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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02876
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 4/25/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02876
System ID: UF00084249:02876

Full Text





A "Im

PFILET1O'FISH
FOR LENT I'mlovin' It,.

HIGH 83F
LOW 72F

MOSTLY
SUNNY


The


Tribune


Volume: 103 No.127 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007 PRICE 750


H


*GP Ieis8am s


GEEA ELCIO


PegasuI



Chief executive says he

gave staff paid vacation

due to workplace tension

over upcoming election


PEGASUS Wireless chief
executive, Jasper Knabb, has
denied that the wireless man-
ufacturer and assembly plant
is closing down, saying he gave
staff a two-week paid vacation
leave because the political
environment was causing
altercations between staff in
the workplace.
Mr Knabb last night
responded to rumours circu-
lating in Freeport that the
company was due to close its
doors just months after being
officially opened by Prime
Minister Perry Christie, say-
ing that the upcoming general
election was causing work-
place tensions, prompting him
to give the 100 staff their two-
week paid vacation now.
However, he said some 25
staff had decided not to take
this and were-still working at
Pegasus. Yet the company's
staff said that Mr Knabb had
given staff a one-week break,
although he did not explain
why he was doing this.
Mr Knabb said the Freeport
facility had generated $2 mil-
lion in revenues during its first
two months, some 10 per cent
of the company's total stream.
He added that it planned to
be a long-term player in
Grand Bahama.
The decision to close Pega-
sus' doors is likely to mystify
many, given that all manner
of Bahamian businesses
employ staff who support both


the FNM and PLP, yet they
do not shut their doors dur-
ing general election.
Several sources last night
suggested that Pegasus may
be awaiting what is called
'payment against delivery',
where purchasers of the com-
pany's products pay in
advance for the orders they
make,
Pegasus' arrival on Grand
Bahama has been the subject
of much controversy. The
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty (GBPA) was reluctant to
give the company a licence,
only doing so after the Gov-
ernment intervened, while
there have been claims that
the company has been used to
boost the re-election prospects
of the PLP's Marco City MP,
Pleasant Bridgewater, who is
Pegasus' attorney.
As The Tribune reported in
December 2006, Pegasus
Wireless as a company has
bounced around during its his-
tory, starting out life incorpo-
rated in Nevada on April 5,
2000, as Burrard Technolo-
gies, focusing on software
development.
In 2001, it discontinued this
business and became inactive
until December 18, 2001,
when it acquired a Swiss com-
pany called Technocell. Then,
on April 2, 2002, it changed
SEE page eight


Never start your
1imv without us!


Times to
dance,
"art choice is
agement.
u can trust.


CE MANAGEMENT
0. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
, I Eluhera I Exumo
mr3(ilt~l:(M21~)3]2*lb Te(2|U ]6*2]M


s closure


SUPPORTERS of the PLP make their way to last night's rally at Clifford Park. Both the PLP
and the FNM have held major rallies in New Providence over the last week, drawing huge crowds.
(Photo: Felipi Major/Tribune staff)


Wife testifies in the
inquest into death of
Christopher Esfakis


* By NATARIO McKENZIE
THE inquest into the death
of Christopher Esfakis opened
yesterday with testimony from
his wife.
Mr Esfakis, 42, died at Doc-
tor's Hospital on April 22, 2002,
having been admitted a few
days earlier for treatment for
burns to his body. The inquest
into Mr Esfakis' death is being
heard before Magistrate
William Campbell in Court 7,
Victoria Gardens.
Lisa Esfakis told the Coro-
ner's Court jury yesterday of
how her husband came to be
admitted to Doctor's Hospital.
She explained that on the
night of Friday, April 19, 2002,
there was a party at their home.
That night, she said, her hus-
band appeared to be very upset.
During cross-examination she
SEE page eight


More 'vote

buying'

allegations
By PAUL
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
FURTHER allegations of|
"vote buying" have arisen -
with constituents claiming they:
have even been threatened with
physical violence if they do not
vote for the PLP in the upcom-1
ing elections, The Tribune has
learned.
As the highly contested May:
2 election date draws near,:
these allegations have emerged
in the quiet constituency of:
South Eleuthera.
Through its own sources, The
Tribune has learned that per-1
sons in this constituency were
being offered between $200 and
$400 to vote for the incumbent
PLP candidate, former House
SEE page eight


nied


PM predicts

PLP will

win at least

28 seats
THE PLP will win at least 28
constituencies in next week's
election, Prime Minister Perry
Christie predicted last night.
Speaking at the party's mass
rally at Clifford Park, Mr
Christie named 24 of these seats
15 in New Providence and
nine in the Family Islands.
"I have never lost an elec-
tion," Mr Christie said. "I've
been winning elections for 30
years straight. I know how to
read elections. And I've been
reading them right for 30 years
now.
"And don't let Ingraham try
to tell you that he can match
that record because he can't.
He lost the last election as
prime minister. That's the same
one I won! And this time I'm
going for two straight!"
According to the prime min-
ister, in the capital, the PLP will
win:
Pinewood; Bain and Grants
Town; Golden Gates; Engler-
ston; Baillou Hills; Yamacraw;
SEE page eight


Govt claims


Claim that PLP a vote for
candidate is
offering jobs the PLP is


for votes
CLAIMS of candidates brib-
ing people to get theirvotes
continued yesterday with a min-
isterial employee alleging that a
New Providence PLP candidate
is giving out government jobs
in exchange for a sure PLP vote.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, a resident of a New
Providence constituency
claimed that 100 people were
hired into the public service on
Monday after swearing that
they will vote PLP on May 2.
The caller, who wished to
remain anonymous, claimed
that the PLP candidate in ques-
tion had a list written up of per-
sons who are seeking employ-
ment in the public service.
This list was then sent to
"PLP cronies" at the various
ministries, government agencies
SEE page eight \


vote for NHI
A VOTE for the PLP is "a
vote for National Health Insur-
ance", according to the govern-
ment party.
The party said in a statement
issued yesterday that the May 2
election is as much about
whether Bahamians want
National Health Insurance as it
is about any other issue.
"The Progressive Liberal Par-
ty has been at the forefront of
every major transformative pro-
gramme and initiative intro-
duced in the Bahamas over the
past half century."
The party said it has remained
committed to the ideals
espoused by Governor General
Arthur D Hanna, who encour-
aged them "to wipe every tear
from every eye".
The PLP said the National
SEE page eight


WINN; It, I.W., W1


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION



SBAHAMAS EDITIONral
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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


0 In brief

Police

investigate

alleged

suicide

GRAND Bahama police are
investigating an alleged suicide
that occurred on Friday at a
house in Indiana Lane.
Assistant Supt Loretta Mack-
ey said police were notified that
a man, believed to be an expa-
triate Worker, was discovered
dead in his bedroom around
7pm on Friday.
Officers of the Central Detec-
tive Unit went to scene, where
they found the body of a 38-
year-old man, who is a native
of the Philippines and an
employee at Grand Bahama
Shipyard. He was hanging from
the closet with a belt around his
neck.
Attempts to revive him were
unsuccessful. He was taken to
Rand Memorial Hospital,
where he was pronounced dead
by doctors.
Investigations continue.

Marcus Bethel
to speak at
BNT's AGM on
Thursday
MINISTER of Energy and
Environment Dr Marcus Bethel
will speak at the Bahamas
National Trust's annual general
meeting on Thursday, April 26.
"He will give his environ-
mental message and speak on
the role he sees the Bahamas
National Trust playing in envi-
ronmental conservation in the .
country," said the BNT in a
statement.
The annual meeting is held
for the membership of Trust, to
inform them of the work that
the organisation has done over
the previous year on a national
and regional level.
Another major item on the
meeting's agenda is to elect nine
members to the council of
Trust.

BV Islands
considers
liberalising
telecoms
PUERTO RICO
San Juan
THE British Virgin Islands
will consider opening its
telecommunications market to
outside providers in three years
under a liberalization policy
announced Monday, according
to Associated Press.
The three existing suppliers,
which have had exclusive con-
trol of either landline tele-
phones, cable television, or cell
phone service, will also now be
encouraged to compete against
one another in multiple fields.
"The public can look forward
to better services and prices,"
Communications Minister
Elmoure Stoutt said.
The small British Caribbean
territory began inviting license
applications Monday from its
public suppliers BVI Cable
TV, CCT Global Communica-
tions, and Cable & Wireless Plc,
a landline service provider that ,
has already expressed interest
in offering mobile services.
After a three-year period, the
communications minister will
determine whether the market
can accommodate additional
operators.

