word Network
or TBN; for in so doing they've regarded them-
selves as successful.
But I say unto such religious leaders, as the
Apostle Paul said to the churches of Galatia, in
Galatians 3:1, "0 foolish Galatians, (Bahamians)
who hath bewitched you".
In II Corinthians 12:9, The Apostle Paul was
faced with some personal challenges. In petition-
ing God for relief here's the answer he got, "My
grace is sufficient for thee: for my strength is
made perfect in weakness".
Again! The grace mentioned here is not our
religious acronym of grace (God's Riches At
Christ's Expense) but rather it was His charis,
khar'-ece; God's super-enabling power coming
upon Paul's natural person thereby causing him
to operate in the supernatural to be able to do
great works and influence others into the things
of God. As the church leadership gets truly con-
nected to God this nation will begin to see God's
grace abounding much more than sin.

Romans 5:20, "but where sin abounded, grace
did much more abound"

Join Pastor Brendalee and I along with the
family of Kingdom Minded Fellowship Center
Int'l, every Sunday morning @ 10:30am and
Thursday nights @ 7:30pm at the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School Auditorium for more of God's
powerful teaching. For questions or comments
contact us via e-mail:pastormall(a'J, 'yahoo.com or
Ph 225.3850/1 -242-441-2021


.ul~i~iVIRdYa~Ur*c;IrylCIP+







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 9, 2007 PG 27


The Lord's


Prayer:


Talking with God


* By FATHER JAMES MOULTRIE

"Father, hallowed be your
name..." (Luke 11:2)

The Lord's Prayer is the
first and greatest of all
Christian prayers. Its
short and simple phrases
embrace every aspect of our rela-
tionship with God. It not only tells
us what to pray for, but also how to
pray for it. We often come to God
with a long list of needs, mainly for
ourselves, and we need not, for He
knows our needs before we even
ask.
However, because the Lord's
Prayer is so well known, and it is
often said so hurriedly and without
thinking, much of its meaning is lost.
This is a great pity for the prayer is
rich in meaning for Jews and
Christians. Properly understood, the
Lord's Prayer contains a whole pro-
gramme for Christian living and if
we were to live up to what it con-
tains, we would be perfectly in tune
with the mind of Christ, because
undoubtedly this is how He Himself
prayed and lived. So let us take a
closer look at this prayer given to us
by Jesus.
The first part deals with God. We
begin by acknowledging His exis-
tence, and calling Him "Father'.
God is like a parent to us, and we
are His children. He is the best
example of parent in all creation,
and we who are parents would do
well to follow His example of love in
the extreme. He loves so much that
he would give His One and Only
Son to die on a cross for us. That is
love in the extreme. Parental love
comes close, but not quite.
After praising His name, we pray
for the coming of His Kingdom: a
kingdom of truth and life, holiness
and grace, justice, love and peace.
And we have a part to play in mak-
ing His Kingdom a reality. We must
live out these kingdom qualities in
our daily lives, and that is an impor-
tant part of this prayer.
Then we pray that His will may he
done on earth, ie, in our lives. God's
will may not always be the easiest
thing to do, but it is always the best
thing to do, and that is why He
taught us to pray for grace to


N JAMES MOULTRIE


accomplish the same. Do we pro-
mote a world of justice, peace, and
love? It is easier to promote divi-
sion. Our world and our country suf-
fer from very deep divisions. The
divisions in our country are palpa-
ble, especially at this time. Not only
is there sharp political division, but
there are deep social class divisions,
divisions between the haves and the
have-not's (which division continues
to grow), and even deep spiritual
divisions. We contribute to those
divisions by the way we respond to
one another, especially those in
need.
The second part of the prayer
deals with our needs. We begin by
praying for our daily bread. Bread in
this instance is a metaphor for all
our material needs. Some of us want
more than our needs and actually
expect God to provide it. And we
are often disappointed that our
wants are not always met. But He
taught us to pray for our needs and,
by extension, the needs of others.
The latter we fail at miserably, for
we seldom remember others when
we pray for our own needs. In that
regard we are selfish and thereby
fall short of God's expectation in
this prayer. Many of us think only of
ourselves and seldom petition for


