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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02957
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 8/2/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02957
System ID: UF00084249:02957

Full Text







MIGHTY
WINGS


1m .
I'm lovwn' It.


HIGH 93F
LOW 80F

AFTERNOON
,A T-STORM


The


Tribune


Volume: 103 No.209


THURSDAY,


ng


AUGUST 2, 2007


PRICE 75c


is


Claim that majority of

disputed ballots in

Pinewood were cast by

former MP's own party


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE majority Qf the 266 elec-
tion votes being challenged by for-
mer Pinewood member of parlia-
ment Allyson Maynard-Gibson
were cast by supporters of her own
party, according to sources who
claim they are conducting a poll in
the area.
They alleged that Mrs Maynard-
Gibson's challenge could even end
up widening the vote gap between
herself and current MP Byran
Woodside as the majority of the
persons polled thus far are furi-
ous with the former MP for ques-
tioning their right to vote in the
area.
On Monday, the newly elected
MP for the area Byran Woodside
- the FNM's representative for the
area published an advertisement
listing the names of 266 persons


who the former MP is contesting
as not entitled to vote in the May
2nd general election.
Speaking to campaigners in the
area yesterday, it is reported that
the majority of the names listed
on Mrs Maynard-Gibson's chal-
lenge were in fact PLP support-
ers.
"Some of the people that are
being challenged are middle aged,
or people who are somewhere
near their retirement age, 60 and
later on. Some of these people
have been living there for 20 and
25 years, and most' of them are
PLPs," the campaign worker said.
According to another worker,
the main issue facing these resi-
dents is that the former MP must
either consider them non-Bahami-
ans, or non-residents of the area.
SEE page 13


Average income 'expected to
increase 21% in three years'
* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
THE Bahamas' average annual income per person is expected to increase
by 21 per cent to $23,000 over the next three years, with unemployment falling
to 6.8 per cent in 2010, as a Wall Street credit rating agency yesterday gave
this nation's economy a major "thumbs-up" by increasing its outlook from
"stable" to "positive".
Standard & Poor's (S&P), iH affirming the relatively high 'A-' and 'A-2'
long-term and short-term ratings on the Bahamas' ability to repay its gov-
ernment debt, said average annual income per person in this nation is set to
increase over the next three years from the $19,000 it reached in 2006.
Average income per person will rise to $23,000 by 2010, while unemploy-
ment was projected by S&P to decline to 6.8 per cent that year from 10 per
cent in 2005, both developments driven by foreign direct investment and the
tourism industry.
SEE page 12


* 4pc Thighs & Legs
* 2 Regular Fries
. 2 20 Drinks
,i"Add 2 Biscuits for 75c


* By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
THE trial over the Grand
Bahama Port Authority's own-
ership yesterday experienced
what a Supreme Court justice
said was an "extraordinary"
development, when counsel
representing Sir Jack Hayward
left the courtroom saying his
client had told him not to pro-
ceed with the hearing after they
failed to obtain an adjournment.
The trial on Sir Jack's claim
to 75 per cent ownership of the
GBPA and its Port Group Ltd
affiliate, which is disputed by
the estate of his late business
partner, Edward St George,
opened in the Supreme Court
without Sir Jack's appearance,
or the presence of his son, Rick,
who is said to be in Turkey.
Ousted GBPA chairman
Hannes Babak is also allegedly
abroad in Austria.
Then, a development Justice
Anita Allen herself described
SEE page 13


Crashed plane 'was

not owned by Leair'


THE plane that crashed in
New Providence on Tuesday was
not owned by Leair at the time of
the incident, according to the
company's president Larry
Brown.
Reports about a plane crash
published yesterday stated that
the aircraft in question was
owned by Leair, a charter airline.
"I wish to state for the infor-
mation of the public that the air-
craft reportedly involved, a Piper
Aztec, was not owned by my
company, neither was the flight
SEE page 13


THE plane crashed in
New Providence on Tuesday


Airport union president says
she's not in violation of courts
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
AIRPORT Worker's Union President Nelerene Harding has
declared that she is not in violation of the courts, and has given
access to the office to a dissident union executive.
Ms Harding yesterday at Worker's House, responded to claims by
Anthony Bain, Secretary-general of her union, and his lawyer Fayne
Thompson, who declared on Tuesday that they are about to file a
motion to have Ms Harding found in contempt of a July 20th court
order and possibly imprisoned for impeding executives such as Mr
Bain from carrying out their functions in the union.
SEE page 12


Police officers
accused of beating
are relieved of
duties pending
investigation
* By TANEKA THOMPSON
THE two officers accused of
beating 27-year-old Desmond Key
unconscious have been officially
relieved of their duties pending the
outcome of an investigation, police
say.
According to Commissioner of
Police Paul Farquharson, a com-
plaint was made by the victim's fam-
ily at the Complaints and Corrup-
tions Unit "about three weeks ago"
and since then was being monitored
by the Deputy Commissioner.
Commissioner Farquharson
added that he was aware that this
particular case had garnered the
public's interest as well as its sym-
pathy, and upon his return from
holiday a few days ago, he prompt-
ly met with the parties involved.
"I noted there was a tremendous
interest in this particular complaint
and I personally had a look into it
yesterday," the commissioner said
during an interview with The Tri-
bune at police headquarters.
"I met with all the parties con-
SEE page 12

NCTU president
calls for Anthony
Bain to resign
* By BRENT DEAN
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE president of the National
Congress of Trade Unions is call-
ing on Anthony Bain to resign from
the organisation after aligning him-
self with the Trade Union Congress.
John Pinder spoke to The Tri-
bune yesterday in response to
remarks made by Mr Bain on Tues-
day at the House of Labour. Mr
Bain serves as secretary general of
the Airport, Airline and Allied
Workers Union and assistant sec-
retary general of the NCTU.
Currently, he is locked in a fight
with the AAAWU president
Nelerene Harding and has publicly
aligned himself with the Trade
Union Congress, led by Obie Fer-
guson, rather that the NCTU, led
by Mr Pinder.
"Now that he has aligned himself
with the TUC he has publicly
made an announcement he can't
serve as assistant secretary general
of NCTU," Mr Pinder said. "That's
a conflict of interest."
"We are looking for him to do
the honourable thing and resign that
post as assistant secretary general, of
SEE page 12


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Red Cross faces food shortages In brief
Cuban


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT The Red
Cross Centre on Grand
Bahama has been forced to
adjust its meals programme due
to a low grocery inventory, an
organisation official revealed.
Samuel Cooper, Red Cross
chairman, said that the organi-
sation's Meals-On-Wheels pro-
gramme has now been reduced
to three days a week.
"The meals on wheels is back


in operation but we can only
serve meals three days a week,
and the reason for that is a lack
of adequate food supplies; we
want to serve meals five times a
week, but we can't," he said.
Mr Cooper, who was speak-
ing on Tuesday at a Rotary
Club meeting at Ruby Swiss
restaurant, said that about 50
persons including residents in
the settlements of East and
West Grand Bahama and walk-
ins at the centre in Freeport -
are served hot meals.


In addition to low grocery
stocks, the executive said that
transportation is a major chal-
lenge for the Red Cross.
Mr Cooper said that more
volunteers are needed to assist
in delivering meals to the needy
on the island in order for the
programme to be effective.
The Red Cross Centre has
established four member groups
on the island. A branch was
formed in the southwest area
of the island to serve the com-
munities of Lewis Yard,
Hunters, Mack Town and Pin-
ders Point.
Branches were also opened


in Eight Mile Rock and West
End, and plans are underway
to open a fourth branch at Hep-
burn Town, Eight Mile Rock.
"We are quite active in the
community and branches are
open daily and people come in
for food and clothing and some-
times shelter," said Mr Coop-
er.
Dr George Charity, a long
time Red Cross volunteer, said
the Red Cross is considered the
greatest humanitarian organi-
sation in the world with over
100 million volunteers.
The Red Cross, he said,
assists during disasters, hurri-


canes, and famine. He also stat-
ed that it is responsible for
training in First-Aid, CPR, dis-
aster preparedness, water res-
cue and blood services.
"In the Bahamas, we are not
involved in blood services, but
in other parts of the world the
Red Cross is responsible for the
blood bank and any hospital
that needs blood would call on
the Red Cross," he explained.
Dr Charity said that volun-
tary service is one of the most
important aspects of the Red
Cross. In the Bahamas, he said,
there are fewer than 10 paid
staff members.


Two weather systems still


threaten tropical activity


FORECASTERS are
continuing to keep an
eye on two systems that
could bloom as the hur-
ricane season enters the
historically busy segment
of its six-month run.
An area of low ores-
sure associated with a
tropical wave located
just east of the Wind-
ward Islands has become
a little better organised
today, forecasters at the TH
National Hurricane Cen- Wedn
tre in Miami said. shows
An Air Force recon- Wind
naissance aircraft is (AP
scheduled to investigate
the area this afternoon.
"While environmental condi-
tions do not appear especially
favourable for development,
there is still some potential for
this system to become a tropical
depression during the next day
or two as it moves westward
near 15 to 20 mph," forecasters
said in a statement.
Meanwhile, a large area of
cloudiness and showers has
developed over the northeast-
ern Gulf of Mexico in associa-
tion with an old frontal zone.
"Some slow development of
this system is possible during
the next day or two as it remains
nearly stationary," a Hurricane
Centre forecaster said.
"There are showers firing up
and some spots in the Gulf have


IS NOAA satellite image taken
iesday, August 1, 2007 at 01:45 AM EDT
s a low pressure system east of the southern
ward islands
PHOTO/WEATHER UNDERGROUND)

very warm water temperatures
in the mid-80s," he said. US fe
"Some of the long-range casters
computer models are taking this they ex
system toward Mobile, Alaba- mal Atl
ma and the Panhandle area," with 13
the forecaster said. with s(
The system named Chantal becomii
rapidly lost the characteristics A trc
of a tropical storm today and tained v
was expected to weaken further and bec
as it moves across the Atlantic. those w:
It could bring heavy rain to Last y
Canada but was not expected ical stoi
to threaten the United States, five hur
forecasters said. made 1;
The storm had top sustained States.
winds of near 50 mph at 1pm. compari
It was centred about 260 2005 se,
miles east-southeast of Hali-, with 28
fax, Nova Scotia, according to them hu
the National Hurricane Cen- ricane IF


tre. It was moving
northeast at about 32
mph.
Forecasters had
expected Chantal to
be short-lived as a
tropical storm and
stopped issuing advi-
sories on the storm
late.Tuesday.
The first named
storm of 2007 was
Subtropical Storm
Andrea, which formed
in May. It was fol-
lowed by Tropical
Storm Barry, which
formed on June 1, the
first day of the official
hurricane season.
federal government fore-
said in late May that
pect a busier than nor-
antic hurricane season,
to 17 tropical storms
even to 10 of those
ng hurricanes.
opical storm has sus-
minds of at least 39 mph
omes a hurricane when
inds reach 74 mph.
'ear, there were 10 trop-
rms in the Atlantic and
rricanes, none of which
andfall in the United
It was a mild year in
son with the devastating
ison, which set a record
na ned.storms, 15 of
mrricanes, including Hur-
Katrina.


migrants on
hunger strike
over detention
* PUERTO RICO
San Juan

ALMOST two dozen
would-be Cuban migrants
detained at the US Navy
base in Guantanamo Bay
have begun a hunger strike
to protest their confine-
ment, an exile group said,
according to Associated
Press.
The 22 migrants who began
their protest on Sunday are
among 44 Cubans, including
three children, who were
intercepted by the US Coast
Guard at sea but not repatri-
ated because authorities
deemed they had a credible
fear of persecution, Ramon
Saul Sanchez, president of the
Miami, Florida-based
Democracy Movement, said
Tuesday.
US authorities are seeking
to settle the Cubans in anoth-
er country but Sanchez said
they should be released
immediately and allowed to
live in the United States,
where they have relatives.
The Cubans migrants are
not confined with the
approximately 360 men
detained on suspicion of ter-
rorism or links to al-Qaida
or the Taliban at Guan-
tanamo and their protest
is not connected to the long-
running hunger strike among
the detainees held by the US
military.
Sanchez said some of the
Cuban migrants have been
able to phone him and other
activists in the United States
to discuss their plight. Among
their complaints, he said, are
that they are treated like
"prisoners" by the private
contractor that runs the
migrant operation center on
the base.
US Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement spokes-
woman Barbara Gonzalez
said the agency rejected the
Democracy Movement's
claims that migrants detained
at the US base were mis-
treated.


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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 3


W LE


O In brief

Man accused
of having
ammunition
and flare gun

A CARMICHAEL Road
man was arraigned in Magis-
trate's Court yesterday charged
with possession of a prohibited
weapon and possession of
ammunition.
Philip Charlow, 31, was
arraigned before Magistrate
Renee McKay at court six in
Parliament Street.
It was alleged that on Mon-
day, July 23, Charlow was found
in possession of an orange and
black Olin 12 gauge flaregun.
It was further alleged that on
the same day, he was found in
possession of 24 live rounds of
.40 ammunition, one live round
of 50 mm ammunition and one
live round of .223 ammunition,
despite not being the holder of
a firearms certificate.
Charlow pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was granted
bail in the sum of $7,500. The
case was adjourned to Novem-
ber 14.

Mud island
emerges from
Caribbean
fissure
N TRINIDAD
Port-of-Spain
A MUD-SPEWING fissure
in the ocean floor has given birth
to a tiny Caribbean island and is
posing a threat to small boats,
according to Associated Press.
The island, breaching a few
inches above the ocean's sur-
face and stretching 500 feet
long, was discovered recently
roughly five miles northeast of
Trinidad, said Roderick Stew-
art, a seismologist at the Uni-
versity of the West Indies in St.
Augustine.
An advisory has been issued
for small boats, which could lose
buoyancy because of gas bub-
bling up from the underwater fis-
sure or run aground in the mud.
The danger may be short-
lived. Large waves are washing
away the mud and the fissure
may fade.
It is not the first time such
tiny, short-lived islands have
emerged off the coast of the
twin-island Caribbean nation of
Trinidad and Tobago. Tempo-
rary islands also were formed
in 1964 and 2001.
The islands are created by
what scientists call "mud volca-
noes," a varying mixture of
water, sediment and com-
pressed pockets of natural gas
that usually emerge along fault
lines. A mud volcano even
erupted on land here in the late
1990s, inundating part of a vil-
lage. No one was injured.
Sediment deposits from rivers
in nearby South America con-
tribute to the phenomenon.
Guyana to
host arts
festival after
Bahamas pass
N GUYANA
Georgetown
GUYANA will host a
Caribbean arts festival that was
thrown into jeopardy when the
new government in the
Bahamas withdrew, a regional
official said Tuesday, according
to Associated Press.
A team from the Caribbean
Community secretariat was
meeting with President Bhar-
rat Jagdeo to discuss the next
Caribbean Festival of Creative
Arts, which was inaugurated
here in 1972.
f The festival, known as Car-
ifesta, is scheduled for August
2008. Participants are expected
S from more than two dozen
S countries, including dance and
music troupes from Caribbean
communities in the United
States. It was last held in
Trinidad and Tobago in Sep-
tember 2006.
The three-month-old govern-
ment of Bahamian Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham said in July


it was withdrawing as host of
next year's festival due to a lack
of preparation by its predeces-
sor. Officials offered to host a
later edition of the festival.
Guyana sees the festival as
an opportunity to use a new sta-
dium and hotels that were built
ahead of the cricket World Cup
that concluded in April.

F]


Apology for slow police response


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SENIOR officer yester-
day apologised to the Bahami-
an people for several serious
shortcomings of the police
force particularly for the lack
of response to emergency calls
- promising improvements in
future.
Chief Supt Burkie Wright,
officer in charge of the Cable
Beach precinct, conceded that
he is very much concerned
about the time it takes for
police units to respond to
emergencies.
Speaking as a guest on More
94 radio show Real Talk Live,
Mr Wright also admitted that
in an incident earlier this week
involving a child who was
potentially in danger, officers
could not respond in a timely
fashion because the police con-
trol room "dropped the ball."
Having previously headed
New Providence's traffic divi-
sion, Chief Supt Wright said
that he is particularly con-


cerned about the slow
response 1ti1"me x\\hII il comes to
traffic pcctidlcils.
"There lih\ve been a number
of cases, which I saw, where
police vehicles bypassed vehi-
cles that were involved in acci-
dents," he said.
However, Mr Wright
emphasised that officers who
fail to respond within a certain
time are disciplined.
"We have supervisors who
are to ensure that these people
reach to these complaints in a
timely fashion. Various divi-
sions have a specific time to
arrive at these cases. Officers,
once they've been found guilty
of these infractions (respond-
ing too slow), are disciplined,"
he said.
Public outrage was sparked
this week after calls to the
emergency call line 919 were
seemingly ignored in what one
witness said could have been a
dangerous situation involving a
child.
A woman on Tuesday called
into a More 94 radio show


telling how she observed a sev-
en-year-old walking by himself
on Prospect Ridge just after
Spm on Monday.
As she circled back in her
vehicle to offer her assistance,
the woman noticed that the
boy had been joined by a man.
The man was no relation to
the boy and was acting in a sus-
picious manner, the woman
said.
The woman said that despite
several calls to 919 for assis-
tance, police failed to show up
to assist her and the boy or to
investigate the case.
Together with another con-
cerned citizen, the woman per-
sonally took the boy to the
Cable Beach police station.
Chief Supt Wright explained
yesterday that his officers only
became aware of the case
when the boy was brought to
the station.
He said that the police con-
trol room never passed the
woman's emergency calls on
to the Cable Beach police sta-
tion.


E1iif] m mi o mld] [s faing


* BUSHES
are getting
higher at
the ruins at
Clifton
soon you
will not be
able to see
these eight
century old
structers.
(Photo:
Felipe
Major/


."It appears from all indica-
tion that some one in the police
control room dropped the ball
by not calling Cable Beach
police station," he said.
Mr Wright said that he is now
making enquiries to determine
which officers were on duty in
the control room on Monday
night.
In the case of the seven-year-
old boy, the Chief Supt said that
this is not the first time he was
found wandering the streets


alone far from home.
He explained that police have
discovered that the boy lives
with his 36-year-old mother and
eight siblings in the Carmichael
Road area.
Mr Wright said it has become
apparent to police officers that
the mother is unable to care
properly for all her children and
the matter has therefore been
referred to Social Services, the
Children's Crisis Centre and the
Children's Emergency Hostel.


... .. "" .st/) Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family
-_ ~~-.* j .. Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
Se-mail www.colesoFax: 326-9953
Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Man is jailed for murder HarbourGreenShops:tLyford3a 2


A 22-year-old man was
sentenced to 25 years in
prison yesterday after being
convicted of murder.
On June 19 of this year,
Jamal Bastian of Kemp
Road was found guilty of the
October 6, 2005 shooting
death of Theotis Johnson,
28, of Fox Hill.
Johnson died of his
injuries in hospital after
being shot in the back of the
head near Augusta Street.
He was shot while in the
passenger seat of a car.
Yesterday \ morning
Supreme Court Justice Jon
Isaacs sentenced Bastian to
25 years in prison, taking
into consideration the time
he has already served while
on remand.
The prosecution had
sought the death penalty for
Bastian however his attor-
ney Romona Farquharson
had argued that the crime
was not sufficiently heinous.
A probation report suggest-
ed that Bastian had had a


very rough childhood.
He was 20 years old when he


was charged with Johnson's
murder.


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THE TRIBUNE


i AGE 4. THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


3 *ORAULETESJ 3 *EDIOR


MONDAY'S HEARING in Washington on
the diabetes drug Avandia and its links to heart
attacks underscores the need for a reformed
Food and Drug Administration one that is
more committed to protecting patients than to
being part of the profit pipeline of the pharma-
ceutical industry. Avandia is just the latest exam-
ple of an FDA-approved drug or medical device
that has been shown to cause serious adverse
effects once on the market.
In 2004, Merck had to withdraw its block-
buster arthritis drug Vioxx after studies indicat-
ed it was associated with heart attacks and strokes
These FDA failures are putting Congress to
the test. It is working on bipartisan legislation that
has the potential to make the FDA a more effec-
tive watchdog, especially if House and Senate
conference committee members agree on a final
bill with provisions that break from the agen-
cy's recent track record of rushing approval for
suspect medications.
A weak link in the FDA approval process has
been the expert advisory committees that often
include members with financial interests in the.
company whose drug is under review. Commit-
tee members with direct links to a company are
supposed to recuse themselves from considera-
tion of its drug, but the FDA has been allowed to
grant exemptions. When a committee approved
Vioxx in 1999, four of its six members had been
gi anted waivers from the conflict-of-interest rule.


The House version of the FDA reform bill
would require that no more than one member of
a committee could get such a waiver. An attempt
to include such a limit in the Senate bill failed nar-
rowly.
Since 1992, the drug industry has paid hun-
dreds of millions of dollars in annual user fees to
help speed approval of new drugs. Too little
money has been available for post-market safe-
ty review to track and correct problems with
new medications. Both bills call for $225 million
in new money from the pharmaceutical industry
for such reviews.
Unfortunately, neither bill insists on the two-
year moratorium on direct-to-consumer adver-
tising for new drugs that the National Academy
of Sciences' Institute of Medicine and the Amer-
ican Medical Association have recommended.
Some adverse reactions become evident only
after .a new drug hits the market, and a morato-
rium on ads would dampen use during that initial
period.
The broader problem of the FDA that reform
legislation does not address is the enormous gap
between its mission ensuring the safety of drugs,
medical devices, and most of the nation's domes-
tic and imported food and its annual budget of
less than $2 billion. Still, a reform bill that adopts
the House rule on conflict-of-interest waivers
will provide some assurance that Congress can
put the public interest ahead of industry's.


Russians upbeat on global warming


MOSCOW Global climate change means
"we'll spend less on fur coats," Russian President
Vladimir Putin quipped in 2003.
But increasingly, Russia's official stand on glob-
al warming seems to be: Why worry?
While global concerns over climate change con-
jure images of melting ice caps, submerged cities
and massive droughts, some Russian experts are
hailing global warming as the answer to Russia's
prayers.
As the long and dreary Russian winters become
balmier, billions of dollars will be saved on heating
and there will be fewer cases of depression, says
Vladimir Klimenko, a professor at the Moscow
Energy Institute, whose lab is funded by the state-
run oil and gas company.
Agriculture, ravaged by the cold and 70 years of
Soviet collectivization, will blossom, and water-
melons could grow in Moscow, he adds.
In the land of frozen tundra and winters that
drag on into June, politicians and scientists are
welcoming climate change as a panacea, not a har-
binger of environmental apocalypse.
"For our great northern country, I don't today
see any imminent problems for the next 100 years
at least," said Konstantin Pulikovsky, who heads
Russia's environmental regulatory agency.
The upbeat assessment comes as Russia is bol-
stered by massive oil and gas wealth. It has led to
calls for the Kremlin to abandon the Kyoto Pro-
tocol, the international treaty mandating the reduc-
tion of greenhouse gas emissions, which Russia
approved in 2004. (While the United States signed
the treaty, the Bush administration has not sub-
nmitted it to Congress for ratification).


Critics, however, say the "good for Russia" argu-
ment ignores key problems.
"Because of drought, we'll lose a major part of
the most productive soil of Russia," said Vladimir
Chuprov, head of the energy department at Green-
peace Russia. "As a result, Russia will receive mil-
lions of climate migrants farmers that can't work
anymore."
Melting permafrost could destroy Russian cities
situated above the Artic Circle. The breaking off of
icebergs from Arctic ice sheets due to higher tem-
peratures will make it difficult to exploit oil and gas
reserves. And any money saved on winter heaters
could be needed for air conditioners if summers
heat up.
"We think Russia will lose more than it gains,
like the whole planet," Chuprov said.
Meanwhile, the Russian parliament is debating
whether global warming exists.
"I read an article by a group of scientists who I
know and respect, and they say there won't be a
warming, but prove there'll be a cooling," said
Pyotr Romanov, a Communist Party deputy.
Russia is not the only northern nation to con-
sider the benefits of warming.
The United States, Canada, Denmark and Nor-
way, along with Russia, are haggling over rights to
the resource-rich Arctic, which may soon be free of
ice.
Some economists predict that summer tourism
will increase in Scandinavia as countries like Spain
and Italy become too hot.
(* The top article is from the Boston Globe and
the second from Cox Newspapers 2007)


Nowadays




there is no





'straw market'


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN V'ERBA MAGISSTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmetns of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCII, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama


A prescription for FDA reform


the super market, and most
importantly the basket was
bought by the tourist who took
it home as a real Bahamian sou-
venir. In addition to the straw
baskets, there were straw hats,
caps, straw mats, place mats,
slippers, handbags, men's wal-
lets, and more.
These were beautifully dec-
orated, some with "Nassau"
stitched on the side. These items
were produced by talented
Bahamians men and women
and brought to market every
day. And when these straw
items were put on display they
set off an explosion of colour
in the stalls. The tourists loved it
and many took photographs of
the market. One only has to
look at some of the photos tak-
en by Freddie Maura, Gus
Roberts, and Roland Rose for
the then Bahamas Develop-
ment Board and displayed in
various tourist promotion book-
lets and magazines around the
world.


Unfortunately to say, not
many people want to bother to
produce real Bahamian straw
goods. It is easier to go to Mia-
mi and pick up flea market
items and sell them to the
tourist as Bahamian items. I
don't have a problem with call-
ing the market the World
Famous Nassau Flea Market,
but please don't call it a straw
market because it becomes an
embarrassing joke.
Finally, I can understand the
government's delay in con-
structing the "new straw mar-
ket" at a cost of millions of our
dollars. If we are going to build
a new straw market then the
government should not issue a
licence to a vendor unless 75
per cent of thp items sold are
Bahamian-made straw items
like before, otherwise there is
no licence. Those vendors who
find it too much trouble to pro-
duce the beautiful straw work
we remember should get out of
the straw business and do some-
thing else such as set up a flea
market at some other location.
G WILLIAMS
Nassau,
July 18, 2007.


Young males have very little


respect for laws in this country


EDITOR, The Tribune.
YOUNG people learn what they live. As a
visitor for over 21 years I have seen a trend
which is very disturbing. There is very little
respect for the laws in this country y young
males. Examples of how we should live must
begin with our publicly elected leadership.
Recently the MP from Golden Gates Gibson
decided to operate his laptop while in session.
This is a well known fact that no laptops are
allowed to be operated during the parliamen-
tary session, but this member probably thought
he was above the rule of the assembly as pro-
mulgated by the elected members.
Last year there was the incident of the "brawl-
ing bobbleheads" in the parliament which result-
ed in damage to the contents of public property.
I have seen no consequences for fighting on
public property or destruction of taxpayer owned
contents. It makes one wonder if perhaps they
are considered above the law? One of them had
the audacity and arrogance to announce that it
was "a private matter and nobody's business." He
misses the obvious point.
What about the prison guard who assaulted
Mario Villego, the Univision Television reporter,
last year? The dastardly event was captured by
the international media and, of course, no one
has been charged. Yet another government offi-
cial who conducts himself apparently with no
regard to law and order, rules and regulations.


I walk the east side of New Providence and the
lack of enforcement of basic traffic laws is abhor-
rent. Of course, why should the youth or anybody
else pay any attention to obeying traffic laws
when there armesome public officials who choose
not to? They are not afraid of traffic law enforce-
ment because rarely do you see any traffic tick-
ets being handed out. So why bother obeying
traffic laws after all everybody knows everybody
and who writes a ticket against a friend, neigh-
bour, cousin, etc?
Maybe it is time for the traffic division to be
made up of independent foreigners who will
enforce the law. All of us are aware of the Sun-
day night motorcycle madness. I recently called
the desk at the local police station and he told me
there "was nothing they could do about it".
Well there you are. Without enforcement of
all of your laws crime will continue escalating.
With murders at twice the rate of last year and
reported rapes of American tourists, it will not be
long before a travel advisory from the State
Department will be in effect.
With your American customers contributing
some 65 per cent (direct and indirect impact) of
your gross domestic product, the effects will be
extremely troubling. The leadership of this coun-
try better wake up and "smell the salts" before it
is too late.
JOHN SMESTAD
July 30, 2007.


9AM 6LPM

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Plus postage
Must be at Village Road office
no later than lucscdy 1pm.

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(next to Sure Alarm)


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EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM starting to get a little
sick and tired of reading in the
press, and listening to TV and
radio, stories about the "straw
vendors" and the "straw mar-
ket". There are no "straw ven-
dors" and there is no "straw
market".
We used to have a straw
market in days gone by. It was
known as the world famous
.Nassau Straw Market. What we
have today is a Flea Market and
Flea Market vendors. Go to the
so-called straw market and look
at what is being sold to the
tourist: baseball caps, beads, T-
shirts, ladies handbags, neck-
laces, dresses, scarves, wooden
flutes, toy turtles, even luggage,
all made and imported from
other countries. Nothing made
of Bahamian grown straw or
sisal.
I walked through the stalls
several days ago and I "ain't see
no straw yet"! Anyone seen a
straw basket lately? The kind
every household used to have
in this country. It was a com-
mon sight. The straw basket
went on picnics to the beach,
went on fishing trips, went to


j


lol








THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 5


THF TRIBUNE


OIn brief

Turks is

criticised

in Haitian

capsizing

* HAITI
Port-au-Prince
BRITISH investigators
found no evidence to support
claims that Turks and Caicos
authorities rammed a boat of
Haitian migrants in May, but
said police were ill-equipped
to handle the capsizing that
killed at least 61 people,
according to a report released
Wednesday, according to
Associated Press.
Britain's Marine Accident
Investigation Branch said
instability caused by over-
crowding most likely caused
the boat to overturn in shark-
filled waters just off the shore
of Providenciales, one of the
Turks and Caicos Islands,
before dawn on May 4.
The report released by
Haiti's ambassador to the
Bahamas said the marine
police were "ill-equipped" for
the rescue operation and
"suffered from poor commu-
nications, lack of central coor-
dination, and slow mobilisa-
tion of resources."
The Haitian sailboat was
nearing the British Caribbean
territory when a police vessel
intercepted it and tried to tow
it to shore even though it
was overloaded with at least
150 migrants, the report said.
"It would appear that the
sloop capsized while under
tow," it said. "The trigger for
the capsize cannot be stated
with certainty, but the under-
lying problem of the inher-
ent lack of stability ... was
almost certainly the main
causal factor in this tragic
accident."
Survivors claimed police
boat rammed them twice,
capsizing their vessel and
pitching passengers most of
whom did not know how to
swim into the ocean.
But the report disputed that,
saying the two boats "bumped"
as police pulled up, causing a
loud noise that alarmed
migrants but did not tip their
boat. "Close inspection of both
vessels revealed no signs of col-
lision damage," it said.
The Turks and Caicos gov-
ernment released a brief
statement saying the author-
ities would review marine
police procedures but offered
no detailed response to the
report.
British investigators also
said the instability of over-
crowded migrant boats was
"well known" to marine
police but found that "no
instructions or operating pro-
cedures for mitigating the risk
of capsize" had been given to
police crew.
They suggested that escort-
ing the boat to shore or
removing the passengers
from their boat would have
been better options than tow-
ing under the circumstances.
The report recommended
that the territory's police
immediately cease all actions
that would lead to a boat's
capsize and establish proce-
dures for safely interdicting
migrant boats.
Haitians have made the
dangerous voyage of about
200 miles to the Turks and
Caicos for years, fleeing the
violence and social turmoil of
the Western Hemisphere's
poorest country for jobs as
construction workers, janitors,
landscapers and bellhops in
the wealthy territory of 33,000.


.4'


/



'I
t


* GREG and Tanya Cash
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)




Family accuses





judge of bias


THE battling Cash family
have accused a Supreme Court
judge of bias in the latest phase
of their five-year fight for jus-
tice.
They have filed an appeal for
a retrial in their battle with the
Baptist educational authorities
- and have vowed to go to the
Privy Council if local courts fail
them.
"This is not a get-rich-quick
scheme," Greg Cash told The
Tribune yesterday. "It is a mat-
ter of principle and of justice.
What does a law-abiding citi-
zen of this country have to do to
get justice against those who
happen to be part of the gov-
ernment or the church?"
Mr Cash and his wife Tanya
have been seeking compensa-
tion from the Baptists since he
was fired as coach from Jordan
Prince William High School in
2002,
The dismissal came after Mrs
Cash and other parents the
couple had children at the
school at the time com-
plained about conditions there.
But they claim numerous
obstacles were placed in their
path as they tried to get a hear-
ing.
Eventually, when their unfair
dismissal and various other
claims were heard by Justice
John Lyons, Mr Cash was
awarded $20,000 against the
Baptists, a sum he and his wife
dismissed as derisory.
Subsequently, Justice John
Lyons increased the award to a
little over $26,000 to take
account of interest, but the cou-
ple claim his ruling, and dam-


ages awarded, bore no relation
to remarks he made during the
trial.
Now they have filed an appeal
in which they criticise the judge
for alleged bias and not penalis-
ing Baptist representatives who
repeatedly failed to appear
before the court when called.
And they claim they were
denied a fair hearing, alleging
"a substantial wrong and mis-
carriage of justice."
They also allege that the
judge had been extremely
unfair towards them. and vio-
lated their constitutional rights.
"What is going on with this
court?" they ask in their filed
notice of appeal. "These par-
ties continue to do as they wish.
as if they are above the law, and
being allowed again to get away
with it, without being held
accountable, or penalised."
The couple claim Justice
Lyons' ruling was "confusing"
and at odds with what he had
said during the hearing.
The judge, they said, referred
to the case as "high profile" and
one of the most disturbing he
had heard in his dozen years on
the bench.
"Is this the type of minimal
and inadequate award that a
case of such calibre gets, or is
assessed, by a justice of the
court?" they ask in their appeal
motion.
Yesterday, Mr Cash the
court system for charging $510
just to file the appeal docu-
ments, and $216 to make avail-
able the court transcript crucial
for their appeal hearing.
But he said he and his wife


would not be deterred. "We are
determined to win this case,"
he said. and we are prepared to
oo to the Privv Council to do it
if necessary.
"If that happens, all the
details will emerge. If we don't
make a stand now, what is going
to happen to our children and
grandchildren in the years to
come'.?
"We hope our stand will
leach them to be good and pro-
ductive citizens who are pre-
pared to stand up for right-
eousness."

Fetler.ugiie


I 1


Call for bishop to be jailed


IN their appeal motion, Mr
and Mrs Cash are asking that
Baptist Bishop Samuel Greene
be committed to prison for
alleged perjury.
They claim the bishop gave
"completely false" evidence on
the witness stand while being
cross-examined by attorney
Edward Turner.
They also accuse Bishop
Greene of libel, having alleged-
ly knowingly made false allega-
tions against Mr Cash.


They also want Rev William
Thompson, another Baptist pas-
tor, committed to prison for
allegedly failing to appear as wit-
ness, even though summoned.
In court documents, they
claim he was allowed to "get
away with this contempt" and
was never penalised.
And they seek committal
action against attorneys Sidney
Collie and Edward Turner for
alle-gedly disobeying court
orders.


SEEKS TO FILL POSITION IMMEDIATELY

Candidate must possess the following characteristics:
Excellent communication skills, able to work in a fast paced
environment, self-motivated, well organized.

JOB REQUIREMENTS
* Knowledge of A/R & A/P
* Knowledge of POS systems, Microsoft Word, Excel and knowledge
of ACCPAC Acctg. Software A Plus.
* Excellent verbal and written skills
* Must be able to work in a deadline-oriented business with
minimum supervision
* Professional Appearance
Salary negotiable based on experience.
Please fax resumes to: 394-8573


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Ph: 242-394-4397
Fax: 242-394-4492


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Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448






PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007 THE TRIBUNE


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Minister emphasises


the need for smart


workers in future


MINISTER of Education
Carl Bethel warned students to
take their education seriously -
as the future of the Bahamas
will depend on the production
of smart workers.
Mr Bethel noted that today's
world has very little use for "the
ill educated or the untrained" as
mechanisation is being overtaken
by the application of technolo-
gy. "And working harder, as a
means of production, is being
overtaken by working smarter.
"An educated populace is nec-
essary if the Bahamas is to con-
tinue to grow at its current pace,
regain market share in a tourism-
driven economy and compete
globally," Mr Bethel said.
He was speaking to the scores
who attended the Bahamas
Supermarkets Foundation
Scholarship Reception held at
Superclubs Breezes.
The minister applauded
Bahamas Supermarkets for
what he called "its magnani-
mous annual philanthropic ges-
ture," awarding $200,000 in
scholarships this year and a total
of nearly $8 million since the
ambitious programme's incep-
tion in 1968.
"It is my understanding that
just under 1,700 recipients to
date have benefitted from the
foundation's scholarship pro-
gramme," Mr Bethel said,
thanking the charitable arm of
City Market stores for what he
called its significant contribu-


* CARL Bethel, Bahamas Supermarkets Limited chairman
Basil Sands and Bahamas Supermarkets Holdings Limited chair-
man Barrie Farrington greet each other


tion to national development.
He asked other companies to
follow City Market's lead as he
addressed this year's recipients
and their families during the
annual scholarship presentation.
The event, a sit-down dinner,
was held at SuperClubs Breezes
July 19. Thirty nine students
were presented with certificates
of the $2,500 award that will go
directly to their university or
college, automatically renewed
throughout a four-year college
career for as long as the student
maintains the required grade
point average.
"The nature of the Bahamian
economy is changing," Mr


is having a


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'hoto by Roland Rose for DP&A)
Bethel told the audience of
more than 150 persons. "Only
an educated population will be
able to weather and adapt to
the changes."
Bahamas Supermarkets
Chairman Basil Sands reminded
the winners of the company's
commitment to education, citing
the programme's history and
the fact that this year's dona-
tion is 33 per cent bigger than
last year's.
Among the high school grad-
uates heading to college with a
Bahamas Supermarkets schol-
arship is Patrieka Young, recip-
ient of one of three Junior
Achievement awards and the
Junior Achiever of the Year. It
was her task to add words of
appreciation.
"On behalf of myself and the
other 38 scholarship recipients,
I would personally like to thank
Bahamas Supermarkets Limited
for investing your time and
more importantly your funds
into the youth of our nation.
We are truly filled with grati-
tude. This monetary donation
could've been used as retained
earnings or even given to share-
holders. You believe in us," she
said.


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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE






I HUHSUAY, AUiUU I 2, 2UUI, HAU /I


THF TRIBUNE


Surveillance boosted



after air crashes


CIVIL Aviation authorities
have announced heightened
surveillance on all small aircraft
following the spate of recent
crashes.
"As a matter of standard
practice, the Flight Standards
Inspectorate of the Civil Avia-
tion Department usually carries
out required operations inspec-
tions of aircraft operators a min-
imum of five times per month,
per aircraft, upwards sometimes
to as many as 12 inspections
each month," said the govern-
ment in a statement. "With
immediate effect, authorities
have decided to step up these
activities.'
These inspections, the state-
ment said, will help Flight Stan-
dards officials evaluate the
structural and mechanical
integrity of all aircraft in oper-
ation. It added that the depart-
ment maintains the authority to
ground any craft failing to meet
required standards.
The Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation yesterday said it is sat-
isfied that the site of the July
31 crash of a Piper 23 Aztec in
western New Providence has
been secured, including the dis-
mantling and removal from the
aircraft of all electrical equip-
ment and electronic devices.
Fuel and other flammable sub-
stances have also been
removed.
"The ministry also advises
that the recent incident is being
closely monitored and that
investigations to determine the
cause of the crash are active and
ongoing, as per the Civil Avia-
tion Department's established
protocols," the statement said.
"Reporting will be made avail-
able to the general public pend-
ing the input of other agencies,
both local and abroad, and
including the office of the
Attorney General and the
International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO)."
On June 27, a small, twin-
engine aircraft crashed near the
airport industrial park when one
of its engines shut down.
The pilot, who was alone on
the nine seater Islander craft,
missed Lynden Pindling Air-


"'. !. .. .,
.4"








mile and crashed in an open
mile and crashed in an open


field. He was shaken by the inci-
dent, but not seriously hurt.
On May 17 in the Berry
Islands, another small plane en
route to Nassau was forced to
turn around and make a crash
landing at Chub Cay, after the
pilot discovered problems with
the landing gear.
The Cat Island Air Piper
Aztec had taken off from Fort
Lauderdale/Hollywood Execu-
tive Airport. Upon landing in
Chub Cay, the landing gear
failed and the aircraft slid on
its belly several hundred yards
before stopping.
In April, five people were
killed when a small plane en
route to the Bahamas crashed
off the coast of Fort Laud-
erdale.
All passengers and crew on
the Piper Aztec died when the
plane headed for Andros -
went down 17 miles out to sea.


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PROPERTIES LISTED

FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using
number code for each property.

HOSS/AATMNS/CMECILBIIG


(401) Lots#17 & #18 Crown Allot-
ments, Love Hill Settlem'ent,
Andros. Containing a two sto-
rey residence.
Appraised value $100,000.

(806) Lots#1 & #2, Block 3 with
a parcel situated between Lot #1,
Block 3, containing a 4 bedroom
condominium Sunset View Vil-
las, West Bay Street.
Appraised value $750,000.

(806) Lot#13, Block#4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.P. with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312 New
Providence bounded northwardly
by a canal or waterway of the
said Subdivision known as Fla-
mingo waterway and running
102.004 ft eastwardly by lot #14
and 146.145 ft southwardly by
a reservation for a private road.
Appraised value $530,000.

(433) Lot#27 of Village Allot-
ment #14 in the Eastern District,
containing residence situated on
Denver Street off Parkgate Road
in the Ann's Town Constituency,
New Providence. Property size
2,500 sq ft Building size 990 sq ft
Appraised value $50,000.