Men suspected
of theft are
beaten to
death in Haiti
* HAITI
Port-au-Prince
CROWDS in a Haitian town
beat and hacked four men to
death as police tried to arrest
them for breaking into homes,
authorities said Monday,
according to Associated Press.
The crowds attacked the men .
on Friday and Saturday as offi-


cers investigating a series of
break-ins tried to arrest them in
Miragoane, south-west of Port-
au-Prince, town police said.
The officers tried to protect
the suspects but were over-
whelmed by crowds of towns-
people armed with sticks and
machetes. Two suspects escaped
during the attacks.
Police arrested seven people
suspected of taking part.
Lynchings are common in
rural parts of the impoverished
Caribbean nation, where police
presence is thin and courts bare-
ly operate.


'~INDEXIm~


RealEsttate








THE TIBUNEWEDNSDAYAPRIL25,A007-NAGES


@In brief

Man is
charged with
cocaine
possession

A MAN was arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yester-
day, charged with possession
of cocaine as well as taking
preparatory steps to export
the drugs.
Bran'do Raymond Stubbs,
24, was arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
at court eight in Bank Lane.
It is alleged that on Mon-
day, April 23, Stubbs was
found in possession of a quan-
tity of cocaine which authori-
ties believed he intended to
supply to another. It is also
alleged that on that same
day, Stubbs took preparato-
ry steps to export the drugs.
The prosecution is claim-
ing that the accused was
found in possession of one
and a half pounds of cocaine.
Stubbs pleaded not guilty
to the charge and was grant-
ed bail in the sum of $30,000.
The matter was adjourned
to October 19 for a hearing.

Young people
invited to
enter essay
competition

BAHAMIAN students
have an opportunity to show-
case the Bahamas and win
valuable prizes in the My
Caribbean essay competition
sponsored by Caribbean
Tourism Organisation and
Conde Nast Traveler, one of
the world's most reputable
travel magazines.
The essay competition is
open to all primary and
junior high students between
the ages of 8 and 12.
Contestants will be able to
walk away with cash prizes
for both themselves and their
school and coveted trophies
as winners in the competition.
This year's essay subject
is: "Imagine you are the min-
ister of tourism for your
island. What would you do,
' and what projects could you
create, to help bring locals
and tourist closer together?"
Bahamian entries will be
added to the entries from
throughout the Caribbean.
The essays are to be hand-
written by each contestant
on 8 x 11 inch lined sheets
of paper or on the entry
forms available at schools
and the Ministry of Tourism.
Entries should contain no
fewer than 250 words and no
more than 500 words.
Judges will award a maxi-
mum of 10 points each for:
creativity and imagina-
tion
style and structure
originality and wit
grammar and spelling
A maximum of 30 points
will be awarded for sub-
ject/content.
The My Caribbean essay
competition is co-ordinated
locally by the Ministry of
Tourism, the Ministry of
Education, Toastmasters and
the Bahamas Hotel Associa-
tion.
The deadline for all entries
is May 9, 2007.


Englerston independent calls




for 'true' local government


* By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter
AN independent candidate
for Englerston is advocating
true local government so the
constituency can administer its
own affairs.
Yesterday, Paul Rolle told
The Tribune that the residents
of Englerston must develop a
plan together to improve the
general conditions of the crowd-
ed "slum- like" atmosphere of
the area.
"The residents of the Engler-
ston community are being treat-
ed like second class citizens and
out cast aliens," Mr Rolle
claimed.
He said that his work as a
long-time community activist
has inspired him to contest the
existing political parties in the
upcoming general election.
"We all know that that there
are many promises and very lit-
tle results from both the PLP
and the FNM in all the over-
the-hill areas," he said.
"We are taxpayers. We
deserve our share of the public
treasury to support our schools,
clinics, streets, and personal
comfort and safety throughout
the community."
"Too little has been done and
enough is enough," Mr Rolle
said.
Mr. Rolle told The Tribune:
"Proper garbage disposal and


SPAUL Rolle


collection is needed in Engler-
ston and street cleaning and
maintenance by the people and
by the government is needed
urgently."
He also pledged to tackle
"neglected" issues like proper
care for the elderly and youth


unemployment in the community.
"Our old people are neglect-
ed, our young people face a life
of crime, poverty and lack of
education. We need job train-
ing, counseling and evening
classes for adults in Engler-
ston," he said.

Churches

Mr Rolle also criticised local
churches for being "uncon-
cerned" about the poor in the
community.
"For instance", he said, "the
Sea Hauler boat tragedy victims
have not been taken care of
despite the efforts of me. and
my colleagues to assist them."
On August 2, 2003, the Sea
Hauler and United Star collided
in the early hours of the morn-
ing. Four passengers were
killed. Sisters Brenda Smith-
Ellis, 40, and Brennell Smith-
Leslie, 29, were crushed to
death by a fallen crane. Also
killed were 38-year-old Living-
stone Seymour and 14-year-old
Lynden Riley. 25 persons were
also injured
A wreck commission con-
vened in 2004 to look into the
collision and found both the
government and the boat cap-
tains liable in the matter.
However, the victims of the
accident have received no com-
pensation for their injuries.


Caleb Outten criticises FNM


accusations over flooding


* BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT PLP Candi-
date for Eight Mile Rock Caleb
Outten has criticised FNM can-
didates who attempted to blame
the government for the ongo-
ing flooding problem at Fishing
Hole Road.
Mr Outten took exception to
remarks made by his opponent
in the FNM, Vernae Grant,
FNM candidate for West End
David Wallace and High Rock
MP Kenneth Russell, who said
the government has done noth-
ing to alleviate flooding in the
area.
He said that the FNM gov-
ernment did nothing either dur-
ing its 10 years in office to
resolve the flooding situation at
Fishing Hole Road. He also
pointed out that Kenneth Rus-
sell, former Minister of Works,
was also aware of the problem,
and did nothing about it.
"I am certain that his advi-
sors and engineers in the Min-
istry of Works must have told
him that a bridge or a new
causeway was needed. Yet, he
chose to do nothing," said Mr
Outten.
Mr Outten said that he has
been campaigning for the solu-
tion at Fishing Hole Road for
several years, prior to his
involvement in politics.
As the former civic leader in
the PUMP organisation, Mr
Outten.held numerous protests
and demonstrations, calling on
the government and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority to build
a bridge at Fishing Hole.
Fishing Hole Road is the only
causeway connecting Freeport
and west Grand Bahama. The
narrow strip of road, which runs


* CALEB Outten


east to west, is bordered by
creek water on the north and
south sides, which overflows
during bad weather.
On April 18, FNM candidates
raised concerns about flooding
when the creek water spilled
onto the causeway.
Mrs Grant said just before
the FNM left office measures
were in place to deal with the
flooding problem, but nothing
had been done when the PLP
took over as the government.
In response to Grant's com-
ments, Mr Outten said that the
FNM candidate for Eight Mile
Rock continues to make
"unsubstantiated claims." He
also said that Mrs Grant failed
to mention what measures were
in place.
"The FNM had 10 years to


deal with the problem. They
even built a new road (the War-
ren J Levarity Highway) com-
mencing at a point where the
problem exists.
"Grant also said that I was
nowhere to be found that morn-
ing. Is she aware of the fact that
I became public enemy number
one of the Grand Bahama Port
Authority, the industrial plants
in the area, and her then gov-
ernment, because of my inces-
sant agitation on these matters?
"Where was she just the oth-
er night when my government
held a town meeting in Eight
Mile Rock to let the people
hear from the experts what the
problems are, and what we pro-
pose to do about them?" he
asked.
Works Minister Bradley
Roberts had announced that the
government was consulting with
an engineering consulting firm
out of Canada to conduct a
study of Fishing Hole Road in
an effort to come up with a pos-
sible solution to the flooding
problem.
Mr Outten said that former
West End MP David Wallace,
who was also a junior minister
in the FNM for five years, knew
of the flooding problem. "Why
didn't you something about it?
he asked.
"My conscience is clear; I
fought hard and will continue
to do so until this matter, which
plagues us all, is concluded," he
said.


Paul Rolle heads the Bahami-
ans United For Justice group,


which represents the 25 victims
of the accident. .


