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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02892
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 5/14/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02892
System ID: UF00084249:02892

Full Text




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The


Tribune


Volume: 103 No.144 MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007 PRICE 750


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ACTONF ROMWEEKEND EVENT


Tourism um ers incorrpec


Ministry downgrades

totals from 2005


* By BRENT DEAN
IN A startling admission, the
Ministry of Tourism has retract-
ed and downgraded the total
number of tourist arrivals to
The Bahamas for 2005. This
admission was accompanied by
the revelation that there was a
further decline in tourist arrivals
last year, sparking concern that
the nation's number one indus-
try might be in trouble.
In a press release issued on
Saturday, the ministry revealed
that for 2005, the 5 million visi-
tors previously reported was
incorrect. Instead, this number
was downgraded by 200,000 vis-
itors to 4.8 million.
Whereas for 2006, the min-
istry reports that visitor arrivals
declined by a further 100,000,
from the new 2005 figure, to 4.7
million.
It was the Central Bank that
had earlier reported that the
total visitor arrivals for the


fourth quarter of 2006 fell in
New Providence by 6.7 per cent,
and 4.7 per cent to 3.9 mil-
lion visitors for the entire
Bahamas in the first 10 months
of 2006. However, during the
election campaign the PLP
avoided these figures, sticking
with the incorrect five million
tourist count for 2005.
The release of this revised
tourism data may come as an
embarrassment to the former
government, which had boasted
publicly about the attainment
of the 5 million visitor mark in
2005. Mr Christie had said on
the campaign trail that "more
tourists are coming now...",
which, in the wake of this new
data, was incorrect.
During the election cam-
paign large billboards were
erected at strategic roundabouts
in New Providence with por-
traits of former Prime Minister
SEE page 12


Businessman found

stabbed to death
* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A Grand Bahama businessman was discovered
stabbed to death at his place of business in Freeport over the
weekend, making him the thirty-second murder victim this year.
The 38-year-old businessman was found dead shortly after 11am
on Saturday in the storeroom of his tyre shop on Forest Avenue.
Police have not yet released the identity of the deceased, who has
been a long-time businessman in Freeport. This latest homicide
pushes the murder count on Grand Bahama to six for the year.
Assistant Superintendent of Police Loretta Mackey said offi-
SEE page 13



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N FELICIA HANNA enjoys a day in the park with her daughter Karea yesterday for Mother's Day.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune staff)

The Tpibine s ells

record amount
THE Tribune's "Red Revolution"
edition, published the day after the gen-
eral election, sold a record 24,555 copies, r
it was revealed yesterday.
Operations director Robert Carron
hailed the figure as the highest in The
Tribune's 104-year history, significantly
better even than sales during the 1984 i '
Commission of Inquiry into drug-traf-
ficking.
"It means that we have a great team
attacking the issues that affect most 0 SOME of The Tribune staff I T The Tribune im
Bahamians," he said, "We have a good members, including (at front) ***
design and good content that hit the managing editor John Marquis and .---
streets at the appropriate times. In times publisher Eileen Carron
of worry and big events, The Tribune is dor was selling copies at $20 a time
the medium that people turn to." because demand was so high. RU B tN
The Tribune's record sale continues Tribune ha bucked interna-
almost a decade of rising circulation tional trends over the last decade, f" I
since the paper converted to morning prompting US circulation expert Jeff
publication in the summer of 1998. Kohler to describe its performance as
In February, The Tribune made inter- "extraordinary". isef o-ma c' e.
national news with its dramatic front- He said many US papers with enor-
page pictures of former immigration mous promotional budgets were
minister'Shane Gibson with the late unable to match The Tribune's .. C
cover girl Anna Nicole Smith. achievements on a percentage basis. D
On that occasion, the paper sold out While most dailies were losing sales,
its entire Monday edition of 16,000 The Tribune was showing impressive M '- '
copies in double-quick time. One ven- increase, he added A v


Ingraham
won't receive
pension while
serving as PM
* By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday that
he will not receive a pension
as a former prime minister
while serving as Prime Min-
ister of the Bahamas.
Mr Ingraham, who was
speaking at a press confer-
ence in his Cabinet Office on
Bay Street to update the pub-
lic on the state of the econo-
SEE page 13

PM to appoint
five Ministers
of State today
* By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
FIVE Ministers of State will
be appointed today, to com-
plement the Ministers and
Ministers of State already
appointed, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said yester-
day.
These Ministers of State will
serve directly under the vari-
ous Ministers, but with more
powers than that of a Parlia-
mentary Secretary. This mea-
sure, Prime Minister Ingraham
SEE page 12

$45 million
borrowed to pay
off govt debt
By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
BORROWING $45 mil-
lion to pay off government
debt was the first order of
business for Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham on taking
office.
This revelation came
when Mr Ingraham, accom-
panied by a few of his min-
isters, called a press confer-
ence at his Cabinet Office
on Bay Street yesterday to
SEE page 13


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The Cove ooens


its doors in a




blaze of glory



Celebrities and politicians head to Atlantis

for the grand opening weekend for Phase III


By BRENT DEAN
IN officially declaring the
multi-million dollar, 600-room
all-suite Cove Atlantis resort
open, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham acknowledged Sol
'Kerzner ag a visionary who has
delivered on his promises to
the Bahamas of over a decade
ago.
Mr Ingraham made these
remarks at the official opening
ceremonies for the new resort,
which were attended by many
international celebrities.
"I believe I can safely say that
Paradise Island and indeed,
Bahamas tourism has gone from
strength to strength during the
past 14 years. For not only has
Kerzner International trans-
nd Paradise Island, it has
rrmed and is transforming
-. 9ahamas tourism," he said.
Referring back to his initial
negotiations with Mr Kerzner in
1993, Mr Ingraham said that
then, the hotelier spoke of a five-
-: phase investment that would
span some 25 years.
Thus far, Mr Ingraham not-
ed, that the three phases of
.Atlantis.have succeeded in
attracting a new tourist markets
to the country.
"Many of you may not be
aware that Sol came to The
Bahamas with a number of busi-
ness partners. He came during
my first term in office. The part-
ners changed some did not
have the stomach for the size of
his risk-taking," he said.
" Sol remained and his plan
for the further investment in our
country continued to grow," Mr


* DOLORES Ingraham cuts the ribbon to officially open The
Cove at Atlantis, watched by Governor General Arthur Hanna,
Sol Kerzner and Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham, and assisted
by Heather Kerzner


* PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham speaks


Ingraham added.
The prime minister remarked
that the continued investment


in The Bahamas by the Kerzners
through several governments,
"speaks volumes of our country,


* THE front of The Cove is lit up in a spectacular fireworks at the end of a concert by Janet
Jackson on Friday night
(Photo:Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)


for the stability of our economy
and business environment."

Tribute

Mr Ingraham also took a
moment to remember the for-
mer president of Kerzner Inter-
national, Butch Kerzner, who
died tragically in a helicopter
crash in the Dominican Repub-
lic last year.
Mr Ingraham said that his
"handprint is figuratively and lit-
erally all over this phase three
expansion."
The Cove features suites that
range from 650 to over 4000
square feet, with costs ranging
from $700 up to $15,000 per
night, which is the cost for the.
two-storey penthouse suite.
The new hotel is also accom-
panied with the new a 63-acre
water park; the new Dolphin
Cay, with interactive dolphin
facilities; and the acclaimed Bob-
by Flay Mesa Grill.
The new restaurant, by the
famous television chef, is his first
outside of the United States, and
brings to the resort a south-west-
ern cuisine.
With nearly 8,500 employees,
Atlantis is the largest private sec-
tor employer in the country, and
the second largest overall,
behind only the government.
SEEpages 14 and 15 for
more pictures from the event


* JANET.Jackson perfomns at AGUanfis for Sol Kerzner's grand,
opening weekend
; (Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)


DO WHAT TASTES RIGHT


*



I'










.1




9

I-..


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007






MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


0 In brief

Missing

Abaco girl

is found in

house
In Abaco, police have also
located a missing girl who was
the focus of a nationwide
search.
Fourteen-year-old Adina
Dolce, who was reported miss-
ing last Friday, was discovered
by detectives in a house in
Cherokee Sound at 8.45pm Sat-
urday.
The teenager was found with
a 15-year-old boy, whose par-
ents, police said, are off the
island.
Both teenagers were taken
into police custody at the Marsh
Harbour police station, where
investigations continue.

Man in

hospital

following

stabbing

A 42-YEAR-OLD male res-
ident of Palmetto Avenue, is in
serious conditions at the
Princess-Margaret Hospital
after being stabbed several
times ofi Saturday.
The incident occurred around
3am when the man was in the
Balliou Hill Road area. Police
say helwas approached by
another',man who was known
to him a'd, was asked for mon-
ey ".
When the victim said that he
had none, he was reportedly
stabbed~by the man in the head
and other parts of the upper
body several times. Police inves-
tigations ,are ongoing into the
matter., :

Man is

crushed to

death by
falling car
' "AROUND 2pm on Saturday,
in the Pastel Gardens area,
police also reported an acciden-
tal death. A 41 y~ear-old male
resident of Sunset Park, was
crushed to death, when a car
jack failed while he was making
repairs underneath a vehicle.
Police do not suspect foul
play in the matter.
Scientists
install
seismometer
under volcano
* PUERTO RICO
San Juan
RESEARCHERS have
installed a seismometer atop an
active volcano called Kick 'em
Jenny under the Caribbean Sea
to warn of eruptions or earth-
quake activity, scientists said
Saturday, according to Associ-
ated Press.
The device allows scientists
to collect real-time rumbling
from tremors or as bubbling
magma and gases are released
from the volcano, about 250
metres beneath the sea's sur-
face off Grenada's north-west
coast.
"The system essentially acts
as a kind of doctor's stethoscope
so we can directly listen to the
pulse of the volcano," said
Richard Robertson, director of
the Seismic Research Unit at
the University of the West
Indies in Trinidad.
He said the seismometer is
connected to a flexible hose that
runs to a buoy, where a high-
frequency radio transmitter
sends readings to an observa-
tory in a northern Grenadian
village all within milliseconds.
A team of scientists led by
the Woods Hole Oceanograph-
ic Institution in Massachusetts
attached the monitoring system
to the volcano by a remote-con-
trolled underwater craft on May
6.


Since its discovery in 1939,
when it shot a cloud of ash 270
metres above the sea surface,
Kick 'em Jenny has erupted at
least 12 times, most recently in
2001. The volcano, which rises
above the sea floor on the steep
inner western slope of the Less-
er Antilles ridge, has not caused
any deaths or injuries.

TROPICAL

EXT'ERMINATOR


Ingraham distances new FNM



government from LNG plant


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE proposed installation
of a Liquefied Natural Gas
terminal on Ocean Cay is
"not a priority" for the new-
ly appointed government,
Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday.
"It is not a priority for the
Bahamas government I
head," Mr Ingraham said,
while addressing the media
at his Cabinet Office on the
state of the economy.
LNG has been an issue of
much contention and debate
for the previous PLP gov-
ernment. Local and interna-
tional environmentalists
have put up a heated battle
with the former Christie gov-
ernment over the issue, call-
ing for the government to
outright deny the issuance of
a licence to AES Ocean
LNG Ltd the company
seeking approval.
The former Christie
administration received
much criticism over its lack
of a definite response to the
company after years of wait-
ing.
AES Ocean LNG propos-
es to construct, own and
operate a terminal on Ocean
Cay in the Bimini chain of
island. The project will
include a LNG import ter-
minal and ancillary facilities
including a Liquefied Petro-
leum Gas (LPG) removal
plant, a seawater desalina-
tion plant, as well as hous-
ing and associated facilities
on South Bimini, and an
undersea natural gas pipeline
to South Florida.
The company has submit-
ted proposals and its envi-
ronmental impact assessment
(EIA) forms in 2002, and


* HUBERT Ingraham at a press conference yesterday during
which he said that an LNG facility is "not a priority" for the new
government


was expecting to start construc-
tion in the first quarter of last
year. Its delivery date to con-


sumers is still being earmarked
as "late 2009" on its company's
website.


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4. MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


,IRA RTTEITOR


DURING THE recent election campaign
the PLP said that one of its visions was to
"build a Bahamas with an education system
that prepares each student to take advantage of
the increasing opportunities for wealth cre-
ation and economic empowerment."
About two years ago Prime Minister Christie
and Education Minister Alfred Sears called a
meeting of business and union leaders at the
British Colonial Hilton to introduce the PPP -
public private partnership to improve edu-
cation. The business and unions were excited
because both sides knew that unless Bahamians
were better educated and better equipped to
take on the challenges of a global economy,
they would be left behind.
It was in June last year that former MP
Agatha Marcelle, then parliamentary secre-
tary in the Ministry of Labour, Immigration
and Training, warned that if young Bahamians
did not get training in skills that were important
to the future of the economy, more and more
foreign workers would have to be brought in.
"We have too many of them already and
that is because we don't have skills amongst our
own people," she said.
For example, "Bahamian Youth the
untapped resource", was a document produced
by the Coalition for Education Reform a
group of business, professional and labour
associations concerned about the state of edu-
cation in the Bahamas. It was an in-depth
report as a result of the grand pow-wow assem-
bled at the British Colonial Hilton, which
Coalition members took seriously. They
believed that their document could assist in
formulating a plan of action.
One of the many problems highlighted in
the report was how Bahamians were slow to
embrace the opportunities offered by the Uni-
versity of the West Indies in hotel manage-
ment at the Tourism Training College, located
in New Providence. The college is considered
by some US colleges as the equivalent to a US
two-year associate degree programme.
Tourism is this country's number one indus-
try, and Bahamians have agitated for the top
jobs in that industry. But what are they doing
to qualify for those positions?
In a survey done by the Ministry of Educa-
tion of professions chosen by high school grad-
uates between 1994 and 2002, it was discovered
that in 1994 100 graduates entered the Hotel
Training College. The Training College was
taken over by the College of the Bahamas on
August 1, 2000 when the number of students
entering the programme had dropped from 58
in 1999 to 17 in 2000 and eight in 2002. With
that level of enthusiasm for training, it is obvi-
ous that foreigner hoteliers will hold the top
positions in the Bahamas hotel industry for
many years to come.
The Coalition report, prepared in 2005, was


submitted to the Ministry of Education in
response to a "national call for papers." The
Coalition had no reply.
Recently we invited a friend in the industry
to comment on what had gone wrong. The fol-
lowing is what our source had to say:
"A Coalition was formed by industry and
union leaders over three years ago with a
shared concern about the skills and educa-
tional deficiencies in high school graduates.
The late Pat Bain was one of the leaders of the
effort. The Coalition spent 18 months careful-
ly studying the BGCSE results, looking at suc-.
cessful education efforts both here in the
Bahamas and globally, and meeting with some
of our nation's most distinguished former edu-
cators. Consultations were held with repre-
sentatives from the nation's unions under
the umbrella of the NCTU, along with private
sector leaders.
"The Coalition took a very deliberate
approach: review the data; understand best and
worst practices here and abroad; consult. The
final draft report showed not only the horren-
dous results of the BGCSEs in a way never
before analytically done, but more than half of
the report was dedicated to recommending suc-
cess strategies and highlighting successful pro-
grammes here and abroad to help support our
efforts and thinking in replicating and advancing
successful strategies and improving education.
"The Coalition was particularly intrigued by
the successful reform efforts in Ireland and
Barbados which embraced the unions, busi-
nesses, government and education sector col-
laboratively in improving the quality of their
workforce through training and education
reforms.
"The final draft, before being released pub-
licly, was sent to the Minster of Education by
the Coalition with a request to meet to dis-
cuss it and more specifically to discuss how we
could help. No response. Repeated follow up
phone calls to the Minister resulted in a meet-
ing, which he then cancelled. Over the course
of three months, and only after repeated fol-
low-up by the Coalition, two meetings were
rescheduled. Those two were also cancelled.
The report was then released publicly.
"A gift of collaboration was rebuffed. The
union leadership in particular was shocked at
the lack of respect given to the Coalition. As
the report rolled out publicly, the public
response from the Minister was more defensive
- stating what he was doing to improve things
-rather than engaging others in a genuine
partnership."
And he added: "Lost opportunity... wasted
community goodwill."
Which proves that the Christie government
even failed to consult their consultative com-
mittees. No wonder the Bahamian people fired
them.


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608


PLP's education plans gone wrong


EDITOR, The Tribune
NOW that the voice of God
(the Bahamian people) has spo-
ken with regards to the General
Election 2007 in the Bahamas,
it can now be analysed in retro-
spect. As every Monday morning
Quarterback knows, there is
nothing like 20/20 hindsight. It
is so easy to look back and
explain events after they have
happened.
One of the possible outcomes
that both the PLP and FNM sup-
porters appeared to have agreed
upon was the fact that the elec-
tion would have been a close
contest. I was a bit relieved when
Prime Minister Perry Christie
added an extra seat in Nassau.
This eliminated the possibility
of a 20/20 tie. My greatest fear
was the fact that we could end up
with a 20-20 tie similar as to what
happened in 1967. What a Con-
stitutional mess that would have
been had both the PLP and
FNM ended up with the same
number of seats. At the end of
the day in 1967, the UBP had 18
seats and the PLP also had the
same number of 18. It was the
Independent candidate from
Saint John's (North Eleuthera)
Alvin Braynen and Randol
Fawkes representing Labour
who made the difference. They
both joined with the PLP to form
a coalition that gave the PLP the
majority to form the govern-
ment.
It is interesting to note that
since January 10, 1967, every
General Election in the
Bahamas had been won by a
landslide. It didn't matter which
government came to power. For
example, in 1997 the FNM won
by a record landslide over the
PLP. However in 2002, the PLP
returned the favour by defeat-
ing the FNM with a landslide
victory. Clearly, there had been
a swing4from the FNM to the
PLP in 2002. The Bahamian vot-
er now has matured to the level
that their vote can no longer be
taken for granted, but it must be
earned. Prior to Election 2007, I
often made the joke that the
2007 election will not be geneti-
cally determined. It isn't your
DNA makeup that dictates how


you vote. That is, you were not
born PLP and you were not born
FNM as some might have you
believe. Yes, these are the "die-
hards!"
What made the 2007 campaign
so interesting is the fact that
there was a degree of uncertain-
ty. Both the PLP and FNM were
able to attract huge crowds at
their rallies. Furthermore, ten-
sion between the major political
parties, the PLP and FNM, was
exacerbated, as this was not just
a battle between the PLP and
the FNM, but a battle of leader-
ship as well. The rivalry between
two best friends and ironically
two greatest foes had come to a
head. Perry Gladstone Christie
and Hubert Alexander Ingra-
ham have had a long history of
both cooperation and adversity.
This time, there would be room
for just one of them at the top.
Despite the huge rallies and
crowds at political events, Elec-
tion 2007 in the Bahamas was
remarkably peaceful and with-
out incident. The only exception
being a few bouts of reported
stupidity! For this incredible dis-
play of political maturity, the
Bahamian public must be con-
gratulated. They have demon-
strated to the world that true
democracy is alive and well in
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas. Yes we have our dif-
ferences but we do agree to dis-
agree without consequences.
This is a sharp contrast to many
other countries around the
world, including some of our
neighbours. The mere sugges-
tion of one's political opinion
could result in injury or death."
At the end of the day, there
could be only one winner! This
time the winner was Hubert
Alexander Ingraham and the
FNM. The PLP has entered the
history books as the only politi-
cal party in the Bahamas to serve
just one term. Many of the pro-
jects such as the Anchor projects
are long term and will not bear
fruit until the next political term.


It will be interesting to see who
will claim credit for these devel-
opments. However, the beauty
of the outcome of Election 2007
is the closeness of the results.
Just a few hundred votes sepa-
rated the winning FNM from the
PLP. This was an election that
went all the way down to the
wire and for a while it could have
gone either way. There seemed
to be no reliable way to accu-
rately predict the outcome of a
constituency contest. Not even
seasoned politicians were spared
the judgment of the voters who
felt that they didn't deserve
another term. This is a harsh and
realistic lesson that politicians
must learn. Keep in touch with
your constituents.
Finally, political pundits from
all segments of the Bahamian
society have agreed and specu-
lated on one thing. The upcom-
ing five-year term of government
should be the best that the
Bahamas has ever seen. With
such a narrow majority, 23-18,
the FNM government simply
cannot afford to rest on their
laurels. So far, most of the Cab-
inet Ministers appointed so far
have had previous experience in
the 1997-2002 FNM government.
The Opposition PLP will consist
of highly qualified individuals,
many of whom had been at the
top of their Department or Min-
istry. With such a strong Oppo-
sition, the FNM government
must stay on their toes. Being a
new government, a spirit of
cooperation with the PLP Oppo-
sition will be a healthy relation-
ship from which the Bahamian
public can only benefit. The cam-
paigning is now over! It is time
for healing and re-establishing
mutually beneficial political rela-
tionships within the national
interest. Wild political rhetoric
at rallies and the campaign trail
must now be replaced by sensi-
ble and practical solutions that
are within the best interest of
the Bahamas. Congratulations
and best wishes to the new Gov-
ernment of the Bahamas!
DR LEATENDORE
PERCENTIE
"Briland"
May 9 2007


A look back at ZNS election bias


EDITOR, The Tribune
What a pleasure it was to
watch the faces of the lady and
gentleman who had to read the
election results on the night of
May 2nd on ZNS. Both would
have wished to have been any-
where else judging from the
sullen, surly and unsmiling looks
on their faces.


I think we owe a special
thanks to Steve McKinney and
Phillipa Russell for their biased
talk shows, particularly in the
past few months. Their insis-
tance on regurgitating political
derelicts like Tennyson Wells,
Algernon Allen, Pierre
Dupuch, Arlington Butler, Tony
Miller, Ashley Cargill and oth-
ers of their ilk helped to cement


the political support for the
FNM. Voters saw the obvious
bias and realized that it is more
than personal likes and dislikes
of a few has-beens that helped
to make up the minds of the
electorate.
MIKE LIGHTBOURN
Nassau
May 6 2007


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0 In brief

Submissions
needed for
Tribune
supplement

THE Tribune will be pub-
lishing its annual 'Back to
School' supplement in
August/September. In prepara-
tion for the supplement, which
will feature graduating seniors
attending university/college,
whether locally or abroad, we
invite all parents, guardians and
graduating seniors to submit a
profile on the graduating
seniors, along with a photo-
graph and contact information.
The profile should include:
Name of student
Age
Name of parents
A list of exams already tak-
en and the results e.g. -
Bahamas Junior Certificate
(BCs) exams and Pitman exams
A list of exams expected to
be taken Bahamas General
Certificate of Secondary Edu-
cation (BGCSE) exams
The college/university they
expect to attend e.g. College
of the Bahamas, Harvard Uni-
versity, University of Miami
Name of degree expected
to be sought e.g .- Bachelors
degree in English, Bachelors
degree in Biology
What career they expect to
enter once their education is
completed a doctor, Mathe-
matics teacher, engineer
All extracurricular activities
- club memberships, team
sports/track and field, church
activities
A list of honours/
awards/recognition student has
received
Please forward all informa-
tion to Yolanda Deleveaux, Tri-
bune Features Editor at email -
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net
- please note 'Back To School'
in the subject line. The infor-
mation may also be hand deliv-
ered or mailed in:
Back To School,
The Tribune,
Shirley and Deveaux Streets,
P 0 Box N-3207,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Three men
arrested for
firearm
possession
AROUND 3am yesterday
morning, officers from Opera-
tion Quiet Storm also arrested
three men in the West Bay
Street atea on charges of pos-
session of an unlicensed firearm.

Raul Castro
meets Chinese
defence
minister

0 HAVANA
ACTING President Raul
Castro, but not his older broth-
er Fidel, met with China's
defence minister to discuss rela-
tions between the two commu-
nist-run countries, according to
Associated Press.
State media reported Satur-
day that Raul Castro and Cao
Gangchuan spoke about the
"fraternal and friendly climate
that characterises the close
existing relationship between
both parties, governments, peo-
ple and armed forces."
But there was no sign of Fidel
Castro at the Friday meeting.
The elder Castro has signed a
series of recent editorials in the
Communist Party newspaper
Granma and met April 20 with
Raul and Wu Guanzheng, a
member of the Chinese Com-
munist Party's Politiburo, spark-
ing speculation he would attend
the meeting with the Chinese
defence minister.
The 80-year-old Fidel stepped
aside following emergency
intestinal surgery in July and
has not been seen in public in
more than nine months. Top
Cuban leaders insist he is recov-
ering steadily and has begun
resuming some of his presiden-


tial duties.
Life on the island has been
little changed under the care-
taker government headed by
Raul, the 75-year-old defense
minister.
Trade between the Cuba and
China has burgeoned in recent
years, doubling from 2005 to
US$1.8 billion last year, accord-
ing to Chinese officials. Chinese
exports of buses, locomotives,
farm equipment and consumer
goods helped account for the
increase. Beijing has also
extended generous loans to the
island.