others: "Of all my mother's chil-
dren..."
Then we pray for the forgiveness
of sins and for the grace to be able
to forgive those who sin against us.
We seldom read this petition care-
fully and are oblivious of the fact
that the forgiveness we give to those
who offend us is in direct proportion
to the forgiveness we can expect
from God! We can be very hard on
those who offend us. How often do
we say, "I might forgive you, but I
won't forget you?" What that really
means is that "I have really not for-
given you at all!" Our inability to
forgive others makes it impossible
for us to receive God's forgiveness.
That should send a chill down our
spines! Forgiveness is proportional,
even with God!
We then pray not to be led into
temptation. There is so much in our
world to distract and tempt us. But
God does not put temptation in our
path; life does. And we ourselves
walk into temptations on our own
accord. And so in that part of the
Lord's Prayer we are asking God to
help us by His grace to cope with
the temptations that come to us
unbidden, and to avoid those of our
own choosing. We are easily dis-
tracted and tempted. We are just
like St Paul who declares: "The
things I ought to do I do not; and
the things I ought not to do that I
do". Because sin is ever near and
the devil is a real presence in our
world, we need to be close to God
and seek His grace to avoid the
temptations that will surely come
our way.
And finally because of our pro-
clivity to sin, we pray to be delivered
from evil. both physical and moral.
Following Christ does not mean that
we will not be faced with evil. In
fact, that is when evil intentions
haunt us most. As long as we live in
this world, we can expect to
encounter evil. And so what we are
asking God for is the grace to be
victorious over all evil, but especial-
ly moral evil.
Our society is sadly lacking in
morality. We appear to have little or
no difficulty with immorality, and
that is a sad indictment on our
nation. Every type of immorality
abounds in this fair land: sexual


immorality, lack of moral judgment,
immorality in business and in daily
discourse. The news media, especial-
ly the print media, lacks moral judg-
ment. Even some pastors of church-
es have had moral lapses, and as a
result many Christians have been
led astray. This portion of the Lord's
Prayer is especially important for us
as a people.
Something else you may not have
noticed is that the whole of the Our
Father Prayer is couched in plural
terms. This shows that we are one
family under God, and that there
can be no salvation for us independ-
ent of others. Sometimes we
Christians can be very selfish and
self-serving. Many so-called
Christians could care less about a
fellow Christian! We turn up our
noses at some people whom we do
not regard as Christians. In the not-
too-distant past many Pentecostals
did not believe that Anglicans or
Roman Catholics could be
Christians. We forgive those senti-
ments and chalk them up to the
ignorance of the past and of the
Gospel of Jesus Christ. Our prayers
must be for all of God's people,
whoever they are and wherever they
are.
In the Gospel Jesus urges us to
ask, seek, and knock. This means
our faith has to be an active one.
However, sometimes we are too
proud to ask, so we do not receive;
we are too lazy to seek, so we do not
find; we are too timid to knock, so
the door does not open to us. We
must not wait for things to happen,
or to fall into our hands. We must be
humble and trustful, yet bold and
energetic, if we are to receive good
things from our Father in Heaven!
Perhaps the next time you pray
the Lord's Prayer you will think dif-
ferently about it.


Forthestoie


_


- I



























Dating a non-believer


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

For many Christians, both
young and old, in search of
finding that special some-
one the soul mate who
they can live happily ever after with -
wading into the dating pool can be a
exhausting experience as each tries to
weed out the bad from the not so bad,
from the good to the better.
Choices. Choices. Choices.
And while the playing field may
seem wide open, it takes a lot of nav-
igation because so many variables
come to play. There are a significant
number of churchgoers who, despite
their beliefs, may be actively engaged
in sexual relationships, while there
are others who have awful attitudes
and are mean spirited. On the flip
side to this, there are many non-
believers who live moral lives, and
who are warm, loving, caring, decent -
the sweetest persons one might ever
come across.
So is it really so wrong to marry
someone who treats you like the
queen or king that you are, but who
lives outside of your faith and who
has no desire to enter or even explore
that territory?
While it may be tempting for a
Christian to develop a romantic rela-
tionship with a non-believer, or peo-
ple who-subscribe to a totally differ-
ent religion because they have a good
moral grounding and possess all of
the qualities that they have been
looking for, many Christian teachers
advise against it, warning Christians
not to be unequally yoked with non-
believers.
This popular scripture, used as the
benchmark for Christian romantic
relations, is found in II Corinthians
6:14, where Paul admonishes the
Christians to simply not be yoked
with non-believers.
"For what do righteousness-and
wickedness have in common? Or
what fellowship can light have with


* IS it really so wrong to marry
someone who treats you like the
queen or king that you are, but who
lives outside of your faith and who
has no desire to enter or even
explore that territory?