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


) CaX "au,


eCO"i








PAGE 4, WEDNESAY, APRIL 25,O007ETHEDTRIBUN


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUSADDICTUSJURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Reports of vote buying widespread


THIS IS certainly an election of des-
peration. It is fortunate for this country
that in seven days time it all will be over.
We have been through many elections
- even elections of violence but nev-
er have we been bombarded with so
many reports of vote buying. That is not
to say that vote-buying has not always
been a part of Bahamian elections, but it
is the first time in our experience that so
many are talking so openly about it. It is
also the first time that so many are calling
The Tribune to report it even those
who have been approached. There is
resentment in their voices. Whether this
will win or lose the election for the gov-
erning party whose "generals" are the
ones being accused will be known a
week from today.
Last night Prime Minister Christie
boasted that he will again lead his gov-
ernment'to victory. He predicts a win of
28 parliamentary seats.
"I've been winning elections for 30
straight years," he boasted. "I know how
to read elections. And I've been reading-
them right for 30 years now.
"And don't let Ingraham try to tell you
that he can match that record because
he can't. He lost the last election as prime
minister. That's the same :ne I won!
Aiid this time I'm going for two straight!"
Remember, Mr Christie, there comes
a time when one's luck runs dry. May 2
might be that time. It just might be the
hour when the town's best orator meets
his Waterloo.
In the past five years so many high
hopes and unfulfilled promises have
escaped his lips that it will be interesting
to see if this is the one that will break the
trend and come to pass.
We have had many reports of victimi-
sation threats of loss of jobs and pen-
sions, eviction from government homes
- if the PLP does not get that Bahami-
an's vote. We have an incredible number
of complaints of vote buying- some
claim that they have even had to swear
on the holy Bible that they will sell their
vote for the Biblical "mess of potage" -
only this time the potage comes in the
form of several hundred dollar bills.
Some say they will take the money


and vote their consciences. As for swear-
ing on the sacred book, they believe that
a forgiving God will understand the eco-
nomic duress they have been under. They
are satisfied that He will forgive them,
and punish those who tempted them.
We have photographs of yellow-shirt-
ed Grand Bahama residents lined up out-
side a PLP office from about 5.30pm until
well into the night. Some claimed they
were there to collect money being dis-
tributed inside.
We called no names and made no
accusations against any individual,
although the FNM candidate said he had
reported the matter to the police. That
event was published in The Tribune on
Saturday morning. On Sunday, West End
MP Obie Wilchcombe made a statement
in response to the article. His statement
was published in Monday morning's Tri-
bune.
"Well, I can tell you tonight," Mr
Wilchcombe said. "I want the record to
reflect that I have no reason to buy any
votes. But if helping people is buying
votes, then I guilty. I dead guilty because
I will be guilty all my life for helping
Peoplee"
, We agree that one should help the
poor, but it is indiscreet to increase that
help just days before an election. At
tim-es like these one has to be like Cae-
sar's wife behaviour above reproach so
that observers are not given the wrong
impression.
If Mr Wilchcombe is go confident of
winning his seat then it is true he should
not have to buy votes, nor should he have
to increase his generosity to the poor at
such a politically delicate time.
In fact if Prime Minister Christie is as
confident of victory as he says he is there
is no reason for any PLP to buy a vote,
threaten a voter or hold the voter's card
of the elderly or mentally challenged to
make certain they vote PLP.
The fact that we have had so many
complaints indicates that something that
is not right must be happening on the
hustings.
If so, it indicates that PLP "generals",
and even some candidates, are not as
confident of victory as their leader.


Commissioner




must control





his policemen


EDITOR, The Tribune
RECENTLY the Commis-
sioner of Police sent out a cir-
cular to members of the Police
Force reminding them about
political activities. The docu-
ment indicated that it was
brought to his attention that
police officers were engaging in
acts associated directly or indi-
rectly with political activities,
and he went on to list those
activities.
It is common practice that
around elections all civil ser-
vants are reminded of their
need to be impartial and not to
overtly engage in political activ-
ities. So on the face of it there is
no problem with the commis-
sioner's letter. However, what is
most interesting is that he chose
to imply that it is a breach for
persons to wear colours associ-
ated with the colours of the
major political parties.
Is the commissioner telling
members of his force that they
cannot wear anything red, yel-
low, blue or white or any colour
associated with the BDM dur-
ing the course of this election?
Is that what he is saying?
The commissioner threatens
that if anyone violates his
instruction they will be disci-
plined. This is a serious state-
ment and if these are the rules
then I admonish that all police
officers abide by them. How-
ever, based on what I am see-
ing now I trust that the rules
will be applied across the
board. That it will apply to
FNMs and PLPs and indepen-
dents and that no attempt will
be made to victimise or prose-


cute (persecute) persons who
show support to any particular
party.
Just out of curiosity perhaps
the commissioner can assure his
officers that he spoke to a
recently promoted senior officer
who was seen at a prayer break-
fast out west in a PLP shirt. I
hope he also spoke to another
senior officer who was seen in
his own clothes escorting the
prime minister to the podium
at a PLP event. I am told this
officer was off duty. He is
known to be a vocal supporter
of the governing party and
therefore if he wanted to pro-
vide protection to the prime
minister then he should have
done the decent thing and wear
his uniform. Will he speak to
the officers seen on television
wearing paraphernalia of the
governing party at a recent ral-
ly?
Will the commissioner tell his
officers working in the urban
renewal projects to stop cam-
paigning for the government? I
am told that when a candidate
went out campaigning one of
the constituents questioned the
candidate about what she had
done. It was not a very peaceful
encounter for the candidate, but
she did assure the constituent
that she would have persons
from the urban renewal project
in that area to come and see the
individual. So said, so done! The
next day the constituent was vis-


ited by police officers from
urban renewal!
I smell a rat! Rumours are
that a certain group of individ-
uals are intent to make a state-
ment at the advance poll and
are planning on showing how
they feel in a very clear way. Is
this letter that was sent out by
the commissioner an attempt to
intimidate these individuals?
The sentence that makes so
many of us so suspicious of the
intent of the letter is that offi-
cers are being forbidden to wear
colours associated with the
colours of any major political
parties.
It is so sad to see the com-
missioner being manipulated by
the political directorate of this
country and that he is allowing
his subordinates who are known
to be strongly aligned with the
governing party to dictate to
him. Before he signs another
document written by these indi-
viduals he should read it first
and check on its constitutional-
ity. After all when these docu-
ments go out with his signature
he will be held responsible.
While retired commissioner
Bonamy may have had his ways
he is sadly missed. One thing
for sure he would have com-
manded his force and not
allowed politicians to dictate to
him. Commissioner please take
control of your force! You hold
a constitutional position and
therefore you have no reason
to be afraid. We will support
you!

DISGUSTED!
Nassau
April 21 2007


Regulating foreign investment


EDITOR, The Tribune

I MUST agree with Nicki
Kelly in her "Between The
Lines" column of The Punch,
publication on the 12th April
2007. We have had all the prob-
lems of the expatriates doing it
their way or no way, since I
have known myself.
We have many capable and
knowledgeable persons who live
here in this Bahamas, but
because you do not have a
degree from some "Ivy
League", upper crust school you
are nobody. Yes we have been
to school, and have been taught
by the same people that taught
them, (for me the Sisters of
Charity of Mount Vernon New
York and the Benedictine
Fathers and Brothers, (Monks)


of St John's Abbey in Min-
nesota. We have been to higher
education like the College of
the Bahamas, or the school of
hard knocks, but we are just
laughed at, by their conceited,
(biggity) attitude.
Look what happened to
Gladstone Farms with the so-
called foreign expertise, and
their superior-than-thou atti-
tude, where they ran that
establishment right into the
ground, and racked up a debt
over double the assets of the
company, and left the employ-
ees and the shareholders with
nothing.
I just hope that with whomev-
er wins the new government on
the 2nd May, that they put in
some kind of Investment Com-


mission, to be an overseer on
the investments that are done
in The Commonwealth of the
Bahamas, foreign or local.
Let them put up some kind
of Bond, as it's needed with
this so-called BahaMar Group.
This so as not to have come in,
to get their foot in the door,
and go bankrupt and every-
one's livelihood is lost along
with their life's experience and
savings, and the foreigner is
back to their original home
country with the absconded
funds, and we are then left
holding the bag.

ROBERT
NUTT
Nassau
April 2007


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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE TRIBUNE









THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007,OCALANEW5


@In brief

French vote
in Nassau for
presidential
elections
FRENCH citizens living
in the Bahamas, like their
fellow citizens worldwide,
were given the opportunity
to vote in Nassau on Satur-
day.
It was decided by French
authorities to encourage a
maximum number of French
nationals living abroad to
participate in the election
process by facilitating access
to polling stations.
Thus, many new polling
stations were added,
enabling registered voters to
do their civic duty with a
minimum of hassle and trav-
el.
For the first time ever, the
Bahamas had a French
polling station (Bureau de
Vote) for the first round of
the presidential elections.
This Bureau de Vote,
located on the premises of S
G Hambros Bank on West
Bay Street, was open from
8am to 6pm.
Voters present were excit-
ed to be a part of the process
without having to travel to
Miami to vote, or to elect a
proxy to vote in their stead.
The French Consulate
General in Miami sent a staff
member over to supervise
the process, and to ensure
that everything went accord-
ing to law.
Local turnout and voting
reflected that of French res-
idents voting in North Amer-
ica, far below the national
level in France which had a
record turnout of over 85 per
cent.
French residents voting in
Nassau had a turn-out of
slightly over 30 per cent.
The results for the
Bahamas were as follows:
Nicolas Sarkozy (right) -
45.16 per cent
Francois Bayrou (centre) -
22.58 per cent
S6golene Royal (socialist)
12.9 per cent
Jean-Marie Le Pen
(extreme right), 12.9 per cent
Oliver Besancenot -
6.45% (extreme left).
The results for the top
three candidates in France
were:
Sarkozy 31.18 percent
Royal 25.87 per cent
Bayrou 18.57 per cent
The second and decisive
round to elect the new Pres-
ident of France will be held
on May 6.
Voters in The Bahamas
will go to the polls on Satur-
day, May 5 due to the time
difference.