FNM outlines its plans for




problems of immigration


* By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
IMMIGRATION is a criti-
cal issue facing the Bahamas,
and one that the newly
appointed FNM government
says it will meet head on.
At a press conference yes-
terday, Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham revealed that he
received a call from US Presi-
dent George Bush on Satur-
day, congratulating him and
his government on their recent
victory at the polls.
Mr Ingraham said that he
had an opportunity to speak
briefly with President Bush
about the Haitian situation in
the Bahamas, and the contin-
ued need for the full co-opera-
tion of both nations with
respect to the illegal migration
of Haitians.
"We have the problem of
illegal immigration," Mr Ingra-
ham said. "We've got the
unaddressed requirement to
respond to the application of
persons who are born in the
Bahamas, and who are there-
fore entitled to citizenship and


* HUBERT Ingraham


who are frustrated because
they can not get it. Then we
have the problem of spouses
of Bahamians who were given
spousal permits for five years,
and whose spousal permits


expired and who are unable to
receive their permanent resi-
dence which the law also
allows them to have.
"Then we have the problem
of Bahamian married women,
who are married to foreigners
who happen to have a baby in
Miami, and come back home,
and they need permission from
Immigration for their child to
reside with them in this coun-
try. These are offensive and
unacceptable things and we
shall tackle them fully," he
said.

Loopholes

Minister of National Securi-
ty and Immigration Tommy
Turnquest added that the only
other avenue to look in terms
of citizenship "loopholes"
would be in dealing with chil-
dren of Bahamian men and a
foreign women who are
unmarried, and whose children
are born in the Bahamas.
"The other thing I want to
say is that there are large num-
bers of applications at the


Department of Immigration,
some that are quite obviously
*No' answers that are just sit-
ting there. When it is clearly a
'No' we need to say no so that
that is not in, the pool of
undoubted applications and the
other matters as stated by the
Prime Minister.
"I think what the PM did with
putting Immigration with
National Security is on the oth-
er side, other than the invest-
ment side, but from the enforce-
ment side, we are going to be
able to develop some synergy
with the other law enforcement
agencies and work very well
together," he said.
When asked if there would
be a Referendum on this issue,
Mr Ingraham said there would
be no Referendum on his


watch, drawing laughter from
his ministers and personnel pre-
sent.
"I've been down that road
before. There is no more Ref-
erendum. Anything I can do
will be done within the laws
of the Bahamas and subject
to the Constitution. There will
be no more referendum under
my watch. Not this time," he
said.
Mr Ingraham was accompa-
nied in his Cabinet Office by
his deputy prime minister,
Brent Symonette, who is also
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
Tommy Turnquest, Minister of
National Security and Immi-
gration, Neko Grant, Minister
of Tourism and Aviation, and
Earl Deveaux, Minister of Pub-
lic Works and Transport.


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* By BRENT DEAN
PERRY Christie's lack of
discipline over his officials
was a negative factor in seek-
ing re-election, said former
PLP cabinet minister, Lof-
tus Roker yesterday.
Mr Roker, who is widely
heralded as a tough-talking
advocate of the strict
enforcement of immigration
laws, made these remarks
yesterday on the Island FM
talk-show, Parliament
Street.
In commenting on reasons
for Mr Christie's downfall,
Mr Roker said that his lack
of follow through with some
of the officials in his govern-
ment affected his re-election
chances.
"He believed once he
appointed a fella to do a job,
he just left it...He wasn't suf-
ficiently vigilant to ensure
that the person was doing
what they were supposed to
do," he said.
The excessive appoint-
ments of consultative com-
mittees by the former prime
minister was a "cop out",
said Mr Roker.
"You have been put there
by the people to govern the
rules are there. Follow the
rules and govern. Don't try
to avoid making a decision
by giving it to a committee,
who in fact have no authori-
ty," he said.
Mr Roker would not say
if he thought the PLP need-
ed a new leader at this time.
However, he regarded the
severe criticism of govern-
ment by Dame Joan Sawyer
in the judicial pay contro-
versy, as another extremely
embarrassing moment for
the government.
Dame Joan agreed with
Justice Lyons' assessment
that the failure of the Cab-
inet to act in a timely man-
ner to the appointment of a
commission pursuant to
the Judges Remuneration
and Pensions act com-
pletely compromised the
independence of the judi-
ciary.
With no reasonable retort,
Mr Roker said that either the


then Attorney General, Allyson
Maynard-Gibson, or, the entire
government should have
resigned.
Mr Roker also offered strong
opinions against the proposed
LNG plant in the Bimini chain.
He said that from his perspec-
tive, the Bahamian people have
already rejected the proposed
industrial project. J., .
Mr Roker further argugi that
the proposed LNG plant will
only create a few low-skilled
jobs for Bahamians, with the
remaining jobs going to foreign
specialists.
Mr Roker said, regardless of
the potential profits of LNG,
the health of the Bahamian peo-











MONDAY,
MAY 14
6:30amBahamas @ Sunrise Live
1:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
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Stewart
2:00 One Cubed
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4:00 Video Gospel
4:30 Fast Forward
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Gospel Grooves
6:25 Life Line
6:30 News Night 13 Freeport
7:00 Bahamas Tonight
8:00 You & Your Money
8:30 Tourism Today
9:00 The Human Senses
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
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pie should be the first consider-
ation for the government.
"If you study the way they
have to process the gas to liq-
uefy it, to send it out, it gives
out all sorts of toxic fumes," he
said.
The former national security
minister suggested that The
Bahamas does not yet have the
technical expertise to monitor
such a development.


Former PLP minister:


Christie needed more


action on officials


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE













A case for debate: the China-Taiwan



issue raises its head once again


THE political struggle
between China and
Taiwan has once again shown
its head in the Caribbean,
dividing the loyalties of the


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* By Sir Ronald Sanders
(The writer is a business con-
i sultant and former Caribbean
' diplomat)


The countries with ties to Chi-
na are: Antigua and Barbuda,
Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica,
Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica,
Suriname and Trinidad and
Tobago.
Under the revised Treaty of
Chaguaramas that established
CARICOM, the member
states declare as one of their
objectives "enhanced co-ordi-
nation of member states, for-
eign and (foreign) economic
policies."
It may, at best, be argued
that they are not required to
have a "harmonised" foreign
and (foreign) economic policy,


countries of the Caribbean
Community (CARICOM) and
delaying the formulation of a
cohesive policy toward Asia.
In early May the St Lucia
government established diplo-
matic relations with Taiwan
causing China to break off its
relations with the Caribbean
island on May 7th. In the same
week, Suriname announced
that it had rejected overtures
from Taiwan and would con-
tinue its links with China
despite an offer of "millions of
dollars."
Now, five CARICOM coun-
tries recognize Taiwan and nine
others have diplomatic rela-
tions with China.
The five who recognize Tai-
wan are currently: Belize, Haiti,
St Kitts-Nevis, St Vincent and
the Grenadines and St Lucia.


St Lucia has
swung back to
Taiwan in the
aftermath of a
general election
which saw the
UWP come back
to office.


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SOf the late


TYRONE CLARKE
KNOWLES
DECEMBER bIT i S- ti Y 14TH ._-004 .
"THE LORD IS MY SHEPHERD
I SHALL NorTBE IN r'vjA
HE MAKES ME LIE DOWN It GREEN
P-A 5 TURE 5.
HE LEADS ME SIlDE QUIET ~. AT ER
HE RESTORES M r' SOUL
FP S.ALM ; I.


Our sorrow of losing you is
overshadowed by our joy of knowing you
are in a better place and that you are at
peace now. We know that some day we
will be reunited with you again in the
arms of Our Heavenly Father.

Sadly missed by: wife Gladys;
children Donna, Peter, lan, Suzette,
Derek, Leanne and their mother Diana;
siblings Everette, Ethelyn, Janette and
Agnes; sons and daughters-in-law;
brothers and sisters-in-law;
grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins,
friends and loved ones.


r Ronald Sanders
* SIR Ronald Sanders


WORLD VIE

therefore their division over
China and Taiwan is excusable.
But, it is doubtful that they
even met the commitment to
"co-ordinate" their policy in
this particular matter. -

The decisions to switch
allegiance between
China and Taiwan appear to
be taken in strictly domestic
political contexts with the insti-
tution of CARICOM and oth-
er member states finding out
about them in the media like
everyone else.
The situation is worse in the
small sub-grouping in the
Caribbean, the Organisation of
Eastern Caribbean States
(OECS). By the terms of the
treaty, the seven member states
are obliged "to seek to achieve
the fullest possible harmonisa-
tion of foreign policy."
But, there is evidently no
harmonisation whatsoever on
this issue.
Within the OECS, the six
independent countries are
equally divided. Antigua and
Barbuda, Dominica and
Grenada for China; St Kitts-
Nevis, St Lucia and St Vincent
and the Grenadines for Tai-
wan.
Grenada and St Lucia seem
destined to be on opposite
sides of this divide, notwith-
standing their obligations under
the OECS treaty.
St Lucia, which used to
recognize Taiwan under a pre-
vious United Workers Party
(UWP), switched to China
when the St Lucia Labour Par-
ty came to; office. Now, amid
controversy about who in the
governmiAt actually made the
decision, St Lucia has swung


25"
Off with card


loans for several projects. The
loans are reported to have been
made before Grenada switched
its recognition to China two
years ago.
And, a spokesman for the
Chinese government is report-
ed to have said that there will
be "consequences" for St
Lucia.
Both CARICOM and the
OECS are faced with a dilem-
ma over this issue. Despite the
obligations of each treaty to
"co-ordinate" foreign policy in
the case of the first and to "har-
monise" foreign policy in the
second, neither is being done in
relation to China and Taiwan.
Both groupings are now organ-
isationally hobbled.
They will have to find cre-
ative ways of overcoming the
problem if they are to tackle
their aid, trade and investment
relationship with China and
Taiwan collectively.
One thing is for sure, China
clearly does, not regard the
extent of its trade and" invest-
ment benefits from a small
island like St Lucia to be
important enough to tolerate
an accommodation with Tai-
wan, and this will equally apply
to other small countries.
There is therefore no pur-
pose in pointing to the Domini-
can Republic which is tied to
Taiwan diplomatically but
trades vigorously with China.
Trade between the DR and
China totalled US$490 million
last year, twice as much as with
Taiwan. It is not money to be
scoffed at, but islands with
small populations cannot pro-
duce that volume of trade.

C ARICOM and the
OECS, as institutions,
still have to come to terms with
the following realities:
China is the official repre-
sentative of the Chinese people
in the United Nations, and
occupies a permanent seat in
the Security Council.
China is now the world's
fourth largest economy and
growing.
By 2020, China will have a
middle class of 200 million ver-
sus 186 million in the US. Chi-
na will be the fourth-largest
source of global leisure trav-
ellers.
China's foreign exchange
reserves, already the world's
largest, have passed $1-trillion
(U.S.). The central bank sai,,
its reserves stood at $1.0663.,
trillion at the end of Decem-
ber last year, making China the
first country officially to top
the $1-trillion mark.
China is not only now a
large aid donor, it is investing
heavily in many enterprises in
various parts of the world.
Until government represen-
tatives can debate the China-
Taiwan issue frankly and freely
and come to a consensus on
how to deal with it jointly in
the interest of the people of
the region, CARICOM and the
OECS will remain divided, and
their Asia policy will continue
to be unformulated, subject to
the peculiar and parochial deci-
sions not even of States but of
political parties in office.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com


20o
Off without card


back to Taiwan in the after-
math of a general election
which saw the UWP come back
to office.
And Grenada switched from
Taiwan to China. This switch
was famously celebrated earli-
er this year when, much to the
embarrassment of the Grenada
government and the amuse-


China clearly
does not regard
the extent of its
trade and invest-
ment benefits
from a small
island like St
Lucia to be
important
enough to toler-
ate an accom-
modation with
Taiwan


ment of the rest of the world,
the Grenada Police band, long
accustomed to playing the Tai-
wanese anthem, rendered it
with relish as a Chinese dele-
gation opened the national
sports stadium in Grenada for
which China had provided the
funding.
The Grenadian band leader,
who lost his job as a conse-
quence of this faux pas, might
usefully seek a transfer to St
Lucia where his skills with the
Taiwanese anthem might be
required after ten years of
unfamiliarity with it at official
occasions.

incidentally, the switching
between China and Tai-
wan has not been without
penalties.
In the case of Grenada, it is
reported that the Export-
Import Bank of Taiwan sued
the Grenada government in a
New York court for US$21 mil-
lion plus interest payments for


lMLMDALE IUW N LCIN IKIE MALl
9am-6pm 10am-7pm Mon-Thurs
Monday-Saturday 10am-8pm Fri-Sat
326-5556 356-3205


THE TRIBUNE


; PAGE 6, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007







THE TRIBUNE


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 7


O


Morehouse College

names Robert

Michael Franklin

as college's

tenth president

ATLANTA, GA The
Morehouse College Board
of Trustees has named Dr.
Robert Michael Franklin Jr
the tenth President of
Morehouse College.
Franklin will officially take
office on Monday, July 2,
succeeding Dr Walter E
Massey (Morehouse class
of 1958), who will retire on
June 30.
Franklin currently serves
as presidential distin-
guished professor of social
ethics at the Candler
School of Theology at
Emory University. He is
leader, in the Office of the
Provost, for the university's
strategic theme focused on
"Confronting the Human
Condition." He also is a
senior fellow in the Centre
for Interdisciplinary Study
of Religion in the School of
Law. From 1997 to 2002,
Franklin served as presi-
dent of the Interdenomina-
tional Theological Centre
(ITC), which is part of the
Atlanta University Centre
consortium. He also has
served as theologian in resi-
dence at The Chautaugua
Institution in New York.
"We are fortunate to
have someone of Dr
Franklin's national stature
- a man who exemplifies
the best qualities of a
Morehouse man, the one
who rose to the top among
a distinguished pool of can-
didates," said Willie J
Davis, chairman of the
Board of Trustees. "In
selecting Dr Franklin, great
consideration was given to
the strength of his moral
and spiritual character, his
experience as an education-
al and administrative
leader, and his ability to
attract funds and friends to
the College."
"At a time of social crisis
in African American com-
munities and throughout
the nation, the educational
mission of Morehouse is
more urgent than ever
before," said Franklin. "I
am both humbled and ener-
gised by the Boards' invita-
tion to serve the College
that has produced extraor-
dinary change agents and
thought leaders such as Dr
Martin Luther King Jr
Maynard Jackson, Julian
Bond and Spike Lee."
A 1975 Phi Beta Kappa
graduate of Morehouse
College with a Bachelor of
Arts degree in political sci-
ence and religion, Dr
Franklin earned the Mas-
ters of Divinity in Christian
Social Ethics, Pastoral Care
from Harvard Divinity
School, and the Ph.D. in
Ethics and Society, Reli-
gion and the Social Sci-
ences from the University
of Chicago Divinity School.
A frequent commentator
for National Public Radio's
All Things Considered,
which airs daily on the
national radio network,
Franklin has built a nation-
al platform on social ethics
and community values. In
his latest book titled, "Cri-
sis in the Village: Restoring
Hope to African American
Communities", Dr Franklin
identifies the crises in the
three anchor institutions
that have played key roles
in the black strtiggle for
freedom black families,
the black church and histor-
ically black colleges and
universities and how
they must address the rising
rates of father absence,
births to unmarried par-
ents, divorce, and domestic
abuse or relationship vio-
lence.
Franklin currently serves


on several prestigious
boards including the Jessie
Ball DuPont Fund (Jack-
sonville, FL); Character
Education Partnership
(Washington, DC); Samuel
DeWitt Proctor Conference
(Chicago, IL); Joseph Low-
ery Institute for Justice and
Human Rights at Clark
Atlanta University
(Atlanta, GA); Public
Broadcasting of Atlanta -
WABE (Atlanta, GA); and
Visiting Committee,
National Centres for Dis-
ease Control (Atlanta.
GA).


Couple unhappy



with settlement



plan next step in



fight for justice


BATTLING couple Greg
and Tanya Cash are this
week planning the next step
in their fight for justice after
winning what they consider
a "derisory" $20,000 settle-
ment in the Supreme Court
last week.
The couple are lodging a
formal appeal with a view to
taking the matter to the Privy
Council if necessary.
"We are going to jump on
this as soon as possible," said
Mr Cash, who has been fight-
ing the Baptist education
authorities since he was fired
as coach at Jordan Prince
William High School five
years ago.
"Right now what they gave
us was pretty much a slap in
the face. The Baptists were
allowed to do more or less
what they wanted in court.
Their witnesses even turned
up late.
"I was fired wrongfully and
my name has been slandered
in a letter written by the Bap-
tists. Yet they could not back
up any of the claims they
made with evidence."
Mr Cash was awarded
$20,000 by Justice John
Lyons last Thursday after
suing the Baptists for wrong-
ful dismissal and slander fol-
lowing his removal as head
coach at Jordan Prince
William in 2002.
The dismissal came after
Mr Cash's wife Tanya and
other parents protested about
poor conditions at the school.
Mr Cash was accused of lead-
ing demonstrations on cam-
pus a claim he denies.
"I had been given acco-
lades and pay increases that
year, 2002, yet in the Octo-
ber I was called in and fired,"
he said.
"The Rev Samuel Greene
said I was the leading


spokesperson for the parents
and that I had led numerous
demonstrations.
"None of these things hap-
pened on campus. The par-
ents took the matter to the
Ministry of Education. He
said I was disruptive without
any evidence to back it up."
Mr and Mrs Cash were
deeply upset by last week's
judgment, but vowed to fight
on. "If we can't get justice in
our own country, we shall
take it to the highest level
possible. We will not allow
unrighteousness to go on in
our country," he said.
Mr Cash compared his own
case to that of .a woman who
was awarded $56,000 at an
industrial tribunal after being
fired for wearing an FNM
tee-shirt. "For me $20,000
was not even one year's
salary," he said.

Business
The couple claim the case
has left them facing hardship.
Though Mr Cash has set up a
small business since being
fired, he said his family had
had to do without many
things as a result of his dis-
missal.
"I have had to let insur-
ances go, I have had my pow-
er turned off, I have been rid-
ing around in a smoky car
loaned by a relative. I have
had to deny my children the
opportunity to do certain
things," he said.
In court, attorney Edward
Turner, for the Baptists, said
Mr Cash had been Idoing
"quite well" with contracts
"all over the place."
But Mr Cash said he had
lost a lot of money over the
years and had to pass up
opportunities because of the
continuing litigation.


Bird migration patterns shifting around the
world, an early warning of climate change
* BONN, Germany
DISORIENTED by erratic weather, birds are changing migra-
tion habits and routes to adjust to warmer winters, disappearing
feeding grounds and shrinking wetlands, a migration expert
says, according to Associated Press.
Failure to adapt risks extinction. Birds face starvation when
they arrive too early or too late to find their normal diet of
insects, plankton or fish. In the north, some birds have stopped
migrating altogether, leaving them at risk when the next cold
winter strikes.
"Species that adapted to changes over millennia are now
being asked to make those adaptations extremely quickly
because of the swift rise in temperatures," said Robert Hep-
worth, executive secretary of the Convention on Migratory
Species, a treaty under the auspices of the U.N. Environment
Program.
"We don't know how many will survive. We will lose species,"
he said in an interview Saturday on the sidelines of an interna-
tional climate change conference in Bonn, Germany.
This weekend, bird watchers and conservationists in dozens of
countries marked World Migratory Bird Day with concerts,
films and children's drawing contests to attract attention to the
rising threat of global warming.


Justice Lyons described the
dismissal as "unfortunate"
but said it was time to move
on.
However, Mr Cash said:
"We are still seeking justice.
We want the new govern-
ment to know that we expect
justice in our own country."
GREG and Tanya Cash
outside of the Supreme Court


*'


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THE funeral of Canon Nehemiah Willrow Dudley Strachan took place at
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 9
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Venezuela dismisses concerns over



sharp fall in foreign reserves


VENEZUELA
Caracas
Venezuela's finance minister
said Friday that the country's
foreign reserves have fallen by a
third this year to help finance
the president's development
fund and the state-oil compa-
ny, but denied any cause for
concern.
*Central Bank reserves
dropped 33 per cent to US$24.6
billion as of Thursday, from
US$36.6 billion in January. The
sharp decline has alarmed some
economists, including former
bank directors, who say
Venezuela needs larger reserves


to provide stability and protect
the economy from potential
shock.
Finance Minister Rodrigo
Cabezas told reporters, "There
is nothing to fear ... there is no
capital flight here."
The reserves "will begin to
recuperate," Cabezas said, and
will rise to US$30 billion by
year's end.
He said part of the reduction
was due to the bank's transfer
of US$6.7 billion to the govern-
ment's Fonden development
fund. Under President Hugo
Chavez, the bank has begun
transferring "excess reserves"
to two separate spending funds


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to finance social and infrastruc-
ture projects promoted by
Chavez.
State oil company Petroleos
de Venezuela SA, or PDVSA,
also bought US$4.5 billion from
the central bank "to obtain
resources ... in order to strength-
en its 2007-2008 budget,"
Cabezas said.
Jose Guerra, a former cen-
tral bank director, questioned
why PDVSA needed central
bank funds amid high oil prices
that should be keeping the com-
pany flush with cash.
"With oil at US$60 a barrel,
there are some things that do
not add up," Guerra told Asso-
ciated Press by phone. "Some-
thing is happening in PDVSA
that is weakening its cash flow."
Analysts worry that the gov-
ernment's practice of milking
PDVSA to fund social initia-
tives could be affecting its oper-
ations.
The company last year hand-
ed over more than a third of its
revenues to the government in
taxes, royalties and some US$13
billion in social spending, and
is paying for a series of nation-
alizations announced by Chavez
this year. Critics suggest that
faced with a cash shortfall, the
company has begun raising
money from international finan-
cial markets, including recently
issuing US$7.5 billion in bonds.
"If PDVSA's cash flow were
in order, it would not be weak-
ening the foreign reserves,"
Guerra said. "What I'm afraid


ft


* FROM left to right: Finance Ministers from Paraguay Ernst Bergen, from Venezuela Rodrigo
Cabezas, from Bolivia Luis Arce, from Brazil Guido Mantega, from Ecuador Ricardo Patino and
from Argentina, Felisa Miceli, walk through a street at Quito's down town after a meeting to
discuss the creation of a South American bank, with Ecuador's President Rafael Correa.
(Photo: AP/Dolores Ochoa)


of is that oil production is falling
more than was thought."
The International Energy
Agency said Friday in its April
oil market report that Venezue-
la's oil production had fallen to
2.35 million barrels a day, down


by 1.7 per cent from March.
PDVSA claims Venezuelan
production is over 3 million bar-
rels a day, but outside estimates
regularly dispute that.
Cabezas denied the fall in
reserves was due to problems


with PDVSA delivering its oil
export revenues to the central
bank. The minister said
PDVSA would bring in at least
US$61 billion in revenues by
December even "in the worst-
case scenario".