(304) Lot#2, Block#8, Steward
Rd, Coral Heights East Sub-
division situated in Western
District of New Providence approx
size 8,800 sq ft with a split level
containing 2 bed, 2 bath, living,
dining & family rooms, kitchen
and utility room. Approx size of
building 2,658 sq ft.
Appraised value: $322,752.

(902) Lot#14, Block#23 (125ft
x 80ft) situated Rainbow Bay,
Eleuthera containing a one
storey house with 2 bed,
1 bath, kitchen, living room and
2 linen closets.
Appraised value $89,998.

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150
x 150 on Queens Highway just


south of Palmetto Point with a
two storey stone building con-
taining two apartments. Each unit
has 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, kitchen,
living room and 3 linen closets.
Appraised value $287,209.

(100) Developed property
Pinder's, Long Island containing
a split level Mediterranean style
home with kitchen, living room,
dining room, master bed and
bath, two guest rooms, full and
half guest bathroom on lower
level. Also garage and breeze-
way a gross area 4,212 sq ft.
Kitchenette, master bedroom and
bath and front entry porch fea-
tures the upper level, gross area
of 780 sq ft. Porches all around
the concrete structure which is
90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.

(400) Property situated in Cala-
bash Bay on the Island of Andros.
75 ft x 150 ft and containing ther-
eon a small grocery store 480
sq ft and an incomplete 3 bed 2
bath house 900 sq ft.
Appraised value $65,000.

(702) Lot#20 with residential prop-
erty located Skyline Heights, N.P.
Appraised value $280,000.

(400) Lot #14 situated in the set-
tlement of Love Hill on the Island
of Andros totaling 20,000 sq ft.
Property contains a two storey
5 bed, 3 bath residence.
Appraised value $185,000.

(902) Lot containing 3 bed, 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor's Har-
bour bounded northwardly by a
19 ft road and running thereon
50 ft eastwardly and running
thereon 100ft southwardly and
50 ft westwardly.
Appraised value $90,000.

(902) Lot (8,000 sq ft) situated
Sand's Alley, North Palmetto
Point with incomplete triplex


(concrete structure belt course
2,529.6 sq ft).
Appraised value $49,414.

(105) Lot containing two storey
building. with 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath
residence, and 30 ft x 86 ft situated
Bailey Town, North Bimini.
Appraised value $235,000.

(203) Lot B situated on the
north side of Shell Fish Road,
being the third lot west of Fire
Trail Road and east of Hamster
Road with a one half duplex
residential premises.
Appraised value TBA.

(701) Lot#16 in Block#16
in Section 3 of the Subdivi-
sion called and known as
Sea Breeze Estates situated
in the Eastern District of New
Providence. Property contains
a 3 bed, 2 bath residence.
Appraised value TBA.

(902) Lot#17, Block#7 of
Section"A" of Eleuthera Island
Shores Subdivision situated 3
miles northeast of Hatchet Bay,
Eleuthera containing residence.
Appraised value TBA.

(701) Lot of land being #11
in Block#10 on a plan of
allotments laid out by Village
Estates Limited and filed in
the Dept of Land & Surveys
as #142 N.P. and situated in
the Eastern District of New
Providence. Property contains
3 bed, 2 bath residence.
Appraised value TBA.

(565) Lot#1018 in Golden Gates
Estates #2 Sub situated in the
Southwestern District of the island
of New Providence containing a
single storey private residence
3 bed, 2 bath. Property approx
size 6,000 sq ft. Building approx
size 2,400 sq ft. '
Appraised value TBA.


VACAT ROERIE


(401) Lot #17456, Bahama Sound
off Exuma #18, located approx
2.5 miles northwestwardly of
George Town, Exuma.
Appraised value $18,000.

(800) Vacant property located
Bahamia South. Block #16, lot
9A, Freeport, Grand Bahama.
Appraised value $52,000.

(565) Lot #5 located Eleuthera
Island Shores, Seaside Drive,
Section B, Block #15, Eleuthera.
9,691 sq ft.
Appraised value $21,805.

(902) Lot #46, Block #32,
Bahamia, Section X, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, 90 ft wide along
Stratford Way and 150 ft along
Stratford Court.
Appraised value $26,000.


(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65 sq ft)
situated in Mango Lane Section
"B" Block#15S, Eleuthera Island
Shores on the island of Eleuthera.
Appraised value $25,665.

(902) .281 acre of vacant
land off Queen's Highway in
the settlement of Governor's
Harbour, Eleuthera. Appraised
value $31,320.

(802) Vacant lot #26, Block
#27 Caravelle Bay, Freeport,
Grand Bahama, consisting of
35,000 sq ft.
Appraised value $150,000.

(802) Vacant lot #27, Block #27
Caravelle Bay, Freeport, Grand
Bahama, consisting of 38,047 sq
ft. Appraised value $150,000.


(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
Hill Road and 659 ft south of
Joe Farrington Rd, N.P.
Appraised value TBA.

(701) Undeveloped Lot#149.
Seafan Lane, Lucayan Beach Sub,
Grand Bahama, 18,750 sq ft.
Appraised value TBA.

(601) Vacant Lot#l, Hamster Rd
off Carmichael Rd, 5,969 sq ft.
Appraised value $54,000.

(402) Lot#89, Block#87, Aberdeen
Dr, Bahamia West, Freeport, G.B.
Appraised value $51,000.

(601) Vacant Lot#20 comprising
a portion of the Murphy Town
Crown Allotment #72 situated in
Murphy Town, Abaco.
Appraised value $18,000.


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Tel: 242-356-8567
(800) Mrs. Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Brian Knowles
(805) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(806) Mrs Lois Hollis
(807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-4426/9
or 242-302-3800
(201) Ms. Nicola Walker
(202) Mr. Frank Dean
(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT'L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179
(433) Mrs. Suzette Hall-Moss
GOVERNOR'S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA
Tel: 242-332-2856/8
(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230
(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda


ANDROS TOWN
Tel: 242-368-2071
(400) Mrs. Rose Bethel
NASSAU MAIN BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-8700
(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Ms. Cherelle Martinborough
(703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
JFK DRIVE BRANCH
Tel: 242-325-4711
(401) Mr. James Strachan
(402) Mrs. Chandra Gilbert
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE
Tel: 242-393-7505/8
(501) Mr. Keith Lloyd
(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH
Tel: 242-327-6077
(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420
(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mrs. Vanessa Scott
BIMINI BRANCH
Tel: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry


GRAY'S, LONG ISLAND
Tel: 242-337-0101
(100) Mrs Lucy Wells
LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE
Tel: 242-394-3560
(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon
(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby
(723) Mrs. Deidre King
(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs
(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson
(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis
MACKEY STREET
Tel: 242-393-3097
(601) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH
Tel: 242-322-2451/3
(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson
(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh
(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson
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Tel: 242-352-6631/2
(101) Ms. Garnell Frith
(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright
(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles
(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey


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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007 THEOCTRIBUNE


Fishermen are reminded to




stick to crawfish regulations


* By TAMARA FERGUSON
THE annual crawfish sea-
son officially opened yester-
day with Department of Fish-
eries officers reminding fish-
ermen to adhere strictly to the
regulations.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Edison Deleveaux,


deputy director of the Depart-
ment of Fisheries, said that
because there is a large
demand for crawfish, the gov-
ernment is encouraging all
stakeholders to do their part
to ensure that the c .untry's
natural resources are protect-
ed.
"This year, we intend to


increase the number of
Defence Force officers avail-
able in this area and ensure
that they are more visible in
order to penalise those per-
sons found not adhering to the
law," Mr Deleveaux said.
According to Mr Dele-
veaux, all crawfish must have
a jacket length of three and a
quarter inches and a tail
length of five and a half inch-
es.
"Crawfish under five and
one half inches have had little
opportunity to reproduce," he
explained.
Mr Deleveaux also warned
fishermen that if they are
caught with undersized lob-
sters, they could pay as much
as $2,000 and the lobsters will
be confiscated.
According to the Depart-
ment of Fisheries, the use of
air compressors, detergents,
gasoline or other toxic chemi-
cals in crawfishing is strictly
prohibited.
"Chemicals such as bleach
should only be used for sani-
tation purposes. Many
Bahamians depend on marine
resources for their income,
therefore in order for the
industry to remain successful,
the regulations must be adopt-
ed." he said.


NASSAU .... BAHAMAS


learning C eni j_
,_ l__'"'^l


BECAUSE there is a
large demand for crawfish
(above), the government is
encouraging all stakeholders
to do their part to ensure that
- the country's natural
resources are protected.


Cambodian genocide
tribunal says imprisoned
Khmer Rouge official
ready to reveal crimes
* PHNOM PENH,
Cambodia
THE former chief of a
Khmer Rouge prison is willing
to testify about the communist
regime's atrocities that led to
an estimated 1.7 million deaths
in the 1970s, Cambodia's geno-
cide tribunal announced
Wednesday, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
Duch, 64, also known as
Kaing Guek Eav, on Tuesday
became the first top Khmer
Rouge figure to be indicted for
offenses committed when the
Khmer Rouge held power from
1975-79. He was charged and
detained by order of the U.N.-
backed international tribunal's
foreign and Cambodian judges.
Duch headed the S-21 prison
in Phnom Penh, where some
16,000 suspected enemies of the
regime were tortured before
being taken out and executed
on what later became known
as the "killing fields" near the
city. Only about a dozen pris-
oners are thought to have sur-
vived. The site is now the Tuol
Sleng Genocide Museum.
The judges' detention order,
posted on the tribunal's Web
site Wednesday, said Duch had
acknowledged that he headed
S-21 and was "ready to reveal
the crimes committed by the
Khmer Rouge."
It also cited prosecutors' alle-
gations that he presided over
abuses against civilians includ-
ing "arbitrary detention, tor-
ture and other inhumane acts,
(and) mass executions."
"He is implicated by many
documents and several wit-
nesses," the detention order
said.
The tribunal also announced
that one of the two lawyers
expected to defend Duch is
Francois Roux, a human rights
activist from France best
known for being on the defense
team of Zacarias Moussaoui, a
Moroccan-born Frenchman
convicted in the U.S. of con-
spiring to commit terrorism and
kill Americans in connection
with the Sept. 11, 2001 terror
attacks.


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Contact Ervin Knowles:
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I I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


I











Venezuelan court rules to keep anti-Chavez channel on cable for now


* CARACAS, Venezuela
VENEZUELA'S SuprCeme
Court ruled Wednesday that an
opposition-aligned TV channel
will remain on cable for now, act-
ing just hours before a govern-
ment-set deadline that could have
ranked it from the cable lineup,
(accordiiin to Associatid /Pres.
The Supreme ('Court of Justice
said in a statement that it sus-
pended the telecommunications
commission's order for Radio
Caracas Television and other cable
channels to register as national
producers, a category that would
require them to interrupt pro-
gramming to carry some of Presi-
dent Hugo Chavez's speeches.


W itli its ruling, the court l
\which s\\ selected by the (Cha\ ez-
donminaled National Asseibly -
defused a political standoff and
opened the way for it to consider
which cable and satellite channels
should be bound by rules requiring
domestic stations to transmit
govern ent-mandated pro gram--
ming.
RCTV, the country's oldest pri-
vate channel, began transmitting
by cable and satellite about six
weeks after Chavez forced the sta-
tion off the air by refusing to
renew its broadcast license, a
move that prompted protests by
opponents who called it a blow to
free expression.
ChavezAccuses the station of


supporting a 2002 coup that brieflh
removed him Irolml power land
insists fccldoln o el xpresslon is
respected in Venezuela.
RC'IV, which is fiercely critical
of Chavez, faced a midnight
Wednesday deadline to agiee to
carry Chavez's speeches or be
yanked from the cable lineup.
Wednesday's court decision gives
the station a temporary reprieve
but leaves it open to futuLre court
rulings.
RC'IV executive Marcel
Granier suggested the court deci-
sion was a way out of a difficult sit-
uation for the government.
"After they made the rules
against Radio Caracas, they real-
ized that they would have to bust


4 5 morecompanics," he
tIld the pl ivate chalannel Glohovi-
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IThIe Coulrt's constitutional


branch said it decided to take up
thle case, brolughl b\l cilbl\ andl
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THE TRIBUNE


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


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PROFESSOR Glen Hold-
en of the College of
Bahamas, has published an
article in the prestigious
Journal of Chemical Educa-
tion that breaks new ground
on a famous, centuries old
physical chemistry experi-
ment.
"If further evidence were
required to support our
belief that faculty members
at the College of the
Bahamas are among the
finest in the region, then we
need to look no further than
assistant professor of chem-
istry Glen Holden," said the
college in a statement.
Professor Holden's article,
The Determination of Heat
Capacity Ratios in a Simple
Open System, is based on his
working with the Clement
and Desormes experiment
that is used worldwide to
introduce students to the
first law of thermodynamics
and the way gases expand.
"'1 he experiment is one
,nial many universities have
in their laboratories,"
explained Professor Hold-
en, "and I planned to import
that experiment into one of
our labs in preparation for
one of our chemistry cours-
es. While I was doing that I
was looking at the way all
the theoretical explanations
had been interpreted and it
occurred to me that there


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* PROFESSOR Glen Holden


was quite a large disconnect
between the actual experi-
mental processes and the
theoretical treatment.
"Theoretically, the system
is treated as 'closed', which
means the top should never
come off the container. In
actual fact though, the top
does come off, the thermo-
dynamics change, so the sys-
tem is open."

Scientists
It is this different way of
treating the system that
gives Professor Holden his
original angle on the age-
old experiment, which
begins with pumping an
inert gas such as helium,
argon or carbon dioxide into
a large container until it is
full and sealing the vessel
with a cork so as to prevent
the escape of the gas. Next,
the pressure in the contain-
er is measured. The cork is
then removed for a very
short time, allowing for the
escape of some of the gas as
it expands. The cork is
replaced and the pressure is
measured again. Over the
years, however, scientists
have treated the experiment
theoretically as if the top
remained on.
Professor Holden now is
recognizing that since the
top is removed during the
test, the container must be
regarded as a leaky tank.
Consequently, the whole
apparatus and related exper-
iment must be regarded as


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an essentially open system.
"Treating it as closed ties
the experiment in beautiful-
ly with the first law of ther-
modynamics," said the pro-
fessor, "and it does a great
job of introducing the
expansion of gases, capacity
and ratio, constant pressure
and constant volume to the
students.
"It is very successful in
generating discussion in the
lecture theatre but my han-
dling of it, treating it as
open, allows us to extend it
beyond the first law to the
second law of thermody-
namics which is not normal-
ly possible. Nobody else has
done it.
"Interestingly, the results
of treating it as open or
closed are identical but the
important thing to note is
that an open treatment more
accurately reflects the actu-
al system used and the ther-
modynamics involved."
This is the first time Hold-
en has published in the Jour-
nal of Chemical Education
but he has published an arti-
cle in the Journal of Quan-
titative Spectroscropy and
Radiative Transfer, a jour-
nal whose articles focus on
the interaction between
radiation, electromagnetic
radiation, or light, as well as
particle radiation and mat-
ter.
Holden's article, co-
authored with Christopher
Essex from the University
of Western Ontario, was
entitled Radiative Entropy
Equilibrium.

Possibilities
"So, here is a College of
the Bahamas professor
whose original way of treat-
ing a well-tried and proven
experiment has led to hith-
erto unrecognised possibili-
ties in the teaching of intro-
ductory courses on thermo-
dynamics," said the college's
statement. "It is an exciting
addition to the world of
physical chemistry and the
sort of creative experimen-
tation we can look forward
to as the College faculty
engage in more research and
scholarship."
Professor Holden, a two
year veteran at COB, is him-
self is about to embark on
post graduate studies at the
University of Rhode Island
and hopes to gain his
PhD in the not too distant
future.
The impetus for Professor
Holden's opportunity at fur-
ther studies and research
has come from the Office of
Research, Graduate Pro-
grammes and International
Relations which established
memoranda of understand-
ing with the University of
Rhode Island last year and
has the promotion of faculty
research as one of its prima-
ry mandates.


I_





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THE TRIBUNE


The US Embassy donates four

computers to the Bahamas Red Cross
After-School Mentoring Programme


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 11

RDAIV I9


THE US Embassy present-
ed the Bahamas Red Cross
Baillou Hill Road facility with
four computers to assist with
its After-School Mentorine
Development Programme
The embassy responded to
an appeal from the Red Cross
for desktop computer systems
to foster the academic devel-
opment of children in that
community.
Prior to the donation, which
took place on Tuesday, the
after-school mentoring facility
was equipped with only one
computer that was used by
more than 30 students.
Now, with four additional
computers, the tour trained
instructors on staff will be bet-
ter equipped to teach basic
computer skills and assist with
homework for the students
that use the facility each day.
US Charge d'Affaires, Dr
Brent Hart, stated that the
embassy is pleased to be able
to assist the youth in such a
tangible way: "I hope the com-
puters will open new windows
of information for the young
people to support their acad-
emic development."
The embassy's information
systems specialists, Wesley
Kane and Bonita Johnson,
installed the four desktop
computer systems and noted
that it was both a wonderful
opportunity and a rewarding
experience to be able to
assist the Bahamas Red
Cross.
National youth officer at the
Bahamas Red Cross Mrs
Exanna Dormeus thanked the
Embassy for the computers.
"This presentation is very
important," she said. "The
computers will enhance the
knowledge the students need
in today's society. I am sure
we will see much growth and
academic development in the
programme."
Mrs Dromeus noted that
with the opening of the
2007/2008 academic school
year just a few weeks away,
the Bahamas Red Cross is still


-VI


/,


..





BAHAMAS Red Cross national youth officer. Exanna
Dormeus, looks on as Morgan Donathan, a community service
volunteer from St Andrew's High School uses one of the com-
puters donated by the US Embassy.


* SHOWS from left: Wesley Kane, systems administrator at
the US Embassy; Exanna Dormeus, national youth officer,
Bahamas Red Cross; Bonita Johnson, information systems officer,
US Embassy; Morgan Donathan, community service volunteer
from St Andrew's High School standing in front of the computers
donated by the US Embassy.


in need of additional items
such as school supplies, uni-
forms and snacks for its After-
School Mentoring Pro-


gramme. She said anyone
wishing to help should contact
her at the headquarters of the
Bahamas Red Cross.


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Airport union president
FROM page one
"He (Dyvwan Rodgers, lawyer for the AAAWU) spoke to Mr
Thompson Fayne Thompson representing Mr Bain and those on the
23rd and the 24th advising them that a key is here for Mr Bain. He is
to come to the office and receive his key," she said.
Therefore, Ms Harding continued, the suggestion that she is deny-
ing him access to the office is "baseless".
The locks were changed at the Worker's House office by Ms Hard-
ing after the removal of a union cheque book, and what Ms Harding has
termed as an unauthorised meeting by dissident members.
Claims by Mr Bain that the president distributed union funds to an
office administrator without the expressed consent of the executive, was
the basis for the removal of the book according to the Bain faction.
To this claim of improper spending, Ms Harding responded:
"It was in her agreement that her increases will be exactly what it is
for all Bahamasair employees. Whenever we receive an increase, the
office staff receive an increase also."
Based on the administrator's evaluation, Ms Harding continued,
she received a three per cent increase on July 6 when every other
Bahamasair employee received their increases.
Ms Harding also told.the media that she has made an official com-
plaint to the Carmichael Road police station over the removal of the
union's cheque book, which is now in the possession of Trustee Fredric-
ka Baker. according to Mr Bain.
Of the members who voted in the now contested special election, Ms
Harding told the media, 171 of the 180 voted for the removal of Mr
Bain's faction, and, she is unaware of why he and his group are unwill-
ing to have an election to clarify this dispute.
The union president emphasized that she has offered to step down
on two occasions to clear up the controversy in January and June -
but her members have refused to accept this move.
And, no official resignation was ever forwarded to the Department
of Labour. Ms Harding said.
Regarding the dispute over the $78,000 deposit Mr Bain's sworn affi-
davit alleges Ms Harding lost over the purchase of a building for the
union, lawyer for the AAAWU Donna Major reiterated that $39,000
has already been recovered.
While, she said, an ethics complaint to the Bahamas Bar Council has
been filed on behalf of the union against a party regarding the remain-
der of the money, which will be accompanied by a court action against
the same.

FROM page one
the NCTU," he added.
When asked if he will enforce a
timeline for the resignation, Mr
Pinder said "no". Rather, he said
that he intends to meet with Mr
Bain to discuss the matter.
When contacted by The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Bain said "yes", he
will step down.
"I don't have no qualms with
that. They (the NCTU) are not in
line with what the law is all about.
I'm not prepared to be a part of
,, any organisation that isn't prepared
s to conform to the law," he said,
adding that he intends to formally
: -leave the organisation shortly.
Mr Pinder in his remarks reject-
AX ed assertions by Mr Bain that he
4.4 has taken sides regarding the dis-
pute in the AAAWU, which has
captured headlines in recent weeks.
"The membership is behind the
ste r Form president." Mr Pi defs~a;pobirit-
ser Fo m ing out that he has advised Mr
ny, Birch) Bain to address his differences with
y Bichl the president at the board level.
"I was shocked to hear him try
to make it sound as though we
tavoured Nelerene. We didn't
favour Nelerene, we just tried to
represent the facts," he said.
Secretary General of the NCTU,
Robert Farquharson also respond-
ed to, Mr Bain's claims of bias
against the NCTU in a press
release.
Mr Farquharson, who too calls
on Mr Bain to "consider doing the


FROM page one

cerned (including) the officers who
are investigating, so that we can
have a review and an update on this
particular matter." He was confi-
Sdenthat-the investigation would
be concluded shortly, and speculat-
ed that results would be released
as early as next week.
The commissioner also contra-
dicted reports circulating that the
accused officers were still perform-
ing their duties stating: "The two
officers involved have both been
sent on administrative leave... until
further notice."
"The complaints unit along with
the criminal investigations depart-
ment are looking into this matter,"
he added. In response to claims
made in another daily that the inter-
national human rights advocacy
group, Amnesty International, was
contemplating launching an inde-
pendent investigation into the case,
the Commissioner said he was not
made aware of that fact by
Desmond's family.
"Every citizen has a right to
make a complaint, wherever, but
as far as the police complaints are
concerned, (they) are conducted
very openly and transparently," he
answered. "The chips will fall as
may, there is not any cover up, no
hiding for those (officers) who want
to go outside the law."
While the grieving family of the
victim is now claiming that the
Complaints and Corruptions Unit is
"dragging its feet" in its investiga-
tion, Asst. Commissioner Juanita
Colebrooke denied that assertion.
"The investigation is being done

NCTUI
honourable thing" that is, step-
ping down from his post in the
NCTU explained that his organ-
isation only became involved in
the affairs of the AAAWU in Jan-
uary after the union's president
and executive officers invited the
NCTU to mediate an internal dis-
pute.
A special committee was set up,
headed by Mr Pinder, Mr Far-
quharson said, and it was deter-
mined that the conflict resulted
from inexperience and ignorance
of some executives regarding the
operating procedures of a union
and deficiencies in the constitution
of the AAAWU, which in some
cases, conflicted with the Industri-
al Relations Act. Mr Farquharson
the NC'U made its recommenda-
tions to help resolve the dispute,
and-said that Mr Bain in February
pledged to work with Ms Harding.
Yet, relations broke down some-
time between March and May of
this year, Mr Farquharson added,
to the point that "members" of the
AAAW,U called a meeting to
potentially recall some, or all, of
the executive of the union the
validity of this election is now
before the courts.
"The NCTU regards this mat-
ter as internal to the AAAWU and
acted in an advisory, consultative
role and will continue to act in an
independent manner to parties,"
he said.


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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


Police officers
expeditiously." Ms. Colebrooke,
officer-in-charge of the Complaints
and Corruptions Unit, said on
Wednesday. She echoed statements
of Commissioner Farquharson, and
told The Tribune that the investi-
gation would be "impartial" and
"unbiased."
As reported previously by The
Tribune, the family of the alleged
victim claimed that on Father's Day,
June 17,2007, Desmond was arrest-
ed for a traffic obstruction, charged
and placed in custody at the Grove
Police Station. He was then "beaten
by an officer in his cell" and
knocked unconscious, his family
said.
The day after the alleged attack,
Desmond was rushed by ambulance
to Princess Margaret Hospital,
where he remains unconscious in
the intensive care unit. According to
* another daily, Desmond is now
"brain dead" however The Tribune
was unable to verify these reports.
The Tribune visited Desmond in
the intensive care unit yesterday,
where he lay unconscious, the right
side of his face slightly swollen, his
body looking very thin. While med-
ical personnel would not reveal any
specific information on his case,
they did say that his situation was
"very ill."

Income
FROM page one
S&P forecast yesterday that eco-
nomic growth was expected to "pick
up and stabilise" at 4 per cent over
the next three to five years, due to
tourism industry investment that
totalled more than $10 billion.
The Wall Street credit rating
agency added that increased rev-
enues, coupled with contained pub-
lic spending, was expected to cause
the "general government debt" to
decline from 38 per cent of gross
domestic product (GDP) in 2006 to
35 per cent in 2010. The only con-
cern, S&P said, was the Bahamian
economy's vulnerability to external
shocks, such as hurricanes and Sep-
tember 11-type events. The US econ-
omy's performance was also critical
for the Bahamian tourism industry.
Still, S&P added that the tourism-
related 'foreign direct investment
capital inflows would boost activity
in other areas of the Bahamian econ-
omy, improving the Government's
finance and this nation's trade bal-
ance.
Olga Kalinina, the S&P analyst
who wrote the report on the
Bahamas, said in a statement:
"While widening external current
account deficits currently reflect high
import requirements and temporar-
ily dislocated tourism capacities,
Standard & Poor's believes that pru-
dent monetary management and sol-
id foreign direct investment inflows
should support the relative stability
of international reserves.
"Similarly, the commitment to a
disciplined fiscal stance should miti-
gate possible capital spending pres-
sures and ensure a gradual decline in
debt ratios."


I









THEAL TBTRA


'I
'U


Either iwa," he said, it comes '
as an insult to the residents
man\ of \ hom had already
supported Mrs Maynard-Gib- 0 ALLYSON
son at the polls. MAYNARD-GIBSON
Reportedly little thought
appeared to ha ie been put into choosing the 266 names
that were chosen by Mrs Maynard-Gibson's election team
to be challenged in election court.
Not only is the list reportedly littered with PLP sup-
porters, but sources claim that it also featured a lady who
worked for the former MP's campaign team by cooking
food for the staff at headquarters.
"These are well known people who live in the area,
whose names they just picked like that. It seems like they
just picked them at random based on the information we
are gathering," another source said.
It has also been reported that the legal team retained to
investigate the cases has advised that the former MP's
chances of winning her challenges at an election court
stands "a snowball's chance in Hell."


FROM page one
as "extraordinary", Sir Jack's
lawyer, Gregory Moss, excused
himself before proceedings began
after his request for an adjournment
was not granted.
Mr Moss had requested the
adjournment because Sir Jack was
experiencing medical problems and
was unable to fly to Nassau from
London.
However in her ruling, Justice
Allen said there were a number of
reasons why that request could not
be granted.
"Having considered the evidence
and the submissions of counsel, I
am of the view, firstly, that we have
arrived at this point because of the
conduct of the first defendant (Sir
Jack) in not making a sufficient
effort to comply with the directions
of the court for trial of this matter.
The first defendant has not com-
pleted discovery. not agreed a state-
ment of facts and issues, or filed
one of his own," Justice Allen said.
She also rejected the claim that
Mr Moss would not be able to prop-
erly consult with his client while he
remained in England.
"Surely in this age of mass com-
munication it would not be difficult
for counsel to obtain any further
instructions he needed from his
client by telephone. e-mail or fac-
simile," she added.
Justice Allen said she had to take
into account the fact that other
elderly witnesses had travelled from
aboard to testify, and that an
adjournment would, be unfair to
them.
"Fourthly, as I have said time
and time again, this matter is of
great importance to the public and
needs to be heard urgently to bring
an end to this very contentious mat-
ter and return some stability to
Freeport," Justice Allen ruled on
the adjournment application.
She added that the court's cal-
endar was full, and that to accom-
modate the first adjournment she


'Extraordin
had to displace other ma
medical report from the cc
cardiologist had been sub
the court either.
After hearing Justice A
ing, Mr Moss said he ha(
tions from his client not ti
in the matter and asked
minute recess to leave t
room.
The St George estate's
Fred Smith, argued that th
a complete contempt, co
how gracious the court ha
Justice Allen said it wa
dinary, but granted a rece
Moss left, saying that he
disrespect or discourtesy
merely acting on the instri
his client.
The trial then began w
ing statements by Harve
QC, who said the plaintif
ed to prove through the r
dividend payments and
money of witnesses that bot
and Mr St George were 5
ners, and not 75/25 as is cl
Sir Jack.
The first witness called
de la Rue, who served as
director and chief financial
Fiduciary Management S
company that looked after
ests of the two families.
Mr de la Rue said
received notice from the t'
1982 they came to an ag
whereby Mr St George's i
Intercontinental Diversit
portion, the holding con
the GBPA, would be exp
an equal partnership and e
of shares. Mr De la Rue a
the men put the agreement
ing, which he said they did
Sir Jack has since said h
recollection of the agreed
Mr de la Rue also test
the men had a very inform
of conducting business agr
Following the agree
divide the shares equally,


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FROM page one
dispatched b\ my company. and neither was
the pilot a metlher ol the stall ol Lcaii
Leair had nolhine at all to do with the flight,
Mr Brown said.
He explained that the aircralt used to be
owned by Leair hut \\ais sold to a new owner
on July 17. 2007.
"1 have in mi\ possession a bill of sale cov-
ering this transactions, Mr B13iown added.
"Accidents cai happen to anybody and air-
lines serving the public must he accountable
when they do.. However, in this case, Leair
has no responsibility and it may be damaging
to us to have the public believe otherwise," his
statement said.
It was also revealed yesterday that despite
the claims made on ZNS TV no looting
occurred at the crash site of the twin engine
Cessna on Tuesday evening.
Admitting th he had heard similar reports,
Chief Superintendent of Police Hulan Hanna
told The Tribune yesterday that the police
have no evidence to corroborate such claims.
He said he could not comment further on
the matter.

l Rue said both parties had a total
ary of 1,735.143 shares cach in IDC.
When it came to FMS, he himself
matters. No held one share as nominee because
consult and there was an uneven number, Sir
omitted to Jack and Mr St George each own-
ing 499 shares.
Jlen's rul- The ownership of FMS rested
d instruc- between the three men, and in 2006
o proceed Mr de la Rue said Sir Jack contact-
for a five ed him and asked if he.would sign
he court- the one share he held as nominee
over to him, which he did. He noted
attorney, that there was some urgency in Sir
is showed Jack's request.
nsidering Mr De la Rue said that in all of
ad been. his dealings with Sir Jack and Mr St
s extraor- George, neither man acted like it
ss and Mr was anything other than a 50/50
meant no partnership.
, but was
actions of
'ith open-
ey Tynes.
fs intend-
records of
the testi-
h Sir Jack
0/50 part-
laimed by
was Don
a former
officer of
services. a
the inter-
he had
wo that in .
reenment,
fied Cor-
npany for
)anded to..
qual spilt
nt in writ-
Salthough
[e has no
uent. ,
ified that ,, .
rmal way
reements... r -
ment to
Mr De la


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


i'M=


6::1












UN chief visits Haiti



amid peacekeepers'



'Pia evolving police role
iaB^^^^H^^^^^^ ^-f, 'HafB ^^^ i^^^^^-^l~f^I^"^


* UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, shakes hands with Commander of the United Nations
Stabilization Mission in Haiti, Brazilian Army Maj Gen Carlos Alberto Dos Santos Cruz at a UN
base in Port-au-Prince on Wednesday. Ban Ki-moon is for the first time in Haiti to observe a UN
force that is transitioning from a military to a policing role.
(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)


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THREE years after arriving
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vided breathing room for a
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UN Secretary-General Ban
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observe a UN force that is tran-
sitioning from a military to a
policing role one that officials
say is essential to maintaining


peace as this impoverished
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The senior UN envoy to Haiti
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"An early withdrawal right
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Ban was greeted by President
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airport.
Ban's 24-hour trip comes as
the UN Security Council pre-


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pares to renew the Haiti man-
date in October. Ban is expect-
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On Thursday, Ban will visit
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Mulet, a Guatemalan who on
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secretary-general for peacekeep-
ing operations, said the UN mis-
sion hopes to use more civilian
police than soldiers but is ham-
pered by a world shortage of
trained, French-speaking officers.
The peacekeepers provide 85
per cent of Haiti's security
needs, but the government is
working to eventually take over.
The national police academy is
pumping out hundreds of
recruits to bolster the nation's
6,000-police force.
"We don't foresee a return
to banditry and criminality,"
said Alix Fils-Aime, one of
Preval's top security advisers.
"The criminals know that the
balance of power has changed."
While the improved climate
has raised hopes that Haiti may
finally escape a long cycle of
misery, officials say gangs, drug
traffickers and chronic poverty
still pose a threat and that UN
troops will be needed at least
until Preval's term ends in 2011.


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THE TRIBUNE






.... 2007, PAGE 15


THE TRIBUNE_


Bahamas First General Insurance Company to


showcase 'Bahamas at Play' in 2008 Calendar


BAHAMAS First Gener-
al Insurance Company Ltd
awarded the winners of
their photo competition for
the 2008 calendar
'Bahamas at Play'.
The calendar will be part
of their 25th anniversary
celebrations for next year,
the company said in a
statement.
"The Bahamas at Play
calendar will feature stun-
ning native scenes captured
by artistic and creative
individuals who have a
keen eye for photography,"
it said.
Out of 200 photographs,
14 were named winners.
Four of the winners were
fortunate enough to have
two of their photos chosen
for the 2008 calendar.
The winners were: Melis-
sa Maura, Linda Huber,
Jessica Robertson, Maria
Gonzalez-Graves, Dahalia
Smith, Olga Stokes,
Roland Rose, Shan Elliott,
Craig Lenihan and John
Snyder.
President and CEO of
Bahamas First General
Insurance Company
Patrick Ward said the
theme of the calendar
"reveals the essence of
Bahamians doing the
things they like to do best."

Ceremony
At a brief congratulatory
ceremony held for the win-
ners last week Wednesday,
a slide show of the winning
entries was viewed by invit-
ed guests.
Mr Ward congratulated
the winners and presented
them with a $500 cheque
per photograph.
He also took the oppor-
tunity to share a brief his-
tory of the company, and
its development. "The
company has grown enor-
mously in 25 years. When
you look at the success sto-
ries of commercial enter-
prises in the Bahamas;
Bahamas First ranks at the
very top, in terms of those
companies that have come
from humble beginnings
to the kind of public
stature and prominence in
the market place that we
currently represent," he
said.
Melissa Maura, a winner,
only found out about the
contest a few weeks before
the deadline. She took pho-
tos from a portfolio of pic-
tures in Elbow Cay, Aba-
co.
"I was completely
delighted and thrilled to
bits that I am a winner -
especially because my sub-
missions came right before


t


~ t-.


BAHAMAS First General Insurance Company Ltd congratulated the winners of the photo calendar competition. The calendar entitled 'Bahamas at Play' captures vivid scenes
of the Bahamas. From left to right (seated): Pauline Ward, chairperson of the 25th Anniversary Committee; Patrick Ward, president and CEO of Bahamas First General Insurance
Company and Val Darville, 25th Anniversary Committee member. Standing: Melissa Maura, Linda Huber, Maria Gonzalez-Graves, Jessica Robertson; Anette, McSweeney, 25th
Anniversary committee member; Deborah McKinney, 25th Anniversary Committee member; Dahalia Smith, Olga Stokes and Roland Rose.
(Photo by: Terrance Strachan)


w


* ABOVE: Jessica Robertson smiled for the camera as she
accepted her prize from Patrick Ward, President and CEO of
Bahamas First General Insurance Company Ltd.
(Photo by: Terrance Strachan)
ABOVE RIGHT: Melissa Maura gladly accepted her prize
from Patrick Ward, President and CEO of Bahamas First Gen-
eral Insurance Company ltd.


the deadline," she said.
Dahalia Smith entered a
photograph she took in
Cupid's Cay, Governor's
Harbour.
"When I saw the compe-
tition I just knew right
away where I was going to
go to take my photos. I
headed to Cupid's Cay and
I saw some boys jumping


(Photo By: Terrance Strachan)


off the dock and I thought
that would be an ideal pho-
to, so I seized the oppor-
tunity," she said.
Bahamas First's 25th
anniversary is marked in
the company's calendar of
events as a very important
milestone and will be cele-
brated in grand style next
year, the company said.


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THE TRIBUNE


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NASA up against clock as



Sit scrambles to fix cabin


leak, bad thermostat



aboard Endeavour


SPACE shuttle Endeavour STS-118 crew, from left, mission specialist Rick Mastracchio, pilot
Charles Hobaugh, mission specialists Barbara Morgan and Tracy Caldwell, Canadian Space Agency
astronaut Dave Williams, mission specialist Alvin Drew Jr. and commander Scott Kelly, front right,
leave the Operation and Check-out Building en route to training exercises at launch pad 39a at the
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, July 19,2007. The launch of the Endeav-
our is scheduled for Aug. 7.
(AP Photo/John Raoux)


* CAPE CANAVERAL,
Fla.
With a launch countdown
looming, NASA scrambled
to fix a cabin leak and a
bad thermostat aboard
space shuttle Endeavour
on Wednesday, according
to Associated Press.
The leak was traced
overnight to one of two
pressure-relief valves in
Endeavour's crew cabin,
located behind the toilet
but separate from the bath-
room plumbing, said
NASA spokesman George
Diller.
Engineers likely will
replace the bad valve with
one taken from Atlantis,
but a firm decision has yet
to be made, he said.
A problem with one of
two thermostats for one of
Endeavour's auxiliary pow-


er units also cropped up.
Both thermostats will be
replaced, Diller said. These
units generate power for
the shuttle's crucial
hydraulic systems.
All this extra work can
be completed in time for
Endeavour's planned liftoff
Tuesday, Diller said, but it
will be tight and anything
else -- like more thunder-
storms or mechanical prob-
lems could force NASA
to postpone the flight to
the international space sta-
tion.
Storms already inter-
rupted work at the shuttle
launch pad and forced a
one-day postponement for
the launch of NASA's
Mars lander, Phoenix,
now scheduled for Satur-
day.
The shuttle countdown is
expected to begin on time


Saturday night, and man-
agers will assess the work-
load on Sunday and decide
whether a Tuesday launch
is still achievable, Diller
said.
Phoenix may factor into
that decision. NASA has
only three weeks to launch
the Mars lander before
standing down for two
years, and officials may
decide to put Phoenix
ahead of Endeavour.
NASA needs at least two
days between launch
attempts for the lander and
the shuttle.
Endeavour will carry
Barbara Morgan, a school-
teacher-turned-astronaut
who was Christa McAulif-
fe's backup in 1986.
McAuliffe was aboard
the Challenger when it
broke apart shortly after
liftoff.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 17


THE TRIBUNE







PAGE 18 THURSAY, AUGSTE2,A007OTHETRIBUN


Russia's mission



to claim Arctic



sea bed set to



& reach North Pole


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* MOSCOW
AN EXPEDITION aimed at,
strengthening Russia's claim to
much of oil and gas wealth
beneath the Arctic Ocean
reached the North Pole on
Wednesday, and preparations
immediately began for two
mini-submarines to drop a cap-
sule containing a Russian flag
to the sea floor, according to
Associated Press.
The Rossiya icebreaker had
plowed a path to the pole
through an unbroken sheet of
multiyear ice, clearing the way
for the Akademik Fedorov
research ship to follow, said
Sergei Balyasnikov, a
spokesman for the Arctic and
Antarctic research institute that
prepared the expedition.
"For the first time in history
people will go down to the sea
bed under the North Pole,"
Balyasnikov told The Associat-
ed Press. "It's like putting flag
on the moon."
In the coming hours, Russian
scientists hope to dive in two
mini-submarines beneath the
pole to a depth of more than
13,200 feet,, and drop a metal
capsule containing the Russian
flag on the sea bed.
Balyasnikov said the dive was


Icebreaker clears the

way for research ship


expected to start on Thursday
morning and last for several
hours.
The voyage, led by noted
polar explorer and Russian leg-
islator Artur Chilingarov, has
some scientific goals, including
the study of Arctic plants and
animals. But its chief goal
appears to be advancing Russi-
a's political and economic influ-
ence by strengthening its legal
claims to the gas and oil
deposits thought to lie beneath
the Arctic sea floor.
The symbolic gesture, along
with geologic data being gath-
ered by expedition scientists, is
intended to prop up Moscow's
claims to more than 460,000
square miles of the Arctic shelf
- which by some estimates may
contain 10 billion tons of oil and
gas deposits.
The expedition reflects an
intense rivalry between Russia,
the United States, Canada and


other nations whose shores face
the northern polar ocean for the
Arctic's icebound riches.
About 100 scientists aboard
the Akademik Fyodorov are
looking for evidence that the
Lomonosov Ridge a 1,240-
mile underwater mountain
range that crosses the polar
region is a geologic exten-
sion of Russia, and therefore
can be claimed by it under the
U.N. Convention on the Law of
the Sea.
The subs will collect speci-
mens of Arctic plants and ani-
mals and videotape the dives.
The biggest challenge, scien-
tists say, will be for the mini-
sub crews to return to their
original point of departure to
avoid being trapped under a
thick ice crust.
"They have all the necessary
navigation equipment to ensure
safety," Balyasnikov said.
Denmark hopes to prove that
the Lomonosov Ridge is an
extension of the Danish terri-
tory of Greenland, not Russia.
Canada, meanwhile, plans to
spend $7 billion to build and
operate up to eight Arctic
patrol ships in a bid to help pro-
tect its sovereignty.
The U.S. Congress is consid-
ering an $8.7 billion budget
reauthorization bill for the U.S.
Coast Guard that includes 72.96
million to operate and maintain
the nation's three existing polar
icebreakers.
The bill also authorizes the
Coast Guard to construct two
new vessels.