TROPICAL

EXIERMINATOR
PEST CONTROL


Manifestos outline different




approaches for education.


* By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
TO improve the dire state of
country's education system, the
PLP is proposing to increase the
Ministry of Education's budget
and to decrease the class sizes,
while the FNM is stating that it
will build new schools and intro-
duce a 10-year literacy and edu-
cation plan if elected.
The two parties paid extensive
attention to the future of the
Bahamas' education system in
their political manifestos for 20071
and while the FNM and the PLP
differ in their overall plans for
education, both are proposing
initiatives to end overcrowding
in schools, give learning oppor-
tunities to all mentally and phys-
ically disabled children, and to
concentrate on improving the
physical health of the students.
In its manifesto entitled
"Action Agenda", the PLP
declared the goal is to offer edu-
cation and learning opportuni-
ties for all Bahamians regardless
of their levels of ability by the
end of their second term in office.
The FNM's manifesto, enti-
tled "Dedicated to Restoring
Trust in Government", is
proposing to develop a 10-year
education plan as well as a 10-
year literacy plan, and to


observe "the letter and spirit of
the Education Act".
The PLP said that one of its
plans to raise the national aver-
age grade which is currently
around a 'D' is to reduce class
sizes at the key age level of five
to seven years old.
"We intend to move from an
average class size of 30 to an
average class size of 22 by
2010," the party states.
The FNM announced that it
will reduce overcrowding in
schools through the planned
expansion of classrooms and the
construction of new neighbour-
hood schools.
The opposition said it will con-
struct new schools and school
additions to meet the demand
of the various communities.


On encouraging healthier
lifestyles for students, the PLP
said that it will protect the
health of the students by con-
ducting more inspections of food
handlers and lunch sites, creat-
ing tougher standards of nutri-
tion and by launching, in con-
junction with the Ministry of
Health, a new lunch programme
aimed at fighting child obesity.
The FNM said that it will
require physical fitness pro-
grammes in all schools and pro-
vide a nutritionally-balanced
lunch programme for students
attending government operat-
ed schools.
To raise the country's aver-
age, the PLP said it will intro-
, duce new programmes provid-
ing renewed focus on reading,


writing and arithmetic with an
intervention programme for stu-
dents who are not achieving at
grade level.
"We will raise the grade by
supporting teachers with
increased training, recruitment
incentives and rewards for
achievements and successes,"
the party manifesto stated.
The governing party
announced that it will also
launch a "Peace in Schools" ini-
tiative, which has been designed
based on lessons learned from
the school-policing programme.
"Peace in Schools will give
young persons and teachers
skills in dispute resolution and
ensure that each school has an
acceptable number of teachers
trained in mediation, the num-
ber will be driven by the size of
the school," the PLP said.
In their proposals for primary
and high schools, the FNM said
that it will ensure that the gov-
ernment-operated high schools
offer academic and vocational
training to meet the needs of the
Bahamas' national economy.
The FNM said it will establish
"a system for continuing review
of the curriculum to ensure that it
remains consistent with the needs
of a 21st century Bahamas."
The party will also ensure that
adequate numbers of qualified


teachers are engaged in the gov-
ernment-operated school sys-
tem, the manifesto stated.
The FNM said it will place.
increased emphasis on improved
literacy, numeracy and oracy
skills among all students and
make the completion of a course
in Bahamian history a require-
ment for graduation from high
school in the Bahamas.
"(We will) include informa-
tion technology, tourism studies
and financial services in the
.mainstream curriculum of gov-
ernment-operated schools,
strengthen the magnet school
system (and) introduce interac-
tive distance education to Fami-
ly Island schools," the FNM said.
The opposition party further
said that it will provide
increased funding for training
and retraining of teachers.
As it concerns .early. educa-
tion, the FNM said it will devel-
op a grant-in-aid programme
for qualifying pre-*hool and
after-school care prQorammes.
The FNM said it will also"
increase scholarship funding for
Bahamian students, wishing to
enter the College of the
Bahamas and reinstate the pay-
ment by the government of one
half of the interest charges on
government guaranteed educa-
tional loans.


New land acquired for school in Faith Gardens


THE government has secured
land for a new school in Faith
Gardens, Education Minister
Alfred Sears revealed.
He said that his ministry is
spearheading the project, in
partnership with the Ministry
of Works and Utilities, as part
of its endeavour to make edu-
cation accessible to all.
"It is a testimony to our com-
mitment of transforming edu-
cation in the Bahamas," said
Sears during a press conference
last week at the Ministry of
Works.
The land, in Faith Gardens
south of Cowpen Road. will
house a new state-of the art
junior high school, he said.
Mr Sears said this school will
be in an ideal location as the
government continues to
address the needs of the grow-
ing and shifting south-west pop-
ulation.
"Over the past several years
we have addressed the needs of
this community by the exten-
sions of the Gerald Cash,
Carmichael, Adelaide and Carl-
ton Francis Primary schools.
"Four modular classrooms
have been added to S C
McPherson Junior High School
and we have added 10 class-
rooms to the H 0 Nash Junior
High School and extensively
renovated the older physical
plant at the H 0 Nash Junior
High School," he said.


* MINISTER of Education Alfred Sears, Minister of Works Bradley Roberts and Randy Penn,
contractor for Ranmar Precison Development, look over the plan for the new school


Mr Sears said additional land
will be acquired north of
Carmichael Road for the con-
struction of additional educa-
tional facilities such as a prima-
ry school and the centre for the
deaf.
"We will have built 500 class-
rooms in our first term 2002 to
2007," he said.


Mr Sears added that in 2002,
the Ministry of Education, Sci-
ence and Technology embarked
on an extensive refurbishment,
expansion and modernisation
plan for school facilities
throughout the Bahamas.
The principal goal was to create
a safe physical environment that is
conducive to learinghe said.


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Mr Sears said the Ministry of
Education, prior to 2004, made
significant progress in the repair of


classrooms and teacher cottages
prior to the onslaught of hurri-
canes Frances, Jeanne and Wilma.
These storms caused millions
of dollars worth of damage to
the school buildings through-
out the Bahamas.
He said the schools particu-
larly affected were in Grand
Bahama, Abaco, the Berry
Islands and San Salvador.
Mr Sears said the Ministry of
Education, Science and Tech-
. nology put in a place a quali-.
fied team to conductLan inven-
tory of schools, and it was dis-
covered that the majority of the.
buildings were more than 35
years old.
He said the government
decoded it no longer wanted to.
use "the band-aid approach" -
but instead develop a rational,
comprehensive approach to
meet educational needs.
Remodelling, expansion and
replacement progtat mes were
created to touch each school
district in the archipelago.
In New Providence, remod-
elling and expansiorijobs were
carried out in 21 schools as well'
as the Learning Resources Sec-
tion, Mr Searssaid' :'.


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


ie Tribel A predatory fish originating far from the area has been
found in local waters. Now, conservationist and

scientists from Florida and the Bahamas are teaming

up to investigate the threat which the lionfish may


present to the local ecosystem.