Cuba honours soldier killed by


deserters who tried to hijack plane


* HAVANA
CUBA awarded a posthu-
mous medal to a soldier killed
by conscripts who fled their
base and later tried to hijack a
plane to leave the island, an
incident the government
blamed on Washington's poli-
cies, according to Associated
Press.
The soldier, Yoendris Gutier-
rez Hernandez, was on guard
duty at a military base on April
29. Three deserters bayoneted
him to death with stolen rifles
after he refused to surrender
his weapon, the Communist
Party newspaper Granma
reported Saturday.
In a sombre ceremony in the
eastern province of Granma, a
medal for heroism was given to
Gutierrez's parents. Acting


N RAUL Castro


President Raul Castro. also the
island's defence minister, salut-


ed the soldier's "bravery and
rejection and opposition to the
demands of three assailants who
threatened him, demanding that
he give them the weapon he
used for military service."
Castro 75, has been in charge
of a caretaker government since
his brother Fidel had emer-
gency intestinal surgery and
stepped aside last summer. The
80-year-old Fidel Castro has not
been seen in nine months, but
life on the island has remained
largely unchanged.
The three escaped soldiers,
all young men from the
province of Camaguey, were
the subject of a huge manhunt.
One was captured May 3, but
the other two commandeered a
Havana city bus, forced it to be
driven to the airport and loaded
eight people including the pas-


sengers and the bus driver -
onto a plane on the tarmac at
the capital's Jose Marti Inter-
national Airport.
The two were captured fol-
lowing a shootout, but not
before they shot and killed Lt
Col Victor Ibo Acuna
Velazquez, 41, who was aboard
the bus after leaving his shift at
a military base. Acuna, a com-
munications engineer, was also
honored posthumously.
A government statement
blamed American policy for the
attempted hijacking, saying U.S.
rules allowing most Cubans to
stay if they reach US soil
encourages violent attempts to
leave the island.
Official media has not report-
ed on the status of the three
escaped soldiers since their
arrest last week. Because they
were active soldiers when the
crimes occurred, the three
almost certainly will face a light-
ening-quick trial by military tri-
bunal.
The death penalty seems like-
ly and many Cubans say it is an
appropriate punishment given
the violence of the case -
though human rights activists
on the island have called on
world governments to implore
Havana not to send the suspects
before a firing squad.
The government has used
capital punishment sparingly in
recent years, but the swift exe-
cution of three men convicted
of hijacking a Havana passenger
ferry in April 2003 a case in
which no one was killed led to
international protests, which
were largely ignored by Cuban
authorities.


of things we
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vww.rotaryorg


PAGE 10, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


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THE TRIBUNE


THE TRIBUNE


* MIAMI
THE Haitian Heritage Muse-
um is, for now, boxed in antiox-
idant cardboard in a climate-
controlled storage locker,
according to Associated Press.
It includes 20 vibrant paint-
ings and pieces of hand-carved
folk art that will one day hang in
a 25,000-square-foot building
scheduled to break ground in
Miami's Little Haiti neighbour-
hood later this year.
Eveline Pierre and Serge
Rodrigue, the museum's
founders and only full-time
staff, hope to build a permanent
collection of about 1,000 items
chronicling the Haitian Dias-
pora, especially in the United
States, and the traditions they
brought to new homes.
The two are of Haitian
descent, having lived most of
their lives in south Florida.
Pierre is in arts and entertain-
ment management and
Rodrigue is in construction
management. They worked
together in 2003 on plans to
commemorate Haiti's Bicen-
tennial in the Miami area the
following year, and both felt
something was missing from the
celebration.
"There was no monumental
symbol of Haitian history and
culture, no readily accessible
public record or storehouse of
the contributions of Haitian peo-
ple to society," Rodrigue said.
The museum project devel-
oped from there.


The two have largely sought
new ac(qjuiitions through word
of mouth, and at speaking
engagements and fundraisers.
To date, they have raised about
$180,()00() for the museum and
haven't specified an ultimate
fundiraising goal.
They estimate the value of
the artwork they have already
collected at $25,000 to $30,000,
they said. As they seek more
artifacts, they find that some
issues get lost in migration -
efforts at proper preservation
and documentation proving
authenticity among them.
"A lot of the history of the
country really lives with the
inhabitants of this country. They
take it with them," Rodrigue
said. "These things go down
through the generations. Grand-
mothers put it in a paper bag
and, because they know the val-
ue of these things, pass it down
to their kids."
The museum's nascent col-
lection includes a wooden bust
of a woman in African dress
with wire earrings; bright.,
Voodoo-themed paintings by
Andre Pierre, considered one
of Haiti's greatest painters; a
painted wooden screen that was
commissioned for a Miami
department store window dis-
play in the 1970s; and artwork
painted on boards used in home
construction that Haitian artists
work with when they couldn't
afford canvases, Pierre said.
Also promised, Pierre said,
are pieces of a wooden freighter

^^'y-Yiq


that ran aground on Key Bis-
cayne in 2002 with more than
200 Haitians aboard. The muse-
um also seeks books, film
footage, stamps and military
memorabilia.
Briefly unpacking the art-
work on a recent afternoon,
Pierre and Rodrigue recalled
some of the items they wish
they had letters written by
Haitian soldiers overthrowing
their French colonial masters,
and documents signed by Tous-
saint L'Ouverture, one of the
leaders of the slave rebellion
that led to Haiti's independence
in 1804. The would-be donor
broke contact when asked to
prove their authenticity.
"I'm pretty sure they were
authentic with my personal eye,
with the training I've gotten.
They were truly deteriorating,
but had the actual signature that
appeared to match other signa-
tures on record," Pierre said.
"In Haiti, there's been a lot of
coups d'etat, a lot of buildings
ransacked and valuables
stolen," she said. "We don't
want to run into a Spielberg sit-
uation. We want to make sure
we start off on the right foot. If
you can't tell us or prove the
authenticity of the item, we'd
rather not deal with that."
The FBI recently disclosed
that filmmaker Steven Spiel-
berg had a stolen Norman
Rockwell painting in his collec-
tion. Spielberg had bought it
from a legitimate art dealer in
1989 without knowing it had


~ TA
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LONG LASTING
PROTECTION




FLYING INSflS


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Sets them for sure!


* EVELINE Pierre, lei, aund :.
Miami which houses aiun ar, ,
the basis for the Haitian heri''cr


been taken from a galleiy mon e
than a decade earlier.
By weeding out artifacts loot-
ed or traded on the black mar-
ket during Haiti's many chances
of government, the Haitian Ier-
itage Museum hopes to avoid
having to return items once their
true histories become known.
Some acquisitions will have
to wait until the Haitian I ol--

/


''I


S: i., pose inside a climate controlled storage area in
*p arlvork and historical documents that ultimately will be
S.~ ;i.oii i te city's Little Haiti section.
(Photo: AP /Lysne Sladky)


itagce Museum opens a secure
building with more space. A his-
tori;n has offered his collection
of Haiti;in coins for exhibit the
found crs plan to call "The Rich-
es of Hialit" in contrast to Haiti's
mgie as the poorest nation in
liec Western Hemisphere. Until
hen. "he's in Haiti. So's the
still', because it's very valu-
able.'" Rodrigue said.


Marcia Zerivitz, chief cura-
tor and founding executive
director of the Jewish Museum
of Florida in Miami Beach, said
prospective artifacts should not
necessarily be rejected for lack
of historical documentation.
"I would take it anyway. His-
tory starts somewhere," she
said. "The Jews have had to
move, after having been slaugh-


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Vibrant paintings



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for new museum


r


ull :''~"'"


y,3,







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 12, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


Ministry downgrades tourism




arrival numbers from 2005


=FROM page one
Christie and his deputy, Cyn-
thia Pratt, which declared that 5
million tourists had arrived in
the Bahamas in 2005. The
release from the Ministry this
weekend now says that the 2005
figure is incorrect. It also says


that arrivals continued to fall in
2006.
In March, with widespread
indications that arrivals were
declining from sources such
as the Bahamas Tourism and
Hospitality Information Net-
work officials from the min-
istry, when pressed by The Tri-
bune to release the statistics,


declined.
Eventually a statement was
released that said: "It is unfor-
tunate that the timing has
caused what for us is a usual
exercise to get caught up in
political speculation, however,
the fact is very simple and that
is that we've had cause for fur-
ther reconciliation of immigra-


tion data before making any
official release."
No release was made before
the election.
Public criticism had started
to mount against the former
administration surrounding the
delay in release of last year's
figures which are usually pub-
lished in February.
The tight-lipped behaviour of
the ministry, in the wake of a
heated election campaign,
raised the question as to
whether the Christie govern-
ment might have delayed the
release of the information to
prevent potential embarrass-
ment.
The revised numbers for 2005
are the result of the revision of
the sea arrivals for that year.
The ministry stated that with
sea arrivals, some visitors make
stops in various ports through-
out The Bahamas, therefore,
some of these visitors were
inadvertently counted multiple
times.
The ministry claims that the
revision comes on the heels of
"a major audit exercise follow-
ing indications of inconsisten-
cies in year-end passenger data
provided by cruise lines, versus


entry point data collected by
government agencies."
Consequently, the ministry
has sought to assure the public
that the statistical inaccuracies
are isolated to 2005, and have
since been corrected.
"2005 was a one-off case
and...the ministry is satisfied
that no further such irregulari-
ties persist," the statement said.
A ministry official, who
wished to remain anonymous,
said that the errors in the 2005
numbers, and the audit that
occurred, were the reasons for
the delay in releasing the 2006
figures.
The fall in overall arrivals
from 2005 to 2006, results from
a decline in cruise ship passen-
gers. Though the ministry spec-
ulated that this decline may be a
consequence of the slide in the
US housing market, and higher
fuel costs, a fall in cruise ship
arrivals may too be linked to
the decline of Bay Street, which
is the arrival point for the
majority of cruise ship visitors.
Though the overall 2006
numbers are down, the ministry
maintains that air arrivals have
remained consistent at 1.5 mil-
lion visitors from 2005 to 2006.


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I
The new numbers also india"
cate that despite the decline
from 2005 to 2006, visitor
expenditure too remained
strong at nearly $2 billion for
both years.
This is significant, the min-
istry notes, as there has been
significant loss of room inven-
tory in New Providence, and
especially in Grand Bahama.
In 2006, 350 rooms were lost
in New .Providence following
the closure of the Radisson
Resort for renovations as a part
of the Baha Mar redevelopment
project. This 2.6 per cent drop
in available rooms for New
Providence and Paradise Island,
the ministry said, is coupled
with a 1,000 room loss oh
Grand Bahama.

Ministers of State
FROM page one
said was to allow these Ministers
of State the authority under arti-
cle 77 of the Constitution to,.
supervise day-to-day adminis,-
trative duties.
Six senators could be appoint-
ed as early as today, Mr Ingra-,
ham added, to complement the'
three that are already there. u,
In Youth Sports and Culture,
where two will be appointed min-
isters of state, one will have.
responsibility over Youth and,
Sports, and the other will be,,
responsible for Culture. .
There will be a minister of
state in the Ministry of Tourism
and Aviation.
In the Ministry of Public
Works and Transport there will.
be a Minister of State for Public
Utilities with day-to-day respon-,
sibilities over the Water and Sew:
erage Corporation and thea
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-,
tion. 1;
The Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Corporation (BTC) will
fall 'under the Ministry 9of
Finance, Prime' Mnister Ingra-.
ham's portfolio. '' "'
In the ministry of Health an41
Social Development a minister.
of state will take responsibility
for Social Development. .,,
"In terms of cost, to the Trea,,
sury, the cost of the previous cab,.
inet was $1.55 million," Mr Ingra-
ham said. "And the cost of the',
total number of persons I will be,.
appointing will be $1.526 million,
"They had 15 Cabinet Minis1,
ters with responsibilities for min-,
istries and a deputy prime minis-:;
ter and six parliamentary secre-.
taries. We will have 10 Ministers,
with responsibilities for portfo-,i
lios, eight ministers of state, and
two parliamentary secretaries,", -
he said.
Mr Ingraham said that while
he is creating a Ministry of,
Lands, he will hold Crown land ,4
in his portfolio at least until the.'
end of this month.
This, he said, was because he
had some issues he wanted to
review pertaining to Crown .
lands. -
I)


gift certtflcate redeermobi at Master Techinllon& 'Best BW E


TO: All Members of Teachers and Salaried
Workers Co-operative Credit Union
Limited, East Street South and
Independence Drive

Notice is hereby given that the Thirtieth (30th)
Annual Meeting of Teachers & Salaried Workers
Co-operative Credit Union Limited will be held at
the British Colonial-Hilton Hotel located on Bay
Street,, on Saturday, May 19,,290Q7 commencing at
8:00am for the following purposes:

To receive the Report of the Board of Directors
for 2006.
To receive the Audited Accounts for 2006.
F To elect members of the Board of Directors.
To elect members of the Supervisory Committee.
To discuss and approve the Budget for 2007.
To take action on such matters as may come
before the meeting.


THERE WILL BE NO SECOND

CALLED NOTICE


-P I -~ II I







THE TIBUNEMONDA, MAY14,O207, PGEW1


Businessman found


stabbed to death


FROM page one

cers on mobile patrol were dispatched to the
business to investigate after officers at the Police
Control Room received a call around 11am.
On arrival at the shop, the officers discovered
the lifeless body of the owner and operator on the
floor of a storeroom. He was fully clothed. There
were multiple stab wounds about the body.


ASP Mackey said the investigation is in its ini-
tial stage. Police are not certain what the motive
for the crime is at this time.
"The Police Department is appealing to the
public to call 350-3107, 352-9774/5 or 911 with
any information that would assist in bringing a
speedy closure to this incident," she said.
Officers from the Central Detective
Unit and the Scenes of Crime Section are inves-
tigating.


PM borrowed $45m


to pay off govt debt


FROM page one

update the public on the state of the econo-
my.
"The first act that I had to perform as Min-
ister of Finance was to borrow $45 million to


pay government debt," Mr Ingraham
said.
This was done, he said, by issuing private
placement bonds.
Mr Ingraham was responding to questions
on whether or not there will be any increas-
es in taxes for the Bahamian public.


Ingraham



won't receive



Pension while



serving as PM


, FROM page one

my, said that this move would in
essence be saving the public
some $114,000 a year.
"I should also wish to
announce to the Bahamian peo-
ple it will save the pension pay-
ments they make to me. At the
moment I receive $114,000 as a
pension payment. Now that I
am prime minister, that will be,
my salary. I will no longer
receive that. So as a net to the
Bahamian people they will save
$114,000 a year by which you
elected me to the office of
Prime Minister," he said.
Mr Ingraham said that he was
"not like others", stating that
he will be redepositing to the
public treasury the monies that
were deposited into his account
without his permission leading
up the general election.
"Others, for political reasons
- naked and wicked political
reasons sought to tell the
public that I am a different man
from who I am. I am who I am.
I am not like others. I am quite
distinct, and that will be demon-
strated when I redeposit to the
public treasury the monies they
sent to my account,, which
should not have been sent in
the first place.
"And when I by law, intro-
duce in the House of Assembly
a Bill, not by me but by my gov-
ernment, on the 23rd of May,
there will be a Bill in the House
of Assembly that .will prohibit
the payment of more than one
salary totally up to more than
the annual salary of a prime
minister in office," he said.
"I will not get both sums,"
Mr Ingraham added, "I will
only get one sum. That will be


* PRIME Minister Hubert Ingraham


the salary and the payment of
the pension will be suspended
until I am out of office again.
And then it will start again.
There will be no question about
being owed any sums in
between. I's only one salary. No
double-dipping, no triple-dip-
ping. The same problem that
they claimed that. I had Mr
Christie is faced with that now.
You know there is an old say-
ing, dig one grave, dig two. So
let's see how they deal with it.
You know how I dealt with
mine," he said.
Mr Ingraham also made oth-
er budget cuts in his appoint-
ments of Ministers, Ministers of
State, and Parliamentary Sec-
retaries.


Presenting a comparison
sheet between his government's
cost and that of the former PLP,
Mr Ingraham said that he will
limit the number of ministries to
12, rather than 17 as under the
former administration.
This again, he said, was done
to streamline various
responsibilities between min-
istries and agencies in the gov-
ernment.
"This is as far as I think I can
go at this stage. There will come
another opportunity at some
point in time during my term in
office to further review it. But
you would note that there are
12 ministries, including the
Prime Minister's ministry," he
said.


KENNEDY SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 48
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Residence
(4,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: East Side of Vernon Street
APPRAISED VALUE: $132,000
BELAIR ESTATES
LOT NO. 259
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family (6,000 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Turtle Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $180,000


FIRE TRAIL ROAD
LOT NO. 24
PROPERTY SIZE: Incomplete Single Family
Duplex (5,457 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: First Dirt Road After Mckinney
Avenue on Fire Trail Road
APPRAISED VALUE: $70,000


I PREl R E- ACAN.L A


MARATHON ESTATES
LOT NO. 238
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi Family Duplex
(6,784 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Marathon Road Near C I Gibson
APPRAISED VALUE: $77,000


JACARANDA SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 10
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot
(10,895 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: West Bay Street Near Old Fort
Bay Development
APPRAISED VALUE: $125,300


The Grand Bahama Power Company, Limited invites i',l' q,- applicants to apply for the position
of Human Resources/Industrial Relations Officer,
This position supervises Human Resources employees; coordinates the activities of instructors
,.,,giJ in training employees and reports to the Director of Human Resources and Training.
The successful candidate will be expected to:
* Develop, implement and modify as necessary, Human Resource procedures and guidelines.
* Represent management and meet with shop stewards and supervisors to investigate and
resolve grievances.
* Coordinate Organizational training and development activities.
* Conduct Needs Analysis and develop and implement training programs, policies and
schedules, based on identified training needs.
* Research and select outside consultants and trainers to conduct training in specific topics.
* Establish and maintain effective communication and professional working relations with
employees, the unions, department heads and other business professionals.
* Assist in the development of annual budget for HR Department.
* Manage budget to ensure that r:; .i;', costs do no exceed ill,,r:i,-'-i funds.
* Keep abreast of and as necessary provide advice and Li iJA,. to Directors, Managers
and Supervisors on organizational and external procedures and statutes relative to Human
Resources and Industrial Relations;
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
* Bachelor's degree in Human Resources or related field with a professional certification
preferred.
* Five (5) years Human Resources/Training experience at a supervisory level.
" Experience in union negotiations and management of union agreements.
* Must possess proven leadership skills and have a reputation as an honest and ethical
employee.
* Must have proven ability to perform under pressure of deadlines.
* Must be confidential in nature, well organized, accurate and attentive to detail.
Applications with supporting documentation including a clean Police Certificate and proof of
Bahamian citizenship should be sent to:






GRAND BAHAMA POWER COMPANY













An excellent opportunity exists with a Bahamian media
company for the right professional to excel as a Sales Manager.
We are seeking a sales driven professional who is challenged to
undertake the following duties and responsibilities:

Direct the advertising department and supervise a staff of
15, including sales representatives, ad design and
production and sales support staff;
Develop marketing strategies and initiatives;
Manage the short and long term strategies to achieve
Company and departmental goals and objectives;
Perform analysis, report and present results of sales initiatives;
and
Monitor competition and set goals relative to changes that
reflect in the media industry.

The chosen candidate must be:

An excellent coach with good interpersonal skills who can
lead a sales team to accomplish sales results;
A self-starter, persistent with execution and delivery;
Motivated, creative and organized;
An excellent oral communicator and must demonstrate
excellent written and report writing skills; and
Capable of developing, building and maintaining strong
client relationships.

The ideal person will have a proven track record of increasing
sales, 8 years of managerial experience and possess a strong
work ethic. A bachelor's degree in a related field or an equiv-
alent of education and experience is preferred.

Interested persons are invited to submit a cover letter and
resume to the following address or via e-mail no later than
Friday, May 25, 2007:


Sales Manager
P.O. Box N-3220
Nassau, The Bahamas
E-mail: agreen@thecounsellorsltd.com


PROPERTIES FOR SALE

D E EAL


INERSTD ARTES SHOLDSBMTOFES TO P..CASE(WT TLPHN
CONACTANDPOTALADDES)3T*CHRR MISIC, .O.:OX SA A3
E AIL --RY.ISIC@CM ANK 3 5 OR ALL22-0-62 FRFUTE
INORATIN W EERETERIH-O EETANY ORALL*FFRS


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 13


THE TRIBUNE


I D





PAGE 14, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


Celebrities meet the residents of Dolphin Cay


ii.





~(


* BO perek (left), Rob Lowe (centre)
and Milchelle Rodriguez became among
the first to meet the newcomers at Dol-


phin Cay on Friday calves Runner and
Missi, along with their mothers Kelly and
Michelle These dolphins miraculously


survived the infamous hurricane after
being swept to sea when her former
home at a Gulfport, Mississippi, aquari-


um was destroyed in the deadly storm.
(Photo: Michael Caulfield/
Wirelmage. com)


Organiser makes a night to remember


,A,


* MODELS dressed in various aquatic costumes formed the centrepiece to Friday night's grand open


ing event, designed by celebrity organiser Colin Cowie
(Photos: Michael Caulfield/Wirelmage.com) '

* COLIN Cowie (below, left) at the grand opening of The Cove Atlantis on Paradise Island. .
Resort magnate Sol Kerzner welcomed John Travolta and Kelly Presto4mindsay Lohan, Sean
Puffy Combs, Liv Tyler, Rob Lowe, America Ferrera and many other nap-es to help Janet Jackson g
inaugurate his $1 billion venture. Jackson (left) brought down the houswith Rhythm Nation,
What Have You Done For Me Lately, Nasty, That's The Way Love Goes & All for You and
closed with a "never-before-seen fireworks display by Grucci that lit up the 171 acre resort.
(Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage.com)

. .* ,* mak -- R ,-****^*T Fly


M CLAIRE Danes, Rashida Jones and Quincy Jones
(Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)


.4'














"5,
^* V



4.
'p










* .4
*'

'>.
**





i"










i

9


* USHER (right) and Tamika Foster
(Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)


I


U



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.44


IS


."2"- '" -"
.... '* *' .. -r -- .,
... '-" ..... *; .** ',
___ ,.- ., __ _____-ii- ..; :"*,,:-


I


:. nl








MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 15


THF TRIBUNE


LOCAL


* SHERYL Berkoff, Rob Lowe, Sol Kerzner and Heather Kerzner
Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com


70s event tops


off Cove launch


festivities


cer
(Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)


i NATALIE Cole, Earth, Wind and Fire and Stevie Wonder
(Photo: Kevin Mazur/Wirelmage.com)
.r-X ,/y\ .jA i i;. l I


family guardian's calendar ohoto contest


a celebration of nature
14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar.
Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each.
Entry deadline is May 31, 2007 -


RULES .
1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open. to all photographers. The ,title for the company's 2008 calendar will be
"A CELEBRATION OF NATURE." Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as found in
The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas. '
2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2007.
3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am and 5:00pm
weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked "Calendar Contest." .
4 All entries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.
5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be positive
(slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing any signs olphoto manipulation,
resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFFor high quality JPEG
and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in the judging process.
(Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CD's will not be eligible). The photographer's name and photo subject should
be written on the reverse"oftie'print. .
6 Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna photographed in its
natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final.
7 All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company's intention to return all entries in their original condition. However, Family Guardian
will assume no liability for any loss, damage or deterioration.
8 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected.
Photographic credits will be given in the calendar. The number of entries per photographer Is limited to amaximumof 5 photos.
9 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future.
10 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
11 Previously published photos are not eligiDle.

SPhoto by TmHlCEA 2008 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM
Family Guardians NAM E ............ .... ......... ................
Calendar TEL BUSINESS. ... .. .. ...... HOME . ............. .. ............
P.O. BOX STREET ADDRESS ... ..... .... ..................
SSIG N ATUR E ....... ... .. .. ... .. ................. .. ..............
DATE .... ...... NUMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERED ............. Maximum of 5)
I aigree inai in the eent itnral one or more o0 m entmerea oholographs is selected as a winner ir the2008 Family
Guardian Calendar Phori Contist acii become tile property a Famiiy Guardian Insurance Co. Ltd., and
I a..sion to Family Guardian all r ignts pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever I a so confirm that the
3phohton entered ,n trns contest were taken in Tne Banamas by the undersigned and have not been I
previously iylpulened
Return with photos to:
Calendar Contest, FaTmily Guardian
Corporate Centre, Vildage & Easlaein Road
Roundabout. Nassau Bahiramas N U AN E
ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2007 C1NO M PA N Y

SALES OFFICES: NASS gAACO & ELEU ERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


* ASHANTI and Tina
Douglas
Photo: Michael
Caulfield/Wirelmage. corn


Share
your

news
The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their,
neighborhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.


: takesyour both to the lush outdoors.


-v

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Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale Soldier Road. 393-7111 Fax: 393-Q440

i i, ii II


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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE le, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


Gallo Cream Sherry Kahlua Nederburg Prem.
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Charles De LaRoche
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L


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750 ml.