A D U D D




July 1st August 31st, 2007

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


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PAGE 20. THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


INERATONL EW


Saudis will consider attending



US-backed Mideast peace



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SAUDI Arabia said Wednes-
day it would seriously consider
attending a Middle East peace
conference proposed by the
Bush administration for later
this year, as Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice began laying
the ground work for the region-
al meeting, according to Asso-
ciated Press.
The proposed gathering is
intended to revive the peace
process and would include
Israel, the Palestinians and
Arab states viewed as moder-
ate by the United States.
Speaking during a rare joint


visit by Rice and Defense Sec-
retary Robert Gates in Jeddah,
Saudi Foreign Minister Prince
Saud al-Faisal said his govern-
ment would "look very closely
and very hard at attending" if
the conference dealt with
"issues of real substance, not
form."
Saud also said Saudi Arabia
would explore opening diplo-
matic relations with the Shiite-
led government in Iraq, an
endorsement long sought by
Washington.
Saudi Arabia's Sunni rulers
have had frosty relations with
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki's government and has
not hidden its suspicions that
al-Maliki does not have the
interests of Iraq's Sunni minor-
ity at heart.

Breakthrough
A meeting between Israeli
and Saudi representatives
would be a major diplomatic
breakthrough. Though Israel
and Saudi Arabia are both U.S.
allies, representatives of the
countries have never officially
met and Saudi Arabia has nev-
er recognized the Jewish state.
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud
Olmert's office said in a state-
ment Wednesday that Israel
hopes "many Arab countries
will attend this international
meeting, including Saudi Ara-
bia."
At a news conference with
Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi
Livni in Jerusalem later
Wednesday, Rice said she was
"encouraged by the attitude
that I have seen here among all
of the parties about the
prospects of this international
meeting."
However, Rice said in
response to a question about
Saudi participation, "I think it's
too early ... to issue invitations
and certainly too early to expect


people to say whether they will
attend."
Rice's visit to Israel and the
Palestinian territories, part of a
wider tour of the U.S.'s region-
al allies, is her first since the
Islamic group Hamas seized
control of the Gaza Strip in
mid-June. Since then, Palestin-
ian President Mahmoud Abbas
has run the West Bank with a
moderate government led by
his Fatah movement, and has
won broad international back-
ing while Hamas remains large-
ly isolated.
Olmert's office said a region-
al peace conference would also
be able to "grant an umbrella to
the bilateral talks between
Israel and the Palestinians."
Before his meeting with Rice,
Israel's ceremonial president,
Shimon Peres, invited President
Bush to visit Israel during its
60th anniversary celebrations
next year, saying "I truly hope
we shall celebrate it in an
atmosphere of peace."
Rice meets with Israeli lead-
ers in Jerusalem on Wednesday
and with leaders of Abbas'
U.S.-backed Palestinian gov-
ernment in the West Bank on
Thursday.
The Hamas takeover in Gaza
has spurred a flurry of peace-
making efforts in the past
month aimed at shoring up
Palestinian moderates, includ-
ing a first visit to the region by
international Mideast peace
envoy Tony Blair and an
unprecedented visit to Israel by
a delegation from the 22-nation
Arab League. That delegation
urged Israel to accept an Arab
plan offering peace in return for
a withdrawal from all land cap-
tured in the 1967 Mideast War.
Further helping the mood of
conciliation are the fears in
moderate Arab states about the
influence of Hamas' hardline
backers in Iran and about al-
Qaida's brand of extremist
Islam.


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Israel has carried out several
gestures to bolster Abbas,
including renewing the transfer
of millions of dollars in taxes
collected from Palestinians and
releasing several hundred Pales-
tinian prisoners from Israeli
jails.
Bush's July 16 announcement
of a Mideast conference was
meant to build on the new
momentum and work toward
the establishment of a Palestin-
ian state.
Palestinian officials said it was
time to move from gestures to
discussing the core issues of the
conflict the borders of the
future Palestinian state, the sta-
tus of Jerusalem and the fate of
Palestinian refugees who lost
their homes in the fighting that
followed Israel's creation in
1948.

Topic
"The main topic will be the
political negotiations," Pales-
tinian negotiator Saeb Erekat
said of Rice's upcoming meet-
ings with Abbas and Palestin-
ian Prime Minister Salam
Fayyad. "We don't want a new
initiative."
Besides Livni and Peres, Rice
is scheduled to meet Wednes-
day with Olmert and Defense
Minister Ehud Barak.
In Rice's meeting with Barak,
the two are slated to discuss
American plans for a major
arms sale to Gulf Arab states,
including Saudi Arabia, and a
parallel boost in defense aid to
Israel, Israeli defense officials
said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because they were
not authorized to talk to the
press.
Israel loudly opposed such
arms sales in the past but has
offered no resistance this time,
saying the weapons were need-
ed to offset Iran's military
strength.


YOUR CONNECT. C 10f THE WORLD


TENDER

GRAPHIC ARTIST SERVICES
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite tenders from
experienced companies to provide design and graphical artwork for the production of the
2008 Telephone Directories.

Interested companies may pick up a specification document from BTC's Directory
Publications Department, located in the Summerwinds Plaza, Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway, between the hours of 9:00 am to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday.

Bids are to be marked, "Tender For Graphic Artist Services" and delivered by 4:00 p.m.
August 8th, 2007 to the attention of:

Mr. Leon Williams
President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, The Bahamas.


I, .


I












Sirens wail, flags fly to mark anniversary



of the doomed Warsaw Uprising


* WARSAW, Poland_
SIRENS wailed Wednesday
across Warsaw,iand other Polish
cities rebuilt from the ashes of
World War 1 to mark the 63rd
anniversary of Warsaw residents'
doomed revolt against their Nazi
occupiers, according to Associated
Press.
Traffic in Warsaw came to a
standstill. People stood silent as
sirens began wailing at 5:00 p.m.


(1500GMT) the exact hour when,
on August 1, 1944. citizens and
members of the Polish resistance
launched their insurgency against
the five-year Nazi occupation.
From lampposts and balconies,
the national and city banners -
Poland's flag white and red flag,
Warsaw's red and yellow flut-
tered in the summer breeze.
At the Powazki military ceme-
tery, Prime Minister Jaroslaw
Kaczynski and President Lech


Kaczynski stood with their mother,
Jadwiga Kaczynska, and first lady
Maria Kaczynska for a ceremony
that included a prayer, wreath-lay-
ing and the rat-a-tat of a military
drum.
Earlier in the day, elderly vet-
erans of the uprising, their medals
gleaming, gathered near the Tomb
of the Unknown Soldier to watch
Prime Minister Kaczynski, Mayor
Hanna Gronkiewcz-Waltz and oth-
er dignitaries lay wreaths.


POLES bow their heads in a minute of silence in front of the monument to the Warsaw Upris-
ing as sirens wail to mark the 63rd anniversary of Warsaw's doomed World War II revolt against its
Nazi occupiers in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2007. Some 250,000 Poles died in the 63-day
struggle against German troops that saw fierce fighting in the capital's streets and much of the city
destroyed. .
(AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)




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Good writing and communication skills
Strong computer skills
Willing to travel within The Bahamas
First Aid and CPR certification
Camping experience a definite plus


Benefits include competitive salary commensurate with
qualifications and experience, and group medical insurance.
r
Applications must include cover letter, resume, writing sample,
and three letters of reference. Applications should be mailed
to Bahamas National Trust, Human Resources Manager, P.O.
Box N 4105 or email:bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org by
August 24, 2007.


HOME AND APARTMENT PACKAGES
0% OR 5% DOWN

If you are now at the bank or somewhere else, stop, do not commit.
"Talk it over with us first."

THE DIFFERENCE
First ever in the history of The Bahamas, Legal Fees for both mortgages
and conveyance at 1 3/4 percent to make it easier for you to qualify or
start construction on you building.

We have only 9 lots left with infrastructure. Packages starting at
$148,800. In some cases even less. (A NEW DIRECTION)

A PLUS: THOSE PERSONS WITH APPROVED PLANS LET US
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WE ARE EXCITED TO NOW REVOLUTIONIZE THE HOUSING
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"Value for Money "Quali&t Product"
MR. MUCAN DAWKINS/CHAIRMAN


- L --


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 21


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 200.


Cockpit recorder reveals pilots'




terror in Brazil plane crash


C2qid (cs Iurati &
iv r l ic 6


26t4


Pastor, Rev. Sherelle L. Saunders


7'hursday, 7:30 pm
Speaker:
Apostle C. Clifford Smith III
Southside Christian
Alinistries International
Friday, 7:30 pm
Speaker:
Pastor Roy Burrows
Vision of 'Hope
Church of God In Christ
Saturday, 7:00 am
"FUN RUN WALK"
In memory of
The Late,
?ev. Dr. Austin E. Saunders
Sunday, 11:00 am
Speaker: Bro. Jack Thompson


For Al Life'sRIoad


The 2007 Chevrolet


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Taking you where 'ou want to go.



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* RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil
THE pilots of doomed TAM
Airlines Flight 3054 screamed
"slow down!" and "turn, turn,
turn!" seconds before their
Airbus A320 skidded off the
runway in Sao Paulo and
slammed into a building last
month, flight recorder tran-
scripts revealed Wednesday,
according to Associated Press.
According to transcripts
read before a congressional
commission investigating air
safety in Brazil, the pilots were


unable to activate the spoilers
- aerodynamic brakes on the
plane's wings as it sped
down the short, rain-slicked
runway.
"Spoiler nothing," one pilot
says, giving the first indication
that something is wrong. "Slow
down, slow down, slow down."
The other pilot replies: "I
can't. Oh mny God!"
The last words heard in the
cockpit were: "Turn, turn,
turn! Oh no!" followed by
screams and the sound of two
explosions.


I


YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD



TENDER NOTICE




The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC) is
pleased to invite Tenders to provide BTC with Trenching and
Duct Laying Service.

Interested companies may collect a Tender Package from the
Security Desk located in the Administrative Building, BTC John
F. Kennedy Drive, between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm
Monday through Friday.

The deadline for submission of all tenders is on or before Friday
August 3rd, 2007 at 5pm. Tenders should be sealed and
marked "TENDER FOR TRENCHING AND DUCT
LAYING" and should be delivered to the attention of Mr. Leon
Williams, President & CEO BTC.

BTC reserves the right to reject any, or all Tenders


The American Embassy is presently considering
applications for the following position:

PROCUREMENT CLERK
Serves in a mixed position with 90% of duties as
Procurement Clerk and 10% as a Mail Room Clerk.
This position is open to candidates with the following
qualifications:
A high school diploma
Two years of administrative/clerical skills.
Must have a good working knowledge of
Microsoft
Word; Excel; database maintenance and
standard office routines and practices.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:
Must have excellent customer service skills
and highly developed management and
organization skills.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:
The successful candidate will be offered an
excellent compensation package including
performance-based incentives, medical and
dental insurance, life insurance, pension, and
opportunities for training and development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S.
citizens who are eligible for employment under
Bahamian laws and regulations.

Applications forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday at the security area
of the American Embassy, Queen Street. Completed
applications should be returned to the Embassy;
addressed to the Human Resources Office no later
than Thursday, August 16, 2007.


I


The July 17 crash at Con-
gonhas airport killed all 187
aboard the jetliner and 12 peo-
ple on the ground in Brazil's
deadliest air disaster.
Brazilian daily Folha de S.
Paulo reported that according
to the flight data recorder, one
of the plane's throttles was in
the wrong position as it
touched down, causing it to
speed up instead of slow down.
The congressional commis-
sion did not review the data
recorder information publicly,
but seemed to acknowledge
the report's accuracy by dis-
cussing how the information
was leaked.
According to the cockpit
transcript, one of the pilots
asked about conditions on the
runway shortly before landing
and was told: "wet and slip-
pery."
Soon after the crash, some
speculated that the runway,
which is short and notoriously
slick in rainy weather, con-
tributed to the crash.
But the airline also has
acknowledged that one of the
jet's thrust reversers, used for
braking, was broken and had
been deactivated prior to the
crash.
The flight recorder showed
the pilots were aware they had
only one functioning thrust
reverser something that is
not usually a problem.
Video footage of the plane
landing showed it speeding
down the runway more than
three times faster than other
planes.
Folha speculated that an
incorrect throttle position
could have fooled the plane's
computer system into antici-
pating that the pilot was try-
ing to take off again, automat-
ically disabling the spoilers.
"There are signs that this
happened," Brazilian aviation
consultant Elias Gedeon said
when asked about Folha's
hypothesis. "But we can't say
100 percent this was the prob-
lem."
A finding that pilot error or
mechanical failure was respon-
sible would likely ease criti-
cism of the government, which
has been widely accused of
failing to address Brazil's avi-
ation woes after a Gol jetliner
went down in the Amazon last
September, killing 154 people.
That crash touched off
months of work stoppages and
slowdowns by air traffic con-
trollers, who complained
of dangerous working condi-
tions.
The runway at Congonhas
had been shut earlier this year
for renovations, but was
opened before it could be
grooved a process that helps
water run off and provides bet-
ter traction in rain.


. ....1 l .i.l.


INTERNATIONAL NEWS


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 23


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


INERAIONL EW


China to step up inspection of fish farms in




crackdown on illegal use of drugs, chemicals


A^ 2.. .- .


A FRIENDLY REMINDER

MASS DISCONNECTION EXERCISES

IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

From August 2nd to August 9th
East and West Bay Streets, Paradise Island, Eastern, Kemp,
Parkgate, Village and Soldier Roads, Village and Dannottage
Estates, Hibury Park, Prince Charles Drive, Seabreeze and
College Gardens. East Street north of Wulff Road to Blue Hill
Road including all side streets. Montel Heights, Ridgeland
Park East and West, Garden Hills #1 and 2, Kennedy Sub,
Nassau Street, Chippingham, Boyd Subdivision, Farrington
-Road, Warren and Davis Streets.


PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon
or the'Main Post Office.

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* BEIJING
CHINA said Wednesday
it will inspect fish farms
across the country to guard
against use of illegal drugs
and chemicals, but insisted
the majority of its seafood
products were safe, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
The move, part of Bei-
jing's latest efforts to woo
back international cus-
tomers after a series of
safety scares, comes as a
team of U.S. health officials
met with Chinese officials
to discuss stricter controls
on food and drug trade and
increasing cooperation to
improve product safety.
Beijing has said the talks,
led by U.S. Health and
Human Services official
Rich McKeown, will also
focus on a U.S. block of
Chinese catfish, basa, dace,
shrimp and eel after repeat-
ed testing turned up conta-
mination by drugs that have
not been approved in the
United States for farmed
seafood.

Measures
Besides inspections, the
new measures will include
the blacklisting of violators
and better education and
training for producers, the
state-run China Daily news-
paper reported, citing Chen
Yide, vice-director of the
Ministry of Agriculture's
fisheries bureau.
Chen blamed drug
residues found in seafood
on unscrupulous producers
and repeated Beijing's
stance that U.S. restrictions
on the five types of seafood
were "indiscriminate" and
"unacceptable."
"It's against the rules of
the World Trade Organiza-
tion to block all products
for problems found in indi-
vidual products," he was
quoted as saying.
He added that 95 percent
of Chinese aquatic products
met food safety standards,
with a higher percentage of
export products qualifying
because of tougher inspec-
tion regulations. He did not
specify that percentage.
International worries
about Chinese exports have
been mounting since a pet


food ingredient from Chi-
na was blamed in the deaths
of cats and dogs in North
America, triggering recalls
and bans around the world.
U.S. Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson, who ended
two days of trade talks with
Chinese leaders in Beijing
on Wednesday, said his dis-
cussions touched on con-
sumer product safety and
food safety but he gave no
details.
In the past two weeks, the
U.S. Consumer Product
Safety Commission has
recalled six Chinese-made
products, from Easy-Bake
ovens, whose doors trapped
dozens of children's fingers
or burned them, to remote
control airplanes that can
potentially explode.
While the Chinese gov-
ernment was initially leery
of acknowledging its ongo-
ing problems with food and
drug safety, it has since
announced new measures,
regulations and inspections
almost daily.
A regulation introduced
Tuesday in Beijing will hold
district and county govern-
ments in the capital respon-
sible for food safety viola-
tions, the China Daily said.
"Officials will be pun-
ished for improper man-
agement or dereliction of
duty," the newspaper said,
and will "also be held


accountable for failing to
plug food safety loopholes
in time or for inflicting
severe consequences by not
dealing with illegal activi-
ties."
Legal measures will be
taken if there are food-
related fatalities and
"blame will be pinned on
food manufacturers and
sellers if they hide, lie or
delay the reports of food
safety accidents," the paper
said, citing the regulation.

Industry
China's lucrative but
poorly regulated pharma-
ceutical industry, where
companies try to cash in by
substituting fake or sub-
staadard ingredients, has
alsobeen under stricter sur-
veilhnce.
The former head of Chi-
na's S'ate Food and Drug
Administration was execut-
ed last month for taking
bribes and gifts in exchange
for approving substandard
medications for the domes-
tic market including an
antibiotic blamed in the
deaths of ajleast 10 peo-
ple.
Although 2heng Xiaoyu
was investigated before the
latest safety sandals, his
punishment wa swift and
unusually harsh.


I ** o*O**"** """"""""""O*"** BO"*SSBOB*OB**##*** *BB*I .


Sf7r Jr,.!w,11


JOB OPPORTUNITIES
POSITION: Volunteer Assistant
The Volunteer Assistant provides operational support to the 2007 volust
teer program.
PRINCIPAL DUTIES:
Maintain volunteer roster & schedule database;
Work with all departments to assess staffing needs and volunteer oppor-.
tunities;
Coordinate orientations and training seminars;
Coordinate outreach to volunteers;
Coordinate set-up of Festival call center:
Manage volunteers throughout Festival;
Work directly with Executive Director on other duties as assigned.
EXPERIENCE/SKILLS REQUIRED:
Extensive experience working with hundreds of volunteers in a fast-
paced event atmosphere preferred;
Proven ability to match people with needs;
Marketing or community outreach experience a plus;
Ability to deal with a wide variety of personalities and individuals with
varying degrees of skill and experience;
Must be detail-oriented, organized and able to work calmly under pres-:
sure;
Outgoing, team player with a good sense of camaraderie:
Strong computer skills including Word, Excel and FileMaker.

POSITION: Production Assistant -
The Production Assistant assists in the various physical aspects of stag-
ing the Festival.
PRINCIPAL DUTIES:
Aids in technical and physical aspects of setting up and striking for
BIFF
Assist in theater/event management during the Film Festival:
Assists in set up and striking elements for the Theatre & BIFF Lounge;:
Assists in the pick-up /return to all vendors.
EXPERIENCE/SKILLS REQUIRED:
Strong communication and organizational skills;
Previous special event experience desirable;
Must be detail-oriented, organized and able to work calmly under pres-:
sure;
Outgoing, team player with a good sense of camaraderie;
Ability to deal with rapidly shifting priorities.

POSITION: Sponsorship Assistant
PRINCIPAL DUTIES:
Coordinate Sponsors and Partfers needs before and after film festival .
Coordinate and sell Advertisement
Have strong data gathering, analytical and report writing skills
lave strong writing skills to submit proposals and contracts
Coordinate sponsor vouchers & tickets to events. as well as any other
benefits they receive
EXPERIENCE/SKILLS REQUIRED:
Strong communication and organizational skills
Business & Marketing background a plus
Previous special event experience desirable
Must be detail-oriented, organized and able to work calmly under pres-:
sure
Outgoing, team player with a good sense of camaraderie
: Ability to deal with rapidly shifting priorities

Contact: 356-5939 or festassistbintlfilmfest.com
-******* ** a. ..aa ******.e** es*e* .*e* .0 11 a ate *ite.* I


I















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Books..110- l
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Pregnant panda expecting fourth cub
IN THIS undated photo provided by the San Diego Zoo, giant panda Bai Yun is shown. The giant
panda at the San Diego Zoo is pregnant again and expecting her fourth cub sometime in August. The
zoo said Tuesday July 31, 2007 that Bai Yun was put on "24-hour birth watch" after officials detect-
7 ed a fetus and fetal heartbeat through ultrasound images July 18.
(AP Photo/San Diego Zoo)


SATURDAY AUGUST 4TH


CHURCH & COMMUNITY DAY
COME & SUPPORT
OUR LOCAL CHURCHES
AND COMMUNITY GROUPS
Buy treats, enjoy entertainment
and learn how they help our
community and people




ATHEMALLtAT


MARATHON




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BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC) invites applications from suitably qualified persons
to fill the position of Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training. The successful
candidate will report directly to the General Manager. Candidates should have a minimum of
15 years post graduate, relevant experience, at senior management level.
Overview and Objectives
The Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training will be responsible for
understanding the human capital needs of the corporation and optimizing the human resource
value provided to the organization. The objectives include:
Preparing the current workforce for success in a cost-effective manner
Anticipating and fulfilling the short and long term human resource needs of BEC
Developing and maintaining the programs required to identify BEC's top performers
and weakest performers
Effectively communicating the vision of BEC both internally and externally
Key Accountabilities and Measures:
Develop and maintain employee records, in a confidential manner, that include all
information necessary to support the training, manpower planning, succession planning,
compensation, benefits, and performance evaluation programs for BEC
Manage employee training to support business productivity and continuity
Administer employee benefits in a cost-effective manner
Provide employee relation services to keep the workforce productive and motivated
Develop and maintain the manpower plan and succession plan
Assist the organization with employee needs analysis and recruitment
Monitor the implementation of collective bargaining agreements, including reviewing
recommendations for engagements, promotions. transfers, discipline, dismissals
Assist the Labor Compliance Officer in industrial relations matters and participate in the
collective bargaining process
o Create and manage BEC's public relations program and improve the impression of BEC
with customers, investors, and governmental authorities
Effectively communicate the mission and actions of BEC to all employees
Establish and maintain corporate policies and procedures relating to human resource
management and monitor compliance
Develop relationships with key external constituents, including the media, to ensure a
positive message about BEC is conveyed to the public
Develop, challenge, and evaluate subordinates
Communicate effectively with superiors, subordinates, and peers
Applications along with resumes should be submitted by Friday, August 10, 2007 and addressed to:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Re: Assistant General Manager Human Resources and Training
Private & Confidential


II


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 25


THE TRIBUNE









PAGE 26, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


7:30


AUGUST 2, 2007

10:00 10:30


Antiques Road- Celtic Woman: A New Journey Singer Hayley Westenra joins Celtic * THE ROLLING STONES
B WPBT show Royal Woman for a performance at Slane Castle; hosted by Lord Henry Mount ROCK AND ROLL CIRCUS (1968.
Yacht Britannia. Charles. (CC) Documentary)
The Insider (N) Big Brother 8 Head-of-household CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Without a Trace "Primed"An artist
0 WFOR ,n (CC) competition; elimination. (Live) n "Toe Tags" Victims give voice to disappears shortly after an exhibit of
(CC) their murder investigations. n her work opens. f (CC)
Access Holly- My Name Is Earl 30 Rock "The The Office Ryan Scrubs A life- (:01) ER Abby and Kovac hire a
B WTVJ wood (N) (CC) The power of the Head and the invites Michael to threatening nanny.for their son; Morris and Sam
media. Hair" / (CC) speak. (CC) coma. ) (CC) treat a belligerent patient.
Deco Drive Don't Forget the Lyrics! Missing So You Think You Can Dance Two News (N) (CC)
B WSVN song lyhcs. (N) (CC) more dancers leave. (Live) f (CC)


Ugly Betty "Snow Job" Daniel re-
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stood up for a date in college. ft


Grey's Anatomy The race for chief
heats up as a new competitor
comes forward. ft (CC)


(:01) Men in Trees "The Menais-
sance" Jane leaks an excerpt from
Marin's new book on men.


S :00)CSI: Miami CSI: Miami A high-school senior is The First 48 "Last Birthday" Well- Dallas SWAT High-risk narcotics
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Scrubs "My The Daily Show The Colbert Re- Reno 9111 John- South Park South Park (CC) American Body
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T ops "Coast to Inside American Inside American Inside "Prison Gangs" Gang vio- Forensic Files Forensic Files
COUR Coast A (CC) Jail (N) Jail (N) lence within the prison. "Writers Block" "Up in Smoke"
The Suite Life of THE PROUD FAMILY (2005, Fantasy) Voices of Kyla Pratt, Tommy That's So Raven Life With Derek
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DIY This Old House Home Again Sweat Equity Rock Solid Rock Solid Desperate Land- Desperate Land-i
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lywood Story f (CC) Goes to Camp Goes to Camp Door Door
ESPN (:00) 2007 ESPY Awards From Los Angeles. (CC) X Games From Los Angeles. (Live) (CC)
6ESP I :15) PGA Golf WGC Bridgestone Invitational -- First MLS Soccer Kansas City Wizards at New England Revolution. From
ESPNI found. (Same-day Tape) (CC) Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Mass. (Same-day Tape) (CC)
WTN Daily Mass: Our Life on the Rock Parable The Holy Rosary Back Stage The Pure Life
EWTN Lady
FIT TV :00) Cardio Art of the Athlete "Dominique Insider Training "Golf Golf tech- Deadly Arts Josette seeks out
BFIT TV Blast (CC) Dawes" Dominique Dawes. (CC) niques. (CC) Capoeira's Mestres. f (CC)
FOX C Fox Report- The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC). On the Record With Greta Van
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FSNFL :0) MLB Baseball Colorado Rockies at Florida Marlins. From Dolphin Stadium in Miami, Inside the Mar- The FSN Final
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GOLF (6:30) PGA Golf Reno-Tahoe Open PGA Golf WGC Bridgestone Invitational -- First Round. From Firestone Country Club in
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j G N (CC) (CC) (CC)
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M*A*S*H Klinger Walker, Texas Ranger Singers the JANE DOE: YES, I REMEMBER IT WELL (2006, Mystery) Lea Thomp-
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Buy Me "Lionel Holmes on Homes "Lack of Truss" Dream House Over Your Head Disaster DIY Junk Brothers A
HGTV and Marcia" n n (CC) f (CC) Patio project. f "Small Kitchen, hall water fea-
(__CC) Big Mess" (CC) ture. (N) (CC)
I SP Morris Cerullo Breakthrough Love a Child Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) This Is Your Day The Gospel
N (CC) day (CC) Truth
Reba Disciplining My Wife and According to According to Friends Rachel Everybody Everybody
KTLA Henry. n (CC) Kids Child care Jim Family trip to Jim "Cars and meets a good- Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
course. ft (CC) Las Vegas. Chicks" (C (CC)lookingguy. (CC) (CC)
Still Standing Reba Reba is Reba "Pilot" ** HOW TO DEAL (2003, Romance) Mandy Moore, Allison Janney,
LIFE "Still Rocking ft rushed to the Reba's husband Trent Ford. A disillusioned teen thinks true love does not exist. (CC)
(CC) hospital. (CC) leaves her. (CC)
SMSNBC IHardball Countdown With Keith Olber- MSNBC News Live Nightmare Behind Closed Doors
MSNBC H CC)_Hrl mann (Live)
NICK Jimmy Neutron: Drake & Josh SpongeBob Funniest Home Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of
NICK Boy Genius "Alien Invasion" SquarePants n Videos Bel-Air Bel-Air Bel-Air
NTV The Office A Big Brother 8 Head-of-household Shark "Dial M for Monica" n (CC) News (N) t News
(CC) competition; elimination. (CC) (CC)
SPEED Pinks Pinks All Out From Reading, Pa. Fine Tuned "Pilot" NOPI Tunervi- NOPI Tunervi-
D(___N) sion (N) sion
J5:00) Macedon- Behind the Michael Youssef Bishop T.D. This Is Your Day Macedonian Call Annual fundrais-
TBN ian Call Scenes (CC) Dr. Michael Jakes (CC) (CC) ing event.
Youssef. (CC)
MLB Baseball Houston Astros at Atlanta Braves. From Tumer Field in Atlanta. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) Friends Rachel
TBS (CC) will do anything
to give birth. n
:00) Monster American Hot Rod "Sobe 1" 1960 American Chopper Last-minute de- Hard Shine "Race Day" A'57
TLC Garage"All Girl Mercury station wagon. (N) lays threaten to stall the completion Chevy gasser. (N)
Build (CC) of the triple build. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- Law & Order "Ambitious" The mur- * ENOUGH (2002, Suspense) Jennifer Lopez, Billy Campbell, Juliette
TNT der "Cruel and der of an audio installation sales- Lewis. A woman takes her daughter and flees her abusive husband. (CC)
Unusual" n man is linked to the mafia.
TOON Pokemon: Dia- Courage the Camp Lazlo Home for Imagi- Grim Adven- Courage the Naruto
r N mond and Pearl Cowardly Dog nary Friends tures Cowardly Dog
T(:00) Toute une Des racines et des ailes (SC) Le Maitre des Les Coups de Surla route des
TV5 histoire genies coeur de Bruno festivals
TWC torm Stories Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(CC)
(:00) Yo Amo a Amar sin Limites Un hombre lucha Destilando Amor Aqui y Ahora
UNIV Juan Querend6n para salvar a la mujer que ama.
i * THE BOURNE IDENTITY (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente, Chris Burn Notice "Unpaid Debts" (N)
USA Cooper. An amnesiac agent is marked for death after a botched hit. (CC) (CC)
SVH1 (:00) 40 Greatest Pranks f Fabulous Life Of... "Wall Street Ty- My Big Fat Fab- I Hate My 30s
coons" ft ulous wedding (N) A
VS. :00Legends of Legends of the Ring Legends of the Ring
vis the Ring
:00) America's ** SPECIES (1995, Science Fiction) Ben Kingsley, Michael Madsen, WGN News at Nine (N) (CC)
WGN Funniest Home Alfred Molina. A genetically engineered creature may destroy mankind.
Videos n (CC) n (CC)
Everybody Smallville "Freak" Clark and Chloe Supernatural "Road Kill" Sam and CW11 News at Ten With Kaity
WPIX Loves Raymond discover a young man who can Dean help a young woman they Tong, Jim Watkins (N) (CC)
(CC) identify "meteor freaks". f meet on a dark highway. A
Jeopardy! (CC) Dr. Phil n (CC) News (N) Jeopardy! (CC) FrasierFrasier FrasierMartin
WSBK quits the wine has a woman
club. n (CC) spend the night.

(615) * * LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE (2006, Comedy- (:45) Rocket Sci- John From Cincinnati The citizens
H BO-E PRACTICAL Drama) Greg Kinnear, Steve Carell. Members of a dys- ence: HBO First of Imperial Beach fear for Shaun's
MAGIC (1998) functional family take a road trip. ft 'R' (CC) Look (N) safety. f (CC)
Entourage The * INSIDE MAN (2006, Suspense) Denzel Washington, Clive Owen, (:15) Flight of (:45) * FAN-
H BO-P Day F...ers"' Jodie Foster. A cop matches wits with a bank robber, n 'R' (CC) theConchords TASTIC FOUR
(CC) "Drive By(CC) (2005)'PG-13'
t* JUST LIKE HEAVEN (2005, Romance-Comedy) (:15) * PRACTICAL MAGIC (1998, Comedy-Drama) Sandra Bullock,
H BO-W Reese Witherspoon. An architect falls for the spirit of a Nicole Kidman, Dianne Wiest. Two sisters face obstacles because of their
comatose woman. f 'PG-13' (CC) witchcraft. n 'PG-13' (CC)
(6:00)* * A Big Love "Kingdom Come" Bill pro- .* *' YOU, ME AND DUPREE (2006, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Kate Hud-
H BO-S PRAIRIE HOME poses a new schedule to his wives, son, Matt Dillon. A jobless buddy moves in with two newlyweds. N PG-
COMPANION ft (CC) 13' (CC)
(:15) * HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE (2005, Fantasy) Daniel Rad- *, THREE TO TANGO (1999. Ro-
MAX-E cliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tourna- mance-Comedy) Matthew Perry. f
ment. f 'PG-13' (CC) 'PG-13 (CC)
(6:45) A* THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS (2003, *t THE FAST AND THE FURIOUS: TOKYO (:45) Sin City Di-
MOMAX Science Fiction) Keanu Reeves. Neo, Morpheus and DRIFT (2006) Lucas Black. An American street racer aries Portrait
Trinity battle vicious machines. ft 'R' (CC) takes on a Japanese champion. 'PG-13' (CC) f (CC)
S :00) * BLOWN AWAY (1994, Suspense) Jeff a* LORD OF WAR (2005, Drama) Nlcolas Cage. Jared Leto. Bridaet
S HOW Bridges, Lloyd Bridges. iTV. A mad Irish bomber plots Moynahan. iTV. A relentless Interpol agent tracks an arms dealer. 'R'
revenge on his former pupil. f 'R' (CC) (CC)


00) * STEPMOM (1998, Drama) Julia Roberts,
Susan Sarandon. A woman tries hard to make her
lover's children accept her. f PG-13' (CC)


(:15) *READY TO WEAR (PRET-A-PORTER) (1994, Comedy)
Sophia Loren, Marcello Mastroianni, Julia Rohprts. Premiere. Filmmaker
Rout, Altman unravels the fasmiion nus , ;


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1









THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 27


COISPG


ACROSS
A town destroyed by a supreme
deity (5)
American dog (5)
Opposed to aristocracy and
royalty? (7)
He flies a good amount, evidently
(5)
Had a penchant for the field of the
theatre? (5)
Pole in a ragged suit abroad (5)
Form of finance backed by Charles
Dickens (7)
Meadow in an arable area (3)
The gird one takes most risks with?
(4)
Compulsive producers? (6)
A major marine body (5)
State of a famous building (6)
One-woman opera (4)
Fishy fellow, but bright (3)
Bird getting on with the cheese (7)
Keeps saints out of a building (5)
Sam turns on good people In
Africa (5)
Mendelssohn's cat (5)
Idly consuming ale brewed in the
best manner (7)
Swell new source of oil (5)
Rosiq'" willowy form (5)


Defusing a Threat


South dealer.
Neither side vulfierable.
NORTH
*AQ2
VVK105
*K62
+10984
WEST
*K9864 4
V 832
*QJ4 4
+Q3


EAST
+7
V9764
SA 10 7 3
477652


SOUTH
*J 1053
VAQJ
*985
4AKJ
The bidding:
South West North East
1 NT Pass 3 NT All Pass
Opening lead six of spades.


DOWN
2 A name for duck offal (6)
3 They make no scar, though lust
one can be painful (6)
4 It quite alters one's meaning (3)
5 A no-good American fellow? (5)
6 Creature related to the zebra? (7)
7 Zero reserves of minerals (4)
8 Run around In a trance (6)
12 A moment of electric effect (5)
13 Its rider can't dismount (5)
14. Quick to describe the weather as
cold (5)
15 Joe, let out to run away (3,2)
16 A large waterfowl seen by a dam
(5)
18 Standing upright, they start talking
during mass (5)
19 No ordinary bloomers (7)
2? Contrive to be the boss (6)
22 Ways of bowling (6)
23 A hundred-to-one pay-out for being
obedient (6)
25 Street light out of place (5)
26 Take Usa for a boat trip (4)
28 For her, flogging would be
excessive (3)


-I
CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS
ACROSS: 4, So-b-bed 7, Pr-olif-ic 8, R-arely 10, C-heap 13, MAs-s 14, Earl 15,
Nips 16, Deb 17, Opus 19, Elan 21, Count-ered 23, RA-ft. 24, Rate 26. Bat 27,
Tear 29, C-lip 32, Tell 33, China 34, Figure 35, Choppers 36, As-sent
DOWN: 1, Spice 2, Roger 3, Limp 4, Scrap 5, Bars 6, Eileen 9, Assert 11, Had 12,
Al-o-of 13, Mistral 15, Nun 16, Dad 18, Putter 20, Lee-CH 21, Cat 22, Ear 23,
Ra-p-ids 25, Kin 28, Elect 30, LIV-E-D 31, P-ass-E 32, Tube 33, Cop-e

EASY SOLUTIONS
ACROSS: 4, Stitch 7, Doorstep 8, Ocelot 10, Cache 13, Room 14, Tree 15, Term
16, Act 17, Root 19, Bile 21, Fortunate 23, Tuna 24, Rota 26, Son 27, Tent 29,
Logs 32, Tons 33, Nylon 34, Cavort 35, Engraved 36, Hooter
DOWN, 1, Edict 2, Force 3, Isle 4, Spoor 5, Item 6, Choice 9, Combat 11, Arm 12,
Heron 13, Returns 15, Tot 16, Ale 18, Orator 20, Italy 21, Fun 22, Not 23,
Tomato 25, Egd 28, Enter 30, Olive 31, Snide 32, Tout 33, Norm


nine. The o
East for the
Since it
the diamond
cashed the
entered du
spades and
Unfortum
queen, and
hope, shift
monds. The
four diam(
went down
Of course
actual club
cashed the
and made
tion is whi
played in'
benefit of
cards.
Strange a


When and when not to finesse is the right lin
one of the most common problems considered
encountered by declarer. Its very fre- South shou
quency of occurrence makes this finesse.
segment of the game a subject wor- Obviousl
thy of close study, is the hope
Consider this deal where West led queen of cli
a spade against three notrump, taken the case, de
by South with the ten. Assuming contract by
West had the spade king, declarer clubs. East
could count three spade tricks, three has it, but
hearts and two clubs as sure winners, South's nin
leaving him one trick short of his the risk of'
goal. the potential
South saw there were two ways At the san
he might acquire a ninth trick. One guards agai
was to play West for the ace of dia- with the Q
monds, in which case a lead toward adds signifi
the.king would produce trick number chances.




HOW many words of
four letters or more n
can you make from I
the fetters shown
here? In making a :A-
word, each letter may
be used once only
Each must contain the C
centre letter and there
must be at least one B
nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms I
ending in "s", no
words with Initial
capitals and no words with a hyphen or
apostrophe permitted.
The flrst word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet
In InkJet printer).


ACROSS
Perspire (5)
Banquet (5)
Outline (7)
Cut (5)
Tumbles (5)
Defeats (5)
Friendly (7)
Expert (3)
Fencing sword
(4)
Rot (6)
Merriment (5)
Steady (6)
Ring of light (4)
Devour (3)
Mentor (7)
Leaves out (5)
Backbone (5)
Proverb (5)
Derange (7)
Faith (5)
Access (5)


2
3





12
13
14
15
16
18
19
21
22
23

25
26
28


DOWN
Strike hard (6)
Agree (6)
Digit (3)
Alloy (5)
More distant
(7)
Cupid (4)
Comfort (6)
Wash (5)
Stop (5)
Took an exam
again (5)
Book of maps
(5)
Mistake (5)
Provides food
(5)
Merciful (7)
Interfere (6)
Concealed (6)
Accounts book
(6)
Garret (5)
Responsibility
(4)
Era (3)


i


TODAY'S TARGET
Good 42; very good
63; excellent 83
(or more).
Solution tomorrow.


other was to finesse against
e queen of clubs.
was too dangerous to test
nd situation first, South
ace of clubs at trick two,
mmy with the queen of
led a club to the jack.
nately, the jack lost to the
d West, having no other
ed to the queen of dia-
e defense then rattled off
ond tricks, and declare
one.
e, if South had known the
situation, he would have
A-K, caught the queen
four notrump. The ques-
ether South should have
this fashion without the
a peek at the East-West

as it might seem, this is
ne of play. If the matter is
objectively, it is clear that
Id not have taken a club,

y, the basis for the finesse
e that East was dealt the
ubs. But if this is actually
clearer is sure to make the
y playing the A-K-J of
may take the queen if he
dummy's ten becomes
nth trick without running
West gaining the lead for
ally fatal diamond shift.
me time, cashingthe A-K
nst West's having started
-x of clubs, and thereby
icantly to South's overall


orator




- ulc pae


THURSDAY,
AUGUST 2

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Everything you touch turns to gold,
Aries. Make productive use of your
resources, and you'll attract much sup-
port down the road. But, beware of
those who take advantage.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Happy times are here, especially if
you are beginning a new romantic
relationship, Taurus. Your connection
is now stronger than ever thanks to
your ability to speak openly.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Keep plugging away at projects,
Gemini. You'll find you must multi-
task this week, especially when some-
thing big arrives by midweek. Make a
list, or have a game plan in mind.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Your ability to concentrate will not
be very strong this week, Cancer,
Friends can help you along and pro-
vide the guidance you need. Expect
big news by Thursday.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
This week will be hectic and you
might feel stressed out and distracted,
Leo. Spending long hours at work
will not help the situation, so see if
you can sneak out early one day.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Unexpected glitches in a project are
set to arise on Tuesday, Virgo.
You'll be full of energy for most of
the week, so you'll be able to tackle
the problem effortlessly,
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Money has been burning a hole in
your pocket, and you're ready to
spend, Libra. Better keep that cash in
check a little while longer because
you'll soon need it.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You will make tremendous progress
in fulfilling dls you've set for
yourself, Scorpwo. You have motiva-
tion, power and resources on your
side to get the job done right.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
You'll be faced with delicate top-
ics this week, Sagittarius. Don't
tiptoe around the issues. Get to
the heart of the situation, and be
honest about your feelings.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You don't need any outside motiva-
tion to plow through your work -
you're naturally motivated. Afterward,
rest up, because change is in store for
you, Capricorn.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Follow-through is the key to locking
in deals that can help you in your
career, Aquarius. Make sure you dot
your "I"s and cross your "T"s as
well details are appreciated.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 .
Keep doing what you've been doing,
Pisces. You're in an ideal position to
expand your skills, horizons and
earning power.