A present danger to marine systems


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT A marine
research expedition is under-
way to investigate the possible
invasion of Bahamian waters by
a species non-native predatory
fish that could pose a severe
threat to fishery resources.
Lad Adkins, director of spe-
cial projects at REEF, a US
marine conservation organisa-
tion, is heading a team of about
40 volunteers on a lionfish sight-
ing expedition in Grand
Bahama and several other
islands in the Bahamas.
Lionfish, which are originally
from the Indo-Pacific region,
have been spotted in waters in
South Florida, the Bahamas, as
far south as The Turks and
Caicos Islands, and even in
Bermuda.
These predatory fish feed
heavily on other juvenile fish
and crustaceans such as baby
shrimps, lobsters, and crabs.
The fish is also venomous.
REEF (the Reef Environ-
mental Education Foundation),
based in Key Largo, Florida, in
collaboration with the College
of Bahamas, is conducting a
week-long lionfish expedition
and research study in the
Bahamas.
Nicola Smith, research assis-
tant in Marine and Environ-
mental Studies at the College
of the Bahamas, is accompany-
ing REEF on its expedition.
"We are trying to learn more
about the fish by documenting
exactly where they are, how
many there are, how fast and
how big they grow, what is eat-
ing them, and so far nothing we
know eats them.
... "It is very pretty fish, but it is
also a big issue right now in
these parts, and the big issue is
what impact they are going to
have on our native marine envi-
ronment, and what are we going
to be able do about it," she said.
While in Grand Bahama on
Saturday, Mr Adkins reported
collecting 17 lionfish off the
north side of the island. In pre-
vious expeditions, he said 15
lionfish were collected in the
Exumas, and 20 off the south
ocean of New Providence.
The expedition crew is also
expected to move into other
areas, including the Berry
Islands, northern Andros, and


..'. .

* NICOLA Smith, research assistant at marine and
environmental studies at College of the Bahamas, dissects a
lionfish.


then onto the northern end of
New Providence.
Mr Adkins said that the lion-
fish were initially reported in
the mid 1990's around Florida
in very small numbers, and
shortly afterwards in the
Bahamas.
He said there has been a sig-
nificant increase of the lionfish
population in the last two to
four years along the eastern US
coast up into Rhode Island, as
well as in the Bahamas.
Mr Adkins believes that it is
highly unlikely that these lion-
fish migrated from the Indo-
Pacific region.
"We are almost sure that
they didn't migrate here. But
the best guess as to how they
got here is that they were
released from aquariums -
whether those were personal
aquariums, where the fish out-
grew the ability of the owners
to take care of them, or possi-
bly from public aquariums
which weren't able to care for
the fish after the big storms we
had," he explained.
While REEF officials are still
uncertain about what impact
the lionfish have had, or are
having on marine environment
in the Bahamas, Mr Adkins
indicated that preliminary find-
ings have shown that about 50
per cent of their diet is fish, the
other half crustaceans.
He reported that other stud-
ies in North Carolina have
revealed that 90 per cent of the
fish that lionfish eat are small,
and include species such as sea


bass and grouper.
"II' they are impacting our
grouper and lobster fisheries it
could be a very severe issue. So,
we are just in the initial stages of
finding this information out, and
that's one of the reasons why
we are doing this expedition."
he said.
Lionfish are collected by
spearing or netting. They are


They have very
large long spines
that contain
venomous tissue
and so someone
could be stung.
Normally, it is just
a painful sting, but
if someone has an
allergic reaction...
it could be much
more severe,"


Lad Adkins, director
of special
projects at REEF

then dissected so researchers
can study their diets, reproduc-
tive organs, and examine the
bones in their head to deter-
mine age.
In one dissection, Mr Adkins


* A REEF diver spears a lionfish


(Photos: Sue Tompson]


reported finding seven native
baby fish in the stomach of one
lionfish.
"One other point about these
fish that could be of some con-
cern is that they are also ven-
omous. They have very large
long spines that contain ven-
omous tissue and so someone
could be stung. Normally, it is
just a painful sting, but if some-
one has an allergic reaction . .
it could be much more severe,"
he said.

Sightings

Mr Adkins said lionfish have
be'oaighted in shallow waters
and mangrove creeks in about
three feet of water, and some
in as deep as 250 feet of water.
During their expeditions, the
group will focus on shallow reef
areas that are less than 100 feet
deep, and less than 60 feet deep.
Mr Adkins said REEF has
volunteers from throughout the
Caribbean and the North
America coastal areas, the trop-
ical eastern-pacific including
Baha, Central America and
Hawaii. There are over 100,000
surveys in their database.
He said of the collaboration
with the College of the
Bahamas: "We are working


closely together to co-ordinate
information and sharing it and
looking at ways to deal with it in
a standardised method so
what's going here can be the
same thing that goes on in the
US and other areas where we
are seeing these fish."
Nicola Smith, research assis-
tant in marina and environ-
mental studies at the College of
the Bahamas, said the Bahamas
is working to create and get
underway by mid summer a
national response to the lion-
fish threat.
"The COB is working collab-,
oratively with the REEF, as
well as with NOAA in North
Carolina to address the issue of
the invasion of the Indo Pacific
lionfish," she said.
"Within our first year of
research, we are intending to
look mainly at what types of
habitats in near shore waters
are more likely to be invaded
by lionfish. We will also look at
low, moderate and heavy fishing
areas.
"We have already started a
pilot study at the Montagu
Ramp, interviewing fishermen
about where they are seeing
lionfish.
"In our second year, we will
look at the impact they are hav-
ing on our reefs and their preda-


tory impact, as well as their
competitive impact on other
native species in terms of out-
eating and feed on similar
prey," she said.
Ms Smith said that COB,
REEF, the NOAA and Stuart's
Cove want to initiate a pro-
gramme to manage lionfish.
She said the college has also
entered a partnership with
Department of Marine
Resources about how to
approach the lionfish issue.
Bruce Purdy of Blackbeard
Cruises, who is assisting REEF
,by providing a.-es el f.rthe
expedition, said hfonfish coud
wipe but the juvehilefish ithe
Bahamas.
"I have been environmental-
ly minded for several years, and
doing a lot of fish surveys for
REEF. The lionfish slowed up
here in Grand Bahama last
summer on the south shore and
we went on the north shore
caught 14 in one spot and we
must do something about this
before our juvenile fish are
wiped out," he said.
Blackbeard Cruises is a scuba
diving operation in Grand
Bahama that conducts scuba
diving in remote areas. such as
in the Berry Islands, Bimini and
West End, for people all over
the world.


Scientists to lay out ways to head


off worst of climate change


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UN-SPONSORED scientists
who warned of the dangers of a
warming Earth will issue a new
study next month describing
how to avert the worst: every-
one must embrace technologies
ranging from nuclear power to
manure control, according to
Associated Press.
Under a best-case scenario
for heading off severe damage,
the global economy might lose
as little as three percentage
points of growth by 2030 in
deploying technologies to
reduce greenhouse-gas emis-
sions, says the panel's draft
report, obtained by Associated
Press.
But it won't be easy.
"Governments, businesses
and individuals all need to be
pulling in the same direction,"
said British researcher Rachel
Warren, one of the report's
authors.
For one thing, the govern-
inents of such major emitters as
the Utnited States, China and
India will have to join the Kyoto
l'iotocol countries of Europe
and Japan in imposing cutbacks
in carbon dioxide and other
heat-trapping gases emitted by
industry, power plants and oth-
el sources.
The administration of US
President George W Bush
rejected the protocol's manda-
tory cuts, contending they would
slow US economic growth too
much. China and other poorer
developing countries were
exempted from the 1997 pact,


but most expected growth in
greenhouse emissions will come
from the developing world.
The draft report from the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC), whose
final version is to be issued in
Bangkok, Thailand on May 4,
says emissions can le cut below
current levels if the world shifts
away from carbon-heavy fuels
like coal, embraces energy effi-
ciency and significantly reduces
deforestation.
"The opportunities, the tech-
nology arc there and now it's a
case of encouraging the
increased use of these tech-
nologies," said International
Energy Agency analyst Ralph
Sims. another of the 33 scien-
tists who drafted the report.
Two previous IPlCC reports
this year painted a dire picture
of a future in which unabated
greenhouse emissions could dri-
ve global teIlperatulrcs up as
much as 11 degrees Fahrenheit
by 2100. Even a 3.6-degree-
Fahrenheit rise could subject
up to 2 billion people to water
shortages by 20150 and threaten
extinction ior 20 percent to 30
per cent of the world's species,
the IPCC' said.
The third report makes clear
the world mlusl quickly embrace
a baiskclt of technological
options bothI ahlrcady available
and developing just to keep
the ltemperatlur i isc to 3.0
degrees IFahrenheit.
The draft notes that signifi-
cant cuts could come from mak-
ing buildings more energy-effi-
cient, especially in the develop-
ing world, through better insu-


lation, lighting and other steps,
and by converting from coal to
natural gas, nuclear power and
renewable energy such as wind,
solar and biofuels.
Less significant but also impor-
tant would be steps to make
motor vehicles more fuel-efficient,
reduce deforestation, and plant
more trees as a carbon "sink,"
absorbing carbon dioxide. Even
capturing methane emitted by
livestock and its manure would
help, the report says.