GORDONS







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Sale Date May

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business@tribunemedia.net


Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Fears over Grand Bahama




Power bidder's intentions


* Chamber chief calls for 'greater scrutiny' and 'more transparency' over Marubeni's purchase of Mirant's 55.4 per cent stake
* No approach made for Lady Henrietta/ICD Utilities consent, or government approval, leading to concerns deal will be presented as 'fait accompli'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce's presi-
dent has called for "greater
scrutiny" of a Japanese con-
glomerate's acquisition of a majority
55.4 per cent stake in Grand Bahama
Power, saying the business community
knows nothing about the buyer or its
intentions, which could involve increas-
ing electricity rates.
Calling for a "lot more transparency"


over the deal, Christopher Lowe said
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) licencees, and the island's
business community in general, knew
nothing about Marubeni Corporation
other than its name.
Nothing was known about the terms
of the sales agreement struck with the
seller, Atlanta-based Mirant Corpora-
tion, or Marubeni's immediate and.
long-term plans for Grand Bahama
Power, which as the sole electricity
supplier in Freeport and Grand
Bahama is an essential service for the


island's business community.
"We've heard the name, but that's
the sum total of anything we've heard,"
Mr Lowe said. "It's a shame, because
we know nothing about this supposed
sale. That's unfortunate, because it
concerns something that is an essential
service, and perhaps indicates that we
need a little more transparency in
Freeport regarding one of the assets
that used to belong to the Port Author-
ity."
Separately, The Tribune understands
that Marubeni Corporation and its rep-


resentatives have yet to themselves
approach Lady' Henrietta St George
for permission to acquire Mirant's
stake.
. This consent is vital because Lady
Henrietta, through controlling a major-
ity 50.37 per cent stake in ICD Utilities,
the BISX-listed holding company that
acts as holding vehicle for 50 per cent
of Grand Bahama Power's shares,
holds the "first right of refusal" to pur-
chase Mirant's stake.
Therefore, ICD Utilities, and by
extension, Lady Henrietta, can effec-


tively act as 'kingmaker' by deciding
whether to accept Marubeni as the
buyer, and new operating partner, of a
controlling interest in Grand Bahama
Power.
The Tribune also understands that
.Marubeni has yet to appoint a Bahami-
an attorney to deal with all aspects of
its purchase, which includes all Miran-
t's Caribbean assets, here. The Japan-
ese company believes it does not need

SEE POWER, page 8


Work permit fees Court orders BISX fund to pay $950k


face EPA pressure


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
WORK permit fees levied by
the Bahamian government
"should be either eradicated or
reduced" if this nation signs on
to the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) with the
European Union (EU), a
CARICOM study has adirned,
as they could act as a non-tariff
barrier to free trade in services.
The study of all CARICOM
work permit and entry regimes,
by Trinidadian firm Dykon
Developments, indicated that
the Bahamas could lose much


$20m in Bahamas
revenues might be
impacted, as seen as
non-tariff trade barrier

more than the estimated $10
million in import duties it would
give up in return for guarantee-
ing duty-free market access to
the EU for the likes of Bacardi,
Polymers International and the
seafoods industry.
The Bahamian government

SEE page 6


Blue Hills deal costs

Consolidated $200k in Q1


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
A BISX-listed company has
been ordered by the Supreme
Court to pay just under $1 mil-
lion to liquidators of a counter-
party for a collapsed $448 mil-
lion Bahamas-domiciled invest-
ment fund.
Premier Commercial Real
Estate Investment Corporation,
itself a mutual fund set.up as a
real estate investment trust
(REIT), was ordered on Feb-


Monies to go to liquidators of collapsed $448m Bahamas fund


SLt
* SCOTT


ruary 16, 2007, to pay $965,200
to Mosaic Composite, repre-'
senting dividends and interest
owed to it as a result of its 49
per cent stake in the BISX-list-
ed entity.
Michael Scott, a partner and
attorney with Callenders & Co,
who is representing BDO Mann
Judd accountant Clifford Cul-
mer, the joint liquidator of
Mosaic Composite and the $448


million Olympus Univest fund,
confirmed to The Tribune that
Premier Commercial Real
Estate had been ordered to
make the payments to Mosaic.
This was after the Supreme
Court determined that Mosaic
Composite was indeed the own-
er of a substantial stake in Pre-

SEE BISX, page 5


Sau Exuma *Abaco *Freeport Cayman
Life and Health Insurance Mortgage Lending Retirement Planning


N


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CONSOLIDATED Water,
the BISX-listed water supplier,
lost $200,000 during the 2007
first quarter in supplying the
Water & Sewerage Corporation
with 1.2 million gallons per day
in free water under its non-rev-
enue water contract, again hit-
ting margins at the Blue Hills
reverse osmosis plant despite it
generating $1.7 million in water
sales.
Rick McTaggart, Consolidat-
ed Water's chief executive, said
in a statement that "margins for


the [Blue Hills] plant continue
to be affected by a requirement
under our contract to provide
the government water utility
with free water until we com-
plete the requirement under the
Blue Hills contract to reduce
the water lost by the public
water distribution system on
New Providence.
"We continue to believe that
we will meet this requirement
before the end of this year."
Consolidated Water said in
its form 10-K filed with the

SEE page 10


Cable Bahamas 'pursuing'

basic television rate rise

* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
CABLE Bahamas is continuing to "pursue its goal" of obtaining
government approval for an increase in the $30 per month basic
television rate, arguing that this is needed to mitigate increased pro-
gramming costs that rose by 15 per cent in fiscal 2006 from $6
million to $6.9 million.
The BISX-listed company said in its 2006 annual report said
programme and signal providers had increased the costs for Cable
Bahamas to acquire their programmes, citing increased opera-
tional costs and consumer inflation as the reasons behind the
increases.
As a result, Cable Bahamas
warned: "Our major concern con-
tinues to be the rising costs of SEE page 16


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* 3 years participation in Bahamian capital markets
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* Excellent analytical skills
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CAE BMODAYIMY 14,2007THEWRIBUN


* By Fidelity Capital
Markets
Moderate level of
trading activity took
place in the Bahami-
an market this past week, with
36,700 shares changing hands.
The market saw six out of its
19 listed stocks trade, of which
three advanced, one declined
and two remained unchanged.
Volume leader for the week
was FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) (CIB),
with 30,500 shares changing
hands and accounting for 83.11
per cent of the total shares
traded. The big advancer for
the week was Bahamas Waste
(BWL), up $0.10 or 3.85 per
cent to close at $2.70.
Year-to-date, BWL's share
price has appreciated by 54.29
per cent to $2.70 versus $1.75
at the end of 2006.
On the down side, CIB's
share price fell by $0.37 or 2.53
per cent to end the week at
$14.25. The fall in CIB's share
price was due to a cross of
shares on BISX, and not any
bad news about the company
or its financial performance.
For the week, the FINDEX
declined by 8.86 points, to
close at 788.24.
COMPANY NEWS
Cable Bahamas (CAB) -
For the 2007 first quarter,
CAB posted net income of
$4.9 million, which represents
an increase of $671,000 or 15.5
per cent over the $4.3 million
net income achieved during the
2006 first quarter.
Earnings per share grew by
$0.03 year-over-year to total
$0.25. Total revenue increased
by $2.5 million to total $18.1
million, while operating
expenses rose by $1.3 million
to total $9.1 million.
Income from operations
increased by $884,000 to total
$6.3 million, versus $5.4 mil-
lion for the equivalent period
in 2006. Year-to-date, CAB's
share price has enjoyed a mod-


The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 788.24 YTD 6.22%


CHANGE VOLUME


BISX CLOSING
SYMBOL PRICE


0
0
0
1200
0
0
1000
100
3400
0
30500
0
0
0'
0
0
500
0
0
0


DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

FCL has declared dividends of $0.12 per share, payable on
May 11, 2007, to all shareholders of record date April 30,
2007.

FAM has declared dividends of $0.06 per share, payable
on May 18, 2007, to all shareholders of record date May 11,
2007.

CHL has, declared dividends of $0.04 per share, payable on
May 14, 2007, to all shareholders of record date May 7, 2007.

Commonwealth Bank will hold its Annual General Meet-
ing on May 16, 2007 at 5pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

Freeport Concrete Company will hold its Annual General
Meeting on May 16,2007, at 10am at Westin at Our Lucaya,
Freeport, Grand Bahama.

Bahamas Waste (BWL) will hold its Annual General
Meeting on May 23, 2007, at 6pm at The National Tennis
Centre, Queen Elizabeth Sports Centre, Oakes Field, Nassau,
Bahamas.

J. S. Johnson & Company will hold its Annual General
Meeting on May 30, 2007, at 6pm at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel, Number 1, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

FOCOL Holdings will hold its Annual General Meeting
6on May 30. 2007, at 10.30ain at TOCOL Holdings Limited
Corporate Office. Queens Highwqy, Freepont, Grand Bahama.

Cable Bahamas will hold its Annual General Meeting
on June 4, 2007, at 6pm at British Colonial Hilton Hotel,
Number 1, Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.


AML
BAB
BBL
BOB
BPF
BSL
BWL
CAB
CBL
CHL
CIB
CWCB
DHS
FAM
FCC
FCL
FIN
ICD
JSJ
PRE


$1.18
$1.30
$0.85
$9.05
$11.60
$14.60
$2.70
$10.42
$14.31
$2.10
$14.25
$5.20
$2.43
$5.94
$0.54
$17.18
$12.49
$7.25
$9.05
$10.00


$-
$-
$-
$0.03
$-
$-
$0.10
$-
$0.05
$-0
$-0.37
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-
$-


YTD PRICE
CHANGE
93.44%
4.00%
11.84%
12.70%
2.65%
0.00%
54.29%
4.20%
14.39%
10.53%
0.71%
0.00%
-2.80%
2.59%
-1.82%
36.89%
3.91%
.1.40%
5.23%
0.00%


est capital appreciation of 4.2
per cent, to end the week at
its current share price of
$10.42. In related news, Cable
Bahamas will hold its Annual


General Meeting on June 4,
2007, at 6pm at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, Num-
ber 1, Bay Street, Nassau,
Bahamas.


ISIGHT


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007
















BUSINESS


he Miami eralb aMONDAY, MAY 14,2007


WALL STREET



S&P's firms post gains; top estimates


BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press
NEW YORK Wall Street ana-
lysts are calling it the first-quarter
surprise and wonder if it's a har-
binger of even better times to come.
At the start of earnings season last
month, investors prepared for what
was expected to be the slowest
period of corporate profit growth in
more than four years. Analysts had
slashed forecasts across every sector,
worried that higher energy prices, a
continued housing slowdown and
increasing subprime mortgage prob-
lems would slice into results for the
first three months of 2007.
They turned out to be wrong, and
astounded investors ran to buy
stocks that suddenly looked more
attractive in the process, they cat-
apulted major indexes to record lev-
els.
Standard & Poor's said the growth
rate for members of its flagship S&P


500 index showed, on average, a
profit growth of 8.3 percent for the
quarter easily topping projections
of a 3 percent rise.
It's apparent U.S. companies have
proven themselves to be more resil-
ient in the face of a slowing economy
than previously thought. So, even
with ongoing concerns about infla-
tion and consumer spending, Wall
Street is increasingly looking for big-
cap stocks particularly those oper-
ating multinationally to help
extend the market rally.
"I braced myself for slow earnings
growth, and I'm now looking at the
water level trying to go higher," said
Jack Ablin, chief investment officer
at Harris Private Bank.
"Given the lay of the land and how
these companies were able to out-
pace estimates, the lesson I learned is
that international exposure is impor-
tant and size matters," he said.
About 88 percent of the S&P 500


index members have reported results
so far, and analysts are surprised at
some of the leaders. Healthcare has
turned out to be one of the strongest
performing sectors, with companies
like Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer and
Schering Plough all posting better-
than-expected results.
Even companies that fAll into the
consumer discretionary category,
selling non-essential products like
high-end electronics and automo-
biles, fared well. Take Ford, which
posted a loss during the quarter that
was still significantly smaller than
Wall Street projected. "This is as
close to a perfect landing as we could
have hoped for," said Howard Silver-
blatt, S&P's head index analyst. "The
earnings are coming through very
nicely despite the effect that analysts'
low-balled their projections. If this is
the payback for more than four years
of double-digit profit growth, than I'll
take it."


The first quarter also trended
above average in the number of com-
panies with results that beat expecta-
tions, according to Thomson Finan-
cial. With about 431 of the S&P 500
reporting, 67 percent surpassed
expectations. Some 12 percent
matched forecasts, and 21 percent
posted disappointing results.
John Butters, Thomson's senior
research analyst, pointed out that
companies also have been able to
beat projections by a wider margin
than usual. He said it was most evi-
dent among financial companies like
banks and brokerages a sector
many analysts would like to see lead-
ing a rally.
Those that beat projections during
the first quarter did so by about a 6.2
percent margin, according to Thom-
son. That's above the average of 3
percent seen in recent quarters.
The big question remains can
this continue?


"The estimates were ramped
down for the first quarter, and they
are as well for the second quarter,"
Butters said. "We like to look at the
earnings guidance, and so far they
haven't come down all that much."
Thomson Financial reported there
were 54 negative pre-announcements
during the quarter, compared to 21 to
the upside. Butters said that's "not as
drastic" as it could have been. In the
year-ago period, with the same
amount of companies reporting, the
S&P 500 members issued 62 negative
pre-announcements compared to 15
positive.
Meanwhile, S&P forecasts second-
quarter profit growth around 5 per-
cent and 7.3 percent for the entire
year. While these numbers aren't in
the double-digit range that Wall
Street grew accustomed to in recent
years, it still represents a decent rate
at a time where most investors
thought corporate profits would sink.


PIRACY


CHRISTINE LOSS/NEW LINE CINEMA
GLOBAL REACH: Earlier this year in a Montreal theater on its opening night, someone using a
hand-held camera recorded New Line Cinema's The Number23, starring Jim Carrey. Within days,
DVDs made from that copy were on sale worldwide.


CANADIAN PIRATES


BEDEVIL HOLLYWOOD


U.S. FILM STUDIOS AND
LAWMAKERS CALL FOR AN END
TO PIRACY IN CANADA

BY JIM PUZZANGHERA
Los'Angeles Times Service

Hollywood is singing a new tune in its fight
against movie theft: "Oh no, Canada."
Piracy north of the border has exploded in the
two years since Congress made it a crime to use
hand-held cameras to copy movies in U.S. theaters,
according to industry officials. With piracy laws
more relaxed in Canada, bootleggers can operate
there almost risk-free.

A frustrated Warner Bros. last week canceled all
promotional public screenings in Canada, including
any for its big summer movies Ocean's Thirteen and
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. The studio
estimates that 70 percent of its releases over the past
18 months have been illegally recorded in Canadian
theaters. "Within that first week, you can almost be
certain that somewhere out there a Canadian copy will
show up," said Darcy Antonellis, senior vice president
of worldwide anti-piracy operations for Warner Bros.
Entertainment.
About one in five unauthorized movies worldwide
now originates in Canada, with pirates there on pace
to illegally produce 150 films this year, more than dou-
ble their 2005 output, according to the Motion Picture
Association of America.
Last week, the U.S. Trade Representative put Can-
ada on its 2007 "watch list" for protection of intellec-
tual property, citing "continuing concern" over the
country's "failure to prohibit the unauthorized cam-
cording of films in movie theaters."
Movie pirates typically look to make copies on
opening weekends and quickly upload them to the
Internet. From there the copies are downloaded and
stamped onto DVDs sold worldwide. Films typically
open the same day in Canada as in the United States.
Canada's theaters are top-notch, many with head-
phone jacks for the hearing impaired that camcorders
can plug directly into for high-quality sound. Films are
shown in English and French in Quebec, so copies can
be made in two of the world's most popular languages.
In the United States, bootleggers face up to three
years in federal prison if caught recording a movie in a
theater. In Canada, the worst that usually happens to a
pirate is getting kicked out of a theater. That's because
Canadian authorities have to prove that the person


making the recording planned to sell copies.
"Sometimes that's quite hard," said Superintendent
Ken Hansen, director of the federal enforcement
branch of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. "The
guy could simply say in court, 'I am a movie nut. This
is what I do. I go out and make these copies and look at
them in my home.' If he does that, he's not committing
a criminal offense."
People filming with camcorders are trained to say
exactly that if caught, industry officials said.
Theater operators in Canada said they can only try
to halt recording activity. Employees search bags of
people attending premieres, and surveillance teams,
often with night-vision goggles, scan dark theaters.
"We can stop them in the middle of filming and
send them out so they don't have a full movie. That's
our objective to catch them in the act," said Ellis
Jacob, chief executive of Cineplex Entertainment, Can-
ada's largest cinema chain.
* Sens. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and John Cornyn,
R-Texas, who sponsored the 2005 law cracking down
on U.S. camcording, have written to Canadian Prime
Minister Stephen Harper, warning that "illegal pirating
will continue to mushroom" unless he takes action.
Canada has struggled to deal with the problem,
partly because Harper's minority government has had
difficulty pushing legislation through the country's
parliament. Critics say Canadian officials haven't
made stopping movie piracy a high priority.
"For a country this small to represent 20 to 25 per-
cent of the pirated copies, that's not a good story," said
Douglas Frith, president of the Canadian Motion Pic-
ture Distributors Association, which represents the
major Hollywood studios.
Earlier this year, for example, someone using a
hand-held camera recorded New Line Cinema's The
Number 23, starring Jim Carrey, in a Montreal theater
on its opening night. Within 12 hours, DVDs made
from that copy were on sale in Los Angeles, the MPAA
said, and in days were spotted in Thailand and Great
Britain.
For Dan McTeague, a liberal member of Parliament
from Toronto, the Canadian government's failure to
crack down on movie piracy is an international embar-
rassment. "It is clear pirates are operating with impu-
nity through a combination of lax laws, poor enforce-
ment, and, for some people, a laissez-faire approach,"
McTeague said. He and other legislators have been
pushing for a law similar to the United States.
If Canada doesn't act soon, the studios might. Last
fall, 20th Century Fox threatened to stop showing its
films in Canada or at least delay releases there to slow
the piracy.
McTeague worries that studios will follow through
on those threats.


HEALTH STANDARDS


China's honey industry



shows a sour side


BY DON LEE
Los Angeles Times Service
FUFENG, China For two years,
Sun Baoli has been trying to clean up
the dirty honey business here. He's
been met with nasty stings from bees,
but those are nothing compared with
the curses and punches from their
keepers.
The 52-year-old entrepreneur paid
the local government about $5,000 to
rent part of a nature preserve teem-
ing with nectar-filled Acacia trees.
He's been recruiting beekeepers to
harvest on the grounds, and all he
asks is that they follow a few simple
health rules. First, no using antibiot-
ics in their colonies; the drugs can
make people sick. Second, no storing
honey in metal containers; those can
taint the sweet goo with toxic iron
and lead.
Some 45 keepers have signed up:
But many others are hostile to his
efforts, which they see as a threat to
their decades-old way of doing busi-
ness on the cheap and making easy
profits.
On a recent Saturday night, as the
first Acacia flowers were starting to
bloom, a gang of 15 local bee farmers
ambushed Sun as he got out of his red
Isuzu truck, beating him and leaving
him with a mild concussion.
"It's going to take some time," he
said with obvious understatement.
Honey and thousands of other
Chinese food products are showing
up more and more often on dinner
plates worldwide. Last year, China
said it exported $3.8 billion worth of
food to the United States including
vast quantities of apple juice, garlic,
sausage casings, canned mushrooms
and honey.
In any given month, though, U.S.
customs inspectors block dozens of
Chinese food shipments, including
produce contaminated with banned
additives and pesticides, and seafood
tainted with drugs. In the wake of the
recall of pet foods that American reg-
ulators believe contained tainted Chi-
nese ingredients, China's food-safety
standards have become dinner-table
conversation.
U.S. inspectors believe that the pet
food was made with wheat gluten
and rice protein from China contain-
ing the chemical melamine, used in
plastic. Although officials in Beijing
say there is no evidence that mela-
mine killed American pets, they


CAO JUN/LOS ANGELES TIMES
SETTING HIGHER STANDARDS: Sun
Baoli carries nontoxic plastic
honey containers in a nature
preserve in Fufeng, China. He
follows strict safety guidelines
for his honey.


moved to ban its use in food, as the
United States does. And President
Hu Jintao said China must produce
more chemical-free foods and do a
better job of ensuring that producers
follow safety standards. But as the
honey business in this remote region
in western China shows, major obsta-
cles remain.
Even where standards have been
set, making them known to millions
of far-flung peasants is an enormous
task. The result is a constant stream
of tainted and sometimes poisonous
food. Last year, duck farmers added
cancer-causing Sudan B to their ani-
mal feed to make yolks redder and
bring a higher price. In 2004, baby
formula missing key nutrients left 13
infants dead and hundreds ill.
In 2002, Chinese honey was
blocked first by the European Union
and then the United States after ship-.
ments tested positive for chloram-
phenicol, an antibiotic banned in
foods by many countries because it
has been known to cause a fatal blood
condition. Later that year, China's
Ministry of Agriculture outlawed the
use of chloramphenicol in food pro-
duction, and last year the Agricul-
tural Science Association of China
added it and nine other medicines,
including penicillin, to its list of
drugs prohibited in food.
The efforts by China helped
restore shipments to the West, and in
2006 exports of Chinese honey to the
United States grew by 14 percent to
$273 million.
But for many beekeepers, old hab-
its die hard.
Wang Zhonggang, 50, pitched his
tent in the Acacia forest here in
Shaanxi province, about two hours'
drive west of Xian, a couple of weeks
ago. He had 60 bright-blue boxes,
each hive filled with 20,000 to 30,000
bees.
Earlier this year, Wang says, he
averted a near-disaster when his bees
suddenly became lethargic and their
numbers appeared to decline. The
second-generation beekeeper thinks
they got sick after drinking polluted
water.
Wang went to a local drug store
and bought 10 pinkie-sized tubes of
penicillin for about $L He says he
mixed the medicine with sugar water
and fed them to his bees. It didn't
take long before they became active
and produced honey. Wang knew
that chloramphenicol was illegal, but
he had no idea that penicillin was
another type of antibiotic and its use
also had been restricted. He says he
stores the honey he collects in both
iron and plastic containers.
"The reason these farmers use
antibiotics is simple. It is very cheap
and effective," said Wang Fengzhong,
an expert on China's honey industry
at the Chinese Academy of Agricul-
tural Sciences in Beijing.
No one knows what percentage of
Chinese beekeepers still use antibiot-
ics. Sun Baoli believes the figure is as
high as 70 percent.
Sun bases his estimate on the
number of beekeepers he turns away
because they don't want to follow his
rules.
Sun hired a bee technician to help
beekeepers keep their colonies
strong without using medicine, and
he doles out free plastic storage con-
tainers for honey.


I












INTERNATIONAL EDITION MONDAY, MAY 14,2007 I 4B


JOB SEARCH



Know the value of job hunting in person


BY KELLY KEARSLEY
McClatchy News Service
Elisabeth Leaf is the poster
child for a successful job
search.
The 21-year-old University
of Washington-Tacoma senior
knew she wanted to work in
urban planning. So a few
months into her senior year,
Leaf began cold-calling people
who work in her chosen field
and arranging informational
interviews to glean an insid-
er's perspective on what their
jobs are really like.
She discovered a few
things, like the fact that she'd
prefer to work in the private
sector.
"I wanted more of a career
path, rather than just a job,"
she said.
She ended up with an
internship at her first-choice
company and will likely have a
permanent job offer after she
graduates.
When it comes to finding a
job that you want, successful
job hunters, career counselors
and recruiters all say to spend
less time on the Internet and
more time meeting people.
Job seekers spend most of
their time sifting through job
listings online and in the want
ads, while employers get most
of their new hires through per-
sonal and professional con-
tacts, said Judy Colburn, man-
ager of UWT's career
development center.
"Go out and have conversa-
tions with people in the jobs
you are interested in," Col-
burn said. "We encourage peo-
ple to search online, but we
also encourage them to talk to
everybody they know."