CHESSby Lenard arde


Dance2Dance v Terminater077,
instantchess.com 2006. In web
chess you normally choose a
pseudonym or handle rather
than play under your own name.
Black probably meant to call
himself Terminator007, though
both his spelling and
numerology were off beam.
White had a normal handle, but
his strategy of marching his king
to the centre with several pieces
still on the board was bizarre.
So, not surprisingly, it's Black to
move and win here.
Instantchess is a free site with
user-friendly graphics where you
can find an opponent quickly,
though if you seriously want to
improve your play it's best to go
to chessclub.com where you can
watch grandmasters in action


both online and over the board.
How did Black (to move) finish off
his opponent?


LEONARD GARDEN


Chess solution 8328: L..e5+ 2 Kd5 R2c5+ 3 bxc5
Rxc5+ 4 Kxd6 Bf8 mate.


TIGER


CRYPTIC PUZZLE


R

I
a
U
N


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
ma -- ;-n-
1011
12







313 141


DW
R






THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 28. THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


France, Denmark, Indonesia ready to take


part in the Darfur


* PARIS
FRANCE, Denmark and
Indonesia offered Wednesday
to contribute to a joint United
Nations-African Union peace-
keeping force for Darfur, while
Sudan praised the U.N. resolu-
tion, which was watered down
to drop the threat of sanctions,
according to Associated Press.
Acceptance of the new
26,000-strong force marked a
major turnaround for Sudanese
President Omar al-Bashir's gov-
ernment, which had resisted for
months a push to send U.N.
peacekeepers to the western
Darfur region, where over
200,000 people have died and
2.5 million been chased from
their homes in four years of
fighting.
But Sudan agreed in June to
a compromise deal for the
African Union to deploy jointly


with the U.N. in a "hybrid
force" to end the violence,
which is what the U.N. resolu-
tion passed Tuesday provides
for.
"The Sudanese government
is committed to implementing
its part of the resolution,"
Sudanese Foreign Minister Lam
Akol told reporters on Wednes-
day.
The U.N. Security Council
unanimously approved the
force, which if fully deployed
would be the world's largest
peacekeeping operation. It is
expected to be made up mostly
of peacekeepers from Africa
with backup from Asian troops.
Tuesday's resolution won
Khartoum's praise after it
dropped the threat of sanctions
against Sudan if it fails to accept
the force and an authorization
for the new force to seize or col-
lect arms. The changes were


made in negotiations betwei
Security Council members
avoid a veto by China, Sudan
top diplomatic ally.
Major Western powers a
expected to provide only lim
ed manpower in the force,
many are already overstretch
in existing peacekeeping effoi
and conflicts such as Ira
observers say. Britain's militai
for example, has 7,100 servi
members in Afghanistan ai
5,500 in Iraq.
"We would consider request
to support the United Natior
Africans Mission in Darfur on
we receive a formal request
do so," Britain's Defense Mi
istry said Wednesday, addii
that it is already assisting ti
existing AU mission in Darf
in areas including logistics ai
planning.
But a spokeswoman at ti
British foreign office wl


peacekeeping (
en spoke on condition of anonymi- said the force, called UNAMID,
to ty, in keeping with the ministry's will have "a predominantly
n's regulations said Britain African character," as Sudan
would not send ground forces. demanded.
re "We're not going to be African troops already in
it- putting soldiers with guns and Darfur will stay there. Nigeria,
as tanks in Darfur," she said. which has about 2,000 troops in
ed The conflict in Darfur began Darfur, is ready to send an addi-
rts in February 2003 when ethnic tional battalion of about 700
q, African tribes rebelled against soldiers, said army spokesman
ry, what they considered decades Col. Mohammed Yusuf.
ce of neglect and discrimination France offered to send sol-
nd by Sudan's Arab-dominated diers and participate in the
government. Sudan's govern- chain of command, as well as
sts ment is accused of retaliating take part in reconstruction and
is- by unleashing a militia of Arab humanitarian efforts, Foreign
ce nomads known as the jan- Minister Bernard Kouchner
to jaweed a charge it denies. said. He did not say how many
n- More than 200,000 people have troops France might contribute.
ng died, and 2.5 million have been Denmark's Defense Minister
he uprooted. Soeren Gade said his country
ur The new peacekeeping force would definitely help.
nd will take over from the belea- "Beside the fact that there is
guered 7,000-strong African a need for quite a lot of soldiers,
he Union force now in Darfur no there is a need for logistical
ho later than Dec. 31. The U.N. staff, people in the headquar-


effort
ters, ships that can ferry equip-
ment on long distances, planes
that can move equipment and
personnel," he said in an inter-
view from Iraq with the TV2
News channel.
pesra Percaya, spokesman
for Indonesia's foreign ministry,
said the country was willing to
contribute troops but was wait-
ing for details on how many
non-African troops are needed.
Several countries includ-
ing Italy, Sweden, Austria, the
Netherlands, Poland, Turkey,
Thailand, and South Africa -
said they had not made a deci-
sion yet. Australian Foreign
Minister Alexander Downer
said the country would send a
small number of doctors and
nurses, but no troops or securi-
ty personnel, given its existing
commitments in Iraq,
Afghanistan and the Solomon
Islands.


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I









THURSDAY, AUGUST 2,2007


SECTION -


business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


I U


Albany and Baha Mar delays





'major disaster' for builders



Bahamian contractors laying-off workers in soft construction market, with revenues down 'substantially'

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7--------------


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The delays sur-
rounding the
multi-million dol-
lar Baha Mar and
Albany projects
were yesterday described as "a
major disaster" by Bahamian
contractors, who said the situ-
ation would "exacerbate" an
increasingly soft market where
there was minimal work and


cause them to lay-off employ-
ees.
Richard Wilson, Cavalier
Construction's managing direc-
tor, yesterday told The Tribune
his company had been count-
ing on the $1.3 billion Albany
Golf & Beach Resort after
completing construction work
on the new 100,000 square foot
Atlantis convention centre in
March 2007. There were no
other projects the company
had lined up.


However, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham hinted in the
House of Assembly on Mon-
day that he may seek to amend
the Heads of Agreement the
Albany developers signed with
the former Christie adminis-
tration, arguing that the invest-
ment incentives were too gen-
erous.
He added that he felt the
Albany project had a relative-
ly small hotel component that
was designed to attract cus-


toms duty and stamp tax
exemptions for the much larg-
er private, residential real
estate component, and that
resolving these differences with
the developers might not hap-
pen soon.
Mr Wilson told The Tribune:
"It's a major problem for us.
We had negotiated a contract
for Albany, and have been
waiting for the last two months
to get started on it. Now, it
looks like it's not going to hap-


pen.
"To me, it's a major disas-
ter to be frank. We were
counting on Albany, and right
now have absolutely no work,
nothing. It doesn't bear think-
ing about, to be frank. It's
affected us considerably."
I The only other work Cava-
lier Construction is presntly
engaged in, Mr Wilson added,
was a small office block at
Caves Village for Caledonia,
the financial services compa-


ny.
Other contractors who had
obtained construction contracts
for Albany, and have been
impacted by the current
impasse between the develop-
ers and the FNM government,
are understood to be Mosko's
United Construction and Tarm
Corporation, who have also
been unable to start work.

SEE page 14


Freeport quarry


sold to US firm

E By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
FREEPORT Aggregate, the Grand Bahama-based block
and quarry operation, has been sold to a Florida-based con-
struction materials and aggregate company that is publicly list-
ed in New York, it was revealed yesterday.
Florida Rock Industries has closed the deal to acquire the
company, which employs between 60-70 people, from pre-
vious owner Mike Hamilton, The Tribune was able to con-
firm.
When contacted by this newspaper, Mr Hamilton con-
firmed that the closing of the purchase by Florida Rock
Industries was "real close" and likely to have been com-
pleted by the two sides' attorneys.
When asked why he had decided to sell Florida Rock, Mr
Hamilton replied: "Thirty-eight years was long enough. I
enjoyed it."
He added: "We shipped rock to Nassau, quite a bit, all dif-
ferent types of rock, and sold concrete block in Freeport
and Grand Bahama.
"We did a pretty good business. It's growing, and it's going
to continue to grow."
Mr Hamilton said any fur-
ther comment would have to SEE page 10


Hutchison warned purchasing Port's


regulatory function would be 'mistake'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
HUTCHISON Whampoa was yester-
day warned that it would make "a mis-
take" if it acquired the Grand Bahama
Port Authority's (GBPA) quasi-govern-
mental and regulatory responsibilities, the
Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce's
president saying that it would do better to
activate a clause in the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement that would devolve these pow-
ers to a new authority.
Reacting to Tribune Business's revela-
tions that Hutchison Whampoa, which has
already invested some $1 billion in equity
into Freeport, had made an offer to
acquire the GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
Christopher Lowe said that while the deal
might make sense to the Hong Kong-
based conglomerate, there were questions
over its long-term plans and what it would
do to benefit the local economy and
Bahamian licensees.
"What would they be buying?" he
asked. "I think, quite frankly, it would be


a mistake for them to assume the regula-
tory aspects of the Port Authority, but
instead they could play a role in the pro-
visions of the [Hawksbill Creek] Agree-
ment, namely Clause 4......"
That clause permits the GBPA to
devolve its regulatory, licensing and qua-
si-governmental responsibilities to a 'Local
Authority', with the approval of 80 per
cent or more of the licensees.
Mr Lowe said of the prospect of Hutchi-
son acquiring the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd: "In the first instance, they couldn't do
any worse than the current shareholders in
respect to developing Freeport.
"Obviously, they have the financial and
global clout and presence to turn Freeport
into something immeasureably successful.
I think the licensees, and certainly the
Licensees Association, would certainly be
interested in talking to Hutchison."
Yet he added: "But at the same time
there is some house clearing to do with
respect to the entities as they exist now.
"Anything is possible, but I would cer-
tainly call for a bit of transparency and


open dialogue. I think the days of 'back
door' deals in Freeport are over,"
Freeport-based attorney Rawle May-
nard said any sale to Hutchison, even if the
existing shareholders, the late Edward St
George's estate and Sir Jack Hayward,
were willing, could not be done quickly
because there were so many other issues
that needed to be resolved.
He pointed to the Supreme Court action
filed by the licensees, seeking declarations
and answers to certain questions regarding
past events involving the GBPA, espe-
cially the transfer and sale of stakes in
major assets that formerly belonged to it -
Devco, the Freeport Harbour Company,
Freeport Container Port, Sanitation Ser-
vices and Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny.
"If Hutchison Whampoa buys the
GBPA, what happens to those assets that
have been divested," Mr Maynard asked.
"The problem is not Hutchison, it is the


SEE page 10


Airport fee rises likely


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
LANDING fees at the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port have not been increased
since 1993, the Nassau Airport
Development Company's
(NADC) president and chief
executive said yesterday,
explaining that the failure of
revenues to keep pace with
maintenance needs "is what
has contributed to the airport
being in the state it's in".
Addressing the Bahamas
Society of Engineers, Craig
Richmond said NADC, which
is being managed by Canadian
airports operator Vancouver
Airport Services (YVRAS)
under a management contract
with the Government, had
benchmarked the $15 and $5
passenger user facility fees it
was charging international and
domestic travellers respective-
ly with other Caribbean air-
ports to ensure they were com-
petitive.
Revenues from the passen-
ger user facility fees are likely
to be used to back or guaran-
tee a bond issue to finance the
construction of two new ter-
minals at Lynden Pindling
International Airport by 2012,
a project that Mr Richmond
yesterday estimated would cost
between $350-$400 million.
But while NADC would to
try to minimise fees and any
increases for passengers and
the airlines, Mr Richmond
used the example of the fail-
ure to increase landing fees for
14 years to show how the air- *
port's failure to maximise rev-
enues and keep them in line
with inflation had cost it dear-
ly when it came to capital


No landing fees
increase at Lynden
Pindling International
Airport since 1993, with
airport's sorry state
linked to failure of
revenues to keep pace
with maintenance needs

works and maintenance.
"When you let that happen,
and it gets far out of whack
with what you need to get in,
the airport is not upgraded and
maintained as it should be,"
Mr Richmond said.
"We will try to minimise
increases, but having no
increases is what has con-
tributed to the airport being in
the state it is in."
Mr Richmond said NADC's
mandate was to make the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port and make it profitable and
efficient, while reducing costs.
"It has not been happening
in the past," he added in refer-
ence to the Airport Authority's
lack of profitability. "But it will
happen under NADC. Oper-
ating the airport as a business
is the biggest change."
Apart from the passenger
user facility fee, NADC is also
looking to generate increased
revenues from parking, retail
and land development.
Mr Richmond pledged that
the airport would become self-
financing, self-sustaining and
consumer focused, "a business


-.. ..... .....


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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE
'A D*RTO IAL


FirstCaribbean International Bank

In Celebration of Excellence


An Evening of Special Honour and Recognition






FirstCaribbean International Bank
paid special honour'and recognition-
to those who embodied the spirit of
excellence at its 3rd Annual Pro
Performer Awards Ceremony
Dinner The:. Player of the Series
awardeeprs for0062aretarue
exem.pars of FirstCaribbean's
organisatioa values ,-.consistently
deliVerin t.. dd excelence
and, eei aect ion. They
demowthtn osheler6 t dete.mina w
ande a to cr yo n tothecall.
01- -j





future" and rendzvou wit destiny.1
"" M Chairman of
FirstCawasio n determnational Bank,
Sin histribute- to these Pro Performers






200ztoexcl i-who wse.srie
noted, "There is a need for vision, to
go within ourselves to determine what
is possible.-it is about doggedness and
determination to carry you on to the
final destination and it takes a self-
disciplined approach to reach the
future and rendezvous with destiny.."

It was vision, determination and
self-discipline that enabled these
FirstCaribbean Pro Performers.
2006 to excel in what was described
as an exceptional year for the bank -
a year of growth and development
in every aspect of the business.












FIRST CARIBBEAN
*',INTERNATIONAL BANK
GET THERE. TOGETHER.


www.first c a r i b beanbank.com


- - - - -


I~ Ir IJ L~ I~






THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 3B


Having trust in modern laws


An important tea-
trust law is the
principle that the
transfer of a trust from the
original trustees resident in one
jurisdiction, to new trustees
resident in another jurisdiction,
must be made in accordance
with the provisions of the trust
deed. It must also be in com-
pliance with the jurisdiction's
trust laws that govern the trust
deed, in order to be properly
effectuated.
The proper law of a trust is
the law that is specified under
the terms of the trust deed. If
the trust deed is silent on the
proper law that governs the
trust, the proper law that will
be applied to the trust will
often be that with which the
trust is most closely connect-
ed.


This means consideration
will be given to such factors as
the place where the actual
administration of the trust is
carried out; the place where
the assets of the trust are situ-
ated; the place of residence of
the trustees; and the place of
residence of the beneficiaries.
Although a settlor may


Net Tonnage
2,000 or less
2,001 to 5,000
5,001 to 25,000
Over 25,000

Non-commercial Yachts


choose to have a trust admin-
istered by trustees in a juris-
diction different from that of
the trust's proper law, it is
advisable that he chooses the
proper law of the trust based
on where the trustees are resi-
dent. This is because courts of
the proper law jurisdiction
would be more inclined to


Registration Fee
BS/USS
52.000
Sl pet ton
SO.9 per ton
S22.500

$2,000


afford protection to local
trustees, should a dispute arise
in relation to the trust. Addi-
tionally, a settlor can avoid
obvious management. control
and taxation problems by
appointing trustees who are
resident in the proper law juris-
diction.
In most trust deeds, there
will usually be some provisions
that cover the power to change
the proper law of the trust to
that of another jurisdiction.
This power will often be given
to the trustees of the trust, and
a deed or declaration is exe-
cuted by the trustees to effec-
tuate the change of the proper
law. However, it should be not-
ed that reference should also
be made in the trust deed of
the desire to change the law of
the forum (courts chosen to
adjudicate any future disputes


0 f ee[s


THE last Legal Ease column published
incorrect ship registration and annual fees.
Here are the correct numbers.
Discounts
A scheme of discounts, legislated by Par-
liament, has been introduced with regard to
the registration of vessels.
A discount of one third off the initial reg-
istration fee will be offered to an owner
registering a vessel less than five years-old.
A discount of one third off the initial reg-
istration fee will also be offered to an own-
er registering three or more vessels at the
same time, provided they are less than 12
years-old. This discount will be increased to
50 per cent in respect of an owner regis-
tering 10 or more vessels at the same time
A discount of 60 per cent off the initial
registration fee will be offered where 20 or
more ships, in the same ownership, and less
than 12 years old, are registered at the same
time.


registered at the same time, and where the
net tonnage is more than 200,000, provided
that an inspection, if required, has been
satisfactorily completed (this applies to


A discount of 60 per cent off the initial when ships may be over 12 years-old).
registration fee will also be offered where 20
or more ships in the same ownership are NOTE: Discounts cannot be applied to


vessels with net tonnage of less than 500.
** 'at the same time' means within a peri-
od of 12 months.
All ships over 12 years-old require a pre-
registration inspection.


Annual Fee
BS/USS
$2,552
$2,090 plus $0.20 per ton
$2,090 plus $0.17 per ton
$2,090 plus $0.17 per ton

$700
$150 Radio Licence
$ 60 Certificate of Registry


Commercial Yacht fees are to be calculated on net tonnage.


or problems relating to the
trust) as well.
The most common method
of transferring a trust to anoth-
er jurisdiction is by having the
existing trustees appoint new
trustees in the chosen jurisdic-
tion, before they then retire
from the trust in a Deed of
Retirement and Appointment.


On the retirement of the exist-
ing trustees and the appoint-
ment of the new trustees, the
trust assets will be transferred
to the new trustees or auto-
matically vest in them.
However, 'this method is

SEE page 9


BAHAMAS MARITIME AUTHOR TY
REGISTRATION AND ANNUAL FEES 2007


lRKING<'s


INDIGO
GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

A unique opportunity to own 5 adjacent lots in this quaint gated
community, each lot measures 60' x 130' zoned for 15 units.
Amenities include double tennis court and swimming pool. Was
$650,000 now reduced to $550,000 for quick sale.

LOT #70 HOPE TOWN-ABACO

Large lot less than 300' from the beach with partial ocean views,
priced to sell at $285,000.

ORANGE HILL
WEST BAY STREET

17.5 Acres Superb Oceanfront in the most desirable location on
the island. Ideal for a High-End Condo development or Class A
Office Finacial Centre. Offered at $8,000,000.

GILINGAM HOUSE MONTAGU

Class "A" Office Space Available!
Top floor comprises of 2,562 sq. ft. of leasable area and 1,108
2q. ft. of common leasable area totaling 3,670 gross square
feet. Lease is $32 per square foot with CAM charges being $12
pers square foot. This floor is being leased with partial office
furnishings.


Contact Kingsley Edgecombe
Ph: 242-424-4959
Email: kingsley@kingsrealty. com


oP TirE BA*


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas (the Commission), a
statutory agency responsible for the oversight, supervision and regulation
of the investment funds, securities and capital markets in or from The
Bahamas, invites applications from qualified Bahamians for the
following position:

Field Examiner
Responsibilities:
* Conducting on-site inspections of entities licensed or registered by
the Commission
* Assisting in the enforcement process addressing deficiencies identified
in the inspection


Qualifications and Experience:
* Bachelor's degree in Accounting or Finance
S1I 2 years experience in Auditing or Public Accounting
* Knowledge of the securities industry a plus.


Competencies:
* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
Word and Excel)


A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. Interested persons
should submit applications in writing marked "Private and Confidential"
to:


MANAGER CORPORATE AFFAIRS
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. 0. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be received no later thanAugust 15, 2007


Vacancy For The Position Of:






Core Responsibilities:

* Provides user support for the company's networked systems, by
investigating and performing resolutions to problems. that are
reported.
* Performs routine installations, preventative maintenance and
repairs to hardware, operating systems and application installations.
* Troubleshoots system and application problems, including issues
and servers.
* Assists with documentation and maintenance of technical standards
and operations.
* Assists with the implementation of new technologies and
information systems and the decommissioning and disposal of
old technologies.
* Assist with the administration of the company's networked anti-
virus and data back-up systems by checking that these systems
are current and operate as scheduled.

Knowledge Skills and Abilities:

* Advanced knowledge various Windows operating systems to
provide help desk support and to troubleshoot end-user and back
office systems.
* Sound knowledge of computer hardware to execute hardware
repairs and upgrades.
Basic knowledge of networking, especially protocols in use by
the company to troubleshoot and assist in rectifying network
issues.
Analytical and problem-solving skills to assess issues and technical
information, examine alternatives, and use judgment to provide
reasoned recommendations.
Must be open to new technology and ability to problem solve in
support of the network and central database systems.
Associates degree in a computer-related field, industry standard
network certifications required, plus two (2) or more years of
proven technical support and network systems experience.

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than August 17th, 2007 to:
DA 8128
c/o The Tribune
P.O. Box N-3207
Nassau, Bahamas


----7


I I


- '''


THE TRIBUNE














Crime spree is directly


linked


to


bad education


discussion started
by J. Barrie Far-
ringtion and the
Coalition for Education
Reform, and other employer
representatives, left off, I
believe the violent crime
spree we are now experienc-
ing is directly related to the
poor academic achievement
in our schools.
There exists a major corre-
lation between poor educa-
tion and crime. As if educa-
tion wasn't important enough
to our nation's future and
ability to compete in the
world, we seem to be ignor-
ing the fact that in terms of
dollars and "sense", we are
spending millions on putting
more and more people in
prison while neglecting the
very thing that could alleviate
the problem.


Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation's
president, said in Tuesday's
Tribune: "We are see applica-
tions from persons who lack
the necessary skills." And Mr
Farrington sums it up appro-
priately when he said: "What
we are looking at is a failure
of immense consequences. It


Legal Notice
NOTICE

GOLDEN CLEAR VISIONS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of GOLDEN CLEAR VISIONS INC.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOUVELLE CORP.
--- --


Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of NOUVELLE CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

OLDFIELD MANAGEMENT LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of OLDFIELD MANAGEMENT
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck
off the Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


is a real nightmare, a horror
movie..."
Having worked in law
enforcement all my life, I
have experienced this night-
mare first hand. On many
occasions I have dealt with
suspects and perpetrators of
violent crime who could not
even spell their name, let
alone read the statement that
I had to write for them. To
add insult to injury, the level
of understanding was greatly
diminished, resulting from a
limited vocabulary or one
that was consistent with the
mainstream.
So, when Philip Simon, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce's executive director,
says: "We operate in a ser-
vice-based economy, which
requires a high level of inter-


action with persons from all
over the world", is he speak-
ing to the inability of the
poorly-educated person to
relate and reason out simple
problems, basically because
they cannot understand what
is being said or written? Illi-
eracy is a major barrier to
communication. It is how we
communicate, aside from
bashing in the head a fellow
human being because they
just did not understand what
was being said.
It is this frustration, I
believe, that causes persons
to react violently and irra-
tionally. The problem, in
their opinion, seems so over-
whelming that they resort to
the basic human instinct of
'kill or be killed'. This reac-
tion is normal, as all of us
have it, but the more quickly
we arrive at this alternative,
the faster we would have
exhausted all others.
Is this concept unique to
the Bahamas? In 1996, sepa-
rate studies by Harvard and
Berkeley examined this cor-
relation. According to Bruce
Kennedy, the lead researcher
of the Harvard study: "The
size of the gap between the
wealthy and less well-off, as
distinct from the absolute
standard of living enjoyed by
the poor, appears to be relat-


Legal Notice
NOTICE

SAN JALAPA INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
31 st day of July 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

ARVILLE POINTE INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of ARVILLE POINTE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

CORPORATION BONETE LTD.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of CORPORATION BONETE LTD.
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


ed to mortality." This is
accompanied by the follow-
ing social problems:
Higher rates of homicide
Higher rates of violent
crime
Higher rates of incarcera-
tion
Higher rates of unem-
ployment
The list is not complete,
and there were quite a few
problems, but what stood out
for me is the item on the list
that said
Poorer educational per-
formance, including poorer
reading skills and poorer
math skills.
Sounds familiar. I wonder
if we, from a national per-
spective, realise how all eche-
lons of society affect each
other. Earlier, I mentioned
my time as a police officer,
having to deal with various
criminals. There were many
attempts to reason and justify
their deviance, one of which
came up all the time. That is,
they see the banker, lawyer,
politician and religious leader
committing the same or simi-
lar offence. So, the rationale
is: 'If they can do it, then why
can't I?'
What compounds this crisis
is that education is usually


equated with high salaries
and higher standards of liv-
ing. I do not necessarily agree
with this concept. However,
this is what is being taught in
the schools and our formal
social systems. So, are we to
say failure in academics sen-
tenceq a great number of our
population to a life of crime?
Now, for clarity, I must
interject that I am quite
aware that most of the high
dollar losses from crime
occur in the financial and
business sectors, and are per-
petrated by more educated
and affluent individuals.
However, the more violent
loss of life crimes are com-
mitted by the less-educated,
poorer members of our soci-
ety.
NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative
Measures, a loss prevention
and asset protection training
and consulting company, spe-
cialising in policy and proce-
dure development, business
security reviews and audits,
and emergency and crisis
management.
Comments can be sent to
PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas, or email; info@
preventativemeasures.net or
visit us at www.preventative-
measures.net '


Legal Notice
NOTICE

JOKERS CHARM CORPORATION LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on the
31 st day of July 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

OCAMPO LIMITED




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of OCAMPO LIMITEED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice
NOTICE

RST HOLDINGS INC.




Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RST HOLDINGS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


Safe &


Secure


I ByGamlTNery


.THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007







THE TRIBUNE


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE -,`


executive


passes Series


7


A CLIENT services representative with Lion Corporate
Services has passed the Series 7 examination after studying with
the Nassau-based Securities Training Institute (STI1).
Paulette Lozaique-Reckle) is shown here with Barrn Her-
man, Lion Corporate Services director and president.
Michael Miller. the STI's president, said in a statement:
"Our investment training programmes provide !Indents wilh
the conceptual foundations and practical skills necessary lo suc-
ceed in the raidl) evolving fields of securities and financial
services." A0ll


Legal Notice
NOTICE

HOPELAND LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HOPELAND LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
31st July, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Michael Low
of co 1 Raffles Link #05-02, Singapore 039393.
Dated this 02nd day of August, A.D. 2007



Michael Low
Liquidator

'_ ""_ .. ._.. '. U "


GRAHAM

REAL ESTATE
Showing Integrity Every Day


Are you looking to relocate your practice

We have office space conveniently
located near Princess Margaret Hospital.
Spaces ranging from 1000 sq. ft to
2600 sq. ft to fit your needs.


Call us today at 356-5030.





IMMEDIATE EMPLOYMENT

OPPORTUNITIES
FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS
ARE AVAILABLE AT

THE GREEN PARROT
Harbourfront Bar and Grill
East Bay Street


Shift Managers/Kitchen Managers
Cooks
Waiters/Waitresses
Bartenders


Please provide all resumes in writing
to the Director of Operations
Email to infoOagreenparrotbar.com
Or fax to 328-8381


Legal Notice
NOTICE

PRINCESS STAR LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PRINCESS STAR LIMITED is in voluntary dissolution
under the provisions of Section 137(4)
of the International Business Companies Act 2000.
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced on the
31st July, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Michael Low
of c o I Raffles I ink #05-02, Singapore 039393.
Dated this 02nd day of August, A\ D 2007



Michael Low
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE
NOTICE IS IIEREBY GIVEN as follows:
(a) MEDICO LAB() TRADING LTD. is in dissolution under the
provisions of the Interiationalo Business Companies Act 25000
(b) The Dissolution of said ( company commenced on July 31. 2007 when
its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the Registrar
General.
(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burro"ws of 2nd
Terrace West, Centreville. Nassau. Bahamas.
(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the l0th day of September. 2007 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims Io the Liquidator of
the company or. in default thereof. the3 may ,be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved

August 2. 2007
SIIAKIlRA BURROWS

LIQI IDAOR )01- TI E ABOVE-NAMIED COMPANY


Lion


Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 1 August 200 7
BISX LISTED ,e TRADFD SECURITIES VISIT WVWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DA1 A & INFORMATION
BIS\ ALL SHARE INDEX. CLOSE 1 844 44 / CHG 00.00 %CHG 00.00 / YTD 168 25 / YTD % 10 04
S. .. S ..... I... .. ': S. T,., ; .-:. '. _. .- I'c .l . -.: .. Il -
12.05 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.65 11.65 0.00 1.527 0400 7.6 345%
9.41 7.49 Bank of Bahamas 9.40 9.40 0 00 0.733 0.260 12 8 2 77%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 -0.013 0.020 N/M 2 35%
3.65 1.48 Bahamas Waste 3.65 3.65 0 00 0.279 0 OGO 13.1 1 64%
1 57 1.20 Fidelity Bank 1.57 1.57 0.00 0.064 0 020 2,1 5, 1.27%
10.75 9.10 Cable Bahamas 1072 1072 0.00 0.949 0.240 ,1 3 224%
2.41 1.80 Colina Holdings 2.41 2.41 0.00 0.281 0.080 86 332%
15.12 1099 Commonwealth Bank 15.12 15.12 000 1.190 0.680 12 7 4 50%
6.82 4.60 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.79 6.82 1 03 0.112 0.050 51 8 0 86%
2.76 220 Doctor's Hospital 2.31 2.31 000 0.281 0.000 82 0.00%
6.40 5.54 Famguard 6.20 6.20 0 00 0 694 0 240 R.9 3.87%
12.76 11.51 Finco 12 76 12.76 000 250 0.787 0 570 16 2 4 47%
14.70 12 80 FistCahibbean 14.65 14.65 000 0.977 0470 14 6 321%
20.73 11 15 I uool 2073 20 73 000 1.657 0 530 12 5 2 56%
1 00 0 54 Freepui1 Coincirte 064 0.64 000 0415 0 000 1 5 000%/
865 710 ICD Utilities 725 7.25 000 0411 0200 170( 276%
9.90 8.52 J S Johnson 9.90 9.90 0 00 0 946 0 580 10.5 5 86%
10.00 10.00 Premirer Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0 00 1 167 0 600 8.6 6.00%
Fidelity Over-The-Counler Secunlies
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S Div $ P/E Yield
14.60 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14060 1560 1600 1 234 1 18' 12 6 8 120%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Cn.ossigs (Prpf) 6 00 6 25 10 00 0 000 0 640 NtA 7 85%
0.54 020 RND Holdings 0.35 0.40 0 20 0034 0 000 11 8 0 00%
Cotina Over-The-Counter Securities
4300 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 4300 4100 2 220 0 '000 1 4 0000';
14.60 14 00 Bahamas Supermakn'ts 14.60 15.50 14 00 1 234 1 125 126 7 /1
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings O 45 0.55 045 0021 0000 26 2 r.)',
BISX Usted Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low F-....d Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div S Yield %
1 3484 1 2q98 Colrina Mo.,e.s MaIkt Fund 1 348410"
3.2920 2.9449 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.2920""
2.7399 2.4415 Colinr MSI P .r...IredI Fund 2.739935-*
1 2576 1.1820 Colin, Bon,, Fund 1 257576."W
11.6049 11 1193 FidLlity Prnime Inonm. Fund 11 6049.....
FINDEX: CLOSE 833.57 / YTD 12.33% 1/ 2006 34.47%
BISX ALL 'iHARE INDEX i- 1 r'. MARKEI I [RMS YIELD -In 12 o 1, I d "iv d"o1 divi des i d ihv ilrpsii l prt.<. N,
52wk-HI Hig, chest (.lusinp .- . Bid S Buylig price of oC llna .ind irlolity
52wk-L w Lowest l,tiir i1 I t. ..k Ask $ Seillinj price o,, ,,Coln.a and fidity
Pr-vlou- Cl, Prollow: (0r) i 0 a La.,t Pac. - ast traded over the-counter Dri
Today' Cil. e Cure,,t It, U < lr. WoA kiy V l divlr q V.i Lumi(t oI thi pril w l --k
Chang, i .han.i e itn InFsi prl frr,, i h .i F EPS $ -A i,,,,ey % repn nt't, rngii a h
Daily Vol -Nurber of total hat ', I/ d t iny NAV N.t Asset Va.lu. ,
DIV $ Dividends per share pald In ih" In';L, 12 rnntls N/M Not Mearningful
P/E Closing price divided hy the la. 12 invn. il o r. iing FINDEX The Fidelity Bahanl as Stock IIndX J.1nuary 1 199.1 100 i ,, i)017
TO TRADE C FIDELITY 22-356-7764 FOR MORE DATA INFORMATION CALL 03
TO TRADE CaLL C,.LiNr, 2::-'.02-701O t FIDELITY 242-356-7764, FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL (242i 94-'2503


To adets nThU~fg


BU91NES


Legal Notice

NOTICE


A & A CORPORATE SERVICES CORP

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International I3usiness Companies Act 2000 the Dissolution A & A
CORPORATE SERVICES CORPhas been completed, a (citiliiate
of Dissolution has been issued and the compin h1.- thl. lcie been
struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Conmpletion of dissolution was the 25111 of June 2007.









LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business CompAnies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
Tagle & Co. Limited is in dissolution. Ms. Joneka A. Wright
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbothain
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-3026,
Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-damed company are required to send their names,
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before the 25th day of August. 2007.


Sign J- 4-1
J iA. Wright








Long Island landscaping company seeks to
employ a gardener to work in Long Island.
Persons applying should be independently
motivated and willing to relocate. Please apply by
sending a resume along with Police Record to:


LANDSCAPER
P.O. Box N3726
Nassau, The Bahamas.
All applications should arrive on or before
August 17th, 2007.







PAE BTHRSAYUAGUTIN00STESRIUN


Paying for em


.can


ion


small businesses to


develop, retain good staffers


* By JOYCE M
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) With
the start of the school year not
far off, employees of small busi-
nesses might have a hankering
to take some courses. And com-
pany owners might want to
think about paying for them to
take some classes the learn-
ing may help their careers and
in turn, help the business retain
its best workers.


Many companies are willing
to pay for courses that will help
employees upgrade their skills
or learn new ones. Others go
further, making tuition reim-
bursement an employee benefit
that even covers courses not
directly related to the job.
"For me, it's really straight-
forward: We value the employ-
ees we have here," said Kyle
Corkum, president of
Landquest, a land development
company in Raleigh, N.C.
"We're not interested in hav-


ing people come and go like a
revolving door. We're trying to
upgrade the capability and
knowledge of our people."
Landquest is currently pay-
ing for a staffer to take a
preparatory course for the Law
School Admission Test, and it is
paying undergraduate tuition
for another employee. Its direc-
tor of philanthropy is taking
business writing and literature
courses at company expense.
"We have 20 employees. 11
we lose one, we're in a tough


At any one moment

there are a million ways

to have fun.


CARNIVALTRIUMPHe
OCTOBER 20,2007
7 DAY
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US$f Q*
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Rates are per guest, double occupancy capacity controlled and
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spot. Everyone we've got is
hand-picked, and we want them
to stay for the rest of their
careers," said Corkum. He
added that the company will
pay for law school for the staffer
now studying for the LSAT.
Human resources profession-
als say that paying for employ-
ees' courses is a great motivator
and retention tool for all com-
panies, so a small business that
offers tuition reimbursement
will make itself more competi-
tive when it comes to attract-
ing and keeping good workers.
Beverly Kaye, an employee
retention consultant in Sherman
Oaks, California, said research
has shown that one of the top
reasons why workers stay with
their companies is they're learn-
ing and growing on the job.


Taking courses helps that
process along.
"I'm a believer in paying for
anything that in any way helps
them be more effective on the
job," said Kaye, co-author of
the book "Love 'em or Lose
'em: Getting Good People to
Stay."
Kaye suggests owners take
the initiative and offer tuition
reimbursement to staffers rather
than waiting for workers to
request it; employees will appre-
ciate the goodwill behind the
offer.
"It loses some of its panache
if you wait for them to ask,"
Kaye said.
And don't presume to know
what kind of course is right for
a given staffer. Don't assume
that a graphics designer, for


instance, should only be taking
a computer graphics course.
"What you need is to under-
stand what challenges and moti-
vates each individual employ-
ee," Kaye said.
Joyce Gioia-Herman, presi-
dent of The Herman Group, a
management consulting firm in
Greensboro, N.C., doesn't have
employees now, but when she
did in the past, all staffers, as
long as they worked at least 20
hours a week, were offered
tuition reimbursement.
"We wanted it to be some-
thing that would develop them,
but we gave it a very wide lati-
tude," she said. "If somebody
wanted to take a course, for
instance in balancing their bud-
get or some other real practi-
cal skill or ability they could
acquire, that would help them
feel better about themselves
and their ability to function per-
sonally as well as professional-
ly."
Tuition reimbursement isn't
the only way to help employ-
ees learn; some businesses offer
onsite learning.
Alfred Portale, owner of the
upscale Gotham Bar & Grill in
New York, has arranged for
classes to be given at the restau-
rant, including English classes
for workers who wanted to
improve their language skills.
Portale has also paid for indi-
vidual language classes for some
employees.
He also offers culinary edu-
cation classes, including a wine
program planned for later this
year.
"1 feel that people want to
continue to learn in their posi-
tions," Portale said. "It's a very
important component of the
workplace if they feel they're
learning, they're happy and stay
on."


HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS
PROUDLY RECOGNIZES OUR TOP
SALES AND MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES
FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE


lan Gilbert Seanend Ctwright
TOiA Sd. L- fA;


Maudne Roberts


Julian Gomez
lifto P*wM


Gustaf Hernqist
I C- a


HARBORSIDE
RESORT
ATLANTIS
-ME TLAl.;IS VACATION CLUB

.. . . .-.- .-.. .. .


Legal Notice

NOTICE

KARMARCUS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 13th day of June 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa
Corp. Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.






ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


m PrENtTpAVEL.
#57 Collins Avenue
P.O. Box N-9670
328-0264 / 328-0257


EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency responsible
for regulating the Investment Funds, Securities and Capital Markets in the
Bahamas through its administration of the Securities legislation (the Investment
Funds Act, 2003 (IFA) and Securities Industry Act, 1999 (SIA), is seeking
candidates for the following position:

Programmer
Responsibilities:

* Assist with the design development and ongoing maintenance of IT
application systems within the Commission
* Identify ways to improve current software that will result in a better user
experience
* Add new features to current software and create new software applications
as needed
* Work independently or in a team environment to meet deadlines
* Research and fix problems and acquire new knowledge with little or no
supervision
Qualifications and Experience:

* Qualified programmer with a minimum qualification of a bachelor's
degree in computer science or related field or 5-7 years of programming
experience
* 2-3 years experience developing web
* Knowledge of IIS6 and SQL server 2005 essential
* Ability to write SQL statements and stored procedures is an asset
*' Sound knowledge of web security using SSL encryption and building
secure applications
* Ability to work in Dreamweaver, Front page, Visual Studio or other web
design tool a plus
* Working knowledge of the securities industry and the relevant legislation
Competencies:

* Excellent oral and written communication skills
* Proficient in HTML, VB/Java script, ASP.NET, SQL, SSL
* Must have ability to grasp new programming technologies and apply
new techniques to environment
A competitive salary and benefits are being offered. To apply, please provide
a resume to the attention of:
MANAGER CORPORATE AFFAIRS
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs
Applications should be submitted no later than August 15th, 2007


Antonio Miller


Ethan Adderey
r0
lnH-me


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007







THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY;AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 7B


Airport fee rises likely


FROM page 1

that creates economic oppor-
tunities for Bahamians by sim-
ply being the best Bahamian
airport possible".
The Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport currently pro-
vided between 4,500-5,000
direct jobs, a total that was set
to increase when construction
work on the new terminals
begun next year.
NADC had allocated a cap-
ital budget of $10 million to
short-term "fix-ups" at the air-
port, and had identified 45
areas that needed attention.
These included the purchase
of trucks and sweeper vehicles,
a new public address system,
carpeting and lighting, kerb
upgrades and flushing out the
drains in the parking lot.

System

A new system that would
eliminate the final stage in bag-
gage screening for travellers
flying to the US the final
check before the US departure
lounge was set to be com-
pleted in December and
launched in January 2008, free-
ing up retail and seating space.
A further $1.8 million was
being spent on new washrooms
upgrades, Mr Richmond
added, with some $750,000 of
that going on the 'model' in
the US departures lounge.
Longer-term, construction
of the new US departures ter-
minal, which will be located to
the right of the existing build-
ing, is set to be completed "in
early 2010".





Anyone interested in
forming or joining a
scuba diving club in
Nassau please email
your interest to

nassauscubadivers@ coralwave.com


The existing US departures
terminal will be be trans-
formed into the international
arrivals hall, with immigration
upstairs and baggage claim
downstairs, by 2011. A new
domestic and international
departures terminal will be
constructed by 2012, covering
some 600,000 square feet in
size.

Future

Mr Richmond said that "at
some time in the future" the
Lynden Pindling International
Airport would need to look at
constructing a parallel runway


UT).1SO


to the existing 11,000 foot main
runway, as currently the two
main runways converged. The
new runway would likely have
to be some 5,000 feet from the
existing one.

Present

NADC is due to present its
financing and new design plans
for Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport to the Govern-
ment in mid-September.
The design currently
involves a number of elevators
and escalators, and attempts
to minimise walking distances
for airline passengers.


-N-S OP HN E
I" 116 The "homes. D o*&- --t..