Technology

Over the next century, it says,
such technology as hydrogen-
powered fuel cells, advanced
hybrid and electric vehicles with
better batteries, and carbon
sequestration whereby carbon
emissions are stored under-
ground will become more
commercially feasible.
It says taking "optimal" miti-
> nation measures might by 2030
stabilise greenhouse-gas con-
centrations in the atmosphere
at 445 to 534 parts per million,
up from an estimated 430 ppm
today.
It indicates that stabilising
concentrations relatively quick-
ly at 450 ppm an unlikely sce-
nario might keep the temper-
ature rise to 2 degrees 3.6
degrees Fahrenheit over pre-
industrial temperatures, a level
scientists think might avert
severe damage.
Achieving the 445-534 ppm
range might cost under three
per cent of global GDP over
two decades, the draft says.


That compares favorably to
global economic growth that
every year has averaged almost
three percent since 2000. The
damage from unabated climate
change, meanwhile, might even-
tually cost the global economy
between five per cent and 20
per cent of GDP every year,
according to a British govern-
ment report last year.
The IPCC draft notes, how-
ever, that its cost estimate is
based on a "relatively small"
number of studies and would
require all nations to join in
those best-case mitigation
efforts, and that "barriers to
implementation of mitigation
options are manifold."
The report says governments
could lower economic costs if
low-carbon technologies are
promoted via carbon taxes or
"cap-and-trade" systems like
Europe's, whereby industry is
allocated emissions quotas,
which can then be raded
among more efficient and less
efficient companies.
Turning the report into reality,
authors acknowledge, will
require a significant shift in polit-
ical will among some large
economies. The last IPCC assess-
ment, in 2001, also called for
introduction of many of the same
technologies, but they so far
haven't been widely embraced.
"I've been involved in this
game for 35 years. We're not
progressing as quickly as we
could or should," Sims said.
The draft notes, in fact, that
current government funding for
most energy research programs
is about half what it was in 1980.








WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


Bahamas will be another Haiti without



proper education for people, says BDM


* By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas will become
another Haiti if it fails to edu-
cate its people, the Bahamas
Democratic Movement
warned.
The BDM launched its web-
site and a 40-year plan for
national development at its
headquarters on Marathon
Road yesterday.
The party claimed that in the
last 13 j ears, the educational
system has been getting worse
rather t' an better.


According to the BDM: "It
is safe to conclude that both the
PLP and the FNM are major
failures."
Referring to recent studies
which found that graduating
students are averaging a 'D'
grade, the BDM said: "This is
an indictment and a crying
shame on our government. The
repercussion of our failure to
properly educate or people will
be that in 15 years, the Bahamas
will become another Haiti; an
uneducated, unproductive and a
chaotic society."
In terms of protecting the


environment, the BDM said
that it wants all Bahamians to
be able to enjoy the country's
natural heritage.

Environment

The party's website reads:
"The BDM will continue to
maintain and preserve the
integrity of the environment
in order to enhance our
ecosystem. With the increase
in global warming, deforesta-
tion, pollution and continued
destruction of the ozone, it


will be the mandate of the
BDM to insure that proper
legislation is enacted and
enforced in order to protect
our environment."
The BDM said that it will
seek to establish an environ-
mental court that will prose-
cute environmental offenders
and impose heavy fines, and
that these monies will be used
to assist in funding the BDM's
implementation of an envi-
ronmental task force that will
be responsible for policing
and protecting the environ-
ment


The BDM also said that
Prime Minister Christie has
been too soft on the issue of
crime.
"The past two administra-
tions have failed our country
because they didn't address the
insurgence of violent crimes.
Under the FNM administration,
crime was prevalent and now
under the New PLP nothing has
changed."
The BDM said that it intends
to create a programme to track
sexual offenders, castrate "sick
sadistic rapists", and enforce the
death penalty for persons con-


victed of murder and sentenced
to death.
The BDM also said that it
plans to introduce mandato-
ry 10 year prison sentences
for any individual caught
with an illegal firearms and
an additional five'years for
every bullet found in the
weapon.
"And we shall not stop, we
shall not rest, we shall not lay
down our weapons of political
warfare, until the PLP is gone
forever and a caring BDM gov-
ernment is in power," the party
said.


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for GSM or QuikCell phones in denominations ranging from $5 to $100. Previous BTC pre-paid
cards started at $20. The new cards went on sale yesterday. Shown are Leon Williams, BTC
president and CEO, Marion Johnson, vice-president marketing and sales, and Kirk Griffin,
-executive vice-president
(Photo: Franklyn G Ferguson)
I


IActn ChefJstcesor i


* SENIOR Justice Anita Allen (left) was sworn in as Acting Chief Justice of the Supreme n -
Court yesterday at Government House by Governor General Arthur,Hanna. The Acting;,,.
Chief Justice is shown taking the oath of office as the Governor General looks on. -
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PAGE WEDESDA, APRL 25,2007THE TIBUN


Wife testifies in the inquest into




death of Christopher Esfakis


FROM page one

said that it appeared he might
hac had too much to drink.
She told the court of how, in a
series of events, her husband's
shirt caught fire.
Mrs Esfakis said that her
husband went downstairs to the
garage and got a jug of gaso-
line. She followed him because
she thought it strange how sud-
denly he had got up and headed
for the garage. When he
returned upstairs he started to
pour gasoline in the entrance
hall. She took the gasoline jug
from him and locked it in a
room. She said that Christopher


was still angry.
He was sitting in the kitchen,
she said, and she was talking to
him. She turned her back for a
few minutes, but when she
turned back, his shirt was on
fire.
Mrs Esfakis said she extin-
guished the flames with a fire
extinguisher and tore the shirt
off his body. He ran to the bath-
room and put water on his
chest.
She said that she and a friend
took him to Doctors Hospital.
During cross-examination
Mrs Esfakis said that she did
not recall seeing her husband
with a match or cigarette. She
told the court that her husband


reluctantly went to hospital.
She said her husband was in
pain for quite some time as he
could not be given morphine
because he was allergic to it.
She told the court that subse-
quently doctors were able to
give him something to ease his
pain. She said that doctors at
Doctor's Hospital explained
that he had received first and
second degree burns to his body
and third degree burns to his
hands which would require plas-
tic surgery. Later that day.
Christopher began complaining
abotit having difficulty breath-
ing. vMrs Esfakis said that she
told a nurse about this and later
a physical therapist came and


did some breathing exercises
with him. Later that day, she
said, a psychiatrist came to see
her husband and interviewed
him.
On Sunday, April 21, 2002,
she said, she received a call
from the hospital saying that
Christopher had had a minor
setback, but was all right. Mrs
Esfakis said that when she
arrived at the hospital her hus-
band had already been moved
to the intensive care unit. When
she saw her him he no longer
looked like the Chris she knew,
she said tearfully. She explained
that when her husband saw her
he got up as if he was going to
get out of bed, but the nurses


held him down. He was sedated.
She told the court that doc-
tors told her that they had had
to perform an emergency tra-
cheotomy on him. She said that
a doctor suggested that he be
airlifted to Jackson Memorial
Hospital. However, air ambu-
lance personnel would not take
him because they said he was
in no condition to fly and an
argument broke out between
Doctor's Hospital staff and the
air ambulance personnel. She
said that at 7.22 pm on Mon-
day, April 22, Dr James Iferenta
announced that Christopher
had died.
The inquest resumes on Fri-
day.


PM predicts PLP will win at least 28 seats


FROM page one


Garden Hills; South Beach; St
Cecilia; Fox Hill; Fort Charlotte; "-''
St Thomas More; Farm Road and
Centreville; Kennedy; Clifton.
In the Family Islands, he pre- '
dicted victory in: Marco City; High
Rock;-Eight Mile Rock; Cat Island
Rum Cay and San Salvador; Exu-
ma; MICAL; South Andros; North
Andros; South Eleuthera.
Playing on the FNM's reference
to the huge crowds they have been
drawing at rallies in recent weeks
as the "Red Sea", Mr Christie said
that just as they did in 1967, "the
children of Israel are going to 0 PRIME
march right down the middle of Perry
the red sea and cross over to vic-
tory on May 2, 2007.
"And when the mighty majority of the PLP
cross over, and when the final count is taken -
hear me now and hear me good the PLP will
have won not less than 28 seats in the next par-
liament of the Bahamas way more than enough
to form the next government of the Bahamas."
According to the prime minister, the FNM
have had their time.
"They had 10 years and didn't do it. The rich
got richer all right, but what about you?" he
asked the audience.