It takes some nerve to call
up strangers and ask them
questions about their job and
for advice.
But Leaf said she received a
phone call back from every
person she called.
Four times she met with
people in person for more in-
depth interviews.
The UWT senior didn't
immediately ask about open-
ings, but instead prodded peo-
ple for bits of information
about their jobs.
Anne-Marie Ditta, vice
president of the National
Resume Writers Association
and a career coach in New
York, said cold calls can lead
to great opportunities. Just
make sure that people can give
you what you ask them.
So start with those smaller
informational questions and
hold the "do you have any
openings?" inquiry for later.
"If a person can't help you,
they are going to disappear,"
Ditta said. "Start with things
that are doable for them, like
'what is the best thing about
your day' and 'what advice do
they have for someone new to
the industry.'"
For Leaf, those initial con-
tacts paid off.
She set up an informational
interview at AHBL, a Tacoma
urban planning agency. Later,
when that company was
looking for an intern, they
called one of her professors.
Leafs name came up and
the company already knew
who she was.
A well-written resum6, a
snappy cover letter and a dis-
play of confidence during an
interview are additional tools


ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS WARE/MCT


that take people from job seek-
ers to job holders.
Having contacts increases
the chances that the resum6
and cover letter get to the
right person at just the right
time.
Cover letters are a chance
to expand on what's in your
r6sume, said Judy Colburn,
manager of UWT's Career
Development Center. Here are
a few tips on how to get your
letter noticed:
Tailor each letter to the
company and job.
Mention how you found
out about the position.
Provide new informa-
tion about yourself instead of
repeating what is in your
r6sume.
Build a strong connec-
tion between yourself and the
position by highlighting your


skills, any special training and
accomplishments.
Tell the employer what
you can do for the company
and why you want to work
there.
Include contact informa-
tion: phone number, address
and e-mail.
Close the letter with
something that will encourage
a response, such as a polite
request for an interview or
your willingness to provide
any additional information.
INTERVIEW TIPS
Tom Vangen works as a
national recruiter for the
Internal Revenue Service in
Seattle. He scouts out job can-
didates for positions in Wash-
ington, Oregon and Idaho -
and he's pretty much seen it
all when it comes to inter-


views. Here are a few tips
from a hiring insider:
Come prepared. Know
the basic information about
the organization and the posi-
tion. Wear business attire,
preferably a suit.
Have specific examples
ready. Vangen said many
interview questions regard
behavior, such as how a per-
son handles conflict. Think of
examples beforehand and be
ready to explain them. Vangen
suggests using the acronym
CAR: describe the Challenge;
explain your Actions; describe
the Resolution.
Use "I" statements.
Starting sentences with "we"
doesn't tell a potential
employer much about you.
Convey confidence.
Potential employers want to
see people who are sure of


themselves and confident that
they can handle the job.
Don't ask stupid ques-
tions. By stupid, Vangen
means questions that are
either basic or aimed at the
wrong person. The person hir-
ing you for the job knows
about the job and the com-
pany, but probably not the ins
and outs of the organization's
benefit plan. Save these for
HR.
Don't make employers
prod you for information. Lis-
ten to the interview questions.
If you don't understand, ask
for a clarification. Then give as
complete an answer as possi-
ble.
Don't ignore the small
things. Sit up straight. Shake
hands when you leave. All
contribute to a good first
impression, which might lead
to a second interview or job
offer.
REVAMP YOUR RESUME
Judy Colburn, manager of
University of Washington-Ta-
coma's Career Development
Center, said job seekers need
to make sure their resumes are
relevant to the job they are
applying for and highlight
the accomplishments of previ-
ous jobs, not the duties. She
offers these tips:
Tailor your r6sum6 to
the job you want. If you are
applying for a job that super-
vises people, highlight previ-
ous experiences that speak to
that.
Organize your experi-
ences and accomplishments so
that the ones at the top are
strongest and most relevant to
the job.


TRAVEL


COMPENSATION


Airlines raise customer service


BY SCOTT MCCARTNEY
The Wall Street Journal
After years of airline cut-
backs, some fliers may have
become resigned to dingy
seats, costly snacks and surly
service. But, now somewhat
more flush with cash, carriers
are planning a host of
upgrades.
Middle-aged airplanes like
Boeing 757s and 767s are get-
ting interior makeovers at
American, Delta and US, Air-
ways with enhancement like
new seats, overhead bins, car-
peting, video monitors and
entertainment systems. Some
airlines, including Delta and
US Airways, are planning to
add tastier and heartier food to
sell on flights. Carriers are
sprucing up some airport ter-
minals. And airlines are test-
ing technology that may
shorten lines.
Continental Airlines says it
will begin installing new
kiosks at its Newark, N.J., hub
later this month that will let
customers rebook themselves
after they miss connections or
have flights canceled by
storms.
For travelers, that would be
a. huge improvement over
waiting in an airport line or a
telephone queue.
LITTLE LUXURIES
Delta Air Lines, just coming
out of bankruptcy, has been
spending $25 million a year to
"deep clean" airplanes once a
month, and by December
should be finished installing
"Live TV" entertainment sys-
tems on planes that fly long
domestic trips. The systems
include on-demand movies,
live TV, music and games.
The five biggest airlines do
have some money to spend,
having added $2.6 billion in
unrestricted cash to their bal-
ance sheets over the past 12
months, a 19 percent increase.
AMR Corp.'s American Air-
lines upped its cash position
by $1 billion to more than
$5.4 billion and even paid
down $2.2 billion in debt at the
same time. American's total
debt is still huge, however -
$17.5 billion.
Though carriers have
turned profitable, they still
worry about high oil prices,
softening domestic demand
and having enough money to
make it through the next
downturn or crisis. Some have
been reluctant to make major
investments in planes and
people, knowing the economy
can turn on them again. Paying
down debt is a major issue for
the industry.


j'~
U *~\ \\


ILLUSTRATION BY CRAIG V

Travelers say in-flight enhancements a
long overdue, especially when discount
competitors are offering nicer product


Still, having postponed
improvements and seen air-
ports and airplanes age during
the prolonged downturn, air-
lines are starting to spiff up
their products.
Some are putting money
into technology. Southwest
Airlines is investing to
improve its website and air-
port kiosks, Chief Financial
Officer Laura Wright says.
Most of Southwest's cash goes
toward buying new airplanes.
Baggage handling is also get-
ting more money for improve-
ment this year, she said.
Travelers also say in-flight
enhancements are long over-
due, especially when discount
competitors are offering nicer
products.
Entertainment systems like
satellite television and higher-
quality food for sale would be
welcome, especially on long
flights.
A few carriers are also beef-
ing up staffing, putting more
resources toward training and
launching programs aimed at


boosting employee mor
US Airways Group sa
rushing to hire 1,400
tional airport workers b
mer and Continental
more "soft-skills trainii
airport customer service
Delta is giving bonu
employees, instituting
sharing and paying 4 p
raises for most worker
comes out of bankruptcy
WITH STYLE
"Having better r
among employees really)
the operation," says Jin
tehurst, Delta's chief op
officer. One example he
Delta put flight attend.
new uniforms last year
to improve morale. Inde
company found that after
ning the uniforms flight
dants treated customer
ter. Customer comp
about in-flight si
dropped by half.
The new focus on th
at a few airlines is we
news for many traveler


ing for shorter lines, fewer
cancellations and friendlier
service. "Fliers who are always
on 'planes just want service,
politniess and a clean plane,"
said fidith Schwager of Chi-
cago.
Rich Bohnsack missed a
connection in Chicago to Syra-
cuse, N.Y., recently because of

No seats were available to
Syracuse on UAL Corp.'s
United Airlines for two days,
so he flew to Scranton, Pa., and
drove three hours to Syracuse.
"If there is extra money to
be spent, I would like to see
them invest it in spare or
reserve aircraft and crews," he
said.
STREAMLINING SERVICE
Andrew Watterson, a direc-
tor at Mercer Management
Consulting, says he's advising
clients to invest in improve-
ments that will boost produc-
tivity and help companies
through the next downturn.
Airlines need to move people
faster and easier through air-
ports by making kiosks handle
more travel functions and
speeding up ticket lines, bag-
gage lines and security lines,
for example. "A New York
subway station is a lot more
productive than an airport," he
WHITE/MCT Said.
Airlines are tackling major
re airport renovations, some of
it which were tabled or delayed
in the downturn. American
:S. spent $L1 billion for a new ter-
minal at New York's Kennedy
Airport that should be com-
ale. pleted by the end of this sum-
ays it is mer; it also spent $100 million
) addi- in Chicago O'Hare improve-
*y sum- ments and is working on a new
plans terminal in Miami.
ng" for Delta said it spent $30 mil-
:e staff. lion during its bankruptcy
ses to reorganization to spruce up
profit- the airport lobby in Atlanta.
percentt Next on Delta's "to do" list:
rs as it Upgrade JFK and LaGuardia
Iy. facilities in New York,
upgrade planes that fly inter-
national routes and roll out
morale better food for sale.
y helps That should be a top prior-
a Whi- ity across the industry, says
rating Randy Babbitt, chief executive
e.cited: of Eclat Consulting, an avia-
ants in tion firm.
hoping He flew 10 hours on two
!ed, the United flights from Washing-
er don- ton, D.C., to Los Angeles and
atten- on to Hawaii recently and had
rs bet- only two beverages and two
)laints bags of pretzels. The crew ran
service out of snacks before reaching
him.
he staff "That's pathetic," he said.
welcome
*s hop-


Pay gap strikes early


BY AMY JOYCE
Washington Post Service
For years, women have out-
numbered men on college
campuses. Overall, they get
better grades than men. And
yet, just months after they toss
their mortarboards into the air
at college graduation, men
start to pull ahead of women
in pay.
Though the pay gap
between men and women is
well documented, it is startling
to discover that it begins so
soon. According to a study by
the American Association of
University Women (AAUW),
women already earn 20 per-
cent less than men at the same
level and in the same field one
year after college graduation.
Right at the beginning, before
taking time off for childbirth
or child-rearing, women find
themselves behind.
Of course, it only gets
worse. Today, women earn
about 77 cents for every dollar
a man earns, according to cen-
sus data, a figure that has
remained steady for about a
decade. The gap is entrenched.
The AAUW started studying
the disparity in 1913, docu-
menting different pay for men
and women among federal
government workers.
The latest study is unusual
because it devotes attention to
the first year out of school.
"We are looking at a younger
group of people who have
many similarities," said Cath-
erine Hill, director of research
for the AAUW.
The gap, starting early, only
widens as time goes on,
according to the AAUW
report "Behind the Pay Gap."
Ten years after graduation,
women fall further behind,
earning 69 percent of what
men earn. A 12 percent gap
appeared even when the
AAUW Educational Founda-
tion, which did the research,
controlled for hours, occupa-
tion, parenthood and other


factors known to directly
affect earnings. The remainder
of the gap is unexplained by
any other control factors. That
may mean, Hill said, that dis-
crimination is the root cause.
What to do?
One word: Negotiate.
While discrimination
accounts for some of the dis-
crepancy, said Linda Babcock,
James M. Walton professor of
economics at Carnegie Mellon
University, women also suffer
because they have not been
taught to ask for more. Bab-
cock, co-author of Women
Don't Ask: Negotiation and the
Gender Divide, argues that
women don't negotiate
enough, or many times, at all.
She is not blaming women for
creating their own wage gap,
she said, but rather, society,
for raising "little girls to
accept the status quo."
Babcock encountered such
an example while watching
one of her daughter's favorite
television shows, Dragon
Tales, an animated PBS series
where a human brother and
sister visit friends in Dragon
Land. In one episode, the sister
wants to make friends with a
group of dragon scouts.
Instead of just asking, Babcock
said, the girl used indirect
ways to fit in.
For Babcock, the show
reflected reality: Women are
brought up to avoid asking for
anything directly.
In a widely cited study
from 1979, first-, fourth-, sev-
enth- and 10th-graders were
given a set task, then asked to
pay themselves based on how
well they thought they did.
There was no difference
between the sexes in the eval-
uations, but researchers found
that in every grade, girls paid
themselves 30 percent to 78
percent less than boys did.
Babcock said women
should use a "cooperative
negotiation style" to get what
they want.


___________________________


THE MIAMI HERALD I MiamiHerald.com


4~









THE_ TRBN ODAMY1,207 AE~


Family Island real



estate in top demand


* By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
An increasing number of
Bahamians are purchasing
real estate in the Family
Islands, as more persons see
the potential for investment, income or a
place to retire in these locations.
According to Hazel Wicky, of Island
Realty, the number of calls from Bahami-
ans looking for land in the Family Islands
has skyrocketed in recent months.
"If we were lucky, we used to get maybe
five calls a month from Bahamians inquir-
ing about property in the Family Islands.
Now, we get a lot more per day, and there
is a greater urgency in their voices," she
said.
The increased interest and demand could
also be due to the major tourism develop-
ments proposed for many Family Islands, in
addition to the relatively high prices and
scarce supply of land on New Providence.
"Advancements, accessibility and
improved health care have made the Fam-
ily Islands more attractive to large and
small investors, international and domes-
tic,"said Ms Wicky. "When homeowners
build on the Family Islands, there is less
traffic congestion."
Ms Wicky added that property in the
Family Islands is still relatively affordable.
"With building lots starting at a little more


than $14,500 in parts of Eleuthera and Exu-
ma, and major developments in the Fami-
ly Island on the rise, it's just a matter of
time before prices increase," she said.
In Abaco, we already see the prices
soaring. Regardless, I think Bahamians are
now realising that they can be homeowners
and invest in something they can pass down
for generations."
Earthamae Burrows, a residential spe-
cialist at Bahamas Isles Realty, told Tri-
bune Business that they have also seen an
increase in Family Island sales.
"A lot of people are looking for some-
thing that they can set aside for their retire-
ment, or they went something to build a
rental property, or they just want some-
thing that they can use as collateral when
they go to the bank," she added.
Ms Burrows said most persons interest-
ed in purchasing property are over 30
years-old, but come from all age brackets.
"Andros, Exuma, Abaco and Eleuthera
are the islands we are really seeing a boost
in," she said.
The average price that people are spend-
ing for real estate is between $30,00-
$50,000, she said. While that won't buy
beachfront access on most Family Islands,
it will buy a fairly decent sized inland prop-
erty.
"It really depends on what people want.
If they are interested in building a resort,
then they will ask for beach front property,


but if it is an investment or a rental, then
they usually are not that particular about
whether it is near the beach or not," she
added.
Ms Burrows said most Bahamians pur-
chasing in the Family Islands do not pur-
chase already existing homes.
"Bahamians like to have their own
flavour reflected in their homes, so they
usually buy land and build. Even the ones
who do purchase a home tend to make a lot
of renovations because they want their own
flavour," she added.
Ms Burrows said property continues to
appreciate quickly in value on the Family
Islands ,and the real winners are the per-
sons who purchased property years ago on
the more popular islands such as Eleuthera.
"They are ahead when you consider what
they paid compared to what people are
paying now," she added.
Another realtor, Brenda Knowles, of
Island Living, said that in some cases
demand is so strong that when individuals
cannot afford to buy alone, they form small
investment groups to purchase property.
"This is a new phenomenon. Young peo-
ple are forming groups just to get their
piece of the land pie," she said.
This is a reversal of the past trend of
family islanders leaving home to move to
Nassau said Anthony Wells, another Island
Living broker, who says vacant land
accounts for a large portion of his sales.


BISX, from Page 1


mier Commercial Real Estate, Commercial Real Estate has
and that the dividends should been valued at about $7.2 mil-
be paid to the liquidators. lion, as has long been identified
The Tribune reported earlier as one of the best sources for
this year how Premier Com- recovery available to investors
mercial Real Estate's trustees in Norshield, the Canadian
were are allegedly "refusing" money-manager that managed
to turn over to the liquidators both Olympus Univest and
fund some $1.1 million in divi- Mosaic Composite.
dends that Mosaic Composite Premier owns both the
and Olympus Univest were Freeport Commercial Centre
allegedly owed. and the three Caribbean Bot-
No explanation was then giv- tling properties in Nassau and
en in the sixth report by Ray- Grand Bahama.
niond Massi, of Canada-based It was set up by Hannes
RSM Richter, who is working Babak, a former major share-
with Mr Culmer on the liquida-,., holder.in the,First Commercial
tion, as to why the Ltstees were, Centre,,an4dthe man who has
Sndot emitting the dividends 'to; been ousted (at least temporar-
the liquidators. ily) from his position as Grand
Mr Massi said they had deter- Bahama Port Authority chair-
mined that Mosaic Composite, man due to the current share-
the counterpart for Olympus holder dispute. Mr Babak is also
Univest, held a 49 per cent chairman of BISX-listed
stake in Premier Commercial Freeport Concrete.
Real Estate, which was set up Among Premier's founding
to own Bahamas-based proper- directors, although he is no
ty. longer on the board, was
Mosaic's stake in Premier Stephen Hancock, president








ill repair all of our broken furniture.
Weill repadan an pI.n wooden and metal furnilure.
We replace nd and caning ondN our dinette chairs

and also re-strap patio. lounge furniture.
.... nr bdrom ead boards and broe


draCers. ,e % %ill make 3then5 as ne.

.m.,^h..,e ,at 325-2150


Let us I


or visit our factO on Dolphin Drive.

e could collect large pieces of furniture and
return them to1 our premises.









EXCLUSIVE BOUTIQUE
RESORT & SPA

Seeking to employ a Certified Accounting Clerk
To fulfill this position, duties will include the following:-
Payroll
Accounts Payable
Accounts Receivable
Cost Control
General Cashiering
Reconciliations
Job Requirements:- All applicants should have at least 3 years of
Hospitality Accounting experience and possess the necessary
qualifications to complete the requested tasks listed above. Applicant
must also be IT computer certified and familiar with the Quick
Books program.
All applications are appreciated but only qualified individuals will
be considered. Our e-mail address is guestrelations@marleyresort.com,
or you may fax it to (242) 702-2822 or mail it to SP-63148, Nassau,
Bahamas.


and chief executive of Cardinal
International, the fund admin-
istrator for Olympus Univest
and a number of other entities
in the Norshield investment
structure.
A former shareholder in
Caribbean Bottling, Carelton


Williams, is Mr Hancock's
father-in-law. Caribbean Bot-
tling has since been sold to a
new investor group, headed by
former Commonwealth Bank
executive Walter Wells, which
has no connection to Premier
or Olympus Univest.


Security & General, a local Property & Casualty
Insurance Companyeeks to employ a mature, ambitious
individual for the r (A'f

Qualifications:
* 2-3 years Bookkeeping experience
* At least an Associates Degree in Accounting or
equivalent
* Good oral and written communication skills
* Computer literate

The company offers a competitive remuneration package,
salary commensurate with experience.

Resumes should be sent to: The Human Resources
Manager, at P.O.Box N-3540 or faxed to 323-2880 by
Mayl6, 2007


I


relocating to Cumberland


situate at #1


Court


Cumberland Street


which is next to Majestic Tours,
South of British Colonial Hilton


Hotel. Our telephone
325-5741 remains the same.


number


' BETY KKAGENCIES LTD .,

announces




Weekly Freight Service


BETWEEN


MAMIF NASSAU ARS ARBOUR, ABACO


MIAMI WAREHOUSE

Now Receiving Cargo
First Sailing May 2nd 2007
Located 3701 NW South River Dr.
Miami Florida 33142


NASSAU DEPOT

Will Receive Cargo
Bradley St. Palmdale Opp. Kemp's Funeral Chapel
Commencing May 2nd 2007 (Dry Cargo)
May 3rd, 2007 (Refrigerated & Dry)


GOVERNMENT

NOTICE

The Department of Statistics will carry out
its Annual Household Survey during the
month of May. Enumerators with official
identification cards from the Department of
Statistics will visit selected households in
New Providence, Eleuthera, Exuma and
Grand Bahama, and will be calling upon
residents to complete the questionnaires
honestly and accurately. The information
obtained will be handled in the strictest
confidence and will be used to maintain
essential statistical data on our country.


ABACO NASSAU MIAMI
Don Mackay Blvd East Street North, Kelly's Dock 3701 NW South River Dr.
Marsh Harbour P.O. Box N-351 Miami, Fla. 33142
P.O. Box AB 20116 Nassau, Bahamas Tel: 1 (305) 635-4650
Abaco, Bahamas Tel: 1 (242) 322-2142 Fax: 1 (305) 635-4651
Tel: 1 (242) 367-0593 Fax: 1 (242) 322.6089 aat Opposite Dollar Rent ACar
Fax: 1 (242) 367-0594 Airport Location)


^^^^^1^^^_^_BUSINESS^--i^


I


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE


ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ANGOLA (BLOCK V) LIMITED

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 200,0, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 30th day of April,
A.D., 2007.

Dated the 11th day of May, A.D., 2007.


Karen Floyd
Liquidator of
ESSO EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION (BLOCK V)
LIMITED







We wish to inform the general
public that effective Monday, May
14, 2007, the LAW CHAMBERS
.OF MELISA HALL & CO. will be


I









PAGE B, MODAY, AY 1,2007THEITIBUN


NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of200)

WIVENHOE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), the
Dissolution of WIVENHOE HOLDINGS LIMITED has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was May 3, 2007.




ALMEAMOXeY
LIQUIDATOR .,


Work permit fees face EPA pressure


FROM page 1

earns at least $20 million per
annum from work permit fees,
the former minister of labour
and immigration in the PLP
government, Shane Gibson, say-
ing last year that the Depart-
ments of Labour and Immigra-
tion process and approve
between 25,000-30,000 work
permit applications per annum.
Yet much of this revenue
could be lost if the Bahamas
signs on to the EPA, given the
analysis and implications of the
Dykon study. It explains that
there are four 'modes' of ser-
vices trade commercial pres-
ence; the cross-border supply
of services; services that are
consumed in other countries;
and, finally, the temporary
movement of services providers
across borders.
It is the last category that has
implications for the Bahamas,
its work permit regime and the
fees earned from it. Service sup-
pliers in this category would be


AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has a vacancy in its Nassau Office for Audit Managers
whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in the Bahamas
Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should be employed
in public accounting and have at least one (1) year of experience at the Assistant
Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of diverse client engagements.
Candidates are also required to have a high level of computer literacy.

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and other
areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different
levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance. In addition,
the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit your application with Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
"Audit Manager Position"
PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas








1805

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-


JUNIOR TR UST OFFICER

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

Strong organisational skills.
Ability to function independently but work as part of
a team.
Ability to function in a high volume, high pressure
environment.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

Minimum of the STEP Foundation Certificate.
Sound knowledge of trust drafting, reporting and
accounting.
Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents.
Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly
the Trustee Act, 1998 and the Financial Transactions
Reporting Act, 2000.
Working knowledge of legislation in competing
jurisdictions.
Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
At least five (5) years relevant experience in a Private
Bank or Trust Company.
Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. 0. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in
Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London,
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich


those who enter another coun-
try to fulfill a specific country,
either as a self-employed per-
son or company employee, or
workers confined to employ-
ment in one sector of the econ-
omy.
In the Bahamas work per-
mit fees range from $250 per
annum for a farm worker to a
maximum of $7,500 for senior
executives and professionals. It
would be the fees charged to
companies seeking to employ
the latter that would come
under most pressure as a result
of the Bahamas signing on to
the EPA.
The Dykon study recom-
mended that "a standard fee
that would represent the admin-
istrative cost of processing" the
work permit application, and
employment of a service
provider, be introduced by all
CARICOM countries. The
Bahamas currently imposes a
$25 per work permit applica-
tion processing fee.
But the Dykon study then
went on to say: "The various
levels of fees charged, by pro-
fession for example, currently
act as a non-tariff barrier to
trade and make the cost of
doing business unfairly higher.
There should be a charge for
the administration of the
process, that seems reasonable,
but charges based on categories
of skills should either be eradi-
cated or reduced."
Apart from foreshadowing
the pressures for change to the
Bahamian work permit regime


that the EPA will produce, the
Dykon study again hints that it
will lead to this nation becoming
more integrated with the rest
of CARICOM. This is desired
by the EU, as it wants to deal
with the Caribbean as one trad-
ing bloc, rather than a collec-
tion of individual states, but is
likely to raise the fears of those
who believe the EPA might be
a 'back door' route taking the
Bahamas into the Caribbean
Single Market & Economy
(CSME).
The Dykon study noted that
work permits and the tempo-
rary supply of services by for-
eign nationals was viewed in the
Caribbean as a labour or immi-
gration issue, rather than one
involving trade and the econo-
my.
"The fees charged for work
permits and related processes
seem to be dependent on the
need for protecting sensitive
sectors and, in other cases, a
source of income," the Dykon
study said. "The work permit
fee varies from non-existent to
levies on the basis of profession
or duration. The fees do not
seem to be the cost of recover-
ing the administration of the
process, but a technical barrier
to entry."
A Leonard Archer, the
Bahamas CARICOM Ambas-
sador and point person on the
EPA negotiations, previously
told The Tribune that the
Bahamas would likely have to
make some modifications to
reciprocate the EU's market


access offer for certain cate-
gories of professionals. Howev-
er, any changes were likely to
be phased in over a period of
time, and it is unclear whether
the Bahamas will seek any
reservations from these aspects
of the EPA.
Calls for greater transparency
over how Bahamian work per-
mit fees are calculated are noth-
ing new, attorney Fred Smith
having asked the Department
of Immigration why permit fees
for two employees hired by his
firm, Bahamian Outdoor
Adventure Tours, amounted to
10 per cent and 30 per cent of
their salaries respectively.
And the former minister of
foreign affairs, Fred Mitchell,
has said that work permit fees
were looked on more as a rev-
enue-raising mechanism by the
Government.
The Dykon study recom-
mended that CARICOM states
develop a harmonized tempo-
rary entry regime for services
providers that was similar to the
EU's, and dismantle the non-
tariff barriers to the trade in
services..
It also called for "the removal
of Ministerial" discretion when
it came to permit applications
for services providers, as this
could "prejudice one supplier
over another". Licensing
requirements should be the
same for both foreign and
Bahamian services providers,
Dykon said, warning that much
legislation in CARICOM states
was outdated.