UBe prepared for the storm
BLACK & DECKER STORMSTATION
ALL-IN-ONE RECHARGEABLE POWER
SOURCE/RADIO/LIGHT
Rechargeable emergency power
source/radio/light with locator light that goes
on when power goes off
25-watt power source for low-wattage
devices; AM/FM/TV audio/weather-
battery radio; detachable flashlight
Rugged plastic case with soft rubber
3-position carrying handle
Includes 12-volt charger


Limited quantity

Only $179

Tel: (242) 394-4949 East Bay Street
P.O.Box N- 3050 Nassau Bahamas
email: shopkeeper@stopnshopbahamas.com
website: www.stopnshopbahamas.com
SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!


Unsuitable applications will not be acknowledged.


Lot#18, Rockwell Subdivision,
N.P. Single Family Residence.
4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 950 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $159,000.
Travel west on Carmichael Rd,
turn north onto McKinney
Dr and west onto Rocky Pine
Rd, take the third right and the
subject is the third house.

Lot#1267, Pinewood Gardens,
N.P. Single Family Residence.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom.
Property Size: 5,000 s.q. ft.
Building Size: 1,000 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $108,000.
Travelling west on Pinewood
Dr turn on to Willow Tree Dr;
which is the first corner on the
right side after the Pinewood
round about heading north
on Willow Tree Dr. Take the
third corner on the left side
which is Sugar Apple St and the
property is the seventh lot on
the left side. The lot is yellow
trim with white.

Lot#1852, Pinewood Gar-
dens.Single Family Residence.
2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 914 sq.ft.
Appraised value: $107,000.
Turn onto Pinewood Dr from
East Street South and travelling
east and take the third corner
on the right hand side, which
is Thatch Palm Ave. Travel-
ling south on Thatch Palm Ave
turn through the fourth corner
on the left hand side which is
Spice St and the property is the
seventh lot on the lefthand side.
The building is pink trimmed
with white.

Lot#209, Sunshine Park, N.P.
Fourplex Apartment. Property
size: 4,944 sq.ft. Building Size:
2,200 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $205,600.
Heading south on Blue Hill
Road, take the 1st entrance
into sunshine park, take the first
corner on left Murray St. The
subject property is fifth house
on left hand side of the street,
blue with white trim.


Lot #143, Yellow Elder Gar-
dens Sub, N.P. Single Family
Residence. 3 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroom. Property Size:
3,200 sq. ft. Building Size:
873 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $104,000.
From Blue Hill Rd, travel pass
Yellow Elder Primary'School
turn right onto the next street
which is Seymour St travel,
west along Seymour St which
curves left turn left on the
second corner Prince Court
and the property is the fourth
house on the left. blue trimmed
with white.

Lot#159, Winton Meadows
Section #1. Single Family
Residence. 3 Bedrooms, 2
Bathrooms. Property Size:
8,000 sq.ft. Building Size:
2,312 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: 222,000.
Travel east along Prince Charles
Ave and turn right on Jasmine
Drive continue to the third
corner on the right Holly Rd
and the property is the sixth
after the first corner on the
right. Ninth House white, with
brown trim.

Lot#11, Blk#2, Lightbourne
Sub, N.P. Single Family
Residence. 3 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroom. Property Size: 6,000
sq.ft. Building Size: 1,176 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: 145,000.
Travel west on Farrington Rd to
Rock Crusher Rd turn right
at the entrance and travel
around the curve the subject
property is the sixth house
on the left house #16 green
trimmed white.

Lot#20, Domingo Heights,
N.P. Single Family Residence.
3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 4,750 sq.ft.
Building Size: 1,475 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $163,000.
From the junction of East Street
and Soldier Road, travel south
on East Street, take the 5th cor-
ner on the left (El-bo Ave), at
the T-junction turn left, take the
first right (Silk alley), the prop-
erty is 100 feet on the right,
white trim with aqua.


Lot#3, Blk#9, Eastern Estates,
N.P. Single Family Residence. 4
Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms. Prop-
erty Size: 6,000 sq.ft. Building
Size: 2,377 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $225,000.
Travel east on Prince Charles
Dr and'turn into Eastern Estates
travel south to the T-Junction
(Chaster Rd) turn left onto
Chasier Road and travel around
the curve after the first left lead-
ing into Winton Meadows the
property is the third property
/ second house on left oppo-
site Willet Rd house#33, blue
trimmed white.

Lot#464, Yellow Elder Gardens
Sub. Single Family Residence.
4 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom.
Property Size: 3,200 sq. ft.
Building Size: 1,797 sq. ft.
Appraised Value: $111,000.
From Tonique Williams Dar-
ling Highway roundabout,
travel north on Yellow Elder
Way, turn right on Graham Dr,
continue pass the 1st corner
on the left and property is the
second lot on the left.

Lot#701, Pinewood Gardens
Sub, N.P. Single Family Resi-
dence. 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath-
room. Property Size: 5,000
sq.ft. Building Size: 960 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $118,812.
From the roundabout at Pine-
wood Gardens travel north on
Pigeon Plum Street turn at the
fifth (Plane St) and travel east
on Plane Street to the intersec-
tion of Plane St & Buttonwood
Ave the subject property is at
the intersection and the end of
Panes Street on the left white
trimmed blue.


ISAPARTMENT$/CONDOMINIUMS I


Lots#33,34,35,36, Blk#40, Nas-
sau Village, N.P. Commercial
Building. 3-1 Bedroom, 1 Bath-
room. 1-2 Bedroom, 1 Bath-
room. 1 Retail Store. Property
Size: 10,100 sq.ft. Building Size:
4,900 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $491,000.
Travel east on Alexandria Blvd.
to the intersection of Alexandria
and Taylor Sts and the prop-
erty is on the southwest corner
of intersection, a commercial
building painted tan trimmed
with brown.

Lot#342, Stapledon Gardens
Sub, N.P. Duplex Apartment.
1-3 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom.
1-2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom.
Property Size: 9,600 sq.ft.
Building size: 1,920 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $377,106.
From the roundabout at Sir Milo
Butler hwy travel west along
Harrold Rd to Christie Ave, turn
right on McKinneyAve, then first
right Hampden Rd cross over
Walrus Rd and property is the
fifth on the northern side of
Hampden Rd.


Lot #400,Yellow Elder Gardens
Sub. Duplex Apartment. 2-3
Bedroom, 1 Bathroom. Prop-


ley turn left onto Doyle St travel
west beyond the Tom "The Bird"
Grant Sporting Complex after
the first left, property is second
house on the left #400 green
trim white.

Lot#18, Evansville Sub,
N.P. Duplex. 2 Bedrooms, 1
Bathroom each. Property
Size: 7,328 sq.ft. Building Size:
1723 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $204,000.
From Spikenard Rd travel
west along Carmicheal Rd
on the left. The property is the
second on the left painted rust
trim with white.

Lot#23876 & 2388, Pinewood
Gardens, N.P. Commercial
Building 2 Office Spaces.
Property Size: 20,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 2,440 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $431,000.
Travel to the west entry of
Charles W Saunders Hwy,
property is on the first corner
on the right southside oppo-
site Cleveland Eneas Primary
School. A single storey com-
mercial building housing a
laundrymat, convenience store
and restaurant. Painted mauve
and pink.


Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 2,248 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $216,000.
Travel south on East St South
turn right onto Pineway Dr
(intersection at South Beach
Police Station) travel west
on Pineway Dr after the first
comer on the left, Oleander Ave,
property is second property on
the left (duplex) painted white
and trimmed maroon.

Lot of Land Francis Ave, Fox
Hill, N.P. Duplex Apartment.
1-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms.
1-4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms.
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 2,291 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $216,000.
From Fox Hill Rd round about
travel south on Fox Hill Rd take
the second left Davis St turn
left at T-junction at Armbris-
ter St then first right Francis
Ave, then the first left and the
subject property is the first on
the right.

Lot#16, Blk#21, Shirley Heights,
N.P. 3 Single Storey Buildings.
2-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom.
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft.
Building Size: 2,400 sq.ft.
Appraised Value: $119,000.


erty Size: 3,200 sq. ft. Building Located within 355 feet west
Size: 1,490 sq. ft. Lot#3, Blk#2, South Beach of Mount Royal Ave on the
Appraised Value: $143,320. Estates, N.P.DuplexApartment. northern side of Arundel
Travel north on Blue Hill Rd 1-2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms St and two lots east of the
at the intersection of A.E Adder- and 1-1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom. Centerville Park. A


RBC
- FINCO




DISTRESSED PROPERTIES


LISTED FOR SALE

For more information contact 393-2004

II^BHIHI^^H^^^^HBHIHUS


COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION
EUGENE DUPUCH LAW SCHOOL
NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS


POST OF TUTOR
Legal Aid Clinic

Applications are invited from attorneys-at-law who are admitted to practice in The Bahamas
for the post of Tutor at the Eugene Dupuch Law School, Legal Aid Clinic, Nassau, The Baha-
mas. The successful applicant will be expected to assume duties on the 1st day of November,
2007. The post is a full-time one and no outside employment may be undertaken without the
prior approval of the Council of Legal Education.

Applicants are required to have at least five (5) years practical, professional experience includ-
ing both criminal law practice and civil law practice particularly in litigious work, personal
injury cases, family law, conveyancing, real property and probate.

The appointment will be on contract for three (3) years in the first instance and its renewable.

The duties and responsibilities of the post include:-

* Performing the duties of full-time attorney-at-law in the Legal Aid Clinic.
The includes representing clients in court.
* Supervising, instructing and teaching students in the practical aspects of their training.
* Participating in a regular assessment of relevant areas of the established curriculum with a
view to the continued development of content and advancement in teaching methodology.
* Participating in activities to facilitate the training programmes of the Law Schools of the
Council of Legal Education.
* Assisting the Director of the Legal Aid Clinic and performing any other duties as assigned by
the Principal.

Some of the benefits attached tot he post include:

* housing allowance
* duty allowance
* study and travel grant
* book grant

Where appropriate, up to five (5) full economy class passages and baggage allowances will be
paid on appointment and on normal termination of appointment.

Six (6) copies of a letter of application, accompanied by curriculum vitae and supporting docu-
ments, and the names and addresses of three (3) referees, should be sent to arrive not later than
Friday, August 31, 2007 to:-

The Principal
Eugene Dupuch Law School
P. 0. Box SS-6394
Nassau, N.P.
The Bahamas


...A


i


THURSDAY,-AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


OM


e




D7 THE TRIBUNE


"Your Bahamian Supermatrket
*q

SUPER
VALUE
\o NOW ACCEPTING
SSUNCARD
QUAL.TYC HTS ANO PPtCESRESERVED

II.-
B^M^T w il
HL M *j I


REGULAR A


LIBBY'S
WHOLE KERNEL
CORN
&
SLICED


BEETS

99,y 15-OZ.


BETTER VALUES
BETTER BRANDS
4 OUR SERVICE
GUARANTEED
Redeem Quality Stamps at Bed, Bath & Home
ALL STORES WILL BE OPEN AUGUST MONDAY FROM 7AM 12 NOON
CABLE BEACH STORE WILL BE OPEN AUGUST MONDAY FROM 7AMB- 3PM
0 DOUBLE QUALITY STAMPS EVERY SUNDAY*


CARNATION
EVAPORATED

MILK


S B




WESSON
VEGETABLE/CORN

OIL


2 48-OZ


r, H I A I


QUAKER
BAG

CEREALS


QUAKER CRISPS 3-OZ....$2.59


SHURFINE
MACARONI
& CHEESE
7.25-OZ..


SHURFINE 18-OZ.
BBQ SAUCE...................2/$3.00
SHURINE 26-OZ.
SALT.................................. 590
RICELAND 20-LB.
RICE .................................$7.99
SHURFINE 24-CT.
KNIVES,
FORKS,SPOONS.................990
SAVER CHOICE 100-CT.
PAPER PLATES ................$1.49
SHURFINE 16-OZ. 20 CT.
PLASTIC CUPS ...............$1.99
VALUTIME 40-CT.
FOAM PLATES-...............2/$3.00
VALUTIME 33-GAL. 10-CT
TRASH BAGS...................$2.99


KOOL AID
DRINK

MIXES
SMALL PACKS
T15/$ 00







JOY
DISH

LIQUID
$1 590
-.12.6-OZ 'g^


PRINGLES 6.5-OZ.
CHIPS............................. $3.00
LIBBY'S GAL.
CORN/BEETS............$5.99
SEABEST 66.2-OZ.
TUNA..............................$6.99
MARDI GRA 500-CT.
NAPKINS........................$5.99
KINGSFORD 32-OZ.
LIGHTER FLUID. ............. $6.99
SHURFINE 12-OZ. 12-CT.
PLASTIC BOWLS.............$1.39
VALUTIME 25-FT.
FOIL....................................... 990
DIXIE 240-CT.
RED PLASTIC,
CUPS........................... $15.99










10-PK.
CAPRI SUN &
KOOLAID JAMIES

DRINKS

$369



..


KELLOGGS
TRI FUN
CEREAL


!52-OZ.


BLUEBIRD

JUICES

2/$ 39
11.5-OZ.







NIAGARA
SPRAY
STARCH


K.)


PAR EXCELLENCE
PARBOILED

RICE

2/$501
5-LB


p.


i


0
3.


l


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, ;


PAREXELLENCE


e


-11


--


ILI ~La~dl-~-rc~~s I- I C~L~I L I I


*
STARKIST^^^^1
TUNA.B
*LrOZ..


\^__.___


9 89
22-OZ.







g I--% -F


B BAR-S
CHUCK
WAGON

BACON
12-OZ

$259


FDA R R Z .E F O PIA


BREADSTONE 8-OZ.
SOUR
3 REAM.........,,,,,,,,, 1 .99

PHILDELPHIAASST'D FLAVOR 8-OZ.
CREAM

3UPER VALUE ASST'D ..... GAL
FRUIT
_RIN K................. .$2.39


PILLSBURY AST'D FLAVOR 11.5-OZ
TOASTER
STRUDEL......................... $ 3.59

PEPERIDGE FARM LAYER
ASST'D 19-OZ.
CAKES... ******** **........$2.99

GREEN GIANT ASST'D FLAVOR.......24-OZ.
PASTA
ACCENT ,,,,,,,,,,.,,,.,,,,,.,,,,,,$5.59


A .,a


OSCAR MAYER
WIENERS &
BUN-LENGTH
WIENERS

$ 79.
2 .1-LB. j


OSCAR MAYER
BEEF
BOLOGNA

$ 99
12-OZ.


*SIE


COUNTRY TREAT

GLAZED DONUTS


$ 99
5 12-PK.


SWEET
GGREEN SEEDLESS

PP GRAPES RN

39 49
14PER-LB.


FROM page 3

only effective if the new
trustees are resident in a juris-
diction that has trust laws sim-
ilar to, or based closely, on
English trust law, and the trust
laws of the jurisdiction from
which the trust will be trans-
ferred.
Alternatively, it may be nec-
essary to alter the form of the
trust settlement to take into
account the differences
between English trust law and
the law of the country to which
the trust settlement is to be
transferred. This can be done
by using a power in the trust
instrument to revoke existing
trusts and to declare new ones.
Again, much will depend on
the provisions of trust as to
who can use and enforce this
power, although normally it


-BEEF

BACK

RIBS
PER-LB.


1 29


will be the trustees. If there is
no power in the trust to do this,
then application will have to
be made to the court under the
relevant statute within the
existing jurisdiction.
In transferring a trust from
one jurisdiction to another,
consideration will have to be
given to the following issues.
This is by no means, an
exhaustive list:
The similarities and differ-
ences in the trust laws of both
jurisdictions
The interests of the bene-
ficiaries, and whether the
change of jurisdiction/change
of trustees will have any
adverse or prejudicial effect on
these interests.
The interpretation of cer-
tain words compared to other
jurisdictions. Particular atten-
tion should be given to any
terms of the provisions or pow-
ers that may be altered
because of the change in juris-
diction.
The appointment of a
trustee in the new proper law
jurisdiction.
Another consideration with
regard to the transfer of trusts
is the existence of a flee clause
in the trust instrument, which
will have the effect of changing
the management and adminis-
tration of a trust to another
jurisdiction on the occurrence
of a particular event (politi-
cal instability, civil unrest, tax-
ation).
The flee clause will normal-
ly contain some provision that
on the occurrence of some pre-
determined event, the trustees
will automatically retire and
new, specified trustees will be
appointed in another jurisdic-
tion. It will also state that the
proper law and the law of the
forum will also be changed at
the same time as the change
in trustees.
The jurisdiction to which the


SAL.STAT [SMlONDAYJULY30TH-.> ATURD! Il.AYABUGTI TH,2007


trust will flee should have com-
parable trust laws to that of
the former jurisdiction, in
order to avoid any possible
future conflicts. It should, nor-
mally, be one in which the orig-
inal trustees have some repre-
sentation or office.
It should be noted that the
new trustees who are appoint-
ed under a Deed of Retire-
ment and Appointment
should, as a matter of good
practice, review the trust laws
of the original/former jurisdic-
tion to ensure they are com-
parable to those of the country
in which they are resident.
They should then carefully vet
the provisions of the trust deed
to make certain the provisions
are acceptable in terms of the
duties, powers, obligations,
risks, and indemnities they will
assume in accepting to act as
the new trustees of the trust.
The new trustees should also
investigate the existing rela-
tionship between the original
trustees and the beneficiaries,
and any administration and
accounting issues that may
pose potential conflicts.
NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute, nor is it a substi-
tute, for legal advice. Persons
reading this article and/or col-
umn are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may
relate to the information pre-
sented. 2007. Tyrone L.E.
Fitzgerald. All rights reserved.
Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney with Fitzgerald &
Fitzgerald. Should you have
any comments or enquiries
regarding the content of this
article, contact Mr Fitzgerald at
Suite 212, Lagoon Court Build-
ing, Olde Towne Mall at
Sandyport, West Bay Street,
P. 0. Box CB-11173, Nassau,
Bahamas


Share
your
news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won.an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


WHOLE ROTISSERIE

CHICKENS


$799
--77 EACH )


Having trust in



modern laws


- I -s I


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


Freeport quarry sold to US firm


One-Stop-Shop Business Services
Business Plans ........ ...........................$750.00
* legal, Accounting & Marketing Services
o(it kolioks Ac'ounlng Traiming
i nltrepr o eurship/Buuiness Mgnit. Training
Busmine. C llli ultit per hour)...............S50.00


I oI o wwww.i arrklirnquestconsulting.com


I k A


APPLICATIONS ARE INVITED FOR THE POSITIONS OF:

1. Manager Private Island

Applicant should satisfy the following minimum requirements:

* Have a First Degree i, Marine Engineering from a recognized
College, Uve: ,ty or -quivalent on tle job experience and training
SA least tw, years experience in the hospitalityy industry or closely
related fiepd
Will bp ,.jired de and be tui1 responsible for the operation of the
er tire island
Mr ,'-< e '): -: ib ote
Be proactive -'t .- 'iv)'r.i ,d w:.r'g to work long hours
S B able to !ea,.' i -earn of technicians with varied trades
Ba- able to se,. Trend for timely and quality work performance

2. Chief Engineer

'he successful aop', :ant will be reCu:red to reside and be responsible for the
o-ipiete Engineerir a Maintenance -,)oeration of a small hotel on a private
Island This includes

Budget prepaatio and stock controls
SHVAC & Re'* gefathL.n Systems
Waste wate: treatment
Reverse osmosis water plants
Si *,SandoDygeiera1L
a Commercial ,0 'e,' equipment
* Spa, pools and Jacuzzi equipment
SLaundry machines
SEnvironmental and computerized energy management systems and
v wrveite mn.. "i.' e
* Water sports facilities & marine engine maintenance

3. Food & Beverage Director

* University or College degree in Hospitality Management with special
emphasis on Food & Beverage operations.
*A minimum of 5 years in similar position of a luxury hotel/resort
* Good Knowledge of the culinary arts and international cuisine.
* Experience in food & beverage training.
Must be computer literate in Excel & Word
Strong communication skills oral and written.
Have strong organizational and leadership skills.


Serious applicants should send resume to:
steve@sribahamas.com or by fax to Human Resources at
242-322-4770


"She ells............ Sea Shells"
A Fashionable Book Signing Event
Ticket Stations:

Juke Box- Marathon Mall
Faith Life Christian Center
Gilead Full Gospvl Baptist Church Offlce Farrington lid.
Chapter One Bookstore Oaksfield


Author Franzetta LJohnson
Date. Fridd'..u;gust 24. (2W7
%enu :\aorkers IlIua tHuitilrud Ro


Credit Suisse (Bahamas] Limited
is presently considering applications for

BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGERS

he Pri .e Banking Business Department invites applications for three (3)
suitably qualified candidates for the position of
BANKING RELATIONSHIP MANAGERS:

Requirements:

Applicants should possess a degree (or equivalent) in Business
administration
At lease five (5) years banking experience including trading, trade
reconciliation- custody business and securities markets
Marketing experience in either Europe, Latin America or North America
Existing client base with assets under management in excess of US$100
Mio.
Candidates should have strong communication skills in English together
with at least one of the following languages: German, Spanish, Italian
and French
Good computer literacy on PC and host software
Must have solid analytical skills with keen attention to details
Must have the ability) to establish and maintain strong working
re' .i onships with key personnel and work effectively in a team

Wi Lming to travel extensively within the market area designated and
utilize a network of existing contacts and associates
Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Keiy Duties & Responsibilities will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore clients
Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients on products, services and investment opportunities
Management of accounts / relationships with clients originating from market
area countries.

ONLY APPLICANTS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS WILL BE CONTACTED.
NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Applications should be submitted:

Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS AUGUST 10, 2007


CREDIT I SUISSE


Time "'-30 pm
R. IP I .i242P 3til-35-40


r











the


FROM page 1

come from Florida Rock. Hec
was represented in the deal b\
attorney Chris Gouthro, while
Florida Rock was represented
bv Gregory Moss, of Moss &
Associates.
Freeport Aggregate is
expected to supply up to
300,000 tons of aggregates
annually to Florida Rock,
which is embroiled in trouble


currently in its home state.
A ruling by a federal judge
shut down three South Florida
quarries, one owned by Florida
Rock. over environmental con-
cerns. Seven other quarries are
being investigated.
The companies have
appealed the order and a
motion for a stay has been
filed. Florida Rock's chief exe-
cuitive, John Baker, said the
300,000 tons that will be sup-
plied by the Freeport quarry
is a small fraction of what
Florida Rock needs.
"That's tiny," Mr Baker said.
"We have 25 million tons of
reserves and we'll work on it,
but we're starting from a low
base and we'll just try to see
what we can make happen."




Hutchison


Whampoa


warned

FROM page 1

assets."
He added that under the
terms of the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement, the GBPA was
supposed to hold those assets
in trust for the 99-year dura-
tion of the agreement, saying
they could not be sold or
divested especially without
licensee consent.
Mr Maynard said that if the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd
were to be sold, Hutchison
Whampoa was the most appro-
priate buyer, since it was
already so heavily entrenched
and invested in the Freeport
economy.
He added that a group of
European investors, put
together by ousted GBPA
chairman Hannes Babak,
might also have been interest-
ed in acquiring the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd.


GLINTON I SWEETING I O'BRIEN



COUNSEL & ATTORNEY S-AT-LAW
303 SHIRLEY STREET I P.O. BOX N-492
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE I THE BAHAMAS
T: 242.328.3500 I F: 242.328.8008.1 w ww.gsolegal.com

GLINTON I SWEETING I O'BRIEN is seeking two qualified
Attorneys-At-Law to join the firm as Associates specializing in Real Estate
Law and Litigation, respectively.

Applicants should have strong academic records, particularly in
respect of their legal studies, be organized and diligent workers with sound
analytical and writing skills, and should have the personal skills
necessary for direct professional interaction with the firm's most
important clients. Two or more years experience is
preferred but is less important than ability and the right attitude.

Successful applicants will receive a highly competitive salary,
including full medical insurance and will participate in a generous
profit-sharing scheme. More importantly, the successful applicants will join
a thriving new practice in the early stages of its growth, and work in an
enjoyable and challenging environment while having the benefit of
careful and thorough training from experienced practitioners.

Interested applicants should deliver their curriculum vitas to our offices
in the Destinations Building, 303 Shirley Street, along with copies of all
degrees and certificates earned and at least two samples of written work
prepared by the applicants in either an academic or professional context.
All applications will be treated as confidential.


E v r \Vr We ,.di.- ., I ri..d r 'Tli.' Arb ti The
Tri!, ,,- lI p, id.', ...,nnpr, I,.. i, i .,o'.' i ,g> >t
j F,, .1l1 ,.i ,cl.i.. rl l. l i Ii .'... ,, iii T lice IIjh .1i1 .i'
TIhel Tril b une i, nii newspaper."
JOHN BEADLE
A RTI ,T



The Tribune
7 7/4'W ^ /W?


BUSINESS


I-


Le_ I----~.-~ ---I IIIC


'llL


~ II I ~~- ----n-






THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 11B


THE TRIBUNE


Fear of greater risk




driving investors more





than the actual risk, as





credit markets weaken


4CUEcui










CORE 'OR ILLU SS & HEALTH CONDliNOS-.


* By DAN SEYMOUR
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) The
widening fallout in the U.S.
mortgage industry has remind-
ed investors of a risk they had
forgotten: the fear of risk itself.
As unpaid mortgages and
bankrupt lenders bring the
weakest segments of the mort-
gage industry to its knees,
investors have begun dumping
debt and other investments
that would seem to have noth-
ing to do with home loans.
Corporations are paying
higher interest rates on their
bonds, some private-equity
firms are having trouble raising
money to close big purchases
and the stock market has lost 7
percent of its value in less than
two weeks all mainly
because of an exodus from
risk.
"I would characterize it as a
loss of excessive risk appetite,"
said Ian Lyngen, an interest-
rate strategist at RBS Green-
wich Capital. "There is a lot
more apprehension about lay-
ering on riskier assets."
The flight to safety in the
financial markets in the past
few weeks can be traced to
"subprime" mortgage lending.
Subprime refers to people
with spotty credit histories.
Fueled by Wall Street's easy
money, the subprime mortgage
market exploded to $1.3 tril-
lion over the past few years.
But as home prices sagged and
more borrowers missed pay-
ments on these loans, the
industry fell into turmoil this
year..
The meltdown of this com-
paratively small segment of the
U.S. economy is contributing
to a much bigger and broader
issue: lenders around the world
are growing scared to lend.
"It is making people pull in
their tolerance for risk," said
Doug Sandler, Wachovia's
chief equity strategist. But San-
dler thinks investors had been
way too eager take on risk
without enough compensation.
Far from crashing, he said
the market is returning to nor-
mal. Important voices agree.
"We have the strongest glob-
al economy I've seen in my
business lifetime today," Trea-
sury Secretary Henry Paulson
- the former CEO of Gold-
man Sachs told reporters in
Beijing Wednesday. "We have
a healthy economy. What is
going on in my judgment is a
reassessment of risk."
There are plentiful examples
of the effect that reassessment
is having.
Insuring against a defaulted
loan using something called a
credit-default swap has
become pricier. Treasury
bonds the safest investment
in the world have grown
more expensive since mid-July
because investors crave a safe


Share

your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


haven.
Robert Bach, senior vice
president of research at real
estate services firm Grubb &
Ellis, said some of the lenders
he works with will not even
quote a loan right now.
And a measure of volatility
known as the VIX has sky-
rocketed by nearly two-thirds
in the past two weeks to reach
its highest level in more than
four years.
Attitude
"There has been a change in
attitude," said Eric Thorne,
investment strategist at Bryn
Mawr Trust. "We were in a sit-
uation a couple of weeks ago
where there wasn't much that
investors were worried about.
It's more a psychological
impact of the lending environ-
ment in general."


Two mortgage insurers said
this week a $1 billion partner-
ship created to invest in mort-
gage debt may now be worth-
less for that very reason.
The partnership C-Bass
LLC insists nothing funda-
mental has changed and the
credit quality in its portfolio
remains intact. The only prob-
lem, it claims, is that it cannot
come up with the cash to repay
the skittish lenders who have
demanded their money back.
This was similar to the argu-
ment presented by Sam Moli-
naro, the chief financial offi-
cer of Bear Stearns Cos. Two
of the Wall Street investment
bank's hedge funds filed for
bankruptcy protection this
week because of their expo-
sure to wrong-way bets on
risky mortgages.
Molinaro insisted the loans
were safe and backed by suffi-


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JEANMARIE JEAN BAPTISTE
CROOKED ISLAND, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RODLESS PETITPHAR
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 2ND day of
AUGUST, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2006/FAM/div/430
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Family DOivisiom



PHILIPPE ANDRE BERNARD HATTAB Petitner
AND
BRICKELL ANGELIQUE YAUN HATTAB
nee BRENNEN Respondet


NOTICE

TO: BRICKELL ANGELIQUE YAUN HATTAB nee BRENNEN

TAKE NOTICE that a Petition has been filed in the Supreme
Court by your husband Philippe Andre Bernard Hattab for
divorce.

AND that it has been ordered that service of the said Petition upon
you be effected by this advertisement

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you must within
fourteen (14) days from the publication of this advertisement
inclusive of the day of such publication, acknowledge service of
the Petition by completing a prescribed form of
Acknowledgement of Service and Memorandum of Appearance
which may be obtained on request from the attorney whose name
and address appear below, otherwise the court may then, without
further notice to you, proceed to hear the Petition and pronounce
judgment, notwithstanding your absence.






C. YVFTTF MC(CARTNEY
Chambers
Building No. 10
71 Terrace Centervillte
Nassau, Bahamas
Tele: 12421 328-6725/326-4620
Email: cymcped cymec(a coralwave.com
Attorneys for the Petitioner


cient collateral, but said the
funds needed to liquidate to
satisfy panicked lenders.
American
And now American Home
Mortgage Investment Corp. is
teetering on the brink of bank-
ruptcy despite almost no
exposure to subprime. The
lender's minimal exposure to
subprime is little consolation
to the home buyers to whom it
promised $800 million in loans
this week and failed to deliver.
"It's just a broader fear,"
said Grubb & Ellis's Bach.
"That credit disruption has
spread to the point where peo-
ple are reluctant to make
loans. What started in sub-
prime mortgage has sort of
transferred into other kinds of
debt right now."


(ALL "P.A." AT PKK N' PM FARMS ,
mBAMARDI ROAD f
PHONE 62-1929 ,

CURRENTLY AVAIABLE FOR SALE
PINEAPPLE SLIPS!!! PUMPKIN?!!
HOT PEPPERS!! MANGOES GOAT PEPPERS


TEACHERS WANTED

Tutors *Dance. Karate Music

For extra curriculum classes for a new after-school center
Teaching small classes (5yrs-12yrs) twice a week

Call: Ms. Rolle 376 1809






IndiGO
N E T W O R K S
IndiGO Networks is a developing telecommunications company based in Nassau, Bahamas.
The company has a 16-year history in offering innovative technology and telecommunications
solutions to businesses in The Bahamas. In 2004 IndiGO was granted the first and currently
only license to allow international and domestic voice competition with the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company. IndiGO Networks is currently in search of a highly qualified
individual to fill the position of Senior Network Engineer.


Senior Network Engineer
Job Description
Successful candidates should be highly energized and willing to take on the challenges of
a fast-paced network rollout. The Network Services team is tasked with the 7/24/365 OA&M
of an international telecommunications network., The successful candidate will be challenged
with a collection of objectives in the next year.
Responsibilities
7/24/365 OA&M
Administration and maintenance of all network hardware/software, NMS, custom monitoring
tools and an underlying Cisco telephony infrastructure
Storage Management & System Backup/Restoral (NetApp/Symantec Netbackup)
Ongoing administration of MMDS wireless network
Monitoring and troubleshooting inter-carrier switch-to-switch interconnection
Creation and support of network management and maintenance. scripts
Creation and maintenance of Tier 1-3 support documentation
Creation and maintenance of network diagrams
Network and subscriber capacity planning
Qualifications
Proficient in all aspects of network engineering: design, implementation, monitoring and
troubleshooting
Willing to follow assigned projects through to successful completion
Willing to work hands-on 7/24/365 and participate in on-call schedule to resolve network
problems
Must be comfortable in a team environment
Minimum of 7-10 years of relevant technical experience
University degree
Cisco certifications CCNP or CCIE highly preferred
Previous telecom experience in a similar capacity maintaining a service providers network
preferred
Extensive experience with Cisco routers, switches (LAN and WAN) required. Additional
expertise with VoIP gateways, SS7 controllers, and BTS softswitch preferred
Comprehensive knowledge of TCP/IP, EIGRP, BGP, OSPF, telecom circuits from DS-O
through OC-3
Broad Knowledge of IP telephony (VoIP/VoN), softswitches, PSTN gateways, SS7,
QoS,SIP,H.323. MGCP
Fluent with data packet analyzers and IP packet analysis
Excellent verbal and written communications skills. Experience writing OA&M
documentation
Excellent troubleshooting and analytical skills
IndiGO Networks offers a highly competiti, e package of benefits. Salary is commensurate
with ll alitications and experience.
Qualified candidates should submit their resumes in writing to:
IndiGO Networks PO BOX N-3920,
Attention: Network Services Manager
or via email to: careers@indigonetworks.com


I


BUSINESS I






THE TRIBUNE


.,, B l1B THURSDAY, AUGUST 20u,'

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"My work at The Tribune is rewIrding

and challenging. I enjoy contributing

to the look of our newspaper while

meeting the needs of our aIdvertisrs.

I am proud to work here. The

Tribune is my newspaper."


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ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER
THFE TRIBUNE


The T'ribune


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THE TIBUN THUSDAY AUGST 2 200USPAEESS


State revenue


estimate down by




nearly $1.5 bn


N By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press Writer
TALLAHASSEE, Florida
(AP) Florida's slowing
economy is expected to cost
the state government nearly
$1.5 billion in lost taxes and
other revenue in this budget
year and the one that ended
June 30, state economists said
Wednesday.
They blamed the revenue
shortfall on an unexpectedly
long housing market slump.
The revised estimate includes
about $380.5 million less than
expected during the last part
of the 2006-07 budget year and
$1.1 billion this year.
Legislative leaders had antic-
ipated the latest bad news from
the Revenue Estimating Con-
ference and last month sched-
uled a special session for Sep-
tember 18 to adjust the $71 bil-
lion budget that lawmakers
passed in May.
"Though the revenue revi-
sions will pose major state bud-
get changes, we must stay
focused on the longer view,"
House Policy and Budget
Council Chairman Ray San-
som, R-Destin, said in a state-
ment. "This slow growth peri-
od will eventually end and nor-
mal growth will resume."
Economists
The economists said Florida
has all the elements of a reces-
sion but technically that term
only can be for a broader eco-
nomic decline, not one affect-
ing just a state.
The housing market now is
expected to return to normal in
2009, but that is later than had
been anticipated when the last
revenue estimate was made in
March, said Amy Baker, coor-
dinator of the Legislature's
Office of Economic and
Demographic Research.
That most directly has affect-
ed stamp taxes on real estate
transactions. It also affects
sales tax collections for hous-
ing-related items such as car-
pets and appliances but also
includes purchases unrelated
to housing.
It's what's called the "wealth
effect," Baker said.
"When people believe the


housing market's in a funk,
that they're not bringing in as
much money every year, their
house isn't going to be appre-
ciating as much every year,
they don't feel as wealthy," she
said.
Money
So they don't spend money
on cars, boats, clothes, restau-
rant meals and other purchas-
es that have nothing to do with
housing.
Corporate income taxes col-


elections also have fallen signif-
icantly below estimate.
The $380.5 million 2006-07
shortfall will be absorbed by
the current budget's $1.8 bil-
lion reserve fund.
Leaders of the Republican-
controlled Legislature and
Gov. Charlie Crist, though,
have made it clear they intend
to make up for the remaining
tax deficits through spending
cuts.
Democrats say all options
should be open, including tap-
ping the reserve fund and


MARLEYi%,
-(- Oaacha, Nawssau bhamas


Honest. Passionate, Efficiont, Porsonable,
Individuals to fill the following positions:

Bollman
ocurity
Room Attendants
Public Aroa Affondants
Laundry Attondants
Maintonanco helpoar

Cooks


Bartondors
Bus person

Kipa Thorapist
Nail Tochnicians
fpa Rocoptionist


All applications are appreciated
qualified individuals will be


but only
considered.


Our email address is admin@marleyresort.com
or you may fax it to (242) 327-1662 or mail it to
SP-63148. Nassau, Bahamas


increasing taxes.
They have argued that
recent tax cuts that have most-
ly benefited the wealthy and
out-of-state corporations
should be rescinded.


Bahamas Genesis Life Center


Raffle which was schedule for
July 28, 2007 has been Postponed.


All tickets sold will be honored

on the new date. For information


call: 394-0734


The Nature Conservancy's Northern Caribbean Program is seeking to fill the position of Office
Manager. The In-country Office Manager performs or oversees all financial and operational
transactions of the Northern Caribbean office. The Office Manager processes (or oversees) the
local payroll and ensures that all required tax withholding, payments and corporate contributions
to appropriate government agencies are made. S/he handles external vendor accounts and
payments, internal accounting transactions (reimbursements, petty cash, etc.), and prepares/
monitors the budget for the office's administrative operations. S/he manages in-country bank
accounts) and prepares monthly expense report for the Conservancy's Worldwide Office detailing
office income and expenditures. S/he works as needed with Regional Finance & Operations staff
and in-country external accounting advisors to ensure that operations comply with local legal, fiscal,
and labor requirements. S/he ensures that all office transactions comply with TNC's policies &
procedures and maintains appropriate and accurate files. The Office Manager is responsible for
office logistics and supervises/oversees maintenance, janitorial, reception, and security services
as well as coordinates all office related tasks such as purchasing supplies and office equipment.
S/he coordinates (or oversees) relationship with external travel agency (if any). S/he shall act as
the office liaison to the department of Technology and Information Systems. S/he shall also act as
office liaison to the department of Human Resources as well as carry out tasks related to personnel
administration including paperwork related to new hires or adjustment of an employee's of status,
new employee orientation, and time report management. The Office Manager is responsible for
maintaining efficient and effective operations of the office and for addressing all local compliance
issues stated in External Compliance Audits.

* Bachelor's degree in Accounting, Business Administration, management pus 3- years
related experience or equivalent combination. Non-profit accounting and U.S. government
grants accounting experience desirable.
* Excellent verbal and written skills in English
* Demonstrated experience in MS Office, Word and Excel. Technical command of spreadsheet
programs, general ledger reports and other financial management tools.
* Knowledge of current trends and legal requirements in financial, payroll and labor law.
. Supervisory experience, including ability to set objectives and manage performance a plus.
* Proven organizational and analytical skills and attention to detail.
Interested persons should apply in writing with full details, including resume and cover letter by
August 6, 07 to bahamas(gdtnc.orq.






PUBLIC NOTICE


DEFENCE FORCE RECRUITMENT EXERCISE



CORAL HARBOUR BASE (RBDF) The Royal Bahamas Defence Force is
presently conducting a Recruitment Exercise for persons in the Family
Islands. Applications can be obtained and returned to the Local
Administrator's Office.

The deadline for submission of Applications is 13th August 2007.

Applicants Should:
* Be a Bahamian citizen
* Be between the ages of 18-24 years
* Possess a minimum of (5) BJC's or equivalent, including Math and English
with .'C' passes or above.
Obtain two character references and a Police Character Certificate.

Applicants are required to be successful in all the following:
A Psychometric Evaluation
Recruitment (written) Examination (Math, English and General Knowledge)
Physical Fitness and Swimming Tests
Vetting Assessment and Medical Examination
Interview Assessment

Emphasis for recruitment will be placed on candidates with:
Strong Character and leadership qualities
Desire to maximize potential in a disciplined environment
Willingness to spend time at sea
Willingness to conduct tour of duty at satellite base on a Family Island or
outside the Bahamas.
Good academic background
Proficiency in a second language
Proficiency in a musical instrument


Interested persons may contact:

Lieutenant Commander Gaye Major
Personnel & Recruiting Officer
Defence Force Headquarters
P.O.Box N-3733
Coral Harbour, New Providence


EGN 538





MINISTRY OF HEALTH & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Invitation for Tenders

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting tenders for the necessary
Service, Maintenance and Repair of Tractors and Mack Tandem Trucks for
the New Providence Sanitary Landfill.

Interested parties may obtain further information, including eligibility to
participate and may collect the bidding documents upon payment of a non-
refindable fee of $100.00, as of Monday, July 23 2007.

The Department of Environmental Health Services
Farrington Road
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone No: (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No: (242) 322-8073
Between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday.
The method of payment will be certified cheques or cash. Tenders are to be
submitted in triplicate (3) in a sealed envelope(s) addressed to:
The Tenders Board
C/O The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance and Planning
Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017
Nassau, N.P.
The Bahamas
No later than 20TH day of August_ 2007.,
Tenders will be opened at. 10:00a.m. on 21', August, 2007 at the office of
the Tenders Board, Ministry of Finance and Planning

The Government reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 13B


THE TRIBUNE






THE.TRIBUNE


PAGE 14B. THURSDAY. AUGUST 2, 2007


p----- I __ __ _


The Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
qualified firms to submit bids to provide security services
schools/facility in New Providence


invites suitably
at the following


Government High School
R.M. Bailey Sr. High School
C.R. Walker Sr. High School
C.V. Bethel Sr. High School
C.I. Gibson Sr. High School
C.H. Reeves Jr. High School
L.W. Young Jr. High School
H.O. Nash Jr. High School
C.C. Sweeting Jr. High School
C.C. Sweeting Sr. High School
S.C. McPherson Jr. High School
Thelma Gibson Primary
Columbus Primary School
Learning Resources Section

Tender Documents outlining the scope of services may be obtained from the
Physical Plant Section located on the 2nd Floor North East Wing in the
Ministry of Education, Youth,. Sports & Culture Headquarters, Thompson
\Boulevard, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked "Tender for Security
Services" and delivered on or before Monday, 13th August, 2007 to:-

Tenders Board
Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield Centre
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017
Nassau, The Bahamas

The Tenders Board reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders.