(Posed by models)

darkness? Or what harmony has
Christ with Belial, or what has a
believer in common with an unbeliev-
er? Or what agreement has the tem-
ple of God with idols? For we are the
temple of the living God..." the scrip-
ture states.
Paul's comment here is that believ-
ers and nonbelievers do not have any-
thing in common, so trying to start a
marriage with such disparity will only
lead to problems. God is to be at the
centre of a Christian marriage, and if
half of the humans involved don't
acknowledge that, tensions will arise.
Pastor Barrington Brennen, a coun-
seling psychologist and marriage and
family therapist told Tribune Religion
that dating between believers and
nonbelievers is a major concern in the
Church.
"Many individuals who marry non-
believers and persons of other reli-
gions believe that they can change


them. They marry them because they
like their personality, but that is a big
mistake," Pastor Brennen said.
"You are supposed to marry who
you want, not hope to change them
into who you want them to be," he
added. o
According to Pastor Brennen,
many people who marry or date non-
believers run the inevitable risk of
becoming what he calls "spiritually
single". In this situation, the person
goes alone in all matters related to
their faith, for example to church,
prayer meetings and other church
related activities. Though they have
someone in their lives who is proba-
bly meeting their physical, financial
needs, they do not have a spiritual
partner who they can seek God with.
While he admits that some couples
do manage to strike a "happy medi-
um" with different religious beliefs,
Pastor Brennen believes that for an
optimum marriage that brings about
optimum joy, the couple must have
similar beliefs and similar religious
intensities.
"Ideally, the optimum couple who
receives optimum happiness in their
marriage will have similar religious
beliefs, but also similar religious
intensities. For example, there is a
person who is involved in your
church, she attends women's meet-
ings and participates in church activi-
ties. But her husband comes to church
whenever. He isn't involved in church
life and is not really enthused about
it. That is a problem in the marriage,"
Pastor Brennen explained.
He also noted that couples who
marry across denominations can also
encounter problems when one part-
ner does not understand or may feel
intimidated by the other person's way
of worship and Christian life.
In the Seventh Day Adventist
denomination where Pastor Brennen
worships, pastors will not marry an
Adventist with a non-Adventist. But
somehow couples who are intent on
joining their lives together are able to


get around this principle. There have
been instances where a woman is dat-
ing a non-Adventist and they decide
to get married. Then just one week
before the wedding, the man is bap-
tized and becomes an Adventist.
"He comes back a week later for
the wedding and he is never seen
again," Pastor Brennen said. "But we
are trying to get policies in place so
that this situation does not happen."

Dating a Different Way

When it comes to dating and the
journey travelled in search of the
One, Pastor Brennen recommends
Joshua Harris' book, "I Kissed
Dating Goodbye: A New Attitude
Toward Relationships and
Romance".
Harris was 21-years old when he
wrote this book his personal story of
giving up the dating game in order to
focus on serving God. The hope
behind it, he says on his website
(www.joshharris.com) was that other
singles would be helped by some of
the lessons that he was learning. The
core message of the book isn't about
dating, but really about living one's
life for God.
Persons looking for love and wish-
ing to engage in matters of the heart,
being the strange things that they are,
should proceed with caution, Pastor
Brennen advised. "When a particular
girl says that she will never marry
someone outside of her faith, that can
change because love is such a strange
thing. She may end up falling in love
with a boy who is a good person and
who has a nice personality, but he is
not what she planned for when it
comes to spiritual things.
"In a relationship like that, once
you go beyond a certain point where
you see you are not changing that per-
son, compromise happens. So I tell
people that when your friends begin
to consider that the two of you are
dating, you've already gone to far," he
said.


4


I I I - r