CHURCH STREET PLAZA
(SHIRLEY & CHURCH STREETS)




N w



















CONTACT: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-5PM

325-6447/9 325-6456 341-7184 (aller 6pm)




TEACHER POSITIONS

for Lower Primary Grades and
Junior and Senior High School

for the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2007

are rOw available at


AaSpe CariStianl eCchOOI
A Minristry of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel
P.O. Box AB20760, Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas
Applicants with BJC. and BGCSE experience in (2
Language Arts, Mathematics,
Literature, Music, Spanish, French, Computer Science,
Physical Education, Biology, and Art


Applicants must be Bom Again Christians and adhere to the Statement of Faith of
Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel. Teachers must alsohave at least a Bachelors Degree
in Education or a Teacher's Certificate and must be a Bahamian or a permanent
resident of the Bahamas with work status. A heart for children is necessary.
Qualifying persons are asked to contact the office at:
Telephone (242)367-4777 8:30 A.M. 3:45 P.M. or fax (242)367-5777
or visit our website www.agape-schooenicom for job or student applications
or visit our website www4apRe-AsdooLcom for job or student applications


We use the A Beka Book Curriculum which emphasizes
Christian values as well as a very high standard of education and
is approved by the
Bahamas Ministry of Education.
We seek to train the mind, guide the person,
and love the personality.

"Study to show thyself approved unto God...." 2 Timothy 2:15


1


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


" ~"` '~







MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 7B


THE TRIBUNE


Bank's new mortgage




product designed to




'make borrowers




investors'


qp_ p -MwI v. mw .


U i, L itiE i PIWINIh I hi j tcn I, t tilwvt


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
F idelity Bank
(Bahamas) will this
week unveil the launch
of a new mortgage product
designed to "make borrowers
investors" by rebating a por-
tion of their monthly payment
into a mutual fund managed
by one of its affiliates, then
investing it on their behalf.
Fidelity's MoneyBack Mort-
gage, according to the bank,
will rebate 0.5 per cent of the
interest rate and invest into
the Fidelity Bahamas Growth
& Income fund every time the
monthly mortgage payment is
made, a move designed to fos-
ter savings and investments


among Bahamians.
Anwer Sunderji, chief exec-
utive of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) and its parent,
Fidelity Bank & Trust Inter-
national, told The Tribune:
"We're very excited about it.
It's very innovative. We're
making borrowers investors."
The monthly rebate is esti-
mated to be about $30 for
every $100,000 borrowed on
the mortgage, meaning that
Bahamians who have a mort-
gage worth roughly $300,000
will receive an estimated $90
per month rebate into the
Fidelity Growth & Income
fund.
Fidelity said its Fidelity
Growth & Income fund had
generated an average rate of


return of 9 per cent per year
over the last eight years, and is
invested in major BISX-listed
stocks such as Cable Bahamas,
FINCO and FirstCaribbean.
The bank said that depend-
ing on the performance of the
Fidelity Growth & Income
fund, a $60 per month rebate
could grow to more than
$100,000 over the life of the
mortgage.
Clients will be able to access
the funds accumulated in their
investment account after a
period of 10 years, and will
also be able to borrow against
these funds after a 10-year
period.
The balance ofaccumulated
funds can also be used to pay-
off a mortgage early.


TWENTY FOURTH ANNUAL
ART COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION 2007

0 I, ~ APPLICATION FORM
SBAV



The Central Bank of The Bahamas is proud to announce its Twenty-fourth Annual Art Competition and
Exhibition to be held from Monday, 5 November to 7 December, 2007. The Grand opening and Awards
Presentation will take place on Wednesday, 7 November, 2007 at 5:30pm.
The objectives of the competition are to identify, recognize and encourage young Bahamians who
demonstrate talent In the visual arts.
REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATION
To qualify, participants must be citizens of The Bahamas age 26 and under, who are not involved in
commercial sales of artwork.
THEME
There are no restrictions as to the theme of works to be entered in the competition, however, works
reflecting aspects of Bahamian culture and of an experimental nature are encouraged.
QUANTITY
Each artist must submit only three (3) works In any of the following media: 1,
o Sculpture
o Drawing
0 Painting
o Print
o Collage
o Other pictorial presentation
,Failure to present the required number of works may result In disqualification from the competition and
exhibition.

GUIDELINES
The entries must meet the following requirements:-
1. ,ach entry must be the authentic work of the participating artist.
2. Repeat entries will ntt be accepted and artists are encouraged to submit original works completed
within the last year.
3. Artists must defnbnstrate imagination in concept and in skillful use of materials.
4. Sculpt!ires must be free standing or mounted on appropriate bases. There will be no restrictions on
size aiid or material used. However, wood, stone and metal, will be preferred.
S. Paintings and drawings must be properly presented and should be framed unless artist chooses to
omit It as part of creative process.
ALL WORKS MUST HAVE SCREW EYES AND HANGING WIRE ATTACHED TO THE REAR.


6. Two-dimensional art works should be no larger than 30" by 40".
CONDITIONS
1. All art works selected for exhibition shall remain in the custody of the Bank for the entire period of
the exhibition, except for sold pieces which may be removed from the exhibition for distribution..
2. Artists are requested to indicate whether they wish to sell their work and to submit a reasonable
suggested price for each piece. All sales by the Bank, on behalf of artists, will be considered binding.
3. All works must be collected within 30 days after the end of the exhibition works. Works not collected
will be suitably disposed of.
JUDGING
A panel of judges will select the award winning entries which will be eligible to receive cash prizes.
Scholarships will be awarded to deserving artists based on their overall presentation and the assessment by
the judges. The scholarships will be tenable at the College of The Bahamas or any accredited College
outside The Bahamas for the study of art.
SPECIAL AWARDS
"* Governor's Chuice Award This will be presented to the artist of one piece selected by the Governor
of The Central Bank of The Bahamas.
"* Best Participating School The recipient of this award will be the school with the best overall
participation in terms of the quality of work.
4" Special Scholarship Award This award will be given, in addition to the usual scholarship awards, to
the deserving individual for completion of a two year Associate's Degree in Art at The College of The
Bahamas.
4 Most Outstanding Sculpture Award This award will be presented to the sculptor exhibiting the
most promise.
Qualities such as originality of expression, creative use of materials and presentation are among some of
the criteria considered. The judges reserve the right to disqualify any entry where there is doubt as to
authenticity.
The Central Bank stipulates that award winning entries may become the property of the Bank. Participants
therefore enter this competition in agreement that the Central Bank be allowed to display winning pieces in
any forum including but not limited to the Central Bank's website. All other entries will be offered for sale
during the exhibition.

APPLICATION FORMS
Entry Forms may be obtained from the CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS, or from the Bank's website
(centralbankbahamas.com) or from local news papers and in the Family Islands at the ADMINISTRATOR'S
OFFICE or the o STRICT EDUCATION OFFICES of the MINISTRY OF EDUCATION.
All entries must be delivered to the Central Bank of the Bahamas no later than FRIDAY, 13 October, 2006.
NB:
1. All entries submitted will be judged, however, only works of the highest quality and presented In accordance with the
guidelines will be exhibited. Works not exhibited will be stored only for 60 days after opening of exhibition.
The Central Bank of The Bahamas will not be responsible for works left beyond this period.
2. All sold pieces may be removed from the exhibition after 30 November, 2007.


Q'Idbrli


TWENTY THIRD ANNUAL
ART COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION 2007

ENTRY FflRM


N a m e o f A rtist:.......................................................................................................................
Tile (aiMrMsMs) FirstName Middle Last Name

Age of Artist:...... Date of Birth: .......................... Place of Birth :........... ........................
(00) (MM) (YYYY)

A d d re s s : .................................................................................................................................

................................................................................................ P O B o x : .......................................

TELEPHONE: ..................................(H) ............ ...... ......(W ................... ............ (C)

E M A IL : ... ............................................................... .................................. .................... .

WEB ADDRESS:.... ....... .......... . ........ ...... .......

ART STUDENT?.(YESy(NO). IF YES WHERE? ............................... ...................................................

MARK "*" APPROPRIATE CATEGORY: OPEN CATEGORY.............. HIGH SCHOOL........................

N am e of A rt T teacher: ................................................................ ..........................................

TITLE AND PRICE OF WORKS TO BE ENTERED:
1. ....................................................... ........................ ................... P R IC E ........

2. ................... ............. ....................... .................. PR IC E .........

3 ............................................................. ............. ... ............. .... ..... PR IC E........

INDICATE MEDIA OF WORK: ........................ ...................................................................

Should any of my entries be chosen for either of the awards available, I agree to allow the Central
Bank of the Bahamas to display that entry (those entries) in any forum including but not limited
to ths Central Bank's website.



Signature: .................... .......... .......Date................................................



& TWENTY FOURTH ANNUAL
ART COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION 2007

ENTRY TAG



(TO BE SUBMITTED WITH EACH ART WORK)
Kindly type or print please


Name of Artist (Mr/Ms/Mrs)
First N am e: ........................ ................ Initial: ............ Last N am e: ............. ................................
T IT LE O F W O R K : ..............................................................................................................................................
Suggested Price: ............ ...............................

Telephone Contact: ........................................... (H)............................... ................. (WORK/SCHOOL)
Signature: ......................... ......................... .. ..... ....... DATE: .............................................
E m ail A d d re ss: .. .................................................................................................................................

N am e of A rt T teacher: ..................................................................................... .................................
N am e and Location of School: ...... .................................................................................................

Emergency Contact::
N a m e : .............................................................................. . . . ...........................................................
Home Phone .... .........................Work ........................... ......... Other ... .... .................
E m a il.l: .................................................................................................................................................


THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS


RECEIVED: ...... ... ............................ DATE: .


The Central Bank of The Bahamas
Twenty Fourth Annual Art Comrelition & Exhibtloan 2007
F- n--eII


- I I


- -- -~..--~~..-~.~~n...--_- s I I I --


Chief Financial Officer
SG Hambros provides wealth management, trust, investment and financial planning service
We employ more than 450 people and have offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar and (0
the Bahamas. We are part of SG Private Banking which is the private banking arm of Societe Generale 4_ 0
Group which employs over 120,000 people worldwide.
SG Hambros. in the Bahamas. is currently looking to recrUit a Chief
" manage the'daily business operations of finance. Servicing the areDs i
and profitable manner.
" Supervise monthly reporting to London, Head Office Linder international iv-
in accordance with Basle Regulations,
" ensure that all relevant controls are in place,
" prepare appropriate information reports and analysis to assist Executive Vanoq(,-
enhanced performance of the organization,
" prepare annual budget in liaison with Executive Management and monitor wsul!-
" ieview all local 'i egulatot-y returns to the Central Bank of the Bahamas.

YOLI ShOuld ideally havc:.
" a Master's Degree in Banking and Finance or Accounting and/or Professiomil 17,
Gli or eC.jidivalent.
" a minii nLini of five (5) yeat s experience in finance and banking roles,
" knowledge. of Sun SYSi0111S.
" kiioMedge nf Cartess InagnIlLide wotild be ideal.
0 Fx("(,.l 9kills inclUdirlij f0rinulae, complnx form creation, with chn(A
0 viviticed knowledge 0 BL)';111()SS ()I)]e(;IS,
0 kno'.vindijo of complialicnm(l Risks liallers and knowledge of legal ipfiii1r,' 1 Is.
You should have excellent management skills, be able to work in an independent manner with little
guidance and an in-depth knowledge of Banking, Trust and financial products.
The position offers an attractive salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted to the follov.,inq
address, to arrive on or before 1 8th May 2007
Manvj
i imnhos Rar
SG
Private Banking
SOCIETY GENERAL GROUP IN Pv








PAGE B, MODAY, AY 14 2007THEITIBUN


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

SWELLSURE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
SWELLSURE LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 18th day of April, 2007.



Corporate Directors (No.2) Limited
Kleinwort Benson House
Wests Centre, St. Heller
Jersey, JE4 8PQ
Liquidator



Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

JARGON PRODUCTIONS LIMITED

"Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), JARGON
PRODUCTIONS LIMITED is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 6th day of May, 2007.



Hugh Alan Durell
1st Floor, 17 Bond Street,
St. Helier, Jersey,
JE2 3NP
Liquidator


Legal Notice

NOTICE

ABLELINK
COMMUNICATIONS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)


Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in disolution, which commenced on the
3rd day of May 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp.
Inc., RO.Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (2000),
NOTICE is hereby given that IAS INVESTMENTS
LIMITED has been dissolved and has been struck off
the Register wth the effect from the 17th April, 2007.



LIQUIDATOR
EDWARD B. TURNER
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Fears over GB Power bidder's intentions


POWER, from 1

such counsel, The Tribune has
been informed.
That might be because the
transaction with Mirant,
although it involves Bahamas-
based assets, along with utili-
ties in Jamaica, Curacao and
Trinidad, is being conducted
outside this nation. The Mirant
subsidiary selling Grand
Bahama Power and the other
Caribbean utilities is Mirant
International Investments, a
company incorporated in the
US state of Delaware, while
Marubeni has also established a
Delaware subsidiary to com-
plete the deal.
What is being sold by Mirant
International Investments is the
100 per cent share capital of
Mirant Caribbean Holdings, the


company that acts as the hold-
ing vehicle for all its stakes in
Caribbean-based electricity util-
ities. The sales document, a
copy of which has been
obtained by The Tribune, is
confused on where Mirant
Caribbean Holdings is domi-
ciled, in one place stating it is
the Cayman Islands, in another
the Bahamas.
The fact that a majority stake
in a Bahamian company, and
especially as one 'as vital as
Grand Bahama Power to busi-
ness operations and residents,
can change hands without hav-
ing to go through the Bahamas
has deep implications for the
Bahamian investments
approvals process. Not to men-
tion the capital markets, given
that ICD Utilities is a public
company, and its Bahamian


Legal Notice


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

CORAL TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
CORAL TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registrar General on the 23rd day of April, 2007.


Mark James Shortland
Vannin, Fairy Cottage
Laxey, Isle of Man
IM4 7JB
Liquidator




Legal Notice
NOTICE


VISILLI LTD.



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of VISILLI LTD. has been.
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.





ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






NOTICE


Pursuant to the provisions of SECTION 138 (4) of The International
Business Companies Act, 2000, Notice is hereby given that:-

(a) DAIMAN INVESTMENTS LIMITED is in dissolution;

(b) the date of commencement of this dissolution is May 4,
2007

(c) The name of the Liquidator is EDWARD B. TURNER of
EDWARD B. TURNER & CO. #10 PETRONA HOUSE,
FOWLER STREET OFF EAST BAY STREET, PO. BOX
N-1375, NASSAU, BAHAMAS.



EDWARD B. TURNER
Liquidator





NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (2000),
NOTICE is hereby given that LEYTON LIMITED
has been dissolved and has been struck off the
Register wth the effect from the 17th April, 2007.



LIQUIDATOR
EDWARD B. TURNER
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


shareholders will want to know
Marubeni's plans.
Normally, the Marubeni pur-
chase would have to be
approved by both the Govern-
ment's National Economic
Council (NEC) and Invest-
ments Board, plus receive for-
eign exchange control approval
from the Central Bank of the
Bahamas. In this case, the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, as well as ICD Utilities and
Lady Henrietta, must also give
their consent.
The fact no steps have been
taken by Mirant or Marubeni
to accomplish any of this, as far
as The Tribune's research has
shown, indicates that the pur-
chase is likely to be presented as
a 'fait accompli' to Bahamian
regulators and authorities when
it is concluded in mid-2007.
Mirant also seems to be treating
its Bahamian assets as a distant
province it can do what it pleas-
es with, especially as ICD Util-
ities nor its Grand Bahama
Power executives were
informed of the sale decision
until just hours before it was
formally announced.
Mr Lowe told The Tribune:
"Is the Government going to
have any say so? They
[Marubeni] don't have anyone
on the ground. Mirant seems to
be treating the assets in the
Caribbean as a bloc to be dis-
posed of, yet it has great impor-
tance to us locally. It requires


greater scrutiny."
The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber president added of Mirant
and Marubeni's apparent atti-
tude to the sale: "It's disturb-
ing at best, considering that it
concerns an essential service on
the ground locally in Grand
Bahama.
"The utility rates in Grand
Bahama have been impacting
businesses here, as they have
been steadily increasing by
greater and greater percentages.
This has been in part due to
increasing oil prices, but in
terms of setting rates it doesn't
fall under the regulatory
purview of the Governrment.
They [Grand Bahama Power]
seem to set rates as they desire."
Electricity rates are approved
by the Port Authority, but Mr
Lowe expressed business com-
munity fears that Marubeni
could look to increase these fur-
ther if, for example, it wanted to
recover the costs of a capital
expenditure. Such a move
would further burden the
Freeport and Grand Bahama
business community, eroding
profits and forcing them to pass
on cost increases to consumers,
given Grand Bahama Power's
monopoly position.
"From an international per-
spective, it's a great invest-
ment," Mr Lowe said. "From a
local perspective, what sort of
increases rates will it mean for
us? We are solely and wholly
on its supply.
"We don't have a face, we
don't have a name, we don't
have a presence. We just don't
know," Mr Lowe said of
Marubeni. He warned that
"costs could be passed along to
us" and that there was a "great
need for transparency. It points
to a great need for transparency
at the Port Authority, its assets
and dealings."


NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8)
of the International Business Companies Act;,
(2000), NOTICE is hereby given that BALSA
LIMITED has been diddolved and has been
struck off the Register wth the effect from the
19th April, 2007.




LIQUIDATOR
EDWARD B. TURNER
NASSAU, BAHAMAS





NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (2000),
NOTICE is hereby given that STEPNEY LIMITED.
has been dissolved and has been struck off the
Register wth the effect from the 17th April, 2007.



LIQUIDATOR
EDWARD B. TURNER
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (2000),
NOTICE is hereby given that LORELLA HOLDINGS
LTD. has been dissolved and has been struck off the
Register wth the effect from May 3, 2007.



EDWARD B. TURNER
Liquidator


NOTICE



Pursuant to the provision of Section 138(8) of the
International Business Companies Act, (2000),
NOTICE is hereby given that IDYLLIC LTD. has
been dissolved and has been struck off the
Register wth the effect from the 17th April, 2007.



LIQUIDATOR
EDWARD B. TURNER
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 9B


Guana Cay opponents warn

Council over 'permit grants'


By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor
The Save Guana Cay
Reef Association's
attorney has warned
the Hope Town Dis-
trict Council that it will launch
judicial review proceedings
against it if it finds that claims
permits were issued to the Bak-
er's Bay Golf & Ocean Club
developers are true.
In a May 11 letter to the Hope
Town District Council, Fred
Smith, a partner in Callenders &
Co, said: "Earlier this week, I was
informed by one of my clients
that apparently, the permits in
question had indeed been very
T recently issued..........
"Can you please let me know
Whether or not the permits have
indeed been issued. If I do not
receive a response within seven
days of the date hereof, my clients
shall be forced to take out judicial
review proceedings against your
authority for the protection of my
clients' rights."
This development comes after
the Association and Mr Smith
wrote to the new administration,
particularly Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham; Attorney Gen-
eral, Claire Hepburn; Minister of
Tourism, Neko Grant; Minister
t, of Works, Earl Deveaux; Minister
4, of State for Finance, Zhivargo
Laing; and Minister of Lands and
Local Government, Sidney Collie,
seeking answers about which per-
mits and approvals had been
issued to Discovery Land Com-
pany by their respective depart-
ments under the previous PLP
administration. The Association's
requests for information were
never allegedly responded to by
the Christie administration.
In his May 11 letter to Mrs
Hepburn, Mr Smith wrote: "My
clients have previously request-
ed that the Government defen-
dants provide disclosure of any
permits, licences or authorisations
which may have been issued to
the developer defendants, and we
have been completely ignored.
We have not even had the cour-
tesy of a reply to any of our let-
ters.........
"In this respect, may I please
emphasise how this matter
demonstrates how vitally impor-
tant it is for your government to
0 immediately enact a Freedom of
0 Information Act so that Bahami-
* an citizens. are not kept in the


dark about their rights under the
cloak of secret Heads of Agree-
ments entered into by the non-
existent National Economic
Council.
"Further, with respect to any
applications that have been made
or that are to be made by the
Bakers Bay Group of Companies
under the Heads of Agreement,
or otherwise, please note that my
clients have interests which are
affected, and wish to have an
opportunity to be heard before a
decision is made with respect to
any such applications."
Permits
Mr Smith added: "Please note
that if any permits, approvals or
licences are granted without giv-
ing my clients an opportunity to
be heard, when the same are dis-
covered my clients will bring judi-
cial review proceedings and seek
damages.
"Further, to the extent that any
permits, licenses or approvals
have been granted, my clients
have not vet been provided with
copies thereof and would wish to
have the same so as to consider
taking action with respect there-
to."


In his correspondncnce to Mr
Ingraham and Mr Laing, Mr
Smith said it was the Associa-
tion's understanding that Discov-
ery Land Company was moving
ahead with construction work
because of terms granted to it in
the Heads of Agreement and
Hotels Encouragement Act.
He added: "My clients are not
aware of the existence of any
agreement under the Hotels
Encouragement Act, and the
developer defendants have,
despite requests for the same, not
produced any by way of discov-
ery. As the Minister responsible
for the public funds, I request
that you immediately investigate
this matter and inform my clients
as to the basis upon which the
Baker's Bay developer defen-
dants have been importing all of
their materials, equipment and
operating without the payment
of customs and or stamp
duty..........
"Bahamian citizens, many of
whom voted for your Govern-
ment. have been kept in complete
ignorance with regard to what
permits, approvals, licences
and/or agreements may have
been issued to the developer
defendants."


A Sales Man Needed Urgently
We are a growing retail company, we are offering:
Base Salary, Bonuses, Pension Plan, Training and lots of
Fun. We are looking for: A young man between the age of
17 and 25, he must be Energetic, Out Going, Stable, Hard
Working, Well Groomed, Honest and Reliable.
Interested then call for an interview
356-4512 or 356-4514


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELIZABETH DOREEN
CLARIDGE OF RUSSELL ISLAND, P.O. BOX EL 27439,
SPANISH WELLS, ELEUTHERA, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 14th day of May, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Ltd.


Employment Opportunity for

Junior Portfolio Manager



Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Ltd. is looking for a Junior
Portfolio Manager to join its select team of professionals.
The appropriate candidate will be flexible and multifaceted,
and may be called upon to work in areas of operations other
than portfolio management.

Responsibilities will include:

asset allocation on customer accounts
application of investment strategies
trading securities
follow up on trading orders
reviewing performance of portfolios

Minimum qualification: Bachelors degree or similar
designation. Series 7 or Canadian Securities qualification
is preferred, and knowledge of foreign languages will also
be an advantage.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Bahamians
or persons with Bahamian residency status only need apply.
Interested candidates should forward a copy of their resume
to:

Human Resources
Banca del Sempione (Overseas) Ltd.
P.O. Box N-8159
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 356 2030

Only persons being interviewed for this position will be
contacted.






Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of









Vacancy for:


Account Administrator

Core responsibilities

* Account Opening/Closing (Apsys/Central File).
* Checking and scanning Account Opening documents
ensuring acceptable KYC and adherence to legislation.
* Verification of client signature.
* IBC/Foundation/Trust -Supervision (ordering, Invoicing,
Filing)
* Documentation controls.
* Review of client accounts and IBCs.
* Payment of annual Government/Incorporation Fees.
* Validation of client input

Knowledge, skills and Abilities

* A degree in Banking/Finance/Administration with a
minimum of two years experience with an offshore bank.
Computer literate-Ability to use electronic working papers,
MS Word and Excel


Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with
experience and qualifications; Group Medical; (includes dental
and vision) and life insurance; pension scheme.