Government Notice
Ministry of Education, Youth, Sports & Culture
Tender for Security Services


FROM page 1
Mr Wilson said: "We've
already had to lay some people
off, and are going to have to
look at some more. That's
what it's looking like."
He described the general
construction industry as "pret-
ty bleak right now", as many
Bahamian contractors had


been relying on a move to
work on Baha Mar, Albany
and other projects throughout
the Bahamas once work on
Kerzner International's Phase
III project on Paradise Island
was completed.
Prospect
That prospect has been post-


poned, at least for now, as the
Ingraham administration con-
tinues to review many invest-
ment agreements and contracts
left in place by its predecessor.
While the review is its right,
the scrutiny and delays that
accompany it are undoubtedly
impacting a number of
Bahamian firms and their staff,
and their livelihoods and fam-
ilies.
Terrence Knowles, vice-
president and general manager
of Flameless Electrical, and
former Bahamian Contractors
Association president, said the
impact on the construction
industry from the current situ-
ations at Baha Mar and
Albany, at least in the short-
term, would be "significant".
"Right now, the construction
industry market is pretty soft,
and this is going to exacerbate
it further," Mr Knowles said.
"It's going to have a major
impact, and affect both con-
tractors and workers and
labourers associated with these
projects.
"The market is soft right
now. It's probably going to go
from bad to worse."
Mr Knowles said while he had
no hard data to back up his
concerns, other contractors he
had spoken to said work was
"down quite substantially and
they have laid-off a number of
workers".
"The work out there right
now is not what is needed to
sustain these contractors and
workers," Mr Knowles added.
"The softening is going to
adversely affect everyone in
the industry in terms of lay-
offs and substantial revenue
decreases for contractors. It's
not good news at all, but I sup-
pose in the best interests of the
country it [the Government"s
investment review] has to be
done."


Albany and Baha


Mar delays 'major


disaster' for builders


B RITOL
WINES & SPIRITS

Bristol Wines & Spirits welcomes
application for the position of:



The successful candidate;
Should have his own vehicle
Should be Computer literate
Should be able to develop analysis
and distribution reports
Should be able to execute the
planed promotion calendar
Should have some experience in
the field of Sales & Marketing

Please contact Arame Strachan to arrange
for an interview today!

341-9300













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.,*-'- :.;"f. : .-r ", :' '', ', "i :T


When an accident happens, it's good to know someone is
there with you. First Response will be there! It is the only
accident assistance programme available in The Bahamas.

One call to32-FIRST dispatches a First Response van to the
scene where trained professionals begin claim processing
and take full control of the situation through to the end of
the repair.

Plus ambulance service, if required, wrecker service and
transportation home.


We're there for you, everyday, 365 days a year.

First Response is available free and at no additional cost to clients whose vehicles are
insured through authorized agents of Bahamas First General Insurance Company.

What to know more? Call your Bahamas First authorized agent today!


A Scott Fitzgerald Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T- (242) 356-5709

Andeaus Insurance
Broker Co. Ltd.
T; (242) 323-4545

Bethel Thompson Agency
T: (242) 394-7251

CARIB Insurance Agency
T: (242)322-8210


CMA Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T: (242) 393-6735


Colina General Insurance
Agency
T. (242) 325. 3809

Confidence Insurance
Brokers & Agents
T: (242) 323:-6920

General Brokers & Agents
1: (242) 322-1871

Moseley Burnsid
Insurance Agevncy
T: (242) 394-8305

N.U.A. Insurance
Agents & Brokers Ltd.
T: (242) 328-5992


Professional Insurance
Consultants
T; (242) 327-2143

Response Insurance
Agency Ltd.
T: (242) 393-3277

Star General Insurance
Agency
T; (242) 393-5529

Sunshine Insurance Agency
T: (242) 394-0011


Frst R~t son pefastes from :jam to i midnight daily arn is ,.,.lr in N.ew Prtovidencv only, First Response operates a ap inlepetident company Wuer
Baharim. -, FIrst h,, i1ri .:. LImlteod. It IS coatfacted to ,ir *..ir),' -). Iynoc-nI V a fc<' l t w .ri. P'idt support w9d to facilitate a spotiiTer claims swttienit process for
clients of Barhramas First General InsurarKe Company.


I F
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THE TRIBUNE


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P A G 2 T H R D Y U U T 2 2 0 7T E T I U E O I U R E


LAKEVIEW

GARDENS &


MEMORIAL

MAUSOLEUM


"For Those You Care About Most"


4 -4 .. -
'- --.-. .', --r..' ---i -.'-. ..'i -" "- :"' ^ .-- :---""' ., ""'-^p ^ '--"o "':",- "'.- ':"' -.:',- ''
t'' : --- ',:-'b "'-"" :"'-',-'- ^ i i^t .":: ,.- ''- j,"'-=-," ,^-.^


. ."t .- .-. . .





k z


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14!


LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL
Gardens & Mausoleum


JFK Drive, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-7244 Fax: (242) 323-7329
Email: lakeviewmemorialgardens@coralwave.com


-"


AM., - Irl


-'---


PAGE 2, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2,, 2007


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


~rpP*x-,


--,. -


_-.- .-.. 1-- ---- C.L r.


Lrr


.-.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


Cherished Memory:
Parents, Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Earle Francis,
the entire Francis Family,
First Baptist Church Family and
Godmnother M irs. nary Churtiim.



"GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN"





Death Notice
A= +]W Joan Moran age 65 of Rainbow Bay Eleuthera,
Bahamas died suddenly in her home "Zimis" on
June 14th, 2007. Born in Brooklyn NY February
1st, 1942. She was a loving mother, grandmother
. and friend. Upon moving to Florida, she discov-
ered the tranquil island of Eleuthera and its
wonderful people. She decided this is where she
wanted to make her investment and build her
dream home, "Zimis" in Rainbow Bay. She loved
her garden. She loved to paint and visit the
.B beautiful beaches. She loved her one grand-
daughter and spent time with her. She found joy
in caring for dogs in need, and spent time and
S--money nursing back to good health, the many
: potcakes that were lucky enough to attract her
attention. She will be dearly missed as she was
loved byso many.
'Left to cherish her memory are her two
S-daughters, Patricia Moran; her fiance, Kent
Bonnett, and Christine Johanson; her
. "grand-daughter, Quinn Johanson; one sister, Liz
Grayson; one brother-in-law, Thomas Moran;
son-in-law. Marcus Johanson; one god-child, Jay
S..' Stubbs; her special friend, Sherman
Thompson, and other relatives and great friends
in the U.S. and Bahamas: also her potcake
"Silver".
A memorial service wil be held in Pennsylvania
also in Eleuthera around the Christmas holidays.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 3
0


J2/i em!


Cherished Memory


of


Keith Charles


Edward Francis



Born: Dec. 6th, 1960
Died: Aug. 1st, 1996


244 Market Street P.O. Box EE-16634
Tel: 322-2070 or 322-2072



ALFREDA "AUNTIE
MILLIE" WILLIAMS, 95
of Burnt Rock, Mangrove Cay, Andros
will be held on Saturday, August 4th,
SI 2007 at 12:00p.m. at Our Lady's Of
The Soul Catholic Church. Deveaux
i" .- and Young Streets. Officiating will be
Father Michael Kelly assisted by Other
L'.. Ministers. Interment will follow in Old
... Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.
Alfreda's memory will linger in the
hearts and minds of her (1) Sister:
Louise Bullard of Mangrove Cay,
Andros: (1) Daughter: Doris Burrows:
(2) step-sons: Ortland Williams of
Lake Placid, Fla. & Leon Williams of
Gifford Fla.; (4) Foster children: Judy
& Janeen Gibson, Princess Greene &
Sidney Bullard; (9) Grandsons: Henry "Butch". Bertram. Gregory.
Ernest, Nelson & Stephen Burrows, Gregory Williams, Isaac & Ortland
Williams Jr. of Florida: (8) Granddaughters: Antoinette "Plummie"
Miller, Pauline McAlpin, Renea & Paulette Burrows, Sophia Ferguson
& Sharon Williams; Felecia Hope & Ciara of Florida; (9) Foster
grandchildren: Denise & Delianna (New York) Burrows, Deangelo,
Coyotito & Edon Greene Jr., Sindera, Corey & Syprianna Bullard: (8)
Nephews: Samuel, David Sr., & Lt. Michael Saunders, (RBDF), James
Curry & Delvin Beckles (Freeport, GB). William Evans Jr., Erskine
& Bertram Williams; (10) Nieces: Helen Woodside, Willamae Curry,
Annie J. Beckles (Freeport, G.B.), Florine Bowleg. Eunice Green,
Marion Williams, Lily Bowe, Maxine Thompson, Marymae Williams
& Naomi Cooper; (8) Grand Nephews: Philip, Kevin, Wesley &
Demetri Campbell, Nathan, Kendrick & Keith Stubbs & Tyrone
Cartwright; (4) Grand nieces: Camille & Augusta Campbell, Sherry
& Christine Stubbs; Other grand nieces, grand nephews, Great-
grand nieces & nephews; a host of other relatives & friends including:
Pandora Miller, Veronica Outten, Lenora Brennen, Ednie Gaitor. Cleomi
Farrington, Venus King & family, Myrtis Green-Lewis, Antoinette
Simpson, Ethrel Tynes, Terrance Neely, Deborah Thompson, Rev. &
Mrs. Hubert King, Diane Cash, Rita Clarke, Maria Brown & family,
Nurse Lynden & staff of Mangrove Cay Clinic, Inez Bowleg & family,
Yvonne Campbell, Neville McPhee. Doctors & Nurses of A & E.
Princess Margaret Hospital, Doctors & Nurses of Female Medical I,
Princess Margaret Hospital, Sister David Mary (Mangrove Cay), Hon.
Picewell Forbes, M.P for South Andros. Mr. Whitney Bastian. Melva
Bastian. Rev. Harrold Saunders. Edward Williams. Francita Nairn.
Florence Wallace. Lorrmne Green and the entire community of Burnt
Rock. Mangrove Cay. Andros.
Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Home #244 Market Street on
Friday. August 3rd. 2007 from I0:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday.
August .4th from I 1:00am at the church until service time.


-,,, I------ -~L


~5~'~8






PAGE 4, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


SBethel Brothers Morticians
7N1 Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


Sharon Lorraine Morris, 45

of Davis Street, Oakes Field will
be held on Saturday 1:45 p.m.
at St. Joseph's Catholic Church,
Boyd Road. Monsignor Simeon
Roberts will officiate. Interment
will be made in the Church's
-' Cemetery, Boyd Road.
--.' 4... -She is survived by, her mother,
Ironaca Morris-Baker; siblings,
Shadrach Morris Jr., Allison
Williams, Bernard Baker, Sylvian Baker, Dwight Baker,
Jeffery Baker, Michael Baker, Christine Baker and
Tericita Baker; sisters-in-law, Sherry Morris, Linda
Baker, Pearl Baker and Sherrine Baker; nieces and
nephews including, Jonathan Williams, Brianne Baker,
Brenelle Baker, Dwight Baker Jr., Elaina Baker, Ryan
Baker, Georgia Baker, Jeffnae Baker, Jessica Baker
and Ashley Baker; numerous aunts including, LetaMea
Forbes, Lillian Williams, Rosenell Sealey, Dr. Ilonka
Roker, Yvonne Smith, Venus Ryan, Reorien Rolle,
Althea Stuart, Nancy Rigby, Nathalie Deal and Rose
Stubbs; numerous uncles including, Garnet Morris,
Rev. Prince Bodie, Ortland Bodie Jr., Kirkland Bodie
and Duke Bodie,
relatives and friends too numerous to mention including,
Sam Williams and Family, Edmeston J. Williams and
Family, Rudolph Williams, Ruthmea Williams, Veronica
Williams, Evalina Johnson, Walter Williams, Gentry
Morris, Moxroy Williams, Jessica McQuay, Jacqueline
Williams and Family, Sharlene Hickson and Family,
Ahab Morris and Family, Joseph Morris and Family,
Anthony Morris and Family, Maurrena Morris, Eloise
Morris and Hestine Morris, Nelson Forbes and Family,
Livingston Forbes and Family, Patsy Thompson and
Family, Eunice Hanna and Family, Leta-Mae Forbes
and Family, Violet Duncombe and Family, Kenneth
Sealey and Family, Ricky Sealey and Family, Abie
Sealey and Family, Claudette Sealey and Family,


Zipporah Sealey and Family, Lillian Sealey and Family,
Carol Morris and Family, Patrick Shem Morris and
Family, Philip Morris and Family, Commodore Davy
Rolle and Family, Joan Rolle and Family, Yvette
Thompson and Family, Dr. Christopher Basden and
Family, Rachael Williams and Family, Wendy Craig
and Family and Richard Bowe, Lorne Smith and Family,
Lorne Bernard Smith and Family, Chester Smith and
Family, Scott Smith, Yvena Brown and Family, Kwame
Ryan and Family, Kwesi Ryan and Family, Anastasia
Sergeant and Family, the entire Stuart Family including
Clarietta Stuart, Henrietta Gilbert, Rupert Stuart and
Family, and Tyrone Stuart and Family, Emeline Murray
and Family, Eugene Cooper and Family, Catherine
Tucker, Floraine Gibson of Miami, Florida, the Family
of the Late Madge and Edwards Simms of Goulds,
Florida, Maud Sturrup, Mary Thompson, Lolitha
McKenzie. David and Rosemae Bain and Family,
Julian and Candice Bostwick, Alice Neymour and
Family, Anastasia and Tyrone Brice, Dorothy Hepburn
and Family, Vernitta Cleare and Family, Gurth and
Beverly Ford and Family, Mrs. Juliette Barnwell and
Family, Mrs. Margaret Claridge and Family, the
Godet/Moss Family, Judymae Brice and Family, Dr.
Henio Podlewski and Family, Dr. Jean Tumquest, Dr.
Kishore, Dr. Richard Van Tooren, Dr. Hubert Orlander,
Mrs. Carla Jackson, Patricia Lewis and Family, Kirklyn
Barr and Family, Bishop Samuel Greene, the Edmond
Rigby Family, Leroy Thompson and Family, Samuel
and Rosalie Hall and Family, Trevor Glinton and
Family, Fr. Martin Gomes and the parishioners of St.
Joseph's Church, Staff at the Medical Records
Department, Dialysis Unit and Accident and Emergency
Department, P.M.H.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers
Morticians, #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to
.11:30 a.m. and at the church.frorn 12: 15 p.m. until
service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES







THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 5


Bethel Brothers Morticians

STelephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026


Kirkwood Hinsey Sr., 68

/ \ #39 Haslemere Road, Highbury Park
will be held on Saturday 12:00 noon
at Holy Spirit Anglican Church,
Howard Street, Chippingham. Fr.
Harry Ward will officiate. Interment
will be made in Woodlawn Memorial
Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by, his wife of 43 years
Dorothy Hinsey; his mother, Mildred
~ Hinsey; sons, Ricardo, Kirkwood Jr.
Sand Jason Hinsey Sr.; daughters,
Vemae Hinsey-Bethell, Shereen Hinsey-
Rolle of Freeport and Raquel Hinsey; adopted daughter, Tanya
Johnson; grandchildren, Clerra, Ricara, Malayka, Rickayla,
Zyaire, Zion, Jafforia, Kirkwood III of Freeport, Keisheneria,
Devron, Tashena, Ebony, Jason Jr., Brion, Javin, Jaquan, Jada,
Kion, Raquon, Jasmine and Leah Hinsey, Leon and Orion Bethell,
Presley Rolle Jr. of Freeport and Asjah Greene; great grand child,
Clerra Hinsey of Freeport; sisters, Kirklyn, Sabrina, Claudette,
Sheldon, Olga and Jan; brother, Gregory; aunts, Hazel Darling,
Franceta Cooper of Florida, Dorothy Nairn, Gaynell Blatch of
Hollywood, Florida and Ophellia Humes; uncle, Thomas Love;
sons-in-law, A.S.P. Leon Bethell and Sgt. 1796 Presley Rolle of
Freeport; expecting son-in-law, Arthur Greene; daughter-in-law,
Sabrina Hinsey of Columbus, Georgia; expecting daughter-in-
law, Carlesia Thompson; sisters-in-law, Vanella, Carmel, Betty
Beba, Olga of West Palm Beach, Marina, Mavis, Melvern,
Marva, Nichole, Deloris, Betty N., Deloris of Rochester, New
York, Kathy of Detroit, Carolyn and Jackie; brothers-in-law,
Christopher Ching, David Johnson, Sidney, Basil and Christopher
Bain, Duke Hanna, Michael and Ricardo Davis, Johnny and
Danny Jackson of Rochester, New York; nephews, Sean Marche,
Omar and Gregory Bowe Jr., Shane and Basil Johnson of Tampa,
Florida, Christoff, Christian and Whitfield Ching; nieces, Schevon
Miller, Crystal and Kishna Bowe; other relatives and friends,
especially his Private Nurse and cousin Brenda Bain, Josephine
Smith, Juanit Grant, Teddy Johnson, Washington Collie, Sandra,
Christine, Anishka, Dellarese, Shantae, Kaylyn, Keisha, Horace
Miller, Van, Kevin, Owen, Anastacia Beckles, Ingrid Bennons
and family, Henry, Clayton, Sanford and Valentino Rolle, Michael,
Alonzo, Clarence, Henry and Joel Hinsey, Alphonso Rolle, Edna
and James Newbold, Glen Granger, Carlton Romer and family,
Joyce Fox, Ronnie Delancy, Barbara Albury, the Hinsey family,
the Darling family, Carolyn Hanna and family, Alice Minnis and


family, Violet Cleare and family, the Love family, C.B. Moss
and family, Bernie Turnquest and family, Oswald Munnings and
Family, Harold Longley and Gloria Archer and family, Theo
Farquharson and family of Freeport, Bradley Roberts, Lester
Turnquest, Adler Minus, Holy Spirit Back-Benchers,
Chippingham Domino family, Staff of Multi Services, Rotary
Club of West Nassau, Paramedics Newtown and Missick, and
many other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 11:00 a.m. until service time.


Miriam Eloise Newbold, 84
,\ of Sheffield Street and formerly of
Savannah Sound, Eleuthera will be
held on Friday 11:00 a.m. at Sacred
Heart Catholic Church, East Shirley
Street. Monsignor Alfred Culmer will
officiate. Interment will be made in
Ebenezer Cemetery, Shirley Street.
.. She is survived by her, son, Gaylord
Newbold; daughter-in-law, Rebecca
Newbold;
brother, Earl V. Thompson Sr.; sister,
V. j Beryl Adolph of New York; sisters-
in-law, Venencia Thompson, Leona
Pyfrom, Joanna Newbold and Dorothea Thompson;brothers-in-
law, Leroy Adolph, Roy Newbold Sr., and Gladstone Newbold;
nieces, Jay Morgan-Hill, Andrea Morgan, Ann Armstrong, Cheryl
Greene, Donna Sherman, Renee Knowles, Elaine and Penny
Thompson, Francis Burke, Marici and Jacinta Thompson;
nephews, Kermit Thomson, Vincent Morgan, John, Anthony
and Marvin Dyett, Phil, Dave and Pat Thompson, Andrew
Thompson. Gerald, Ronald and Mark Adolph and Earl Thompson
Jr.; numerous grand nieces and nephews, and a host of other
relatives and friends including, Ruth Goodridge, Anthony
Sherman, Mitzy Swaby, Tim and Ruth Lightbourne and Lloyd
Johnson.

There will be no'viewing. In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to the Diabetic Assocation.

Funeral arrangements handled by, Bethel Brothers Morticians.
#44 Nassau Street.


- -- -~-


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








PAG 6,TUSAAGS ,207TETIUEOIURE


t1. j1 44Hjffl^jjif4 flt* j ! ~


Harewood Sinclair Higgs LF.D.
President/managing Director



;JU i ,:I .;-^l q'l


V,)"


Mr. Hubert George Rolle, 74


a resident of Ridgeland Park and
formerly of North Mastic Point.
Andros will be held on Saturday.
August 4th. 2007. at 10:00 a. m. at
First Holiness Church of God, Bamboo
Town. Officiating will be Bishop
Jonathan Rolle, Bishop Wilbert Rolle
and Apostle Quebell Martin. Interment
will follow in the Southern Cemetery
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. Services
have been entrusted to Gateway
., Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount
Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish his memory are three (3) daughters Gloria Culmer,
Brenda and Terra Rolle; six (6) sons, Hubert Jr., Charles, Absalom,
Minister Michael, Don and Hercules Rolle; two (2) sisters, Mary
Rolle and Gwendolyn Colebrooke of Freeport; nine (9) brothers,
Bishop Wilbert Rev Jonathan, Deacon Joseph, Errol, Austin Jr.,
Isaac, Jacob, Wilton and Oscar Rolle; grandchildren, Damien,
Ocia Bedford, Anastasia, Keshann Antoneese Johnson, Tarran
Rolle, Aaron, Angel, Kerron, Samia, Julian, Gilda, Kevin, Lisa,
Charlesa, Hugo, Marie, Nicollas, Jeffery, Gino, Courtney. Jerry
and Susie; five (5) great grand children, Chicago, Nicky, Nicole,
Bruno and Kevin Jr.; five (5) daughters-in-law, Mary, Gloria,
Christine, Claudine and Audrey Rolle; sisters-in-law, Mother Idyll,
Kirkland, Judy, Esther, Rachel Shear and Thelma Rolle, Carnetta
Williams; brothers-in-law, Rollin Colebrook and Kermit Pratt:
numerous nieces and nephews including, Godfrey, Rex, Violet
Gray, Pamela Henfield, Portia Poitier, Vanda Burrows, Shawn
Carmine, Stacy, Henry, Vera, William and Joy Storr, Peter, Tony,
Hilton, Gayle, Debra, Winston, Floyd, Raquel, Fredrick, Sally,
Nicara, Nicola, Hilliard, Felix, Minnie Carolyn, Shako, Shelly,
Ann, Lilly and Barry Dorsett; one (1) godchild, Charlotte, other
family and friends, Charlotte Oliver and family, Edgbert and Dottis
Stockdale and family, Pickstock family, Rev. Joseph Oliver and
family, Delphi and family, Ezra and family, Nicey and family, The
Northern Star Society family, Colebrook family, The Methodist
Church family, First Holiness family, Voice Of Joy International
Ministries Church family, Miracle Working Church family, Living
Waters Church family and the entire North Andros Community.


Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday
from 10:00 a. m to 6:00 p. m. and on Saturday from 8:30 a. m. to
service time at the church.

Elima Mano "Rev" Souffrant, 18

/ "% a resident of Farrington Road will be
held on Sunday, August 5, 2007 at 11
a. m. at Johnson Park Seventh Day
S Adventist Church, Farrington Road.
Officiating will be Pastor Danhugh
Gordon and Interment will follow in
the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads. Services have been
entrusted to Gateway Memorial
Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue
and Kenwood Street.

Left to cherish his memory are his
mother, Noelgina Souffrant; his father, Sidney Theophile; sisters,
Irania Souffrant, Sioleline and Jouceline Theophile, Chalenda
Venneus; brothers, Henry, Benson Louis, Reginal Verneus; aunts,
Odilia Cheri, Celia St. Vi., Christine Theophil, Cilianie Thephil,
Rozana Theophil, Exiline Theophil, Marianie Theophil, Anola
Theophil, Celefin Theophil, Nocles Theophil and NoclesTheophil;
Uncles Marcel Theophile, Banave Bien-aime; Renand Venneus;
cousins, Rose Nicole Bien-aime, Guerla Bien-aime, Island Lucien,
Carol Lucien, Alente Nelfoik, Guirlanda Nelfoie, Antoinette Elva,
Ketline St. Louis, Bernadette Jean, Merzina Elva, Therezia Elva,
Theroseline Mesidor, Rosena Mesidoe, St. Helene, Mirline. Lourna,
Denise, Maisy, Adilia, Morissa, Vanessa, Volnic, Sonson, Gary jn
Sidor Yvenet, Nickson, Wysler. Fertil, Steveno Wilbert, Isaac,
Jackson, Rolin, Kervens, Vmmacula Luma, Jessica St. Vii, Mackey
St. Vil, Princess St. Vil, Nadia St. Vil Gurthia St. Vil, Rolin Sammy,
Henry, Henriker, Immacula Luma, Wisls Samuon, Nekeit, Marslim,
Nicole Bellot Orclhomme, Renick Jn Louis, Yvenel Bellot, Monel
Bellot, Monick Bellot, Ernange Theophil, a host of other relatives
and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Saturday
from 10:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. and on Sunday from 10:00 a. m. to
service time at the church.


-- -------- -- ---' ~


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007





THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 7


Florence Williams, 71


a resident of Farrington Road and
formerly of Crossing Rock, Abaco
f will be held on Saturday August 4th
2007, at 2:00 p. m., at New Destiny
Baptist Cathedral, Baillou Hill Road.
Officiating will be Bishop Delton
Fernander. Interment will follow in
the Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street. Services have been entrusted
Sto Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenwood Street.
Left to cherish her memory are, two
(2) sons, Inspector Vincent Williams
and Minister Franklyn Williams; three (3) daughters, Sheila and
Patrice Williams and Audrey Rolle; one (1) son-in-law, Minister
Mike Rolle; two (2) daughters-in-law, Donnette and Minister
Diane Williams; one (1) sister, Edna Russell; One (1) Brother
Laverne Russell; One Brother-In-Law Israel Williams; three (3)
sisters-in-law, Dorothy, Gertrude Russell and Ena Williams; five
(5) grandchildren, Donell Johnson, Reginald, Vincent Jr., Dianthe,
Donnella and Donte; one (1) grandson-in-law, Prison Officer
Whitney Johnson; two (2) greatgrand children, Destiny and
Whitney Johnson; nieces, Janet, Donnell, Barbara, Rocellia, Nyoshi
and Vondria, Sandra, Nathalie, Betty, Carolyn, Gloria and Millie;
nephews, Adrian, Derek, Alvin, Virgil, Dewitt Jr., Dwight, Dereck
and Fr. Anselm Russell, Fredrick, Clayton, Jeffery, Espirit, James
Harry, Philip, Israel Jr., David, Willard, Theophilus, Theodore,
Albert, Kirk, Peter and Leonard; numerous grandnieces and
grandnephews; a host of other relatives and friends including,
The Nichollas family, Margarette Williams and ft mily, Silvia Bain
and family, Mildred Sands and family, New Destiny Baptist Church
family, Sister Pratt and the family of St. Johns Native Baptist
Cathedral, Pastors Dudley and Dianne Coverley and the family of
Miracle Working Church of God, Edward Dean and family, Doris
Russell and family, The Oliver family, Joey McKenzie and family,
Catherine McDonald and family, Alice and family, Mrs. Brennen
and family of Steel City, The Farrington Road family, The Majors,
Willamae Taylor and family, The Lindsay, The Samuels. The
Deveauxs, Gloria Cleare and family, Mr. Dudley Kelly, and special
thanks to Dr. Butler and the Staff of the Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday
from 10:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. on Saturday from 9:00 a. m. to 12:00
noon and from 12:30 p. m. to service time at the church.


\\ 1/,


*S^I~yJewrrt4-4.j^itj~


SARY


Service'


F UNEA SEVC FORi ;~ .~UI.]:


Alvilda Lucita

Johnson, 95

of Miller's Heights and formerly
of Snug Corner, Acklins will be
held on Saturday at 11 a.m. at
Annex Baptist Cathedral.
Officiating will be Apostle
Mitchell Jones assisted by Other
Ministers. Interment will follow
in Lakeview Gardens, J. F. K.
Drive.


Alvilda is loved and survived by three (3) children, Oral Ferguson,
Clarence and Clothilda Williamson; grand-children, Zachary and
Yvonne Williams, Christina and Lionel Ferguson, Alton and Lynette
Ferguson, Lenora and Lorenzo Symonette, Jamuel and Dellareece
Ferguson, Hartley Williams, Minister Generine Williams, Marie
Williamson, Elvis and Mitzi Bain, Tanya, Valarie and Simeon Bain,
Lee and Jessica Williamson; greatgrand children, Zachary Williams
Jr., Lionel Ferguson Jr., Leonardo Ferguson, Lorenzo Symonette
Jr., Altonique Ferguson, Jason Ferguson, Kiria Musgrove, Urvanique
Moxey, Lorenique Symonette, Jasmine Ferguson, Shekinah
Thompson, Lenzel Rahming, Anthony and Redanyah Parker, Hartlea
Williams, Aysha Ferguson, Justin Ferguson, Alton "AC" Ferguson
II and Kevinique Williams; one sister, Elizabeth Hanna; daughter-
in-law, Angela Ferguson; sister-in-law, Daisy Johnson; numerous
nieces and nephews including, Esther Mosley of Opalocka, Florida
and Marion Williams of Hollywood Florida, Carmetha Bain, Miriam
Hanna, Uris Nottage, Brady Hanna, Evangelist Brenville Hanna,
James Ferguson; a host of other relatives and friends including,
Pearline Jones, Apostle Mitchel and Lady Julia Jones, Carnetta
Munroe and family, The Hepburn family, Deon Wright and family,
Dorothy Rolle, Susanna Johnson, Rev. Herman Ferguson, Jeremiah,
Lorenzo and Javan Ferguson, Arlington and Marjorie Farquharson,
Mrs. Elizabeth Farquharson and family, Monique Cooper and family,
Nicholas and Trudy Smith, Eric Cartwright and family, Lucille
Major and family, the Symonette's family, Evangelist Rufus Hanna
and family, Kaylyn and Monique Cooper, Couley Ferguson and
family and Verna Turnquest.
Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and at the Cathedral
on Saturday from 10 a.m. until service time.





Tl(4 A 2 3-EAST,- (2 6-0F : -9


EAST SUN' RISE MOR1


"A New Commitment To


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


J


-,.9 .-




PAGE 8, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL
#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773


Elizabeth Taylor, 77

of Nassau Village will be held
on Friday, August 3rd, 2007, at
10:00 a.m., at New Providence
Seventh Day Adventist Church,
Soldier Road. Officiating will
be Pastor Jeremiah Duncombe.
Interment follows in the
Southern Cemetery, Cowpen &
.Spikenard Roads.
-k Left to cherish her memory are,
two brothers, William
Cartwright and Alfonzo Major; three adopted
daughters, Marsha and Nyochee Major and Cherry
Miller; numerous nieces, Althea, Beth, Theresa Major,
Sherileen Cartwright, Rowena Carroll, Pearlene
Cartwright and Michelle Rolle; grandnieces, Irene
Bethel, Sherell Major, Cliffchella Rolle, Monique
Cartwright and Beryl Cartwright; great grandnieces,
Taharji, Niesha Dawkins, Aliesha Payne, Carlissa Major,
Maygon St. Claude, Erica and Branisha Forbes;
numerous nephews, Vincent, Peter Major, Clifford
Rolle, Freeman Cartwright, Ervin .Cartwright and
Lorenzo Cartwright; grandnephews, Nathan Major,
Drexell Major, Carlos Major, Maurice Major, Buffalo
Major and Deangelo Major; great grandnephews,
Brian Payne, Berin Finalis, Serino Stuart, Zion Dawkins,
Carlos Major Jr., Ricardo Major, Clifton Rolle, Ronald
Cartwright, Remond Cartwright, Devitte Pratt, Donzid
Carroll, Terrance Carroll and Theophile Carroll. Special
thanks to the Smith, Brown and Sands families,
especially Ms. Ruth Smith.
May God bless you all for your support in the time of
need.
Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acki:ns
Street off Market and East Streets on Thursday From.
10:00 a.m to 6:00 p.m., Friday at the church from 9-00
a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

vcfk of ;Ages funeral paipel I


Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 Fax:


328-8852


Dieuseul Lorfils, 37

.of La tortue, Haiti
will be held at
Holy Name
Church in Bimini,
Bahamas on
Saturday, August
4, 2007 at 10:00
1 a.m. Officiating
the service will be
Rev. Remv David
and assisting will be Rev. Deacon
John Sears. Interment will be in the
Catholic Cemetery, Bailey Town,
Bimini.

He is survived by his mother-in-law,
Charitable; children, Medlene, and
McKendell; brothers, Jeanmarie,
Cacius, Sanel, and Sanoir; sisters,
Dieunette (Janet), Mrs. Magre,
Mesianie, Elienode, and Gertha;
brothers-in-law, Estime Durosier,
Magre Andre; sister-in-law, Cherelia;
nieces, Leonne Melene,. Savilia,
Inatha, Natasha, Bicachna, Cindy
Durosier, Genika Loui, and Dervinne
Louis; nephews, Ulrick, Deangelo,
Gary, and Kenken and numerous
other relatives and friends.









^Ien-eritte's JifuneralI imw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782


Matriarch Rosa Evelyn Storr, 88


a resident of Foster Street,
Chippingham and formerly of
San Salvador, will be held at
Zion Baptist Church, East and
Shirley Streets, on Saturday at
2:00 p.m. Officiating will be
Rev. T.G. Morrison, assisted
by Deacon Sheila Strachan and
Associate Ministers and
Deacons. Interment follows in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.


Left to cherish her memory are, a daughter, Beryl Major;
one son, Sharon 'The General' Storr; adopted children,
Sybil Rolle, Bruce Storr (of Freeport Grand Bahama),
and Sybil Johnson (of Hialeah Gardens, Florida);
granddaughters, Dr. Sharith Storr-Taylor, Tamara
McQueen, Schiketa Major and Thea Ashley Storr; great
grand children, Ava McQueen, Jade Taylor, Adantae
Sherman, Quincy, Danielle, and Larelle Jaques; one
sister in-law, Viola Storr; numerous nieces and nephews
including, Nolla Deveaux, Shirley, Mag, Ruth, Althea,
Betty, Anna, Pinky Stuart, Portia, Reta, May, Jeane
Mackey, Stephenie, Laurie, Jack Smith, Sidney Ward,
Ellie, Leon, Bob, Kenny, Eric, Holman, Albert, Sam,
Charlie, Hershel, Gregory and George, a host of great
grand nieces and nephews;
other relatives and friends including, Eva Thompson,
Gwen King, Mrs. Simpson Penn, Bernadette Ingraham
and family, Wendell Seymour; sisters, Ella and Bain,
Georgie Mortimer, Mr. and Mrs. Preston Albury, Mr.
and Mrs. Geno Nairn, Rev. Hershel Johnson (Temple
Baptist Church Miami Florida), Rosemarie Olander,
Mr. and Mrs. Clem Longley, Eddie Ford, Edward 'Shark'
Deveaux, Nurse Monique Hudson- Community Nursing,
Dr. Thompson along with Sister Elliot and staff-Surgical
Ward I, PMH, Dr. Valentine Grimes, Dr. Leon Gibson,
Jamus Johnson and family, Brenda Culmer, Cabbage
'N The Boys, the 'Hut', Leona Sturrup, Rev. T.G.
Morrison, Zion Baptist Church family, Jasmine
Mortimer, the New Providence Association of Basketball
Officials, the Cougars family, the Kentucky Colonels


family Mr. Llewellyn Astwood and the staff of
Demertitte's Funeral Home and the Staff of Woodland
Gardens and many others.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritle's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on
Friday and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon and
at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.


Clifford Randolph Goodman, 74

a resident of Forbes Street,
Nassau Village and formerly
of Deep Creek, Eleuthera, will.
be held in the Chapel at
Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, on Friday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be
Bishop Ishmel Martin.
Interment follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife, Sheila
Goodman; 6 children, Clifton, Anthony, Tyrone,
Dwayne, Patrice Goodman and Sandra Cummings; 1
son-in-law, Craig Cummings; 3 daughters-in-law,
Angeline, Glenda and Margret Goodman; 2 brothers,
Obediah and Richard Goodman; 2 sisters, Melvease
Thompson Butterfield and Celeste Stubbs of Rock
Sound, Eleuthera; 14 grandchildren, Nathaniel, Diane,
Brian of New Jersey, Ruben, Owahteeka, Melissa,
Christopher, Shereka, Donny, Denrick, Jessica, Tevon,
Santia, Anton and Antino; 6 great grandchildren
-including, Morgan Thompson and Serienity Rolle; a
host of nieces and nephews including, Obie Goodman,
Sandra Goodman, Leslie, Russell, Wayde, Eddien and
Syntheia.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 1:00 p.m.-6 p.m. on
Thursday and on Friday from 9:00 a.m. until service
time.


__


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






PAGE 10, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


ienwriitte's (uneru1 ^4mrw
BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782
N AL S F


I


Portia Louise Maria Bethel, 40

.a a1 a resident of Hillcrest Drive, Seven Hills,
will be held at St. Joseph's Catholic Church,
Boyd Road, on Saturday at 10:45 a.m.
Officiating will be Fr. Noel Clarke, assisted
by Deacon Gregory Taylor. Interment follows
in St. Joseph's Church Cemetery.


S-. Her husband, Derrick Bethel Sr., (1) daughter,
Glenda McPhee, (2) sons, Shawn Farrington
and Derrick Bethel Jr., (1) grandson, Darren
S Dean; (1) adopted son, Bryan Bethel, (7)
S, adopted daughters, Rhonda, Nadia, Shantel,
S'h / ''^ Monique, Derricka, Santish and Terah Bethel;
_- her parents, Frank and Maria Farrington; (6)
sisters, Missionary Patricia Miller of Lowe
Sound Andros, Alice Rolle, Andrea Clarke, Patricia Smith, Patricia Waterman
and Marjorie Forbes; (1) adopted sister, Thelma Miller; (3) brothers,
Leonard Farrington of Fresh Creek, Andros, Franklyn and Vincent
Farrington; (5) brothers-in-law, Henson Miller of Lowe Sound, Andros,
Simeon Rolle, Derrick Clark, Ricardo Waterman of Barbados, Pastor
Vincent Dorsett, David Bethel and Leon Rolle of the USA.; (4) sisters-in-
law. Loretta Farrington of Fresh Creek, Andros; Cealot and Samantha
Farrington and Olga Dorsett; (34) nieces, Shabricca and Quinea Miller,
Simone Rolle, Lauren Saunders, Charmaine and Derricka Clarke, Cicely
Maclane, Latoya Darville, Phillippa, Monalisa, Ulander, Samantha, Sharon,
Vincinette, Brenell, Nadia, Latoya, and Shantell Farrington, Camara Gaitor,
Anastacia Oliver, Shandica and Wendy Evans, Kim and Tanya Smith,
Nicola, Lisa, Geraline and Vanessa Pratt, Angela and Mevenil Rolle,
Laurain Young; (35) nephews, Ricardo, Marco, Leonard Jr. Taraj, Bichaino,
Anthonio, Carrington, Philip Jr. Tamar, Vincent Jr. Ricardo, Renaldo,
Javano and Benjamin Farrington; Henson Jr, Omar and Sedenio Miller,
Simeon Jr., and Simon Rolle, Derrick Clarke Jr. Andrew Williams, Valentino
Oliver, Ken Smith, Jerry and Shavago Pratt Jr. and Ian Farrington, Daryl,
Krishna, Glenroy, Alvin, Gary, Dominique, Kellyand Philbert Rolle;
Michael Young; (28) grand nieces and nephews; (3) uncles, Everette and
Sidney Farrington and Michael Thompson; (2) aunts, Linda Farrington
and Harriet Ferguson of Whyms Bight Eleuthera; numerous other relatives
and friends including, Sylvia Wallace, Betty Storr, Portia Rahming, Elcara
Scott, Jamal Smith, Linda Blatch, Debbie Dorsette, Pastor Rosemary
Adderley, Rev. C. B. Moss, Hon. Bernard Nottage and Hon. Branville
McCartney; friends from the United States; Daryl Melvern, Krishna,
Glenroy, Alvin, Gary, Angela, Dominique, Kelly and Philbert Rolle, Lauren
and Michael Young, Leonie: Cookie", and Mario Pratt, Leontyne and
Vincent Kerny, Eleanor and Scott and Freda Dorsett; Drs. Donna Major,
Juliette Dorsette, Bonita Wood, Yvette Carter, Jessica Pasada and Sherrilyn
Storr, Donna Major, Jewel Fountain, Deborah Szabo, Abigail Farringtop,
Bernadette Swan, Sharlene Munroe, Vincent, Timothy, Caleb, Chantelle,
Kezia and William Dorsett; BHRA Executive Board and members, Ministry
of Sports, Miles Yallop, Mia Campbell and family, Island Tunerz and
family, Minnis Import Products and family, Stephanie Sweeting and family,
Dozer Heavy Equipment and family, Bahamas Antique Club, Cruisers
Motorcycle Club, Bahamas Street Carz, PDL Transmission of Locka,
Florida and Elliot Prince and family of Opa Locka Florida; vendors and
members of the Potter's Cay Dock Association, doctors and nurses of the
Female Surgical Ward and the Oncology Department of the Princess
Margaret Hospital, doctors and nurses of the Regional Memorial Hospital
of Hollywood Florida, the staff of Wilmac's Pharmacy, Poincianna Drive,
the entire Baintown and Seven Hills Communities, Eugene Campbell,


Proprietor of Pineville Motel, special friends, Ted Hanna and family, Tedor
Capron and family, Alfred Johnson and family, Dale Ferguson and family,
Ilene Barry and family, Rose Rolle and family, Jason, Norma, Beckles,
Vogal Williams, Carolyn Clarke, Carolyn and Al Symonette and family,
Sandra Kemp and family, "Torpedo" George Robinson and family, Mary
Wilson and family, Bryan Richard and family, Marva Minnis, Fredericka
and family, Sandra Webb and family, Inspector Kemp and family, Joyce
Rawlins "Yellow", Doc, Pearl, Nevil, George, Boones, Jerry, Hastie, Dennis,
Cardie and Winston "Shakey'" Shakespare.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church
from 9:45 a.m. until service time.