MINISTER
Christie


He said the PLP has brought the
greatest period of economic
prosperity in the country's histo-
ry.
"More tourists are coming now,
more investors are coming now,
more money is being pumped in
now, more jobs and business
opportunities for Bahamians are
being created now more than
ever before."
He added that if Bahamians
want "more affordable, high-qual-
ity houses to be built so that you
and your family can live in new
and better communities, then vote
for the party that built 1,500 new
affordable houses in just five years
- more than the FNM built in its
entire 10 years."
Mr Christie said that if Bahami-


ans really want to bring crime
under control, "rather than just talking about it.
you have to write a new prescription for this
national illness.
"Our Action Agenda does exactly that. And
we are the only party with a comprehensive plan
for drastically reducing crime in our country ...
and for tackling and taming the root causes of
crime at the same time.
"It's a smart, innovative, viable plan that will
produce results and make our country a safer
place for all," he said.


FROM page one

and corporations, the caller claimed.
The caller further claimed that she has seen one ministry
receive such a list of persons with the directions to hire those list-
ed who swore they will cast their ballot in favour of the PLP on
May 2.
The Tribune is at this time unable to reveal further details
about this matter.
These claims come on the heels of reports of money being dis-
tributed in Grand Bahama by candidates in an effort to win
more votes.
Earlier this week, The Tribune reported that police were
investigating claims by residents that the PLP is "buying" votes
in two Grand Bahama constituencies.
There were further allegations that residents were asked to
produce their voter's cards and made to swear on the Bible that
they intend to vote PLP.
According to reports, some people were being paid between
$500 and $2,000.
Many residents were seen standing in lines at the PLP's
campaign, headquarters of a PLP candidate in West Grand
Bahaima;


More 'vote


buying'



allegations

FROM page one

speaker Oswald Ingraham.
Reportedly, a person
who was arrested, allegedly
on drug trafficking charges,
was released on bail and is
now actively campaigning
to ensure votes for the
incumbent MP.
FNM opponent Johnley
Ferguson told The Tribune
yesterday that he will be
bringing the matter to the
attention of the local police
as he has been bombarded
with similar evidence.
"They are going around
showing people that they
have Perry Christie's num-
ber in their cell phone
telling them that they have
to
vote for them because that
is how close they are," he
said.
Mr Ferguson claimed
that residents have been
threatened with physical
violence. He said they were
warned that if they don't
vote PLP "what would hap-
pen to them."
"I feel I will still beat Mr
(Oswald) Ingraham,
because the majority of the
people down here are very
upset about this. They are
upset that the campaign has
stooped this low," he said.
Mr Ferguson said that he
planned to meet with
senior police officers yes-
terday in Eleuthera, and
would bring this, and other
information to their atten-
tion.
"Mr Ingraham has sup-
port, but he's loosing sup-
port like this," Mr Fergu-
son added. "In this desper-
ation he is trying to sustain
the support he has, but he
will loose come election
day."
Calls to PLP spokesper-
sons or party officials were
not returned up to press
time yesterday.


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Govt claims a vote for



the PLP is vote for NHI


FROM page one

Health Insurance (NHI) plan
will provide insurance coverage
for all Bahamians from the cra-
dle-to-the-grave, improve the
quality of health services and
facilities available to all Bahami-
ans and generally improve the
health of the nation.
"The general health of a peo-
ple is a powerful indicator of a
country's standard of living, eco-
nomic strength and the effec-
tiveness of social programmes,"
the statement said. "If these are
to be the trademarks of the
Bahamian nation, it is only right
that we establish a national
health insurance scheme. As
long as there is one productive
Bahamian who dies premature-
ly, due to a lack of insurance and
finances, then we as a nation are
not reaching our full potential."
The PLP pointed out that
every Bahamian cannot afford
private medical insurance and
many are not employed at jobs
that offer coverage plans.
However critics of the plan
are worried about the sustain-
ability of government's model,
claiming that the cost to citizens
will go up significantly and end
up as high, if not higher, than
the cost of private insurance.
Many have also pointed out
that such government-run insti-
tutions are vulnerable to abuse
and end up crippled by corrup-
tion.
The FNM says it embraces the
idea of some form of national
health insurance, and will handle
the matter better than the PLP
has if they are elected to office.
The PLP statement continued:
"It is perverse to talk about the
strength and vibrancy of the
Bahamian economy and finan-
cial success when the citizens
who havc toiled so hard are
dying and suffering absent of
dignity.
"As a priniarily service based
economy, humanamm capital is
indeed the most valuable
resource aiid factor fueling the
local economy. It is upon the
backs and brains of the average
Bahamian that businesses are
Surviving and thriving. It is there-


fore only right that the welfare of
workers and their families be
secured."
The governing party claimed
that Bahamians are "anxiously
awaiting" the introduction of the
National Health Insurance.
"The escalating cost of insur-
ance has made access to quality
health care elusive for many.
Every day that we procrastinate
in pursuit of this goal, there are
men, women and children dying
or losing their quality of life, due
to simple, curable illnesses. In a
small country such as the
Bahamas, the moral duty to be
our brother's keeper is a real
one which ought to be taken
seriously."
The PLP said that the FNM
opposes national health insur-
ance, but has tried to "confuse
the issue" by stating that they
prefer the introduction of cata-


strophic health insurance, "by
which persons would be insured
only in instances when medical
expenses exceed $15,000".
"Anyone who can afford
$15,000 in medical fees does not
need any additional assistance
from the government," the PLP
said. "Too many vibrant
Bahamian people are dying or
in poor health due to an inabili-
ty to pay much less. Undoubt-
edly, the FNM does not care
about these people."
The PLP added that for the
most part, the FNM represents
"that economic class, which is
able to afford private care and
high quality medical services.
"They are the haves who seem
unaware, unconcerned or sim-
ply blinded to the fact there are
some Bahamians whose pock-
ets are not lined with millions of
dollars," the PLP said.


Chief executive says he

gave staff paid vacation

due to workplace tension


FROM page one

its name to Blue Industries, becoming inactive until 2003. It only
changed its name to Pegasus Wireless in June 2005.
Since then, it has grown via three acquisitions, the pur-
chase price being financed by a combination of cash and
Pegasus shares. In all three deals, the cash portion was
financed by Mr Knabb buying stock in Pegasus, his own com-
pany.
Controversy dogged Pegasus in the months before it arrived
in Freeport, the company having delisted from the Nasdaq
stock market at the end of October and retreated to the over-
the-counter market.
At the time, Mr Knabb said the move was made to try and
reduce trading volatility in Pegasus' stock, which had been tar-
geted by short-sellers. Then, Pegasus was the subject of a
class action lawsuit filed in early November by Kahn Gauthier
Swick, allegedly on behalf of the company's shareholders,
after several articles on Internet websitc, the Motley Fool, had
appeared criticising the company and its management.
Some in the business community believe Mr Knabb plans to
move Pegasus from its US home to the Bahamas, making
this nation its headquarters.


.{ ...........c
(1~Eta
11.1*""G)


__I


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007














An urgent need to focus on environment


IN the early 1970s Tough
Call was a fresh-faced col-
lege student totally absorbed
with counterculture politics and
the new environmentalism in
America.
We grew our hair, wore tat-
tered clothes, spoke in ways that
horrified the old folks, liberated
ourselves sexually, and ridiculed
the straightjacketed behaviour
of the previous generation. This
cycle of cultural rebellion
peaked in 1970.
And that was when Earth
Day happened. A grassroots
inspired "national teach-in on
pollution and ecological prob-
lems", it involved tens of mil-
lions of Americans across the
country, all passionately protest-
ing corporate and governmental
abuse of the environment.
Together with our scepticism
of big business and big govern-
ment, my generation shared a
new and very emotional interest
in nature. That first Earth Day
on April 22, 1970 marked the
beginnings of a mass movement
to curb pollution, conserve
resources, protect wilderness
and cherish biodiversity. We
saw planet Earth in its totality
foi the very first time.
From that point on, not only
did environmentalism become
a mass movement, it became a
spiritual cause. It also produced
a lot of benefits. By the mid-
1970s, the US had enacted a
series of groundbreaking laws
including the Environmental
Policy Act, the Clean Air Act,
Clean Water Act, Pesticide Con-
trol Act and Endangered
Species Act. And a host of envi-
ronmental groups had sprung
up to work for political change.

T hese measures did not
just add red tape. They
actually led to cleaner water,
cleaner air, safer food, new
national parks and protected
areas, coastal zone management
and much more.
In the Bahamas with our
tiny population and many
islands scattered over a hun-
dred thousand square miles of
ocean teeming with marine life
- we were only dimly aware
of the pressures building around
us. Back then our environment


seemed so large and so healthy
that we didn't need to worry
too much about it.
In the 1960s responding to
the urgings of a handful of for-
eign scientists the government
had set aside a few remote areas
as national parks from Exu-
ma to Inagua. Although this res-
cued the flamingo (our national
bird) from extermination and
saved one of our most beautiful
island chains from piecemeal


development, few Bahamians
.were aware of the long-term
threats to our way of life.