Interested persons should apply no later than 15th May, 2007 to:

The Chief Operations Officer


I, I


FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK


CAREER OPPORTUNITY
for

Technical Analyst

Qualifications:

ITIL best practices including IT Service Management essentials
(understanding and meeting customer expectations, maintaining
service levels)
Good working knowledge in many of the technical skills, concepts,
uses and practices of one of the specialized fields: 1. Data storage;
2. Performance/Capacity; 3. Application support; 4. Operations
support
Experience in related technical field or co-op terms or equivalent
work experience, plus some computer support or application
software courses in the technical specialty.
Basic knowledge in all aspects of technology including LAN/WAN
communications, Client/Server, AS/400, ABM environments
Working knowledge of the tools for change and problem
management: Info/Man.
Skill in customer contact and in problem management and
resolution.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

To assist in the Support, Monitoring and Maintenance of
production systems, products, and applications on behalf of the
client.
To participate in the procurement, testing, installation, training,
and support of all IT infrastructure needs to support the institution
across the region.
Ensure that all work performed adheres to best practices and
ITIL standards so as to ensure the end-to-end confidentiality,
availability, and integrity of FirstCaribbean's data
Implement a high level of automation in the infrastructure to
meet business needs in a cost-effective and timely manner.
Maintain contact with internal clients and peers in the industry
to improve service levels while containing costs.

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter
via email by May 11th, 2007 to:
nicole.scavella@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will be contacted.


P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas
Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: rmullings@pasche.ch


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE













Blue Hills deal costs Consolidated $200k in Ql


CONSOLIDATED, from 1


Securities & Exchange Corn-


mission (SEC) that the non-rev-
enue water contract, requiring
the company to reduce water
losses from the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation's distribu-


tion system by 438 million US
gallons per annum, was contin-
uing to impact gross profits as a
percentage of revenue.
To be released from having
to provide 1.2 million free water
gallons per day to the Water &
Sewerage Corporation, Con-
solidated Water must show the
required water loss reduction
targets have been met. Until
this happens, the Blue Hills
plant operating costs are higher
than they should be, "greatly
reducing the overall gross mar-
gin on total water sales from
the Blue Hills plant during the
first quarter 2007".
The company added in its 10-
K: "We estimate the variable
costs incurred to provide this
non-revenue water to Water &
Sewerage Corporation were
approximately $200,000 for the
three months ended March 31,
2007." It warned that gross prof-


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2007
|N THE SUPREME COURT No. 317
Equity Side

,IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
pr lot of land being the western most moiety of Lot
Number Eleven (11) in the Coral Harbour Subdivision
lituate in the Western District of the Island of New
providence one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas

AND

i IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act,
; 1959 (Chapter 393) Statute Law of The Bahamas
revised edition 2001
'a
AND

; IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
Emmanuel Van Johnson


NOTICE

EMMANUEL VAN JOHNSON, The Petitioner,
claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession
:of all that piece parcel or lot of land hereinbefore
described and has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act to have the title
to the said piece parcel or lot of land investigated
'and the nature and extent thereof determined and
declareded in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the
Court in accordance with the provisions of the Act.

copies of a diagram or plan showing the position
boundaries shape marks and dimensions of the said
piece parcel or lot of land may be inspected during
normal working hours at the following places:

(a) The Registry of the Supreme Court Ansbacher
Building, East Street in the City of Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas.

(b) The Chambers of Messrs. Davis & Co.,
British Colonial Hilton, Centre of Commerce,
4th Floor Suite 400, #1 Bay Street, Nassau,
New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorneys
s for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that'any person or persons
having a right of Dower or an adverse claim or a
7laim not recognized in the Petition shall within
-hirty (30) days after the appearance of the Notice
2erein file in the Registry of the Supreme Court in
the City of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the
petitioners or the undersigned a statement of his
plaim in the prescribed form, verified by an Affidavit
:o be filed therewith.

failure of any such person to file and serve a
Statement of claim within thirty (30) days herein will
operate as a bar to such claim.

p)ated this 24th day of April, A.D. 2007

DAVIS & CO.
SChambers
British Colonial Hilton
Centre of Commerce
4th Floor Suite 400
#1 Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner
.5


its at Blue Hills could be fur-
ther impacted until the non-rev-
enue water contract was ful-
filled.
Meanwhile, Consolidated
Water warned shareholders,
who include its Bahamian
Depository Receipt (BDR)
holders, that its Board of Direc-
tors had decided to end the div-
idend payout policy based upon
a percentage of trailing earn-
ings.
In the past, the company had
adopted a non-binding policy
of a dividend payout of between
50-60 per cent of net income,
but had decided to alter this due
to the need for capital to fund
its growth programme.
Consolidated Water added
that its interest expense rose
from $215,000 in the 2006 first
quarter to $481,000 this time,
as it had been able to capitalise
much of its interest costs last


2006
CLE/qui/No.00897


IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land
containing 8,985 square feet situate in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence being a portion of a larger tract
of land known as Moss Grant

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of Kevin Ferguson

NOTICE

THE PETITION OF KEVIN FERGUSON in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel of land containing 8,985 sq. ft. situate in the
Western District of the Island of New. Providence aforesaid on the northern
side of a Roadway 200 feet north of Theodore Lane which said piece
parcel or lot of land designated "D" on the Plan filed herein is bounded
on the NORTH by land said to be the property of the Estate of the late
Clothilda Higgs and running thereon One hundred and twenty (120) feet
more or less SOUTH by a Thirty (30) feet wide road reservation and
running thereon Eighty (80) Feet more or less WEST by land designated
"C" and said to be the property of the Estate of the late Clothilda Higgs
and about to be conveyed to Celissia Alice Similien and running thereon
One hundred and Twenty (120) Feet.

KEVIN FERGUSON Claims to be the owner in fee simple in possession
of the following land and has made application to the Supreme Court of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas und r Section Three (3) of the
Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated and
the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the provisions of the
said Act.

Copies of the Petition and Plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal office hours in the following places:

1. The Registry of the Supreme Court, 2nd Floor Ansbacher House,
East Street, North, in the City of Nassau, Bahamas; and
2. The Chambers of Lockhart & Munroe, #35 Buen Retiro Road, off
Shirley Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower or right to dower
or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or
before the 6th day of July, A.D., 2007 file in the Supreme Court and serve
on the Petitioner or the undersigned at Statement of his Claim in the
prescribed for verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement of his Claim on
or before the 6th day of July, A.D., 2007 will operate as a bar to such
claim.
LOCKHART & MUNROE
CHAMBERS
35 BUEN RETIRO ROAD
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Attorneys for the Petitioner


year due to the Blue Hills plant
construction. The plant had
gone operational in July 2006,
meaning the company was no
longer able to capitalise this in
2007.
Despite the issues over the
non-revenue water contract
with the Water & Sewerage
Corporation, Consolidated
Water saw its 2007 first quar-
ter net income rise by 17 per
cent to $3.587 million, com-
pared to $3.078 million the year
before. Earnings per diluted
share were $0.25, compared to
$0.24 the year before.
Total revenues for the three
months ended on March 31,
2007, rose by 38 per cent to
$12.7 million, compared to $9.2


million for the year-before peri-
od,
Retail revenues were rela-
tively unchanged at $5.1 million
for the three months ended
March 31, 2007 and 2006. Bulk
revenues rose 39% to $5.2 mil-
lion, compared with
$3.8 million in the corre-
sponding quarter of the previ-
ous year. Services revenues
increased significantly to $2.4
million in the first quarter of
2007 versus $441,000 in the
three months ended March 31,
2006.
General and administrative
expenses increased to $2.3 mil-
lion in the first quarter of 2007,
versus $2.1 million in the 2006
prior-year quarter.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MATTHEW ARTHUR
WHITELAND of #3 PARK PLACE BLAIR P.O. BOX
SS-19335, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th
day of May, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ALEXANDER JOHN
WHITELAND of #3 PARK PLACE BLAIR P.O. BOX
SS-19335, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th
day of May, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that MATTHIEU PREVILON of
FIRE TRAIL ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-50076, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 14th day of May, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE



THE PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF THE
ESTATE OF THE LATE CLIFFORD MCINTOSH
ARE ADVISED THAT A SUMMONS TO STRIKE OUT
THE COUNTERCLAIM OF THE LATE CLIFFORD
MCINTOSH IN SUPREME COURT ACTION NO. 793
OF 1994 C. L. SIDE IS SET TO BE HEARD BEFORE
MR. JUSTICE MOHAMMED 2nd FLOOR SUPREME
COURT BUILDING, PUBLIC SQUARE, NASSAU AT
9:30 AM ON MONDAY 13TH AUGUST 2007. PLEASE
CONTACT ATTORNEY CAMILLE CLEAR ON
OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY 1ST AUGUST 2007.


iC: FA IA
Pricfhg Information As Of:
Frid y. 11 May 2007
"- : t ',. -VISIT.WWW.BIXAHAMAS.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
"-" -'1_' 01 ", A7644I / CHG -22.88 1 %CHG -01.28/ YTD 88 30 / YTD "* 05 27
t2.Jk-H, 5n2Mk-Lo-, Securi y P re.,,us Cic.,e Toa, s Close Cr.arge Da.,. ol EP,: t L'. CF 6 I1,1
1.81 0.54 Abaco Markets 1 1 1 18 00 u. .,, *: ,. "... r *:. -
12.06 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.60 11.60 0.00 1.548 0.400 7.5 3.45%
9.0 7.10 Bank of Bahamas 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.737 0.260 12.2 2.88%
0.8i 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.129 0.020 6.6 2.35%
2.7M 1.26 Bahamas Waste 2.70 2.70 0.00 0.243 0.060 11.1 2.22%
1.41 1.20 Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 0.092 0.020 14.1 1.54%
10.4. 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.42 10.42 0.00 100 0.949 0.240 11.0 2.30%
2.2(0 1.67 Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.245 0.080 8.6 3.81%
14.t 10.50 Commonwealth Bank 14.31 14.31 0.00 1.152 0680 12.4 4.75%
6.2r- 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.03 5.35 0.32 0.118 0.045 43 0 0.89%
2.891 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.43 2.43 0.00 0.234 0.000 8.2 0.00%
6.2-" 5.54 Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.694 0.240 8.6 4.04%
12.49 11.25 Finco 12.49 12.49 0.00 500 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.58%
14. 0 12.00 FirstCaribbean 14.62 14.25 -0.37 30,500 0.977 0.500 14.6 3 51%
17. 10.50 Focol 17.18 17.18 0.00 1.657 0.520 10.4 3.03%
1.1. 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.54 0.54 0.00 -0.432 0000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.532 0.100 13.6 1.38%
9.1(t 8.52 J.S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.868 0.570 104 6.30%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.167 0.795 8.6 7.95%
*..'rfk y Over-The-Counter Securitles
2 i.i4%-.H 52wk-Low S nmt.ol3 B.o -k *I L tSl P'..**.: .:. E : C.. PYield
14.@0 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.234 1.185 12.6 8.12%
10.-D 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54s 0.20 RNO Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.20 0.034 0 000 26.2 0.00%
? 6-ver-Te-CountarSecurites
43.0 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
14.09 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.234 1 125 12.6 7,71%
0 l 0 35 RND Holdings 0 4 n 5 0 0.021 0.000 26.2 000%
.2-Hi 52wk-Low Funa Name NA TL: LaI 1.2 l.1r.ir.r r .. : Yield %
I 3301 1 2867 Colina Moner Markel Funa 1 339101"
3.1 27 2.8564 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.1827"**
2.642 2.3294 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.649189"*
1.2443 1.1695 Colina Bond Fund 1.244286*.'
11.4892 10.9739 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.4992.**
tl3t.ALL i5"ARfE INDEX to Cec 0 ''OA l10,0,'E0 T .i, l -if ,...' 4.'&x .,-) NAV KEY
52wiAHI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
52W-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity May 2007
PrevPus Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Tod as Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week 31 March 2007
Chaige Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A company's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
DailiV.ol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 30 April 2007
DIV t- Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E sCIosing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100 30 April 2007
S.*" 30 April 2007

I-
f


Dr. Nigel A. Lewis

Jill Ward Hygienist


Dr. Palukuri Rao

Family Medicine and Dermatology



to



Scottdale House

Madeira St. 6th Terrace





325-1900


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law and Equity Division


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007








THE TRIBUNE M


BAHAMAS HOT MIX CO., LTD
Tel (242) 377-6351 Fax (242) 377-2193
Nassau. Bahamas



Now Hiring for Grand Bahama Project
NB: Personnel To Be Hired In Grand Bahama



POSITIONS AVAILABLE

Bahamas Hot Mix Co. Ltd is a road construction compnay offering competitive
hourly rates. The following positions are available for immediate occupation
for people to be hired in Grand Bahama:


Heavy Equipment Mechanics

Motor Grader Drivers

Dozer Operators

Backhoe Operators

Carpenters

General Laborers

Excavator Operators


Nassau Office
Airport Industrial Park
Po Box Cb 10990
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 377-6351
Fax: (242) 377-2193


Freeport Contact
Project Manager
Tel: (242) 424-3697


31


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
BAND FESTIVAL 2007
Mayl7-19, 2007

PRINCIPAL SPONSOR





Scotiabank


Where: The College of The Bahamas
When: Three Days: Thursday, 17th May; Friday, 18th May; Saturday, 19th May, 2007
Who can benefit: Community, church and high school bond members who have
played a band instrument for at least one year
Clinicians: Music Faculty at The College of The Bahamas and
Guest Clinicians Jorge L. Triana Hernandez and Janio Abreu Morca
from Cuba
Cost: $50.00 for adults (18 years and older); $30.00 for persons und

Proposed Schedule ----

Thursday, 17th My
10:00 am 12 noon Music Technology Workshop Jorge L. Triana Hernandez


5:00 7:00 pm



7:15 8:00 pm

8:00 8:30 pm


Instrumental Sectionals (on music for Concert)
Brass and Percussion Jorge L. Triana Hernandez and Chris
Justilien
Woodwinds Janio Abreu Morcate and Dr. Kathleen Bondurant

General Rehearsal

Demonstration by Guest Musicians/Clinicians


Friday, 18h May
10:00 am 12 noon Clarinet and Saxophone Workshop Janio Abreu Morcate


4:00 6:00 pm


General Rehearsal (for Concert) Jorge L. Triana Hernandez
and Janio Abreu Morcate


Saturday. 19th May
0 am 1:00 pm General Rehearsal (for. Concert) Jorge L. Triana Hernandez
and Janio Abreu Morcate
- 8:30 pm Concert (COB Band Shell):: Director Jorge L. Triano Hernandez
Tickets: $5.00 per person


THE COLLEGE -OFITi
Usit our websile at www.cob.edlu.bs


Pasche Bank & Trust Ltd
Subsidiary of







CM-CIC IUMVAr aBANKING

Vacancy for:

Internal Auditor/Compliance Officer

Core responsibilities
* Perform operational and compliance audits in finance, operations
and credit areas.
* Preparation of audit reports for review by Management
* Review financial data and reports.
* Assist external auditors during year-end audits and special
reviews.
* Compliance Committee and Money Laundering Reporting Officer.
* Reviewing procedures and recommending necessary changes
* Maintain a compliance monitoring program that identify risks
& breaches in Control and Procedures.
* Maintaining register of Internal Compliance reports.
* Provide guidance on the proper application and interpretation of
laws, regulations and policies applicable to the bank.
* Assist Senior Management with establishing & maintaining good
relationships with regulators.
* Assist in the development of effective internal compliance culture,
by promoting the benefits of ethical business conduct.
Knowledge, skills and Abilities
* A Certified Public Accountant &/or Certified Internal Auditor
with minimum of three years experience with an international
public accounting firm.
* Detailed understanding of Offshore banking, The Central Bank
of the Bahamas Acts and Regulations.
* Computer literate-Ability to use electronic working papers, MS
Word and Excel

Benefits include: Competitive salary commensurate with experience
and qualifications; Group Medical; (includes dental and vision) and
life insurance; pension scheme.
Interested persons should apply no later than 15th May, 2007 to:
The Chief Operations Officer
P.O. Box AP 59241
Nassau Bahamas
Fax: (242)327-1514
Email: rmullings@pasche.ch


IndiGO
N E T W O R K S


IndiGO Networks is a growing telecommunications company based in Nassau,
Bahamas. The company has a 16-year history in offering innovative technology and
telecommunications solutions to consumers in The Bahamas and is in the process of
hiring the highly skilled team required to develop the company's present and future
service offerings. The successful candidate must be highly energized and able to take
on the challenges of a fast-paced network rollout.
Job Description
The Network Services team is tasked with the 24/7/365 OA&M of an international
telecommunications network. The principal responsibilities of the Telecommunications
Specialist are:
* Maintaining end-to-end carrier-grade voice telephony over an MMDS wireless
network and an underlying Cisco telephony infrastructure
* Ongoing administration of softswitch, PSTN gateways and SS7 hardware /
software
* Integration of corporate telephony systems, most specifically circuit-switched
Mitel and Nortel PBX, via Cisco access gateways
* Monitoring and troubleshooting inter-carrier switch-to-switch interconnection
* Network and Subscriber, Capacity Planning

Qualifications
* Determined and independent, but a team-player and a self-starter, with 7+
years of previous telecoms experience in a similar capacity maintaining an
international service provider's network
* Willing to work hands-on 24/7/365 to resolve network or system problems
* University degree preferred. Industry certifications necessary: CCNP / CCSP
/ CCIE
* Excellent verbal and written communications skills
* Excellent troubleshooting and analytical skills
* Deep experience with Cisco routers, switches (LAN and WAN), VolP gateways,
SS7 controllers, and BTS10200 softswitch
* Knowledge of the fundamentals of NLOS MMDS wireless systems and wireless
backhaul
* Solid understanding of telecommunications circuits from DS-0 through
OC-3
* Broad and extensive knowledge of IP telephony (VolP / VoN), soft-switches,
PSTN gateways, SS7, QoS, SIP, H.323, and MGCP, over a range of broadband
mediums
* Fluent in data packet analyzers and expert in IP packet analysis
* Solid PBX (Mitel, Lucent, Nortel) administration, a plus
* Knowledge of carrier class switching systems a necessity (DMS100, DMS250)
IndiGO Networks offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary is commensurate
with experience and qualifications.
Interested candidates should submit their resum6s in writing to:
Attn.: Technical Services Manager; IndiGO Networks;
P.O. Box N-3920; Nassau, Bahamas
Or
Fax: 242-677-1050
E-mail: info@indigonetworks.com


THE TRIBUNE


BUSINESS


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 11B r


KC











MONDAY, MAY 14, 20C


THE TRIBUNE


IICOMICSiPAGE


II CRYPTIC PUZZLE


ACROSS
3 The power to give anaircraft
altitude (5)
8 A chap with taste (5)
10 Weird echo on the lake (5)
11 Means oftravelling second-class
for us (3)
12 One chair between two men (5)
13 The province of a prince, note (7)
15 Quarrelsome looking
oarsman? (5)
18 I say, do it uplastert(3)
19 Walk or be carried by road (6)
21 Pet dog resuming with food $or the
aquarium fish (7)
22 Friend totally free of
drink (4)
23 Drink gets me publicity (4)
24 Is his not a job for a boy? (7)
26 To the Spanish, not an
odd number? (6)
29 A schoolboy smoke? (3)
31 They're taken to show bias (5)
32 Twister's rent or a party (7)
34 Not even put back
rightl(5)
35 In general, it takes years (3)
36 The way to turn a U-boat around (5)
37 Measures up ladder? (5)
38 Dance wildly with alass (5)


Friday's cryptic solutions
ACROSS:9,r-reso-me 0, Co 0 11,WMe-Ag-re12, F
(Philip) 13, Over-due 14. Ramp 15, Mndrad. 17, In.-
action 18, Shelves 19, Part 21, (W)lnies(er) 24, Dev
on horseback 27, War-re-n 29, Own-( 30, Apr+--
cot 33, Ca-rous-er 35, Back-stroke 36, ss 37. H-o-s on
38, Par-AD-e 40, Screen 41, Nun (none) 42, Aic-raft
DOWN: 1, Di-mini-she-d 2, Well 3, Complete 4, Seconds 5.
Word picture 6, Imperative 7, Carrot 8, Primf-rose 10,
Ch-E-er 16, Deliver 20, A-she-n 22, Crazier 23,
Colour-blind 25, Lends a h-and 26, Knocked off 28, A-t a
p-inch 31, Pass-port 32. Scan-dal 34, 0-usted 35. Bi-son
9, R-are


DUWN
1 Amicable communication? (5)
2 His nominal sagacity is never
appreciated (4,3)
4 It may occur at any moment (4)
5 He has skills in making a suit (6)
6 He can sing a wrong note right (5)
7 Tried to improve, albeit weary (5)
9 Underpayment? (3)
12 A relation walks ahead (7)
14 The fabric of drama? (3)
16 Expand imaginatively In
new ideas (5)
17 Prepared inabout a day, possibly (5)
19 Summoned often hastily to
the centre (4,3)
20 Fellowsneedvariedmeals(5)
21 Sluckd th a crude rhyme 15)
23 provides a certain spark (7)
24 One of many once spent
in Spain? (6)
25 Make a mess of tlhe month? (3)
27 Members'slim chance of touring
central Lambeh (5)
28 She looks a star (5)
30 Make r,bygiving a gir
training (5)
32 Groups taking difrent dre'.s a
hejunction (4)
33 Beplural(3)


ML
"I
a-


CO)
9AS


Fr s easysoklios
ACSS: 9. Argnent 10, Tie 11, Loafer 12, Wallet 13,
Trdent 14, Hde 15, Hit the roo 17, Beetroot 18 Enlists
19. Fak 21, Alaska 24, Labrador retriever 27, Select 29,
Dul 30, Grenade 33, Massacre 35, Squandered
36, I 37, Largest 38, Gentry 40, Permit 41, Eat 42, In
demand
DOWN:1, Irrational 2, Purl 3, Seat bell 4, Stetson 5,
Reverberate 6, Gltterai 7, Father 8, Deadlock10, Thief
16, Thimble 20, April 22, Advance 23, Cold-hearted 25.
Articulae 26, Red heing 28, Examines 31,
ade 32, Sstain 34, Salami 35, Sleet
39, NumbA


ACROSS
3 Custom (5)
8 Panel (5)
10 Small bird (5)
11 Undergarment (3)
12 Chuck (5)
13 Uken (7)
15 At no time (5)
18 Pastry iem (3)
19 Corsair (6)
21 Baked day (7)
22 Animal tat (4)
23 Intellect (4)
24 Found (7)
26 Greek islander (6)
29 Failure (3)
31 Drinker (5)
32 Reasoned (7)
34 Viper (5)
35 Deceive (3)
36 Swear (5)
37 Quick d(5)
38 Wear away (5)


) ( Calvin & Hob


South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
*J65
VAK
*J.9876
+1032
WEST
S10982 4
I 109 V
Q10


EAST
4K74
P876532
+A3


+A9654 +J7
SOUTH
*AQ3
VQJ4
*K542
+KQ8
The bidding:
South West North I
I Pass 3*
3 NT
Opening lead five of clubs.


East
'ass


This deal occurred in the Japan-
Switzerland match during the 1982
World Team Championship in Biar-
ritz, France.
When Japan held .the North-
South cards, the bidding went as
shown. The Swiss West led the five
of clubs, and declarer, faced with a
difficult decision, elected to play the
ten from dummy.
East covered with the jack,
ducked by South, and returned the
seven of clubs, declarer's king losing
to the ace. West then led the club


four, on which East, Jean Besse,
world-famous Swiss expert, dis-
carded the ace of diamonds!
It was a sensational discard, no
doubt, but, more importantly, it was
the only card Besse could have
played to defeat the contract. Had he
retained the ace of diamonds, the
Japanese declarer would almost cer-
tainly have scored four diamond
tricks and the contract by lead-
ing a diamond toward the king.
Besse had rightly concluded that
if declarer held the K-Q of diamonds,
three notrump could not be defeated.
He therefore arbitrarily credited his
partner with the queen of diamonds,
and treated the diamond ace as an
albatross around his neck. Declarer
eventually went down one, losing
four club tricks and a diamond.
At the second table, where the
North-South cards were held by a
Swiss pair, the final contract was
again- three notrurnp. At this table,
however, West led the ten of spades,
certainly a reasonable alternative to a
club lead.
Declarer won the ten with the
queen, played a heart to the king and
returned a low diamond from
dummy. After this start, there was no
way he could be stopped from win-
ning four diamond tricks, and he ulti-
mately made four notrump to give
the Swiss a gain of 730 points on the
deal.


IAR


SN



RD
D


EAD
l

T


EU


The
Target
words In
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
11999
oftlttkr


HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TAOET
Good 20; very good 30;
excellent 40 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.