Anthony Elin Bain-Woodside, 52

a resident of Taylor Street, Nassau Village,
will be held at Pilgrim Baptist Cathedral,
St. James Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Bishop E. Randy Fraser,
assisted by Other Ministers of Religion.
Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memory are his wife,
Sabrina; his parents, Shederick Bain and
Nelson and Ethlyn Woodside; fourteen
children, Erica and Nicholas Thompson,
Anthony Jr., Antoinette, Andrea, Janeal,
Antrell, Chad, Roscoe, Teora, Lamona,
Lamont, Burshall and Tamara; fourteen
sisters, Magnola Bain, Reverend Doretta Bethel, Valarie Bain, Louise
Barns of West Palm Beach Florida, Daphne Neely, Christine Rigby, Seadrid
Ferguson, Violet Bain, Billy Dorsett, Jennis Simmons, Marilyn McLounder,
Rochelle Woodside, Alva Ritchie, Stephanie Woodside; six brothers, Cedric
Bain, Charles Woodside, Fredrick Neely Jr., Glenn Woodside, Gladstone
Woodside, and Lloyd Rolle; five aunts, Deaconess Delphine Knowles,
Deaconess Amanda Colebrook, Hilda Rolle, Roselda Woodside, and Erma
Woodside; two uncles, David Pratt and Bernard Woodside; nine
grandchildren, Rasjinique, Essence, Joseph, Quentineque, TaShay, Breneque,
Jamie, Lamont Jr. and Burshall Jr.; thirty-three nieces and thirty-two
nephews; six sisters-in-law, Jennie Bain, Beverly Woodside and Janet
Neely, Louise Minnis of Freeport, Oval Bain, and Charlene Andrews; five
brothers-in-law, Patrick Bethel, Edward Barns, Deacon Albert Rigby Jr.,
Edward Deveaux and Anthony Bain of Miami, Florida; mother-in-law,
Roselane Hanna; and numerous other relatives and friends including, Lydia
Woodside, Bishop Cleavert Bain and family, Reverend Prince Hepburn
and family, Mrs. Burrows and family, The Sherman family, The Butler
family, Norma Rolle, Mr. and Mrs. Harcourt Cooper and family, The Gray
family, Mrs. Hyacianth Pratt and family, Mr. Fredrick Poitier and family,
Mr. and Mrs. David Curry and Family, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Lampkin, Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Saunders and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Huyler and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Percy Lockhart and family, Pastor Ben and Minister
Blythe Bailey, Bishop E. Randy and Minister Jacqueline Fraser and family,
The Staff of the Ministry of Finance and a host of relative and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






BAHAMAS' OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET
P.O. BOX GT-2097 TEL: 323-5782




Otis Allen Cooper, 91


a resident of Rock Sound, Eleuthera
and formerly of Pinders Point. Grand
Bahama, will be held at St. Luke's
Anglican Church. Rock Sound.
Eleuthera, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Andrew
Toppin. Interment follows in Rock
Sound Public Cemetery.


Left to cherish the memory of this great
man are five daughters, Retired
" "',.' Superintendent, Allerdyce Strachan,
., '. Gardina Hepburn, Eulamae Symonette,
;- ."-""'- "- Diana Ingraham and Maedawn Cooper;
four sons, Kingsley, Walton, Otis Jr.
and Carlton; twelve grand-daughters, Constance Deveaux, Veronica
Byron, Woman Coperal 2435 Monique Cooper-Turnquest, Woman
Constable 54 Tamika Cooper-Weir, Teniel, Tangela, Garnel, Brittany,
Briana, Wilshinique, and Garynique; ten grandsons, Dion, Troy, Andret,
Andrick, Diallo, Dillon, Perry Jr., Laquant, Brian, and Otis III; eleven
great grand daughters, Verona, Alicia, Destiny, Brittany-Dioni, Dijone',
Kaylisa, Adania, Akilah, Ayana, Adeyah, Aria, and Dejanique Tumquest;
seven great grand sons, Nolan, Caswell, Marino, Steffan, Sheldon
Diallo Jr and Dillon Jr.; two greatgreat grandsons, Justin and Jaylin;
four daughters-in-law, I-varene, Willamae, Brenda and Debbie; three
sons-in-law, Theophilus Symonette, Gary Ingraham and Wilson Cooper;
seven grand daughters-in-law, Linda Strachan, Susan, Vanessa John,
Mary, Lashelle Ingraham, Natasha Ingraham; three grandsons-in-law,
Steven Deveaux, Davon Turnquest and Jayden Weir; two sisters,
Jestina Russell and Virginia Cooper; five brothers-in-law, Hulan
Bartlett, Revious Bartlett, Elcott Bartlett, Sherwin Bartlett and Wikie
Bartlett; four sisters-in-law, Jetta Rosalie Greenslade, Violet Bartlett,
Mary Monvella Bethel and Alice Edwards; fifteen nieces, Ethel Althea,
Luana, Freda, Agatha, Andrea, Margaret, Myrtle, Francis, Cleola,
Anna, Dianne, Victoria, Rosie, Inez and Elizabeth; seventeen nephews,
Haywood Cooper Senior, Funza Cooper, Elemuel Williams, Morris
Williams, Rodrick Cooper Jr., Lloyd Cooper, Eddie Cooper, Frezel
Cooper, Walton Cooper, David Cooper, Joseph Cooper, Jerry Cooper,
Gilbert Fox and Rufus Fox; fourteen grand nieces, Laverne, Electra,
Deseree, Alexandria, Nicola, Princess, Melissa, Michela, Fetica,
Fertina, Charmine, Natasha, Susan, and Sandra; eighteen grand
nephews, Harrison, Allan, David, Timothy, Dwight, Perry, Anthony,
Brian, Gayland, Englebert, Jason, Terry, Gary, Brent, Michael, Douglas,
Kent and Sebastian; numerous other nieces, nephews and cousins
including, Hester Brittan, Le-Gloria Cartwright, Dolly Pople, Patrick
Murphy, Sheryl Charlow and Rodrick Hall; Marietta Major; (adopted
daughter), Alice Bullard, Merlese Bethel, Hon. Oswald Ingraham,
John Farrington, Phyllis Kemp, Helen Smith, Evan and Sheila Gibson,
Father Toppin, Marinetta Hall, Eugene Gibson and Eltha Hall; friends
including, Glenda, Molly and Bertram, the Rock Sound, Pinders Point
and Eight Mile Rock communities.


Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Rock
Sound, Eleuthera from 1:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday
at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 11






O103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
P.O. Box EE-17228
Telephone: 328-4900
Fax: 328-4903 Cell: 456-9062,436-3586


Brian Andrew Deal, 51

of Pinewood Gardens will be
held on Saturday at 11:00a.m.
at Sure Word Bible Ministries,
Lincoln Boulevard. Officiating
will be Bishop Cannel Swain
k- assisted by Lionel Rolle.
S' Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.


His memory will forever linger
in the hearts of his mother,
1. Amelia Deal; seven brothers,
K Paul, Raymond, Hubert,
Dennis, Kenneth, Kirkwood,
and Jeffrey Deal; four brothers, Geraldine Symonette-Deal,
Leeann Bain, Sandra Deal, and Pamela Seymour; adopted
brothers and sisters, Trudy, Rena, Queenie, Bernadette,
Rochelle, Ricardo, Chase Ben, and David Deal; nieces: Tanya,
Shavonne, Tamara, Rayandra, Lakeisha, Filicity, and
Antinique, Indonesia, Kenice, Alyka, Chera, and Comila;
nephews, Dino, Duran, Antonio, Kirkwood Jr., Anthony Jr.,
Rayvante, Khiry, Dancel, Danrad, Caudray, Aaron, David
Jr., Reno, and Brando; one grand niece, Angel Hepburn;
one grand nephew, Anthony Deal Jr.; brothers-in-law,
Derick Bain, and Anthony Seymour; sisters-in-law, Francis,
Rutbrnae, and Mercia Deal; aunts, Rowena Darville, Myrtle
Turnquest, and Gloria and Eloise Knowles, Hortense Rahming,
Edna Greene, Romelda Owens, Ulease Hall, Iris Grant, and
Edith Knowles; uncles, John, Leonard and George Knowles,
Walter Darville, Kermit Turnquest, Garnet, William (Bill),
Joseph and Haywood Deal; and a host of other relatives
and friends including, Edwin and Rosebud Knowles, Keland
and Michael, Betty, Don, Jada, Beverley, Lawerence, Alex,
Betty, Hugo, Bertrum, Shakera, Tyrone Deal, Patrick Greene
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Thurston and family, Mr. Lawerence
Knowles, The Young family, The Bootie family, The Staurt
family and the entire Deal's family of Soldier Road, and the
Pinewood Gardens Community and many others too numerous
to mention.

Viewing will be held in the State Room of Jones Brothers
Morticians Mt. Royal Avenue and Talbot Street on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00p.m. and at the Church on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. until service time.


/-





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


urtitss fimorial fjfrltuari
Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma Tel: 345-7020- Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761


FREDERICK "FATS" RAMSEY, 36

of Kemp Road, will be
held on Saturday at 10:00 0
a.m. at St. Margaret's
Anglican Church, Kemp "
Road. Officiating will be
Fr. Joseph Mycklewhyte. 4

Margaret's Cemetery.

He is survived by his
children, Fredricka,
Frederick Jr and Fredrico; one brother, Garth;
grandchild, Andricka; grandfather, Abraham Rolle;
one aunt, Frances Dean; four uncles, Leroy, James
and Henry Rolle and Danny Ramsey of Florida;
host of other relatives and friends including, Tiffany,
Phillis, and Mark of Miami, Florida, Susan,
Vicarria, Shanika, Sherman, Michael, Portia Rolle,
Elizabeth Rolle, Rosemaria Rolle, Lawrence Dean,
Shantell, Bernard, Fredrick, Marvin, Taneisha,
Leroy, Aiesha, leanne, Precious, Tamia, Mario,
Dario, Janet, Philemon, Tyvonne, Mario Jr., Eliesha,
Brenda and Patrice Ramsey, Stephanie Sweeting
and family, Anthony Johnson, Anthony Sweeting,
Franklyn Gibson, Dave Sinclair, Antonia Sweeting
(godchild), Bernard Rolle, Betty, Era Hanna and
family, Hilda, Jennymae Armbrister and family,
Stephanie Cartwright and family, Levitt Newbold,
Damian Woodside, David Moses, Diana, Naomi,
Simeon, Margaret Turnquest and family, Pearline
Miller and family, Maria Miller and family, St.
Margaret's Church family, Lester Strachan and
family, Eleanor Ramsey and family, Jean Dean
and family, Ann Turnquest and family and the
entire Kemp Road community and the corner boys
of Mt. Pleasant Avenue and William's Lane.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial
Mortuary, Robinson Road and Fifth Street on
Friday from 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. and at the
church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service
time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


Putter's (unnral Hvrnys

& (Jrecmatrium
Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas


Mr. Edward Ervin Miller, 72


of Detora Avenue, South
Beach and formerly of
Scrub Hill, Long Island
will be held pn Friday,
August 03rd, 2007 at
10:00 a.m. at Roman
Catholic Church of The
Resurrection,
Resurrection Drive,
Joan's Heights West.
Officiating will be Fr.


Glen Nixon.


Left to cherish his precious memories are his
Wife; Lillian Miller; Three (3) Children;
Eddie and Kevin Miller and Janene Miller-
Stubbs; One (1) Daughter-in-law; Ag'atha
Miller; One (1) Son-in-law; Eric Stubbs; Four
(4) Grandchildren; Mitzi, Glenroy, Oscar and
Marcus Miller; Two (2) Great-grandchildren;
Alex Stuart and Sean Miller; One Sister; Maris
Carey; Six (6) Sisters-in-law; Irma Deveaux,
Gwendolyn Tumquest, Lynn, Viola and Deana
Major and Geneva Strachan; Seven (7)
Brothers-in-law; Vincent Carey, Letian, John,
Lambert and Lance Major, Samuel Deveaux
and Daniel Pinder; Two (2) Aunts; Olive
McKenzie and Vera Miller of West Palm
Beach, Florida; One (1) Uncle; Wesley Miller
of West Palm Beach, Florida; Two (2) Close
Cousins; Edith and Eugene Turnquest; Thirty
(30) Nieces and Nephews and a host of other
relatives and friends

Arrangements are being conducted by
Butlers' Funeral Home sand Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets.






THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 13


FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SEVCE O


Ulric Roosevelte Johnson Saunders, 16

of Nassau Village will be held on
Saturday August 4th, 2007 at 11:00
a.m. at Wesley Methodist Church,
Baillou Hill Rd. & Chapel Street.
Officiating will be Rev. Carla Culmer
assisted by Brother Ernest Miller.
S' Interment will follow in Woodlawn
S ''' ~Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Rd.

Left to cherish his memories are his
., Parents: Juanita Saunders Rahming &
.,1 ,*'^^ S SGT 855 Ulric Johnson Sr.; 3 Sisters:
S. Rikissa, Maiya and Amber; 2 Brothers:
Devargo and Jamaal; 9 Auuts: Carla,
Natasha, Stacy, Princess, WPC 50.12 Melvina Johnson, Orean,
Maureen, Bernadette and Monique; 5 Uncles: Arthur Jr. (pony),
Anthony, Hilton, Deno, and Corporal 189 Elvin Emmanuel; 1
Nephew: Javon; 3 Grandparents: Oralee & Arthur Saunders and
Deselene Johnson Hepburn; 49 Cousins: Terrell, Deon, Picazz,
Chante, Elicia, D'Asia, Kisnell, Shinika, Grantonio, Kimberly, Ina,
Kelly, Vanreka, Doralee, Ricardo, Shakarva, Brian, Craig, Cameron,
Daniel Jr., Dannisha, Melissa, Tyler, Aneisha, A'Keisha, Alex,
Deangelo, Kevin, Ossman, Arieal, Antonique, Brondan, Deandra,
Cyncliar, Claron, Gladson, Harrietta, Harry Jr., Deandre', Chlily,
Reka, Carolin, Sheryl, Meradith, Analee of Orlando, Florida, Mark,
Wayne, Troy, Marvin; 9 Grandaunts: Miriam Johnson, Vera Cash,
Wiliamae Albury, Vezel Gibson, Nervaleen Smith, Careana Johnson,
Daisy Johnson, Costella Darling, Velma Adderley; 8 Grand Uncles:
Cleveland Grant, Gilford, Emmanuel, Johnny, Wellington, Fliex
Saunders, SGT. Austin Smith and Esau Johnson; A Host of Other
Relatives and Friends including: The families of Loria Lightbourn,
Inspector Philip Lightbourn, ASP Clement Lightbourn Jr., Neka
Thompson, Debbie and Stephanie Neely, Larry Johnson, Donald
and Doris Cash (Ministry of Education), Avis Lightbourn (Ministry
of Education) Velma Adderley, Joann, Cherry, Maureen, Everette,
Sharmane Rolle and Shannon Thompson (BTC), Sharea Henfield,
Reva Cleare, George Blatch, The Pennermans, Mariea, Wilamae
Darling, Shirley Kerr, The Josephs, Aaron Johnson, The Henrys,
Charylie, Kyke, Joey, Sly, Donavon, Albert, Zekio, Squirrel,
Smudge, Clintonique, Becky, Manny, Doogie, The Wesley
Methodist Church and the entire Nassau Village Community, Fluff
& Blu and many others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the "Serenity Suite" at Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, on
Friday from 10:00a.m. until 6:00p.m. and then again at the
church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.


Rosalie Mae Ferguson, 70

of Matthew Town, Inagua, will be held
on Sunday August.5th, 2007 at 1:00
p.m. at The Church Of God Of
-w Prophecy, Matthew Town, Inagua.
Officiating will be Pastor David
Thompson assisted by Pastor Richard
Ingraham. Interment will follow in
The Public Cemetery, Matthew Town,
Inagua.


S" Memories of her will always be held
I in the hearts of her loving and caring
children: 5 Daughters: Maria Ferguson,
Naverine Smith, Cindy Ellis, Edell
Charlton, and Vanessa Allen; 5 Sons: Eglan Hanna, Freddy, Thevis
and Pohemus Adderley of Freeport, Grand Bahama and Donovan
Roker; 3 Adopted Daughters: Alfreda. Llwenlyn, Paula, and Judy
Beneby of Nassau.; 5 Loving Sisters: Pearline Ingraham, Irena
Decosta of Nassau, Mary Arnett, betty Clarke and Francina Grant
of Freeport Grand Bahama; 1 Brother-In-Law: Logan Decosta;
46 Caring Grand Children: Sharina, Valentino, Seddrico, Sheriya,
Yonardo, Geanno, Ashton, Sonovia, Sharron, Spencer, Rickia,
Reanna, Daphne, Derinique, Derick Jr., Jayvon, Janell, Narasha,
Narisha, Fredrico, Feraud, Tiffany, Thevis Jr., Thavis, Stephen,
Tia, Donovan Jr., Donette, Dontae, Polhemus Jr., Romardo, Jessica,
Eleka, Dexter, Leonardo, Monolesha, Abrianna, Evin, Vargo,
Eyloniec, Nadia, Elanna, Sharad, Keisha, Lauryn and Rashana;
5 Great-Grand-Children: Joshua, Kavontae, Emmanuel, Vardo,
Anna, Makaya; 4 Daughters-In-Law: Niska, Antoinette, Elma,
and Miggy Adderley of Freeport, Grand Bahama; 5 Sons-In-Law:
George, Willis, Ricky, Derick and Lealon; 44 Nieces and Nephews:
Garnet, Gelena, Sybileen, Bernard, Laverne, Barbara, Esther, Don,
Richard, Ingrid, Kenneth, Heather, Debbie, Sharon, Jason,
Dellareece, Patrice, Logan Jr., Stafford, Jeff, Leroy, Joyce, Rico,
Kylan, Ivis, Shavanda, Presa, Carla, Cordero, Rashad, Renatta,
Nevis, Elois, Eloney, Trustin, Constable 2647 Kevin Rolle, Tyron,
Tyler, Steven, Delando, Maxine, Shonia, Lytoya, Ednamae and
Darcey; 2 God-Children: Rochelle and Kodiah Rolle Jr.; Other
Relatives and Friends: The Church Of God Of Prophecy family,
V.Alfred Gray, Pastor Rudy Roberts, Pastor Benard, Precious
Pearls, The Farquharson's, Morley's, Beneby's, Finley's, William's,
Saunder's, Fawkes', Cox's, Palacious', Major's, Burrows' and
Nixon's Families and the entire Matthew Town, Inagua Community.

Viewing will be held in the "Serenity Suite" at Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads,
on Saturday at the church from 10:00a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES








PAG 14 THRSAY AUUT2 07TET UEOIURE


and


FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034


FUNERAL SERVICES FOR


Rowena Geraldine Austin, 80

ofNassau,,Bahamas will be held on Saturday
August 4 2007 at 12:00 p.m. at Bethel
Baptist Church, Meeting Street. Officiating
will be Rev. Timothy Stewart assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel. Interment
will follow in the Church's Cemetery.

.- iLeft to cherish her memories are her 5 Sons:
Charles and Larry Austin, Alfred Lightboum,
.. Tyrone Moss, and Paul Hanson; 5
Daughters: Tina and Eleanor Austin,
Cynthia Lightbourn, Mildred Moss and
Yvonne Storr; 1 Adopted Son: Bobby
Farrington; 2 Brothers: Reginald Austin
and Holland Bowleg; 2 Sisters: Eldica Wilson and Alicemae Ingraham;
1 Brother-In -Law: Donald Wilson; 27 Grandchildren: Shavan, Antone,
Kathy, Trevor, Inga, Omar, Alicia, Michelle, Vivian, Monique, Christal-
Ray, Mario, Celeste, Chelsey Austin, Melissa Riley, Jamal, Heathcliffe,
Shawna, Precious, Michelle, Artlington, Nekia, Romel, Alfreda, Alfred
Jr., and Aaron; 14 Great Grand Children: Randisha, Racheo, Shantique,
Gregory, Sean, Raquell, Matthew, Dianne, Shan, Deisha, Dino Jr., Malini,
Anyhke and Antwan; 52 Nieces and Nephews: Delores Saunders,
Jacqueline and Johnathan Myckelwhyte, Emily and Justice Emmanuel
Osadebay, Ingrid King, Eleanor Conliffe, Louise Daniels and Angela
Ferguson, Calista Johnson, Dona Rose Haley, Natasha, Lynn, Sophie,
Eldica and Monique Austin, Emily Williams, Shenna, Nickita and Betty
Bowleg, Sandra and Frank LaFleur, Shannon and Larry Thompson, Sheila
Dames, Colette Ann Hutchinson, Robert Rolle, Alexander Wilson,
Llewellyn Ferguson, Reginald (Billy), Nick, Dave, Vitori, Marvin, Ambrose,
Toby, Anthony and Rico Austin, Newell, Kerlin, Clement and Vincent
King, Eldridge, Kervin and Clement Bowleg, Dirk Gurrier; 38 Grand
Nieces and Nephews: Yvette, Timothy, Allyson, Jacqueline, Andrew,
Jeunesse, Janelle, Advado, Monette, Lynette, Dareth, Deleno, Meneira,
Jason, Randy Jr., Rev. Father Mario, Barbara Za, Mancini, Kenja, Kerlin
Jr., Kendi, Kachiefe, Kyle, Keron, Keshenell, Yasmin, Simone, Jeremy,
Laurent, Vincent Jr., Dianne, Camry, Jodie, Debbie, Carol, Pamela, Shantel
Kimberly, Bernadette Adorsu; Other Relatives and Friends: Caregiver,
Velora and Millicent, Curley, Robert, wendy, Peggy, and Myrtis Farrington,
Adalee and Leah, Christine Barr, Cambridge, The families of Lisa Bethell,
Carolyn Duncombe, The Barretts, Charmaine and Delores of Florida,
U.S.A., The Progressive Liberal Party, Rev. Timothy Stewart and the
Associate Pastors of the Church, The Bethel Baptist Church Choir and
the entire Bethel Baptist Church family, Bradley Roberts, Sis. Telator
Strachan, Hon. Melanie Griffith, Hon. Malcolm Adderley, Stephanie Pratt,
Katrina Wells, Betty Young, The Scotia Trust family, Father Ranfurly
Brown, Hazel Albury, The Excelsior Temple # 37 Lodge, The entire
community of Cyprus Ct., Elizabeth Estates, The Hatchet Bay family and
many others too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the "Serenity Suite" at Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads, on Friday
from 10:00a.m. until 6:00p.m. and then again at the church on Saturday
from 10:30 a.m. until service time.


Joanna McPhee, 69


of Pirates Well, Mayaguana will be on
Saturday August 4 2007 at 10:00 a.m. at
Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley Street.
Officiating will be Rev. Alexander Missick
assisted by Rev. Anthony A. Sampson.
: Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery, Soldier Rd.

Cherished and fond memories will always
J. 4 '; linger hearts of her 2 Sons: Leroy Williams
and Hiram Kelly; 1 Daughter: Monique
SMcQueen; 1 Adopted Daughter: Erica lamm;
>6 Grandchildren: Latina Kelly Gaitor, Neka
'--'\ J and Simone Kelly, Edison McQueen, Roderick
Wilson and Clarence Styles Jr., 3 Great
Grandchildren: Montel Kelly,Havana and Piper Gaitor; 2 Brothers: Captain
Daniel Gibson and Rev. Levi McPhee; 2 Sisters: Effie McPhee and Irene
Johnson; 3 Sisters-In-Law: Florence Louise and Verdella McPhee of
Rochester, New York, 26 Nieces: Mildred Williamson, Edna Deveaux,
Elnora Smith, Ceola Higgins, Roseline Gibson, Inez Williams; Nora
Thompson, Paulette Gibson, Dotlene Edgecombe ,Hesterlene Collie, Naomi
Collie, Frances Russell, Alma Rolle, Ella Murphy, Melony Murphy, Daphne
Demeritte, Cyprianna Moss, Paula Mills, Deneice Ford, Michelle McPhee,
Phyllis monds, Patsy Johnson, Nicola Berry, Aneska Simmons, Jelize and
Luann McPhee; 30 Nephews: Benjamin Jr.Victor, Carlton and Douglas
Gibson, Byron Collie, Gently, Charles and Vanwright Murphy, Errol, Levi,
Floyd, and Sandy McPhee, Joshua, Brian, Mark and Dennis Johnson, Lelon,
Huden, Ervin, Alexander, Timothy, Stanley, Ormond, Talbot, David, Joel
and Butch McPhee of Rochester, New York; 15 Nieces-In-Law: Syblean
and Cassie McPhee, Sherry Gibson, Tericita Collie, Sheralyn and Magdalene
Murphy, Renay McPhee, Bernadette and Starlet Johnson, Alice, Donnlyn,
Susan, Jane and Teresa McPhee, Neeka Murphy; 12 Nephews-In-Law:
Allen Thompson, Stephen Edgecombe, Clement Russell, Samuel Rolle Sr.,
Ray Demeritte, Ervin Moss, Troy Mills, Kirk Ford, David Monds, Samuel
Berry and Dwayne Simmons; Numerous Grand Nieces and Grand Nephews
and A Host of Other Relatives and Friends Including: The families of
Granville and Vernita Gibson, Philip and Margarita Sands, Butiny King,
Errol Cartwright, Natesha Charlton, Ilene Maxwell, Clarence Styles Sr.,
Dianne Charlton, Cynthia Brown, Ernal Brown, sarah Collie, Rev. Robert
Black, Cornelius and Verlene Collie, Cardinal Rolle, Tanya Collie, Samuel
and Ariline Collie, Mary Black, Beatrice Charlton, Nurse Charlton of
Abraham's Bay, Mayaguana, Nurse Brooks and Nurse Ellis, Patrick Collie,
Doris and Calvin Brown, Claudius and Sheila Brooks, Rev. Robert Brooks,
Deloris Ingraham, Octavious and Stephanie Daniels, Wendy Heslor, Staff
of Ministry of Local Government, Elvin and Velva Brooks, Staff of
Environmental Health, Goldie McKinney, Ilene, Nervalene, Anname, Thelma
Brooks, Emaline Moss, Mabel Edwards, Michael Edwards, Cotrice Hanna,
Randy Woods, Tony Lewis, Bricymae Gibson, Stephen Brown, Ruis Gibson,
Raymond Murphy and sisters, Icnes Louissaint, Dr. Sawyer and his medical
team, The staff of Female Medical I, Princess Margaret Hospital, Jan Minnis
and Christine Adderley.

Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite of Restview Memorial Mortuary
& Crematorium Ltd., Robinson & Soldier Rd. on Friday from 10:00 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. and then again at the church from 8:30 a.m. until service
time.


L


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager. (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager. (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034



Dereka Kemp-McKenzie, 35

of Soldier Road, will be held
on Saturday, August 4tn, 2007
f "' at 2:00 p. m. at Ebenezer
Methodist Church, East Shirley
Street. Interment will follow
Xin the Church's Cemetery, East
Shirley Street and officiating
will be Reginald Eldon.

Left to cherish her memories
are her Mother: Thelma McKenzie, Father: Derek
Kemp, One Daughter: Domaneka McKenzie, Three
Sisters: Celeste Kemp, Deandra Poitier and Shacara
Taylor, Companion: Fred McKenzie, Thirteen
Aunts: Sharon, Nicholette and Lilaca Bethel, Natasha
Bethel-Thompson, Bridgette Bethel, Michelle
Wallace, Angela Adams, Angela, Valarie, Ursula,
Patricia, Joann, and Melissa Kemp, Nine Uncles:
Kermit Wallace, Sheldon and Brent Bethel, Stephen
Adams, Ralph, John, Barry, Perry and Justin Kemp,
Three Nieces: Tynesha Major, Daivonnia and
Daivonte Poitier, Three Nephews: Tyrone Major,
Devinn and Davon Poitier, numerous Cousins
including: Antonio Brown, Sheldon, Shandi,
Shelneka, Shavonte, Sasha, Shakela, Shelvardo and
Lania Bethel, Shenique Styles-Sisk, Jarvis Styles,
Latoya, Ronesha, Ranesha, Ronaisha, Rontario,
Ronnie, and Travian Thompson, Kaylee, Kayshell,
Kaylesa, and Kermit Wallace, Three Grand Aunts:
Winifred Mallory, Edith Whyms, and Katrina
Cartwright, One Grand Uncle: Alphonso McKenzie,
Best Friend: Sonia Higgs, numerous other Relatives
and Friends including: Verilyn McKinney, Euwonka
Saunders, Nyochee Patton, Cheryl Taylor, Marsha
McKenzie, Italia Fox, Lamantha Maycock, Corrington
Maycock, Nathalie and Andrew McKenzie.

Viewing will be held in the "Irenic Suite" at Restview
Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson
& Soldier Rd on Friday from 10:00 a.m to 6:00 p.m.
and then again at the church from 12:30p.m. until
service time.


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 15


RUSSELL & PINDER'S

FUNERAL HOME
Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
Telephone: (242) 348-2340/348-2131/352-9398/353-7250
P.O. Box F-40557 Freeport, Grand Bahamas
Fuea Sevc fo th late-


ROYALTON
THEOPHILUS
WILLIAMS JR., 54
a resident of Pine Forest, Eight
Mile Rock, Grand Bahama
will be held on Saturday,
August 4th, 2007 at Mt
Calvary Baptist Church, Sea
Grape at 1pm. Officiating will
be Rev Paul Mullings, assisted
by Rev Osetta Heldfield.
Interment will be in the


Harbour West Cemetery.


He is survived by his parents, Royalton Sr and Margaret
Williams; three brothers, Charlie, Randy and Alcott
Williams; five sisters, Louise Gibson, Pearlene St James,
Evelyn Williams, Rosie Shaw and Monique Williams-
Pelecanos; three brothers-in-law, James, St James, Dino
Pelecanos and Tyrone Shaw; six uncles, Timmy, Halbert,
Owenton, Llelyn, Walter and Leon Williams and David
Taylor; aunts, Ivy Taylor, Violet McIntosh, Oshie Harvey,
Sarah Cox, Veronica Hall, Iota Forbes, Pearline Henfield,
Myrtis, Orene and Ilene; three aunts-in-law, Eva, June
and Jocelyn; four nephews, Tyrone Shaw, Emmanuel
Forster, Renado Williams and Jayden Dames-Williams;
14 nieces, Catina Braxton and Tychell Shaw, Rayann
Davis, Erica, Donnell and Tamika Seymour, Daniell
Gibson, Kimberly, Melissa and Tantemia Williams, Allysa
Moxey, Shamika Ashwood, Emerald Miller; four
grandnieces, Jasmine and Jada Shaw, Ariel Cooper and
Tiffany Clarke; six grandnephews, Brandon Shaw, Arron
Cooper, Montel, Kevin Ashwood, Mike and Jeremy and
a host of other relatives and friends.

Family will receive friends at Russell & Pinder Funeral
Home, Eight Mile Rock, on Friday, August 3rd, 2007
from 1pm to 7pm and on Saturday, August 4th, from
11:30am to service time.







PAGE 16, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007


FREEPORT
11-A East Coral Road, P.O. Box F-42312
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005
Page 340-8043


NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 Fax: (242) 340-8034


ANORD NEWBOLD, 88
OF ORANGE CREEK, CAT ISLAND,
BAHAMAS WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, AUGUST 4. 2007 AT 1:30PM.
AT ST. PAUL'S METHODIST CHURCH,
EAST SUNRISE HIGHWAY. FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL
N BE REV. DR. J.EMMETTE WEIR ASSISTED
-BY REV. JOHN STUBBS AND REV.
HILGROVE HAMILTON. INTERMENT
S -.- WILL FOLLOW AT THE GRAND BAHAMA
MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER DIRVE,
S" FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA.
Left to celebrate his life are his Wife, Delrona,
Sons: Garnett, Reynald, Leonard, Ronald, Cecil,
Nelson, Freddie and Edward Newbold; Daughters: Alice Stuart, Roselyn
Marshall, Dorothy Callan, Elizabeth and Emily Newbold; Sons-in-law:
Livingston Stuart, Clyde Marshall and Mark Callan; Daughters-in-law:
Gwendolyn Adams-Newbold, Vera and Laurine Newbold; Sister: Maude
Newbold, Sister-in-law: Fearmeana Feast. A host of Grandchildren including:
Lenora, Claudia, Leonardo, Ricardo, Ethlyn, Michelle, Neil, Reynald Jr.,
Rose, Richmond, Janette and Karen Newbold, Eugene and Sheska McPhee,
Natasha Black, Latoya Minnis, Lynette and Gregory Lightbourne, Deniko,
Michelle and Shannell Stuart, Anton, Valerie, Kendrick and Anthony Marshall,
Biran, Nola and Johnathan, Michelle Outten, Michelle Roker and George
Marshall, Ronald, Daphne, Antoine, Natalie, Lynden, Sheenae, Toriano. and
Peaches Newbold, Gwendolyn and Elijah Rahming, Margo Newbold-Jacques,
Vera McKinney, Lenisa, Kelby, Stephen, Tom, Gregory and Garnett Newbold,
and Rosemary Cambridge. Great-Grandchildren including: Travis Fowler,
Ashanti, Shercanon, Ricka, Dynetrious, Deangelo, Eugene, Leginia, Genee,
Pedricka, Prescott, Taliyah, Dezentail, Angelo McPhee, Valdez, Bazille, Joey,
Kedrick Jr., Anwar Marshall, Thomas Stuart, Nelly, Garnelle, Gregory Jr.,
Garnique, & Stefha Newbold, Malaysia, Renee, Rennie, Alex, Lauren, Sheridan,
Chazmin, Tabitha Newbold, Franklyn Charlton Jr., Rondavia, Deveron,
Ronardo, Ronesha, Enrique, Lynden Jr., Shane, Michela Newbold, Patricia,
Siedah and Brittany Demeritte, Breann Rahming, Michelle, Taimak and Keanu
Saunders, Tatika and Temeko Neily, David Rahming, Davanech Jacques,
Ramond, Vadalia, Sheniqua, Ariel, Richonna, Rosetta Newbold, Richmond
Newbold, Jr. Great Great Grand Children: Keishonn Newbold, Vashitinique
Greensiade and Alexander; Nieces: Emily Rosemary Newbold, Alice Frances,
Thedora and Veronica Curry, Marion and Irene Rolle, Barbara Holder
Anniemae Jennings, Gloria Newbold-Riley, Sandra Dean, Pamela Newbold-
Cooper, Violet and Sheyl Feast, Rosalie Celia Joseph and Prescola Cash,
Rosie Morgan, Altamese Carey; Nephews: Ken Ferguson, Charles Williams,
William and Anthony Wong, Joseph Feast Jr., Herbert and Charles Feast,
Herald and Lloyd Newbold and Paul Frances. Other Relatives including:
Roosevelt Newbold, Donald Newbold, Elrona Culmer, Ellen Newbold, Charles
and William Newbold, Harrison Newbold and family, Roosevelt Newbold
and family, McNeil Newbold and family, Sally, Elizabeth and Ophelia Newbold
of Nassau, Donald Newbold of Orange Creek, Cat Island, Clara Grey and
family, Patrice Russell and family, Sybil McGillion, Sharon, Lincoln, Alan
Margaret Cleare, Lillymae Outten, Cecil Newbold, Leather, Forence, Rubin,
Joseph McDonald, Irene Ramsey and most especially Rudymae McDonald
who cared for him so unselfishly in the days before Anord left Cat Island and.
the entire Orange Creek, Cat Island Community.
VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE "SERENITY SUITE" OF RESTVIEW
MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM
10:00 A.M TO 6:00 P.M. AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM
12:30 AM UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES































Winifred Delores Sears

What is Life if you can not give,
What is Life if you can not love,
What is Life if you cannot inspire,
What is Life if you cannot transform,
What is Life if you cannot heal,
Mummy you have done all of them, now you can rest
In God's everlasting mercy.

S On behalf of the entire Sears family we want to thank you for
all of the support shown to us, whether it was through expressions
of sympathy via Cards, Phone calls, Visits, Floral arrangements
or various courtesies, which were extended during our time of
grief. Though we are deeply saddened by Our Mother's death,
we REJOICE as we know without a doubt she is now present
: with the Lord!!!

Special Thank you to:- Mr. Cecil Thompson (the 13 Child),
Rev. Fr. Remy David, Deacon Jeffrey Hollingsworth, Deacon
SNixon Lindor, Minister Kenny Roberts, Gloria Delancey, John
and Lillian Rolle, Advern Munning, Joanne Poitier, Beamin
Stubbs, Kenneth Romer, Marline Hepburn, Henry Dean, Jarnis
Marshall, Louise Gibbs, Francis Friend and Her Ushers, Sandra
Edgecombe, Elaine Sands, The Strachen Family, Essa Williams,
Melissa Knowles, Dorothy King, Mary Wilchcombe, Dellareese
Rolle, Rogan Smith, Charles Colebrooke, Susan J. Wallace,
Mary Star of the Sea Prayer Team, Safeguard Security, GB Port
Authority Workers Union, Martin Town Primary School, Judicial
Department (Nassau and Freeport), Pioneer's of the Decade, Ft.
Charlotte PLP Constituency, Fragrance of the Bahamas, Bahamas
Industrial Electrical, Sanitation Services, Little Flower Children
Services in New York, Bahamas Union of Teachers, Freeport
Container Port Human Resources Dept, Costrite and Solomons,
Staff of Ministry of Education Freeport, The Legend Band &
Crusaders Band and the Entire Staff of Restview Memorial
Mortuary & Crematorium Staff.




THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES
BETHANY'S EDUCATIONAL AND SOCIAL TRAINING
(B.E.S.T.) INSTITUTE
An affiliate of Benthany Baptist Church
The following vacancies exist at B.E.S.T. Institute to be filled for the
new school year which commences September 2007.
One DRIVER
between the ages of 35 and 50 years for 20 + seater school bus
must hold a valid driver's licence
must own a vehicle
must produce police record, letters of reference from your pastor and
previous employer
hours: 6:00 am to 8:30 am and 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm
wages: $10.00 per hour
Three PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
with certificates/diplomas from a reputable teacher's training college
possess a Bachelor's Degree in appropriate discipline
must have a minimum of 5 years teaching experience
produce a letter of reference from previous employer and church
pastor
provide the names of two referees with telephone numbers and
addresses
Knowledge of Music, French and/or Spanish will be an asset.
One INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TEACHER with the ability to teach
Remedial Reading
qualification. experience and requirements as per primary teachers
Salary: $22,800 to $26,400 per annum-commensurate with
qualifications and experience.
All applicants must be a practising Christian of the Baptist Faith; must
be of exemplary character and reputation, enthusiastic, self motivated
and tolerant, have a genuine love for children and be prepared to
demonstrate good work ethics.
Teachers must be willing to engage in extra curricular activities.
Applications should be addressed to the Board of Governors,
B.E.S.T. Institute, c/o Hope Hamilton, P.O. Box 498. Providenciaes.
Turks and Caicos islands B.W.I or fax to 649-941-5118, Email.
bethany(tciway to
Telephone contact 649-941-5632/4803 or 649-946-4921
^/\ ,*.. A/\ A ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.^ /. ..^ ..^..^ .<..>....'*./ ..A/ '. ^X ...'*-*A*.^.. ./ .**/


THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 2007, PAGE 17


Publish your

CARD OF THANKS

or

IN LOVING MEMORY



in The Tribune's

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SECTION


Every Thursday


Call us today

502-2352
or 502-2354






PG 18 Thursday, August 2, 2007


RI rI( IC)


The Tribune


Is the Christian Church failing?


FROM page 1

know what to say. We know some
Bible verses, but I don't think that we
can really bear witness for Christ and
stand in defence of what we believe,"
she told Tribune Religion.
"We have the true belief, the true
faith, but I am not sure if many of us
realize that," she said.
Many persons both within and out-
side the Church understand Estelle's
concern. One of the principles that all
Christians should follow is found in I
Peter 3:15, where the Bible admonish-
es:

.....Sanctify Christ as Lord in your
hearts, always being ready to make a
defence to everyone who asks you to
give an account for the hope that is in
you, yet with gentleness and rever-
ence; and keep a good conscience so
that in the thing in which you are slan-
dered, those who revile your good
behaviour in Christ may be put to
shame.

In this entire chapter, which speaks
about enduring persecution, Peter was
admonishing the Christians of the
early Church to be spiritually
equipped to answer all questions
regarding their faith. It was significant
in that early disciples of Christ
endured unspeakable persecution for
the sake of righteousness but still they
had hope and apparently it was obvi-
ous to those around them. -
But thousands of years later, does
today's Christian know where his
hope really lies?
"No they don't. Looking in today's
society at the people who are aban-
doning the church and losing the foun-
dations that may have been set before
in their lives, the simple fact that they
don't have a genuine understanding of
actually why they go to church is why
they are leaving," Charles*, a twenty-
five year old Catholic said as he
attempted to answer that question.
In Charles' opinion, many churches
do not expose their members to what
it actually means to be a Christian. "I




INSIGHT


think churches today are more just
about the worship and the ceremony
and having a strong sermon, but peo-
ple still leave and to most of them it
was just somewhat of a routine, like
going to work each da\." he
explained.
"And I think that in itself is the rea-
son why vou have so many Sunday
Christians because Sunday Christians
come for a day of observance then the
rest of the week it's back to normal.
There is no reinforcement of actually
why you go to church."
Though it is easy to blame the
Church for the fact that there seems to
be no reinforcement, Bishop Ros L
Davis, senior pastor of Golden Gates
Assembly World Outreach Ministries
International, told Tribune Religion
that pastors present many opportuni-
ties for Christians to come and receive
insight from the Bible throughout the
week. It's just that many Christians -
or probably mere church-goers do
not take advantage of the opportunity.
"Church life is not only on Sunday.
There is Bible study and prayer meet-
ing throughout the week. On Sunday,
there may only be a message of inspi-
ration, but in weekly Bible studies the
pastor can get into in-depth studies
about how you ought to live as a
Christian. We learn about [the beliefs
of other religions], and how we should
respond to them. This is where peo-
ple's questions are answered," Bishop
Davis told Tribune Religion.
Bishop Davis admits however, that
in most churches in New Providence,
the attendance at these intimate serv-
ices throughout the week is a drop in
the bucket compared to Sunday morn-
ing worship.
"I admit that during Bible studies at
our church, only the faithful few show
up. You encourage the members to
come out and be involved with the
total life of the church because no
Christian can be his best without a life
of prayer and Bible study," Bishop
Davis noted.
"In our churches, in prayer and
Bible study services, the numbers are
dwindling and that's because people
only want to get by with the least
amount of information. They don't
realize that if they get really commit-
ted they will be like a tree planted by
the rivers of water. (See Psalms 1:3)"
Unfortunately however, many of
the people who claim to be Christians
but who have not benefited from solid
Christian instruction, are the ones
who are talking on behalf ol the
Christian Church, handling questions
about the faith and coming up short -
which leads the wider society to
believe that the Church is failing,


Bishop Davis noted.
But he is confident that the Church
is not failing.
When asked about a recent online
article written by Christian Apologist
Anthony Horvath which presented
the view that the Church of God is
'near total defeat" because it has
failed to present itself vigorously,
Bishop Davis told Tribune Religion
that such an assumption should not be
made.
The article claims that most of
today's atheists were raised in the
church, including Richard Dawkins,
author of "The God Delusion". Mr
Horvath believes that the church itself
produces atheists because it refuses to
answer tough questions put forward
by young people.
Though saddened that such conclu-
sions could be drawn, Bishop Davis is
not surprised that in recent years the
church is the most attacked institu-
tion, and Christian preachers, the
most attacked vocation.
"We have a big enemy, that is the
devil, who wants to destroy the
church. But it is also because many of
us do not know who we are as believ-
ers. The enemy has hid this from us
and many of us are living in igno-
rance," Bishop Davis explained.
"Don't mind people making these
assumptions. We just have to know
that if we take our relationship with
God lightly, without Bible study and
prayer, we will always have limited
information. But the one who digs
deep and wants to know will strike
gold. (See Matthew 5:6)"
Bishop Davis said that the Christian
Church is indeed doing its job, though
there is a need for Christians to be
more committed. It must not be for-
gotten however, that there are believ-
ers who are after God's presence daily.
Bishop Davis noted that many
mornings when he goes to Golden
Gates Assembly for prayer at 4am and
5am, he passes churches where the
lights are on and the believers are
praying. There are other churches
where meetings are held from 12am to
the early hours of the morning. Now,
how many people actually attend
these meetings is another story.
"There are a whole lot of people
who are on these talk shows and writ-
ing in the newspapers who have no
clue that there are churches that are
busy equipping the saints. God will
build his Nhurch and the gates of hell
will not prevail against it. (Matthew
Io:18)" Bishop Davis said.

li hl ('.v e been chl ,ged to pro-
tect thei identity of those interviewed for
this article.


FROM page 1

Jesus as an example, "It is one thing
to state that the Christian church
believes that Jesus rose from the
dead, as a point of dogma and doc-
trine. It is another to say state the
belief and give the reasons for
maintaining that belief. People
want to think they believe things for
good reasons.
"People aren't going to their pas-
tors for their information anymore.
They're going to the Internet.
People aren't leaving the Church
just because they're bored with
worship styles. People want sub-
stance and don't know that we have
it."
Having toyed with atheism him-
self after years of Christian educa-
tion, Horvath wants to help equip
the Church for the current crisis. He
has a BA in pastoral ministry, is
working on a Masters in Philosophy
and Apologetics, and has been
involved in apologetics ministries
for ten years. "I have a real heart
for the college kid looking for
answers, but I think the big picture
requires us to stop sending our
youth out like lambs to the slaugh-
ter in the first place."
In the end, Horvath said, "The
battle turns on the success or failure
of the local congregations to step up
to the challenge."

Horvath maintains an online
discussion forum where he is proud
to give non-Christians full venting of
their views which many Christian
forums tend to censor. Christians
iad non-Christians, even the most
hostile ones, are invited and wel-
comed, but he warns the faint of
heart. The forum is located at
wwwiti.sntjohnnv.com/smnf.

Christian Newswire


I I C- i' ''


.jhi LLi-n.~rl it~ i i -..u~L;-* u ~~LY-JILLtr~LI~I.i~iYiLY~b i~--~Mr;;r --lr -








The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 2, 2007 PG 19


Xanadu Beach gets a 'cleaning' as




part of church's outreach project


U nder clear, blue
skies members of
Freeport Bible
Church, Grand Bahama.
braved the heat of the early
morning sun last Saturday to
do their part in keeping the
environment clean.
As an outreach project, the
intentional care units and
small group ministry of
Freeport Bible Church took
on the enormous task of
cleaning Xanadu Beach in
Freeport.
Senior Pastor Wilbur
Outten said the beach had
never returned to the state it
was in prior to the 2004-2005
hurricanes. And that there
was still lots of debris, along
with garbage left by beach
goers.
"God has been gracious to
us by giving us the opportuni-
ty to live in this corner of His
vineyard, where we are
blessed with some of the
world's best beaches. We are
not owners, but managers or
stewards of all that He has
entrusted us with. As
Christians, it is therefore our
duty to ensure that our envi-
ronment is kept clean,"
Pastor Outten said.


'...As Christians,



it is therefore



our duty to



ensure that our



environment



is kept clean."


Pastor Wilbur Outten


Supporting the vision of
their pastor, approximately 75


members of Freeport Bible
Church reported for clean up


duty at Xanadu Beach,
between 8am and 10am.
The members began the
hard work of cleaning the
beach from one end to the
other, as far as the Xanadu
Hotel's private beach proper-
ty. One by one the industrial
size (approximately 55 gai-
Ions) garbage bags provided
by Bahamia Sanitation
Services were filled, until in
the end 91 bags of garbage
and debris lie neatly piled.
awaiting the collection of
Sanitation Services.
Ninety one bags of garbage
and debris, Wow! And that
did not include the big tree
trunks of which special equip-
ment is needed to remove
from the beach.
After their hard labour, the
members then gathered for a
short time of prayer and
thanksgiving and drank lots of
water and soft drinks to cool
down. The few children
amongst the group decided to
cool down in the best way by
taking advantage of being on
the beach and swimming or
playing in the water after
doing their share of the work.
Pastor Outten said 'fat he
was overwhelmed -' the sup-


port of the members, not only
by the numbers that showed
up, but by the enthusiasm
with which they did the job
and the camaraderie they dis-
played while working togeth-
er on the beac':


Noting that this project was
done at an ideal time. because
of the reports in the media
this past week of many
tourists complaining that our
country is "dirty". Pastor
Outten said that Freeport
Bible Church would be seek-
ing other opportunities to be
guardians of our island and
country at large. And said
that we need to educate and
instill in our people the
importance of keeping our
community clean for our-
selves and visitors alike as
the old saying goes, "Charity
begins at home and spreads
abroad".
Congratulations to
Freeport Bible Church for
taking on this venture. May
God continue to bless you as
you continue in your vision to
"Love God, Love people and
serve the world."


A review of Bishop Simeon Hall's new book, 'Sermons From A Bahamian Pulpit'


FROM page 23

It is a question that we must all ask
ourselves.
But the message of this sermon does
not end here. Rather its message, its
grand theme is that by trusting in
Christ we can overcome "Ishmael" so
that the Isaac, the good in us may tri-
umph.
"0 somebody ought to shout
Hallelujah, that in spite of your
Ishmael experiences, God in His
mercy, still would H-A-L-L-E-L-U-J-
A-H!"
There are many other interesting
and relevant sermons including
Sermon I, "How To Dance In A
Graveyard Situation"; Sermon II


"Three Irrefutable Reasons Your
Denomination Cannot Save You"
(which has the sharp exchange
between Bishop Hall and Archdeacon
Etienne Bowleg on denominational-
ism); "Sermon 111 "Walking Through
Darkness Towards Purpose" (a
favourite theme also of Dr Myles
Munroe).
Sermon X, "Three Reasons God
Hates Divorce And How To Heal The
Pain"; Sermon XII "Stay Outside
Begging Or Come Inside And
Worship", which is and invitation to
attend divine worship. The last sermon
appropriately has the subject "It's
Time To Give The Benediction." The
Watchnight sermon preached on
Friday, December 31, 2005. The text


taken by the bishop on that occasion
was, "Brethren, I count not myself to
have apprehended; but this one thing I
do, forgetting those things which are
behind, and reaching forth unto those
things which are before..."
I press toward the mark for the prize
of the high calling of God in Christ
Jesus. (Phil. 3:13-14). Taking his cue
from St Paul, the preacher exhorts his
congregation (and by implication you,
the reader) to forget the past with its
failures and disappointments as well as
its triumphs and to press forward to
the future with its hopes and chal-
lenges, trusting in the Lord Yes, the
Preacher exhorts us to forget the past
by giving it a benediction, and to look
forward to the future, confident that


God who has brought us thus far will
enable us to meet what lies ahead.
Sound*advice, especially at the begin-
ning of a New Year, but useful in all sit-
uations of challenge.
This is a very inspiring book. It is
evident, "from cover to cover" that the
Senior Pastor of New Covenant
Baptist Church really takes great pride
in giving of his best in the pulpit. As he
himself puts it in the Introduction: "I
was born to preach. For me, preaching
is both a calling and a science. Nothing
excites me more as does preaching. I
enjoy crafting and delivering a sermon.
I pray that you will be inspired and
blessed as you read these sermons". To
this one can only respond with a hearty
"Amen!"


I-~c L -- II~LII~AA~ -IC--C-lyl-~ --~-~~ ------- ~l--~-P P-- --- -Q-- -- e r --r I









PG 20 Thursday, August 2, 2007


RELIGION


The Tribune


The Testimony Corner


* By PATRICIA PRATT

Chosen
Looking back and remembering the
years when I was a child of darkness,
things seemed so perfect I had lots of
money, clothes to give away and there
was always-a choice of which party or
night club I would be attending.
Sometimes I just wondered who I
would meet when I hit the streets.
Nothing else mattered to me; at that
point in my life all I wanted to do was
dress up and go.
Reality check: It is so funny how,
when God has a plan and a purpose
for your life, that no matter what you
do some how sooner or later something
leads you to God.
In 2002 I had a great job where I
dealt with millions of dollars, and
sometimes my weekly pay was $1,200.
Things were going great or so I
thought the money was, like the
youths would say, "I had it to burn",
but the events that followed would
change my life forever. I still get chills
when I think about it, it's mind bog-
gling how the script can be flipped
whether you like it or not or whether
you're ready or not.
During this period in my life I
weighed a healthy 150 pounds and
wore a size 9-10, but without me notic-
ing my clothes started getting loose. In
short order I actually started loosing
weight with speed, but I had no idea
what was going on and before I knew
it I was in a size 3-4.
Being a typical Bahamian I started
to think the worst. I wasn't woman
enough to go to the doctors for any
type of conformation or information
so I stayed in the house and started to


get worse mainly because of my own
thoughts.
I was worried about what people
would say about me? How would I
explain to people what was wrong
with me if I didn't know my self? After
my collar bone started sticking out I
only went outside if it was absolutely
necessary, I had no desire to work or
do any thing and had also stopped eat-
ing. My eyes seemed larger than life as
my face shrunk and my hair started to
fall out when I combed it.

Terrified

And with all of this going on I was
still terrified to go to the doctor. All I
wanted to do was die, I hated looking
in the mirror because I disliked the
person I saw, so I started thinking of
ways to end my life. I thought if I cut
my wrist I would fiot do it properly so
I scratched that option off the list,
then I thought I'd take some pills -
that was easy so I did and guess what
guys, I woke up the next day. I was so
mad I said Lord I can't even take my
own life right.
One morning I woke up and my
hands were stiff and I could hardly
breathe. I thought this was my final
hour. In the end I was taken to the
hospital by ambulance, and while
there I promised God that if I came
out of this I would serve him for the
rest of my life. I was later seen by doc-
tors and was diagnosed with
Hyperthyroidism. I was treated for
several years and in 2005 I had sur-
gery. Today, I am alive and well,
thanks be to God.
You know what; I honestly believe
God saw something in me and decided


he wanted to use me, he looked
beyond that party animal and saw my
needs and he continues to fulfill them
daily (I Samuel 16: 7).
God is all the world to me, when all
else had failed me God was there
when the glitter and glamour had
faded and reality set in, the reality was
that Jesus Christ died for me so that I
could have life and have it more abun-
dantly, so that I could be a vessel in
which he dwells.
God chose me (John 15:16). Some
people think God roams the earth in
search of these perfect beings who
have not spot or wrinkle, but that's not
true. God wants that drug addict, that
fornicator, that adulterer, that lesbian
so that he can transform our lives and
then and only then can others see and
know that if he did it for us he can do
it for them.
I believe in order for us to win more
souls for Christ we must not be
ashamed of our past or of God, but
share all of it with others bearing in
mind that the future and the plans
God has for us is the main dish
(Jeremiah 29:11).
But first we have to surrender total-
ly. Once we do this God will bring to
pass everything he has spoken over
our lives. We will see change, growth
and develop a more intimate relation-
ship with the Saviour.
Ever since I cried his name he has
carried me where I couldn't go, he has
healed me and he is always on time
with what is best for me. We all have
our trials and tribulations, and I know
there have been times when I wanted
to give up, but I continued to press my
way through because God is with me
and he is my strength.


Isn't God Grand
One of our most powerful weapons
is the word. If you eat the word, drink
the word, then have an extra side
order of the word, Satan can throw
anything or anyone onto your path
and you will in no doubt be ready to
stand and fight knowing you are
equipped. If we base our lives on
God's principles and commandments
we will overcome. (John 14:15)
II Timothy 2:15 says we should
study to show ourselves approved,
sometimes however, we may not want
to read or study God's word or even
pray, we're just so busy and have too
many plans and none of them con-
cerns God.
We plan our whole day excluding
God then try to squeeze him in during
the last few minutes before midnight,
then we sincerely expect God to do
signs and wonders on our behalf -
that's definitely a no, no. When you
get up each morning God should be
the first person you consult.
You know how you like that hot cup
of tea every morning before breakfast,
well instead of that cup try Jesus, put
him first, seek him first (Matthew
6:33), everyday and in everything you
do.
Talk to him about everything, let
him be your counsellor, your doctor,
your burden bearer, your all and all
and he will work miracles in your life.
. If you seek God with all your heart
you will find him (Deuteronomy 4:29).


Persons interested in learning more
about Mrs Pratt's growth in the Lord
can contact her at 394-1377 or 434-
9906.


Religion b@Ac9


'Who let the dogs out?'


THE Church of God of Prophecy
National Youth Ministries presents
Teen Fest: "Rootin' It Up to be
Planted Again!", August 9-11 at the
Children's Chapel of the East Street
Church of God of Prophecy from
7pm nightly.
As part of Teen Fest, there will also
be a block party in Englerston com-
munity, on Prophecy Way and East
Street, Saturday, August 11, from
4pm until. All are invited to attend.


The US-based, Marlin Award
nominees, Mo' Than Conquers
Contemporary Reggae Gospel Band,
will headline a free concert for one


night only at the New Covenant
Baptist Church, on the East West
High, Sunday, August 5 at 7:30pm.
Also being featured during the
concert are Prophetic Voices,
Minister Billy Cleare, Loyalty,
Chariots of Fire, Akia Knowles,
Manifest, The Firm, Chesternique
Rolle, DJ Counsellor, Oasis of Love
Dance Ministry, the Singing Prophet
Lawrence Rolle, Christian Massive,
Jaynel from Eleuthera, Selector,
Mother Mackey, Landlord and oth-
ers.
All are invited because you don't
want to miss this hand clapping, foot
stomping, devil chasing, Holy Ghost
crazy time in the Lord!


FROM page 23

be people of purpose, and focus
on the job at hand, and not to be
wasteful. The acquisition of
patience is paramount if one is
going to live a peaceful and pro-
ductive Christian live.
Men were challenged to be
more than seed donors, but to be
effective fathers. Hopefully, when
our lives on this side are done the
congregation will be able to sing
with the same joy, luster and con-
viction I heard at Rev Russell's
service, and hopefully, the hymn
they sang, written by Fanny
Crosby, will be our testimony:


"When my life's work is ended
and I cross the swelling tide.
When the bright and glorious
morning I shall see,
I shall know my Redeemer
when I reach the other side,
And his smile will be the first to
welcome me."

"I shall know Him, I shall know
Him,
And redeemed by His side I
shall stand;
I shall know Him I shall know
Him,
By the prints of the nail on His
hand."


______ ______


`~.. 13u1L~---lu~i~aus







The Tribune


RELIGION


Thursday, August 2, 2007 PG 21


A review of Bishop Simeon Hall's new



book, 'Sermons From A Bahamian Pulpit'


Title: Sermons From A Bahamian Pulpit
Author/Publisher: Bishop Simeon B Hall
Cost: $ 25.00
Available at: Ucilla's Christian Supplies
In Freeport. Grand Bahama And Christian
Books Stores In Nassau, Bahamas

* By REV EMMETT WEIR

There can be no doubt that Bishop the Rev
Simeon Hall is one of the leading preachers
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The
dynamic pastor of New Covenant Baptist Church,
strategically located on the East West Highway, has,
over the years, proclaimed the gospel with authority
and eloquence, being called upon to deliver "The
Word" at many services of historic significance. Such
being the case, it is very thrilling to report that he has
just published a book including some of the most
inspiring sermons that he has preached during past
decade. Our purpose, then, to carry out a review of
his book, "sermons from a Bahamian Pulpit!" but,
first a word about the author.
Born in Nassau, Simeon Hall grew up in Choke-
Neck-Alley. (Choke-Neck-Alley, incidentally is with-
in walking distance from West Street, where this
writer resided during his own youth). He received his
early education at schools operated by the Ministry
of Education. In 1964 he was converted during an
evangelistic service at Central Gospel Chapel, when
the preacher was the famous black evangelist, the
late Tom Skinner.
He received his theological education at a Baptist
seminary in the USA before returning to serve at
home in the early seventies. Now Senior Pastor of
New Covenant Baptist Church, he has served as
President of The Bahamas Christian Council, active
and influential in the civic, educational and political
spheres as well as in the religious area, he was named
in the Queen's Birthday Honours in 2000 Officer of
the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire. A
family man, he is married to the former Linda
Farrington and they are the proud parents of three
grown children.
Now, Bishop Hall follows the same pattern
throughout in this book of sermons. First there is the
date and the place, with most (if not all) of them hav-
ing been preached at New Covenant Baptist Church.
Then there is the text. Thirdly, there is the subject
and then follows the content of the sermon. In con-
sistently taking or citing his text at the beginning of
each sermon, the Bahamian preacher is in line with
the great pulpiteers of the Church, who preachers
have departed from this approach, it is generally
agreed by experts in homiletics (the are of preach-
ing) that it is advisable to take a text.
This writer, himself a preacher, vividly recalls the
response of the organist after he had preached his
first sermon upon taking up his appointment as pas-
tor of a church in Nassau. "Rev, you gave us a good
text!" he commented.
Now, if there is one quality that distinguishes the
preaching of Bishop Simeon Hall, it is his ability to
make relevant the teaching of Holy Scripture to life
in the Bahamas today. And although this gift is evi-
dent in all 13 sermons in this volume, it is certainly
stands out in what is perhaps the best known and


loved of his many pow-
erful exhortations from
the pulpit of New
Covenant:
Sermon XI: "'WHY
STAGGERLEE k.
SHOT BILLY" ,
This sermon, first
preached in 1997 at a
time when crime was
on the rise, is most rele- .
vant to the situation in
the Bahamas today as
we cope with increasing b.
crime, especially many
murders. The text, most
appropriate is "For A . ,
Crime Wave Has t
Engulfed Us
Landmarks Are SIMEON HALL
Moved, Flocks Of
Sheep Are Stolen" (Job
24:2). A crime wave has engulfed us!" Sounds famil-
iar? Well, it's a verse from the book of Job, which
was written over 2.500 years ago! It only goes to con-
firm the contention of many scholars that the Bible
is as fresh and relevant as today's newspaper!
The scenario is well known because of the popular
Bahamian song of Eugene Davis, "Staggerlee and
Billy". These two Bahamian men drunk became
engaged in an altercation after a gambling game in
which each claimed to be the winner! As a result
Staggerlee got a shot gun and aimed it at Billy. who
implored him not to pull the trigger as "he had a
sickly wife and li'l children at home". Despite his
plea, however, Staggerlee shot and killed Billy.
There is tragedy as the guilty Staggerlee tries to
escape ("Run Staggerlee!" as the song goes) and
Billy lies dead leaving behind a grieving "sickly wife
and li'l children!"
What is extremely gripping about this sermon is
the manner in which the preacher relates it to the
socio-economic situation in the Bahamas today;
when so many of our males are indeed, falling
between the cracks. Why then did Staggerlee shoot
Billy?
According to the eloquent Baptist preacher:
Staggerlee shot Billy because he had lost touch with
his own humanity and could not, therefore, see other
people as human beings. Staggerlee shot Billy
because he had a cheap estimate of his own life,
therefore it was easy for him to see Billy as having no
worth or value. Staggerlee shot Billy because he had
lost all regard for the sacredness of life." (p.100).
How timely are these words in the light of the sit-
uation in our young nation at this time when we are
distressed that 49 murders have taken place this year.
Yes, when young people, especially young men,
become frustrated, hopeless, and lacking purpose for
living, they, indeed, are prone to resort to violence
and crime, at times resulting in taking the lives of
others... and their own!
The tragic end of Staggerlee and Billy vividly
depicts the plight of many males in our community
today. It is a challenge we cannot ignore, as the
Bahamian preacher puts it.
"Too many of our sons are being murdered. Too


many of our fathers are going to jail, Too many of
our finest men are turning to a homosexual lifestyle.
Staggerlee shot Billy because he had a messed up
masculinity, a misplaced identity and misguided pri-
orities." (p.101).
"Messed Up Masculinity", "Misplaced Identity"
and "Misguided Priorities". These are the phenome-
na which are contributing to the high incidence of
crime amongst our young Bahamian males. In iden-
tifying them the Bishop is pointing us in the right
direction in dealing with them. These are the fea-
tures of the lives of our young men that we must deal
with if the crime rate is to be tackled and reduced.
Yes, "Why Staggerlee Shot Billy" is vintage Simeon
Hall!
Another very interesting sermon, most relevant to
life in the world today is "Have You Ever Been To
Lodebar?" The text is "And the King said unto him,
where is he? And Ziba said unto the king, 'Behold
he is in the house of Machir, the son of Ammiel, from
Lodebar." (II Sam. 9:4).
Because the text is not well known, the preacher
reveals that Lodebar was an obscure, forsaken little
village "off the beaten track." In this village lived
Mephibosheth, son of Prince Jonathan and grandson
of King Saul. A cripple, he suffered from very low
self-esteem. Yes, here was he, a man of royal descent,
living in squalor in a remote village. The king, how-
ever, sent for him and, because of his lineage, invited
him to become his guest and to sit at the king's table.
The point of the sermon, however, is a warning to
us all. For we all at some time in life may be subject
to despair, hard times and depressing conditions.
Thus the Preacher warns.
"Never ever rejoice when you hear someone else's
tragedy. Before the sun sets tomorrow you could be
in Lodebar." (p.70). One need only reflect on the
varied experiences of people "from all walks of life"
during the recent hurricanes in Grand Bahama to
realize how profound and insightful are the words of
Bishop Hall here.
Just as profound and insightful is "Sermon
V" "What shall I do with Ishmael" based on Gen.
17:15-22.
Here the preacher, making great use of symbolism,
draws a lesson of tremendous significance trom the
life of the great Patriarch Abraham. God had prom-
ised Abraham that he would be the father of many
nations. But he was an old man and Sarah his wife
was barren. So, instead of waiting upon God, Sarah
suggested that her handmaid Hagar could be surro-
gate mother. As a result, Ishmael was born. Later,
however, when Sarah, against all odds became preg-
nant and bore Isaac, she urged Abraham to "Cast
out the bond woman and her son."
Now, note the symbolism. Whereas Ishmael, the
son of the Egyptian maid, is symbolic of disobedi-
ence, Isaac the son of Sarah is symbolic of righteous-
ness and obedience. Applying this to our own lives,
the preacher points out that when we disobey God
we act like Ishmael and when we obey we act in
accord with the Isaac within us. Thus, Bishop Hall
observes "Each time we disobey God we have an
Ishmael what is that thing that seeks to destroy your
covenant with God? What is your Ishmael?" (P. 49).

SEE page 19


r I r I,~ - I -1








PG 22 Thursday, August 2, 2007


The Tribune


Many are called!


* By PASTOR MATTHEW
ALLEN
The question is: how is
it that with the thou-
sands of churches we
have in these Bahama
islands, the power and forces
of the enemy (Satan) contin-
ues to wreak havoc through-
out this country as the spirits
of murder, divorce, homosex-
uality and other crimes have
their way?
In Matthew 22:1-14,
Yeshuwa Messiah told the
parable of the kingdom of
heaven, likening it to a imar-
riage feast hosted by a king
for his son. The invited guest
found every excuse and rea-
son not to attend the feast as
they offended, insulted and
even killed a few of the
king's messengers/servants.
The messengers were then
instructed by the king to go
into the highways and com-
munities and invite every-
body they saw. The banquet
feast was then well attended;
upon the king's arrival to the
feast he noticed a man that
was not appropriately
dressed for the occasion;
when questioned about his
attire by the king, the man
was speechless; orders were
given for this man to be cast
out into outer darkness
(hell). Matthew 22:14 states
that: "For many are called,
but few a chosen".
If one were to interview
many of the church leaders
we've got in the Bahamas
today it would be relatively
obvious that a great majority


of them were called, but they
didn't wait to be chosen by
God. Therefore they went
out and started their own
work/ministries with God's
name or the word kingdom
attached, but not His
approval.
John 4:24 states that: God
is a Spirit: and they that wor-
ship him must worship him in
spirit and in truth. Well!
Satan, the enemy, is a spirit
and he understands and
intercepts things in the spirit
real to pervert and bring
about confusion, division,
strife, envy and competition
which is rampant within the
body of Christ today. This is
one of the reasons why we've
got so many powerless
churches throughout the
Bahamas, many of which
came about through some
form of strife or bitter sepa-
ration from another church.
Not all of the churches that
we have in this country are
chosen by God. How can I
make such statement? I'm
glad you asked and here's
your answer the in-fighting
amongst members of the
same body and the apparent
division between churches
within the same denomina-
tion clearly shows this.
In I Corinthians 1:13, the
Apostle Paul asked the
saints, is Christ divided? Was
Paul crucified for you? Or
were you baptized in the
name of Paul? The Apostle
Paul was a man of wisdom
and he didn't allow religious
church folks to cause him to
think more highly of himself


-:I


* MATTHEW ALLEN


than he ought, this is why he
could ask the question, was
Paul crucified for you'?
In Isaiah 14:12-14, the very
same spirit in which Lucifer
operates in is at work in
many of the religious leaders.
Whereas our leaders are busy
seeking stardom and atten-
tion by whatever means the
Word Network. TBN, etc as
a result of this quest for fame
and attention these leaders
have caused many that have
been called to prematurely
walk into that calling before
being properly prepared and
chosen by God. This also is
one of the reasons why our
churches are filled with bish-
ops, apostles, prophets and
pastors rather than servants
of the Most High.
Watch the humility of a
true servant, Paul:


Romans 1:1 Paul, a ser-
vant of Jesus Christ, called to
be an apostle, separated unto
the gospel of God.
Paul is a servant first;
then called to be an apostle
Titus 1:1 Paul, a servant
of God, and an apostle of
Jesus Christ, according to the
faith of God's elect, and the
acknowledging of the truth
which is after godliness.
Paul is a servant first,
then an apostle
Philippians 1:1 Paul and
Timotheus, the servants of
Jesus Christ, to all the saints
in Christ Jesus which are at
Philippi, with the bishops and
deacons:
Paul and Timotheus, ser-
vants

The truth of the matter is
that everybody wants to be a
church leader today because
the church is now viewed as a
place of performance, emo-
tional entertainment and as a
cash cow for its leaders
rather than what it should be.
The enemy has done an
effective job in deceiving
many through strife and con-
fusion which has resulted in
division within the church.
This division is what gives
the enemy access and author-
ity to wreak havoc in our
communities.
The enemy knows that
between the call of God and
being chosen by God is a
time period that's called
preparation, and it's in this
timing that the spirit of divi-
sion and strife is at its highest
level. It's at this level that


Building for the future


FROM page 24

counsellors and anyone else who
comes to mind will do even more if
they are energized with your praise
and appreciation, your attention and
encouragement. Sometimes just *a
miiue or "thumbs up" will do. At other
'mnes. a note or small gitt may be such
ioost. None of us work expecting to
'It what our labour deserves, -but a
nervous altitude of goodwill will cre-
,te a context of gratitude that can only
move us all to new levels ot communal


loving.
When it comes to institutional
growth, we really need the support of
the non-governmental organizations,
private sector. Government and inter-
national contributions if we want to be
able to meet the needs of our people.
Area churches need to meet regularly
in this regard. Can your church
become even more active in the com-
ing months?
There are those \who cater to the
needs of the eideriv. some who deal


with the needs of children, some who
are medically involved, others are
interested in the rehabilitation of
youth and adults who have broken the
law. and the rest look out for the
homeless. indigent, bereaved and all
The other groups of hurting people. Is
social outreach and pastoral care a
strong ministry in your church?
Facilities

;n order to build lacilitics. obtain


professional personnel, supply
resources, provide education and
training, pay administrative salaries
and all the rest of what money is used
for, we ask for all of these partners to
work together to access local and
international funding.
As we share together on a regular
hasis we will build our capacity to res-
cue the perishing and care for each
it her. This is what God expects and
Lquips us to do. How do \ou fit into
i(od's building plan?


-BD~ZWl~hBB~q~C~bJ~_P~~


many to be pastors WENT
into ministry and didn't wait
to be SENT by God. This
preparation is not only grad-
uating from some religious
seminary with a master's
degree; because a fool with a
master's degree is nothing
more than a "master fool".
Whenever the church gets
back in sync with God's
agenda rather than man's
agenda we will see the unity
which commands God's
blessings. As a friend/servant
of God I'm committed to
speaking only that which He
tells me too.
If we are a disciple of
Yeshuwa Messiah (Jesus the
Christ) then we're all broth-
ers, servants and friends;
therefore we should be able
to speak the truth in love,
even if it hurts and not kiss
up to other leaders for favour
and to be acceptance into
their fellowships.
Watch this! Proverbs 27: 6
says, "Faithful are the
wounds of a friend; but the
kisses of an enemy are
deceitful".

Join Pastor Brendalee
and I, along with the family
of Kingdom Minded
Fellowship Center Int'l, every
Sunday morning @ 10:30am
and Thursday nights @
7:30pm at the Bishop Michael
Eldon School Auditorium for
more of God's powerful
word. For questions or com-
ments contact us via e-
mail:pastormallen@yahoo.co
m or ph 225-3850/1-242-441-
2021.


RFI IC=IC~N









The Tribune


Thursday, August 2, 2007 PG 23


Mother-daughter relationships


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
pburrows@tribunemedia.net

While the book of Ruth tells an amazing
story of love, one lesson that many peo-
ple may not see are the insights into an
effective mother-daughter relationship.
Ruth, from the royal family of Moab, permanent-
ly left her homeland to dwell with her mother-in-law
Naomi after the husbands of both Ruth and Naomi
died. When Ruth and Naomi returned to Naomi's
former town, they were both poor, with no means to
provide for themselves.
Ruth told Naomi that she would go out to the
fields to collect that part of the crops and harvest
that were given to the poor. That way they would
have food to eat. Naomi agreed, and Ruth went to
the field of Boaz, a relative of Naomi's husband.
Boaz inquired as to Ruth's identity, and upon finding
out who she was, he made sure that she was provid-
ed for. Boaz and Ruth eventually got married.
But long before this extraordinary ending, we are
acquainted with an admirable mother-daughter rela-
tionship. Instead of brooding over the loss of her
own husband, Ruth devoted herself to meeting the
needs of her mother-in-law, to filling that void in
Naomi's life with pure godly love. However, that was
no easy task, and it required leaving all that she
knew her home, her family and her friends, and
moving to another land as a despised foreigner.
Genuine love and concern for her mother-in-law


were her only motives.
The story of Ruth and Naomi suggests that they
shared a close mother-daughter relationship while
the husbands were alive. However, the truth is that
many women today do not get along with their
mothers-in-law, or even their mothers. And men
seem to have the same problem with their wives'
mothers.
But where does love like Ruth's come from?
Only when a person gets to know God and under-
stands how much He gave for him, is that person
encouraged to give of himself for the good of others,
even his in-laws. And when we do that, tension and
turmoil begin to dissolve into harmony and happi-
ness, regardless of the different personalities
involved.
Naomi gave Ruth lots of motherly advice concern-
ing Boaz, and Ruth was submissive to her without
question. Chapter 3 details one of their conversa-
tions:
Naomi her mother-in-law said to her, "My
daughter, I need to seek some security for
you, so that it may be well with you. Now
here is our kinsman Boaz, with whose young
women you have been working. See, he is
winnowing barley tonight at the threshing
floor. Now wash and anoint yourself, and put
on your best clothes and go down to the
threshing floor; but do not make yourself
known to the man until he has finished
eating and drinking. When he lies down,
observe the place where he lies; then, go


and uncover his feet and lie down; and
he will tell you what to do."
She said to her, "All that you tell me I will do."

Such unwavering obedience is also a model of
faith for every Christian. It makes you wonder, what
would the Christian Church be like if it could make
the same statement to God?
Though a principle in developing one's response to
God, obedience is also necessary in any family. It
encourages unity between family members, and is a
true expression of love.
In the book of Ruth, we see that Naomi cared
about her daughter-in-law's future, and loved her
selflessly. And Ruth felt the same way. In fact, look-
ing at their relationship it is unusual that two women
could be so selfless. Ruth leaves family to follow
Naomi, and when Naomi could have taken advan-
tage of the situation, she doesn't. Instead, she
encourages her daughter-in-law to seek security in
Boaz.
In doing so, both women become I Corinthians 13
personified, living their lives, not only through the
context of obedience and submission, but through
love.
Because of Ruth's godly qualities, she went down
in history as one of the famous matriarchs of the
faith. She was counted along side Sarah, Rebecca,
Rachel and Leah who together built up the house-
hold of Israel. And we know that Ruth had the dis-
tinct honour of being the grandmother of King
David.


'Who let the dogs out?'


* By CLEMENT JOHNSON

"WHO let the dogs out?", was the
question Bishop John Humes, presi-
dent of Bahamas Christian Council
and overseer of the Church 'of God,
asked while he was giving the eulogy
at the funeral of Rev Olsworth
Russell, a retired pastor of the High
Rock Church of God Grand Bahama.
The funeral service at the Coral
Road Church of God was filled to
capacity as hundreds came out to pay
their respects and say thanks to a man
who laboured in the vine yard for so
many years.
The outspoken Bishop praised Rev
Russell as a man who lived a life of
principle, purpose and patience -
something that is rare in our country
today. He further claimed that many of
the ills in our country could be blamed
on the fact that men today do not
know how to be responsible and take
their rightful place in society.
"It seems like we have gone mad in
our country today, the level of crime is
frightening, the murder rate out of
control. Everybody gone man. You


wonder who let the dogs out.
Bahamians believe they can do any-
thing and get by with it," Bishop
Humes said.
He further emphasized the need for
fathers to set moral standards for their
families and set examples befitting of
their role.
According to Bishop Humes, Rev
Russell not only preached the word,
but he lived it, but there are to many
Bahamians, he added, who want to
wear a collar but live lives that are
contrary to the gospel teaching.
Labeling the Bahamas as a wasteful
society, Bishop Humes said there was
a need for greater faithfulness to one's
wife amongst the men of the Bahamas.
Individuals within the congregation
were also encouraged to become peo-
ple of purpose, principle and patience.
He added further that Rev Russell was
a humble man .who worked diligently
for the Church of God in Grand
Bahama.
Identifying Rev Russell as a good
father, Bishop Humes said that the
worth of a father can be seen through
the productive seed he sows. And


according to Bishop Humes, when you
look at Rev Russell, he seared eight
sons and five daughters and none of
them ended up in trouble or in jail.
"When the Church needed a pastor
it look to the lion Pastor Russell, and
it ordained Rev Delton Russell for one
of its churches. When the Government
need a cabinet minister, Kenneth
Russell was appointed Minister of
Housing and National Insurance. So
the church had faith in him and so did
the Government of the Bahamas. He
continues to make a contribution to
this nation through the service of his
children. That's called progress."
Bishop Humes said that the Bahamas
needed more men like the deceased
Olsworth Russell.
While it was evident that Rev
Russell was a well-loved man, and we
would like to agree with the Bishop
when he briefly touched on the high
crime and the fact that the murder rate
in our country is out of control if this
epidemic or "monster" is not stopped
we will continue to bury more of our
young men and lose a whole genera-
tion.


Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette paid tribute on behalf of
the Government of the Bahamas. He
remarked that Rev Russell lived to the
promised age and beyond, of 76. Too
often in our country today however,
we bury men between 17 and 30 men
who have lost their lives through mur-
der or useless traffic accidents. We
must find a way to put the dogs back in
their pens or we will be in great dan-
ger.
As the Bishop spoke we wondered
what Rev Russell's secret was for a
long and healthy life. Many of the pre-
vious speakers hailed him as a family
man who could be seen regularly hav-
ing breakfast with his son at a local
restaurant. Someone referred to him
as a peacemaker, and a generous man
who gave freely to anyone in need.
The call went out to all present to
emulate the life of Rev Russell, and to
instill Christian principles in their chil-
dren, but we can only pass them on if
we possess them. We were invited to

SEE page 20


~ II I I al I I I I I


RFI






















Building


for the


future

* By REV ANGELA
BOSFIELD PALACIOUS
WHEN all is said and done
we are in the business of
building our capacity to be a
great nation. We have to see
the building of character as
the best way to even be able to
dream, establish and sustain
the capacity for greatness. Do
you agree?
As we assess our capacity
for globalization survival, we
have to evaluate and amelio-
rate, think and act differently.
If we assess our capacity for
spirituality, we have to look at
our morals and values and
determine that our current
trend is shocking and nation-
ally detrimental to our future,
moral and spiritual health. Is
this your view also?
If we want our children to
dream magnanimous dreams
with philanthropic intentions
to look out for the needs of
others, now is the time to help
them develop the capacity to
care. We have to exhibit this
capacity ourselves. We can do
better than we are doing at
any rate. Now is the time to
increase the level of kindness
and love in our local context.
Are you involved in some way
in such ministry?
One neglected area is to-
ensure that the care-givers in
our midst are receiving ade-
quate care. How do you sup-
port your child's teacher, your
minister/priest, nurses, police
officers, defence force officers
and youth leaders?
Psychologists, psychiatrists,


SEE page 22


Is the Christian




Church failing?


* By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer
n her early twenties and trying
her best to maintain a relation-
ship with God in a world that
seems to be pulling her in sever-
al other directions, Estelle* said that it
is easy to lose faith, especially when you
are not building it daily.
To her, it seems that no new
Christians are joining the fold, and
many people who already attend church
are not truly knowledgeable about what


they believe. Frankly, she questions
whether the Christian Church on earth
is failing.
"Personally, I don't know if we really
know what we believe as Christians.
Okay, we know Jesus Christ came to
earth to die for our sins, he rose and is
now seated on the right hand of God,
but ask any Christian person the real
answers to real questions about their
life and living, and many of us wouldn't


SEE page 18


CHRISTIAN Apologist Anthony
Horvath declares that the Christian
Church is near total defeat because it
has failed over the course of recent
decades to present itself vigorously.
He urges obedience to Peter's charge
in I Peter. 3:15 to always be ready to
give the reasons for what we believe.
Anthony Horvath, who goes by the
Internet name of 'Sntjohnny,' points
out that most of today's atheists were
raised in the church, including those
like British evolutionary biologist
and secular humanist Richard
Dawkins.
"First and foremost, the Church
produces atheists by refusing to
address the questions that young
people have, but secondarily, the
Church has failed to explain what it
believes and why. Books like Richard
Dawkins' "The God Delusion" and
Dan Brown's "The Da Vinci Code"
do not become best sellers in a socie-
tv that understands what Christianity
is all about," Horvath explains.
The solution, 'Sntjohnny' says, is
apologetics, the defence of the
Christian faith. "What I am talking
about is apologetics at a much broad-
er scale then normally understood. It
should not be left to professors or
specialists, such as CS Lewis. It needs
to be incorporated into everything
we do as the Church from cradle to
grave.
Horvath cites the Resurrection of

SEE page 18


I I II I '' -~ ~FTY ii


hfc



I