DOWN
1 Automaton (5)
2 Ensnared (7)
4 Pain (4)
5 Sarcastic (6)
6 Turret (5)
7 Metal fastener (5)
9 Limb (3)
12 Treachery (7)
14 Manner (3)
16 Acceptable (5)
17 Prepared (5)
19 Bullfighter (7)
20 Choose (5)
21 Sneak (5)
23 Relating to drugs (7)
24 Pantry (6)
25 Pull (3)
27 Scoundrel (5)
28 Mock (5)
30 Crazy (5)
32 Loan (4)
33 Policeman (3)


nw

vertebrate
S. S


MONDAY,
MAY 14


ARIES March 21/April 20
Give a gift to someone in your life,
although it may seem risky. Don't
worry, you'll make the right choice.
Beware the temptation to overdo it.
TAURUS April 21/May 21
It's going to take a bit extra from you
to make things work this week,
Taurus. A loved one may try to lean
on you financially, but may need
more than you can give without feel-
ing resentful. Talk it over.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
This week you may have serious identity
issues, Gemini. Don't feel insecure
about your appearance or how much
money you make. Rise above your
doubts and yodull enjoy success.,
CANCER June 22/July 22
There may be a misconception at
work to sort out on Tuesday.
Remember, everyone has their own
ways of doing business, so keep oth-
ers' feelings in mind.
LEO July 23/August 23
You're tempted to spend too much
money on a key item this wed, Leo.
It's best if you wait for a bargain
since you're watching yourbudget
these days. Be patient.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Long-range plans become quite clear
at the end of the week, Virgo. It
makes all of your prior effort worth
it. Enjoy some "you" time 6n Friday.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Opportunities will spring up this
week, requiring you to be in top
shape, Libra. Keep your eyes peeled
so that these chances will not pass
you by. Wednesday is the ultimate
power day for you. Go for it!
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Since you are so good at giving
advice, why not give yourself some
for a change. You are in charge of
your future, and nothing feels better
than reaching your goals.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
This week you are a social butter-
fly. You smile, greet people and
make everyone feel welcome. It
may be the ideal time to entertain
on Friday.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
It's time to speak up and share your
true feelings, Capricorn. You have no
reason to be afraid of others'- reac-
tions. Family is a major concern this
week. Expect Thursday to be trying.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Powerful emotional experiences are
the key to this week's activities. Get
in touch with your need to spend
impulsively now is not the time.
PISCES Feb 19/March 20
Your future and desires come into
clear view early this week, Pisces.
However, don't overextend yourself
in chasing these dreams. Enjoy the
magic you exude.


Haakon Strand v Bob Wade,
Gibtelecom Masters, Gibraltar
2007. At 85, Wade is the UK's
oldest chess professional. He
was twice British champion,
authored and edited numerous
books, and trained the young
talent which made England
second only to the mighty
Soviets in the 1980s. He still has
a sharp eye for tactics and
despite level material he won
cleverly in today's position.
What was Black's winning
move? There are weekend
congresses tomorrow and
Sunday at St Albans School
(Terry Douse on 01727 751072)
and Caterham (Sue Maguire on
020 8656 6420). Anyone from
expert to novice is welcome, and
winners qualify for cash awards
and national ranking points.


8355


-A-*1


It




S I h


LEONARD BARDEN


Chess solution 8355: 1..Nxc3! 2 bxc3 Qxc3 and
White resigned. If 3 Kdl Qd4+ and Oxgl. If 3 Kb OM44
and Black will pick up the rook next turn by Qc5- or
Qd4*.
Mensa quiz: 90.6666
One possible word ladder solution is: SEED. sees.
bees. beds, bods, gods. PODS


Ol


S SeonadB.O rde


790










THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 13B


STHE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMA S


This course is for the beginner who knows very little about computers
and does not understand how it works. This course covers the major
computer concepts with extensive hands on practice of various software
using: (I) Microsoft Office Word Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel -
Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access Database Management.


None
Monday, 7th May 2007
Saturday, 5th May 2007
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$450.00


6:00pm 9:30pm Section 01 (CEES)
10:00am 1:30pm Section 02 (CEES)


COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II


Course Description:



Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees


This course covers the major advanced concepts with extensive hands
on practice of various software using: (I) Microsoft Office Word
Processing (ii) Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet (iii) Microsoft Access -
Database Management.
Computer Applications I
Thursday, 10 May 2007
6:00pm 9:30pm
9 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$550.00


EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

This workshop is designedto provide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of Microsoft
PowerPoint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations.


Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees:


None
Thursday, 31st May 2007
9:30am 4:30pm
1 day
CEES Computer Lab
$160.00


PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR


Course Description:


Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees:

QUICKBOOKS
Course Description:




Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees:


This course is a hands-on introduction to technology systems for use in
information environments. The course will cover the following topics:
Basic Hardware, Operating Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.


None
Monday 7th May 2007
6:00pm 8:00pm Monday & Wednesday
9 weeks
BHTC Computer Lab
$500.00


This course is designed to train new and existing small business
entrepreneurs (fewer than 20 employees) how to organize and manage
their accounting activities using QuickBooks Pro software. Students
will learn how to set-up their company files, chart of accounts, budget,
customers, vendors and employees.
None
Tuesday, 8 May 2007
6:00pm 9:00pm
6 weeks
CEES Computer Lab
$330.00


WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP


Course Description:



Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Time:
Duration:
Venue:
Fees:


This course, which targets persons who would like to create their personal
web pages will cover Web page creation, Web site management, and
HTML. Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics, Multimedia,
Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Participants must be computer literate and have a basic knowledge of
word-processing
Thursday, 14th & 15th June 2007
9:30am 4:30pm
2 days
CEES Computer Lab
$550.00


ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-coordinator at Tel: (242) 302-4300 ext 5201
5202 5205 or email: www.cob.edu.bs, fees are included with the exception of
the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application, kindly
provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right
to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course


ED UCAlNG- & T RAINING BAhAM2LANS


STAFF VACANCIES


Visit our website at www.cob.ei



CENTRE FOR CONTINUING

EDUCATION

AND EXTENSION SERVICES

Computer Offerings Summer 2007

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I


Strong Supervisory skills
Good organizational skills
Excellent oral and written communication skills
Excellent interpersonal skills


LIBRARIAN. Northern Bahamas Campus
The College of The Bahamas seeks to fill a Librarian position for its Northern Bahamas Campus.
The position reports to the College Librarian, but liaises closely with the Associate Vice President
for the Northern Campus in respect to day-to-day matters.
The incumbent should be a dynamic, innovative individual with a strong commitment to service"
in a growing and diverse community. The Librarian will demonstrate successful professional and'
administrative experience in a library, have sound knowledge and understanding of emerging:
technologies and their application within library settings and show evidence of a commitment to
developing a strong integrated library service within an academic environment,;
The duties of the Librarian will include: management of the Northern Bahamas Library Branch,,
leadership in short and long-range planning to expand library services at the Northern Campus,'
development and promotion of library resources and services, budget and personnel management,
initiation and management of appropriate emerging technologies, and liaison with relevant internal
and external groups.
The Librarian must possess a'Madter's Degree iA Libra'.ar"d JifUrmation Science from an accredited;
institution and at least five years post-Master's professid al'tkartyexprience, showing evidence
of expanding responsibilities and growth. Thd ircumbenti.wO demonstrate strong communicatipp:
and interpersonal skills that engender an excellent customer-friendly and professional environment.,
Evening and weekend work (on rotation), research, professional service to the community and,
delivery of library instruction will also be required.
To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by May 21, 2007. A complete
application packet consists of an application letter, a College of The Bahamas' Applicatiho
Form, a detailed curriculum vita, copies of transcripts (original transcripts required upffA,
employment) and the names and contact information of three references addressed to..
The Director
Human Resources
The College of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Thompson Boulevard & Poinciana Drive
P. 0. Box N-4912
Nassau, Bahamas
The College of the Bahamas Application Form can be downloaded from the website at
www.cob.edu.bs


THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS'

Graduate Programmes Office




The College of The Bahamas is launching the Master's in Business Administration
programme in collaboration with the Edinburgh Business School. A town meeting :
will be held to provide information about the new master's on Saturday, Mavy
19th from 10:00 a.m. 12 u.m. in the Lecture Theatre, 4th floor, Michael '


Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT

CULINARY COURSES
ADVISEMENT AND SUMMER SEMESTER 022007
REGISTRATION "
COURSE CODE BEGINS DUR. DAYS TIME TtTI'ION & RESOURCE( Venue Mar. EroL'
PEE MATERIALS
FOR FALL 2007 =
(ADD]_[ tONAI.
S40 APP FEF
FOR NE A a
S-I'ISTDENTS)
1. Bahamian Cuisine COOK 806 May 17 6 weeks Thurs. 6:00-9:00pin $225.00 $10 $12 per week CIIMI Main 15
A s nSo f c o o fKitchen
2. Gourmet Cooking I COOK 823 May 14 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pm $200.00 $20 per week CHMI Main 15
F S e 2 7 l h__MyKitchen
3. Gourmet Cooking II COOK 824 May 14 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00prn $225.00 $20 per week CHMI Main 15
to60_mo__diesuetutbigKitchen
4. Cake & Pastry Making I COOK 813 May 15 5 weeks Tues/ihurs 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15 per week CHMI harder 15
alogteirProram e___ ________ofStuy__Kitchen
afrr5. Cake& l'Pastry Making Il COOK 814 May 15 5 weeks Tues;T-hurs 6:00-9:00pin $250.00 $10 $15 per week CHMI Pastry 15
Kitchen
6. Bread Making COOK 810 May 14 6 weeks Mon. 6:00-9:00pn $200.00 $5 $10 per week CHMI Larder 15
Kitchen
7. Cake Decorating I COOK 817 May 14 5 weeks Mon,'Wed 6:00-9:00pnm $225.00 $10 $15 per week CHMI Larder 15
Kitchen
pf8. Cake Decoration If COOK 818 May 14 5 weeks Mon/Wed 6:00-9:00pm $225.00 $10 $15 per week CIIMI Pastry 15
Kitchen

For further information please contact the Industry Training Department of the
Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute at 323-5804, 323-6804 or fax 325-8175.


Legal Counsel
The College/University of the Bahamas seeks an individual to serve as the Legal Counsel in the-
Office of the Secretary-General.
Specific responsibilities include:
* To plan, direct and administer activities of the Office of the Secretary General ,
* To work in concert with other members of the legal team in order to deliver to all areas of the'..,
College, the best legal advice and services, following best practices -
* To assist the Secretary General in the effective fulfillment of all duties and responsibilities more
specifically as set out in the Mandate and Remit for the Office of the Secretary General.
* To provide assistance and expertise in arrangements for Faculty or College-wide seminars, ,
special events, special projects or lectures
* To act specifically as legal research assistant to the Secretary General
* To work to establish and maintain a compendium of Policies and Procedures for the
College/University with respect to all areas of College/University activities.
* To work to establish and maintain a credible, working library for the Office of the Secretary
General.
* To assist in and execute details relevant to effecting matters of protocol in all College functions`
supervised by the Office of the Secretary General
* To take specific charge of all matters relating to student affairs and the Union of Students
(COBUS) on campus and related Clubs, their constitutions and matters related thereto and/or
specific charge of employee-relations matters and all matters concerning disputes/insurance
claims
* To execute all other assignments concerning the College's legal matters as are referred by the
Secretary General .
* To work in a collegial fashion with all other members of the Office of the Secretary General;.,':

The successful candidate must have a minimum of a Bachelor of Laws Degree, a Council of Legal"
Education Certificate and no less than 5 years post qualification and relevant experience. Additionally
the successful candidate should possess the following:


Course Description:




Pre-requisite:
Begins:
Duration:
Venue:
Tuition:


H. Eldon Complex.
A representative from Edinburgh Business School will make a presentation and'
receive questions from the audience. The public is invited to attend. Further:
information may be obtained from the Graduate Programmes Office at telephone:
397-2601.






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 14B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


THE COLLEGE OF 7i
Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs EEDUC/


i. M.


BAHAMAS


_ FiNG &, TRiAIING .BAHAMALANS


Prospective Applicants



Master's Degree
^ 9


i,


rogramme
Master of Science in
Early Childhood and
Elementary Teaching

Applications for the programme..
I are now available in
the Graduate Programmes Offi-e
Michael Hartley Eldon Comptlix,*
Thompson Boulevard


Room 306

26in collaboration
the Journeyman Plumbing course with The College of The Baith

WHEELOCK
,C 0 1.. E G F









Dean at 368-2676 concerning registration.
NOTICE
All residents of South Andros interested in taking the Single Phase
PElectrical course with The College of The Bahamas, which begins
bon 8 June, 2007 are asked to contact Rev. Dorinda Dean at 368-
registra676 concerning registration.
All residents of North and Central Andros interested in taking
the Journeyman Plumbing course with The College of The Bahamas,
:which begins on 8 June 2007 are asked to contact Rev. Dorinda
Dean at 368-2676 concerning registration.


All residents of North leutheraeseinterested in taking the Single
'Phase Electrical course with The College of The Bahamas, which
Fridaegins on 8 June, 2007, are asked to contact Tomacena Albury at
Spanish Wells All Age School at 335-1732 or 333-4052 concerning
registration.
ILCI
THE INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND
CULTURES INSTITUTE
of The College of The Bahamas








LOCATION: Room 2, Munnings Building, next to KFC at COB roundabout
WINE TASTING ART EXHIBIT
LOCATION: Room 2, Munnings Building, next to KFC at COB roundabout
ADMISSION: $10 Students: $5
CONTACT: For further information, call 302-4587 or 302-4584


Prospective Applicants



Master's Degree


Programme

Master of Education in
Educational Administration

Applications for the programme
are now available in
the Graduate Programmes Office
Michael .Hartley Etdon Complex
Thompson Boulevard
Room 306

in collaboration
with


TO


JULY 2 JULY 13, 2007
9:30A 2:30PM (NM. FR.j
(AGES 5- 12YRS OLD)


71 i


9ijr.


rin


C. OF ,


FOR ADDITIONAL INFO,
PLEASE CONTACT
CAMPUS LIFE DEPARTMENT
302-4525/302-4592.
REGISTER NOW AS SPACE IS LIMITED


- r~ I r I - I I


PAGE 14B, MONDAY,


MAY 14, 2007


SOCCEREP


A14.






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


THE


OF


F ~* ~2


MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007, PAGE 15B


BAHAMAS


Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs


ED...,-', C ikRJ4NING BAHAIAML S


cIzz
UNDER THE STARS
FESTIVAL 2007 -











GALA CONCERT
Saturday June 16. 2007 7:00 P.M.
The College of The Bahamas
Band Shell Poinciana Drive Oakes Field


Featuring


FABULOUS MUSIC
GOURMET DINING
CASH BAR
TICKETS ON SALE AT
CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE and
in THE OFFICE OF COMMUNICATION, BLock A
Oakes Field Campus


Gala Concert and Dinner $175
Includes Gala Concert and Dinner
Gold $80
Includes Gala Concert & Hors d'Oeuvres
General Admission $50
Student Admission (with COB ID) $25


For reservations,
sponsorship opportunities
and further information,
please call
Office of Communication
at telephones
302.4304/4353/4354/4366


Executive Producer Patricia Glinton-Meicholas
Show Producer Roscoe Dames "Mr Jazz"
Catering by Alexandra (Alexandra Maitis Lynch)


A FAB CONCERT
Friday, June 15,2007
7:00 p.m.
COB Bandshell
Contact
Office of Communication
e 302.4304'
302.4366
302.4353


SESSIONS
Friday, June 15, 2007
10:00am to 12:00 noon
and
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Contact
Office of Communication
302.4304
302.4366
302.4353
Register now. Space is limited.


with
Bahamas Jazz Project
and The 30-Member
New Washingtonian Orchestra
from the famed
Duke Ellington School of the Arts
Tickets on sale at
CHAPTER ONE BOOKSTORE
Thompson Boutevard


Bujo Kevin Jones
Drummers Clinic (2 hours)


Nicki Gonzalez
The Tricks & Traps of a Solo Career
(1 hour)
Phillip Martin
Pursuing your dream and a
professional career (1 hour]
Roscoe Dames
The Music Business
From The Islands to The World


For junkanoo artists, school and community bands
and music entrepreneurs
Workshop: $30.00 :: Students: $15.00:


I -. I Ad .misl, I.B- 1 Il0.01,


f~ ,-


Hands-on demonstrations with
"Bujo" Kevin Jones


renowned percussionist


111








PAGE 6B, ONDA, MA 14, 007UHEITIBUN


Cruise market weakness sees


Bahamas miss five million visitor


target in 2005 and 2006


The Ministry of Tourism clung to the fact
that total visitor spending by tourists to the
Bahamas remained constant at $2 billion in
2006, with the higher-spending arrivals also
flat with 2005 totals, as it admitted that total
tourist arrivals in both 2005 and 2006 had failed
to reach the previously-touted five million.
The Ministry said "major revisions" had been
made to its 2005 visitor arrivals totals, which it
said now stood at 4.8 million compared to the
previously-announced five million.
For 2006, estimated visitor arrivals had also
fallen slightly from 4.8 million to 4.7 million, a
2 per cent decrease.
The Ministry said in a statement that air
arrivals for 2005 were unchanged from the ear-
lier figure of 1.5 million visitors, which also
matches 2006 estimates. However, cruise visitor
figures for 2005 have been revised downwards
from 3.5 million to 3.3 million.
The Ministry of Tourism said the revisions
followed a major audit, which found that some
cruise passenger visitors to the Bahamas were
'double-counted' because they stopped at more
than one port in this nation.
Confident
It added that it was confident no further
irregularities in its visitor arrivals measure-
ments persisted, and that the mistakes with
the 2005 count were a one-off.
The Ministry instead pointed to the fact that


at 1.5 million arrivals, stopover tourism
remained strong. It said this was significant
"since this group comprises the stopover com-
ponent, which is responsible for the bulk of
overall expenditure.
"Moreover, to have maintained these strong
levels of 2005 is particularly significant, because
we did so despite a significant loss in room
inventory."
Inventory
The Ministry of Tourism said room invento-
ry on New Providence and Paradise Island
dropped by 2.6 per cent in 2006, due to the
350 rooms lost when Baha Mar began renova-
tions to the Radisson Cable Beach Resort.
There was also the loss of 1,000 rooms on
Grand Bahama associated with the Royal Oasis
closure.
The Tribune has previously revealed that
the Bahamas' cruise line business was becom-
ing increasingly week, with the Ministry of
Tourism saying that cruise arrivals in 2006 fell
by 0.8 per cent to 3.2 million.
It confirmed that the Caribbean cruise mar-
ket had been weak for "some time", impacting
the wider region. Part of this had been attrib-
uted by the cruise lines to weakness in the US
economy, with consumer confidence impacted
by the US housing market downturn, reducing
disposable income and vacation spending. Oil
price rises were also cited as a factor.


Bahamas must




eliminate 'brain




drain' to succeed


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
f the Bahamas is to suc-
ceed in the global econ-
omy, the current brain
drain of capable profes-
sionals must be eliminated,
Nathaniel Beneby, vice-presi-
dent and country head for
Royal Bank of Canada, said.
Royal Bank of Canada
recently relaunched its Royal
Premier Professionals' Pro-
gramme, designed to assist stu-
dents who are completing their
professional degrees and are
looking to establish their own
business after graduation. The
programme also targets pro-
fessionals who are interested
in beginning or upgrading their
skills.
During the programme's


launch, Mr Beneby said that
because people are the most
important asset of any compa-
ny, institution or nation, max-
imising the return on that asset
is critical to competitive suc-
cess.
"If the Bahamas is to suc-
ceed in the global economy,
we must ensure that the whole
country has a force of well-
positioned and capable pro-
fessionals. To put it simply, we
must provide the support for
you to unlock your potential
in order for the Bahamas to
maintain and improve its way
of life," Mr Beneby said.
He added that these types
of financial initiatives will
become even more important
as the Bahamas continues to
grow.
Acknowledging that many
of the Bahamas' brightest stu-
dents choose to remain abroad
after graduation, Mr Beneby
said the country must retain
the brightest and best, who can
"invest and build new compa-
nies and practices, who can
grow our economy and
enhance our prosperity".
He said Royal Bank of
Canada is committed to pro-
viding the financial resources
to eliminate the 'brain drain'.
Annamaria DeGregory,
FINCO's managing director,
said the bank considers this to
be one of the most significant
financial products available in
the Bahamas.


"We are proud to have
developed this special financ-
ing package for students and
practicing professionals. It's an
opportunity to invest in our
nation's top performers while
developing productive long-
term business relationships -
by helping young people like
you to succeed," she said.
"As bankers, we know that
young professionals doctors,
dentists, architects, engineers,
lawyers, etc have to make
enormous investments of time
and money in their education,
and then must find the start-
up capital to invest in equip-
ment, premises and inventory.
Setting up a professional prac-
tice particularly a medical one
- is not something that can be
done on the fly."
The Royal Premier Profes-
sionals' Programme offers a
full range of services to help
young professionals manage
their financial affairs while pur-
suing professional degrees, and
continues to assist them
through graduation and
beyond, by providing profes-
sional advice, banking services
and business resources.
Initially launched 15 years
ago, the programmie was
revamped to include a mort-
.gage component and other fea-
tures targeted to new profes-
sionals. The relaunch took
place during a ceremony at the
British Colonial Hilton on
Thursday evening.


Cable Bahamas


'pursuing' basic


television rate rise


fir ratoWith rates as low as 73/4%,


discount is


applied for the


life of your


mortgage!


Apply today When approved get $200
CASH BACK andu' be ,..: -
entered to WIN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
that can be used toward vour -.-. -
payments for up to 3 months, or to parsase
state-of-the-art kitchen appliances, -new
furniture, central air conditioning, or ariV
other worthwhile purpose!

Blockbuster Mortgage Special offer ends
June 30, 2007. Contact your nearest RBC FINCO


you can make that move into

your dream home or complete
the renovations that you've
been longing to do!

Enjoy these great benefits
with our Blockbuster
Mortgage Special:

) Get QUICK & EASY approval

) NO CASH DOWN PAYMENT if
you own property

> Only 5% cash down payment with
Mortgage Indemnity Insurance

> Reduced legal fees with financing
available for insurance

> Affordable payments and terms
to suit your needs


FROM page 1

acquiring signals and the
adverse effect it continues to
have on our basic cable offering
with no commensurate basic
television rate increase."
No channels had been added
to the basic cable television
package, and Cable Bahamas
said that to counteract increased
programming costs, lower-cost
signals had replaced some chan-
nels, while higher-priced signals
had been removed to premium
tiers.
Reflecting on s successful
2006, Cable Bahamas said total
operating expenses had risen by
9 per cent to $33.1 million, com-
pared to $30.3 million the year
before, a large part of that being
driven by programming. The
company's electricity costs rose
by 36 per cent.
Brendan Paddick, Cable
Bahamas chairman and chief
executive, told shareholders that
the company's data services
subsidiary, Caribbean Cross-
ings, was able to become finan-
cially independent from its
BISX-listed parent for the first
time in 2006, generating an 11
per cent rise in revenues to $8.3
million from $7.4 million the
year-before.
Network
Caribbean Crossings network
was put to the test in 2006, when
it experienced "its first cata-
strophic cable break" in its
international submarine cable
off the coast at Hunter's Grand
Bahama Yet the built-in
redundancy in the system, due
to the second international sub-
marine cable route, came into


service and meant that data traf-
fic between the Bahamas the
US and rest of the world was
never interrupted.
"Had it not been for this
redundancy, a significant num-
ber of companies operating in
the Bahamas that rely signifi-
cantly on Caribbean's interna-
tional links would have been
without .data and Internet ser-
vices for at least one week,"
Cable Bahamas said.
Outages
"However, instead of experi-
encing services outages, all of
Caribbean Crossings and Cable
Bahamas data and Internet cus-
tomers were secure in their
respective connections and were
able to operate without inter-
ruption."
Cable Bahamas said the.cable
break "was the result of the
actions of a local Grand
Bahama company", which it did
not name. That firm had
promised to reimburse
Caribbean Crossings for the
costs of repairing the break, a
sum the company expected to
collect in 2007.
Caribbean Crossings saw its
data circuit sales rise by 16 per
cent during 2006, due to clients
in the international telecoms
market and Bahamian business
community. Operating income
rose by 19 per cent to $5.1 mil-
lion, from $4.3 million in 2006.
For 2007, Cable Bahamas
said it was planning to launch its
latest CoralWave Internet mar-
keting campaign during the cur-
rent second quarter, backing an
increase in residential service
speeds to nine megabytes per
second, ahead of the global six
megabytes per second average.


+


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PAGE 16B, MONDAY, MAY 14, 2007


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