In fact, most Bahamians
were oblivious to the envi-
ronment, particularly when it
stood in the way of their free-
dom to do whatever they want-
ed. But as our population grew
and became more educated,
and as investors sought to repli-
cate poorly planned develop-
ments all over the archipelago,
with little consideration for the
realities on the ground, envi-
ronmentalism was gradually
mainstreamed.
In fact, it goes without say-
ing that we never cease talking
about the environment today.
Since the 1990s the government
has required environmental
impact assessments before big
projects are approved. And par-
liament will soon enact a com-
prehensive environmental pro-
tection law whose regulations
will be administered by a full-
fledged government ministry.
Sustainable development is the
watchword.
Today the Bahamas National
Trust is struggling to deal with
the massive challenges of public


TOUGH CALL
ARY SMTH


education, public access and
supervision for the 700,000 acres
of protected territory under its


cited as an example of this type
of behaviour.
Living close to the sea as we
do, most Bahamians like to fish.
And clearly, if we overfish our
conch, grouper and lobster
those resources will decline or
disappear and all of us will stif-
fer as a result. So the obvious
thing to do would be for all of
us to exercise restraint.
But, as Professor Jared Dia-
mond pointed out in his book
Collapse: "As long as there is
no effective regulation of how
much each consumer can har-
vest, then each would be cor-
rect to reason, 'if I don't catch
that fish, some other fisherman
will, so it makes no sense for


control. And successive gov-
ernments are wrestling with the
urgent need to slow the destruc-
tion of our conch, grouper and
lobster fisheries from over-har-
vesting.

T he environment has
indeed become some-
thing of a religion. As Jurassic
Park author Michael Crichton
recently observed: "If you look
carefully, you see that (enviro-
mentalism) is in fact a perfect
21st century remapping of tra-
ditional Judeo-Christian beliefs
and myths.
"There's an initial Eden, a
paradise, a state of grace and
unity with nature; there's a fall
from grace into a state of pollu-
tion as a result of eating from
the tree of knowledge; and as
a result of our actions there is a
judgment day coming for us
all...sustainability is salvation in
the church of the environment."
And just as priests and pas-
tors wage a moral war against
sin, so environmentalists strug-
gle against the kind of "ratio-
nal bad behaviours" that are
harmful for everyone and that
can lead to social disaster. The
tragedy of the commons is often


me to refrain from overfishing.'
The correct rational behaviour
is then to harvest before the
next consumer can, even though
the eventual result may be the
destruction of the commons and
thus harm for all consumers."

U nlike religion, howev-
er, environmentalism
must be grounded on objective
and verifiable science. It must
be based on realistic cost-bene-
fit analysis. And it must recog-
nise that economic development
is a legitimate goal for human
society.
Professor Diamond's review


of how cultures around the
world have responded to envi-
ronmental pressures is instruc-
live. And he gives several exam-
pls of societies that have
destroyed the environment they
depended upon, including near-
by Haiti.
From this wide-ranging
review he distills a dozen of the
most serious environmental
problems facing the world
today. At the top of the list is
the destruction of natural habi-
tats. And the world's most
important habitats are forests,
wetlands, coral reefs and the
ocean bottom all of which
are under threat in the
Bahamas.
Deforestation, for example,
was a major .factor in the col-
lapse of all of the past societies
considered in Professor Dia-
mond's book. And as most peo-
ple know, wetlands are essential
for the existence of commercial
fisheries. Coral reefs are the
marine equivalent of tropical
rain forests and if current trerlds


continue, about half of the
world's remaining reefs will be
gone within 20 years.

O other problems cited
by Diamond are the
decline of wild species, soil ero-
sion, depletion "of freshwater
resources, ceilings on the use of
fossil fuels, the costs and haz-
ards of chemical pollution, the
damage caused by introduction
of alien species to places where
they are not native, major dis-
locations that can be expected
from global warming, and the
impact of population growth -
meaning resources consumed


and waste put out.
"No-one is willing to
acknowledge...the unsustain-
ability of a world in which the
Third World's large population
were to reach and maintain cur-
rent First World living stan-
dards," Diamond says. The cru-
elest trade-off we will have to
resolve i.s helping all people to
achieve a higher standard of liv-
ing without undermining that
standard by over-stressing g'(b-
al resources."
All of the problems listed' by
Diamond are interconne,dted.
And experts say they will Oven-
tually be resolved one way'or
another within the lifetimes of
our children: "The only question
is whether they will become
resolved in pleasant ways' 6 our
own choice, or in unpleasant ways
not of our choice, such as'war-
fare, genocide, starvation, epi-
demics and collapse of societies."

So what does all this
mean for the Bahamas?
Well, should we really fill in all
of our wetlands, strip our beach-
es of sand, cut down all our
trees, level our hills, pollute our
water, turn our open spacdsinto
toxic garbage dumps, kill every
living thing in the ocean:and
transform our communities into
ugly, unhealthy and congested
slums?
Frankly, it is hard to imagine
anything more importantthan
the air we breathe, the water
we drink, the food we eat, and
the spaces we live in. It all adds
up to quality of life and sure-
ly we all want to enjoy a better
quality of life.
That is what Earth Day is all
about. It is really a matter of
common sense and salience.-
communicating information and
providing guidance that is rele-
vant to public concerns, and tnot
simply regurgitating fact sheets
or depicting the capture of dol-
phins as an ecological catastro-
phe.
It just makes good sense-.to
work with the environment
rather than destroying'it.-
because the future belongs 'to
all of us.
What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net. Or visit www.bahama-
pundit.com


C L

Moving F4wrf


Citco Fund Services is a division of the Citco Group of Companies and is
the largest independent administrator of Hedge Funds in the world with
offices in Curagao, Amsterdam, Dublin, London, Luxembourg, Miami, New
York, Toronto, Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas,
Bermuda, San Francisco and Sydney. The division provides full service
administration to over 2,000 Hedge Funds for multinational banks and
international Investment Managers, totaling over $420 billion in net assets.


As part of our continued expansion in our office in the Bahamas, we are
looking for a number of motivated and pro-active


(Senior) Investor Relations Administrators

who are capable of providing excellent customer service, in an international
and dynamic environment, for our clients who consist of shareholders and
international investment managers within those Hedge Funds. The Investor
Relations Administrator is the main contact for the shareholder, investor,
investment managers, advisors, and third parties, as appropriate.

Your most important tasks and responsibilities are:
perform shareholder record keeping and report shareholder information
to the appropriate parties
maintain contact with shareholders/investors, investment managers,
banks and brokers
supervise and guide the Assistant Investor Relations Administrators
handle payment transactions
liaise with clients and other Citco offices, to ensure that client needs are
met

The successful candidate should meet the following criteria:
a bachelors degree in administration, economics or business related area
affinity with figures
a team player, able to cope with individual responsibilities
ability to multi-task and operate in a fast-paced working environment
highly accurate with outstanding communication skills
working experience in the financial area is an advantage

We offer you: a challenging job in a rapidly expanding international company,
with an informal company culture. You will have the opportunity to broaden
your knowledge with excellent prospects for a further international career.

If you are interested in this opportunity, please send your Curriculum Vitae
and covering letter via e-mail at the latest on May 4, 2007 to: Citco Fund
Services (Bahamas) Ltd., att. Managing Director, Human Resources Manager:
hrbahamas@citco.com You can find more information about our
organization, on our website: www.citco.com


Today the Bahamas National
Trust is struggling to deal with
the massive challenges of
public education, public
access and supervision for the
700,000 acres of protected
territory under its control.


And just as priests and pastors
wage a moral war against sin,
so environmentalist struggle
against the kind of "rational
bad behaviours" that are
harmful for everyone and that
can lead to social disaster.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


:3~E


~r







PAGE 0, WENESDA, APIL 25 2007THE TIBUN


Defence


Force


Band is


on song for students


Colinalmperial



donates $20,000



to BNT project


a DELL

Inspiron

Laptop

Computer'
To enter, purchase one bottle 50g
Nescaf6 Coffee, fill out the entry
form, answer the trivia question,
attach proof-of-purchase and
drop Into entry box provided.
Or bring to Thompson
Trading, Shirley Street.
Promotion ends April 28, 2007.


HIGH on the list of priori-
ties at Colinalmperial Insur-
ance is the promotion of edu-
cation for Bahamian students
and a commitment to com-
munity service throughout
the Bahamas.
To this end, Colinalmperi-
al donated $20,000 to the
Bahamas National Trust
(BNT) to fund their newest
resource project, "Treasures
in the Sea."
This resource serves as an
educator's guide to teaching
the subjects of biodiversity
and marine life. Treasures in
the Sea will be integrated into
the academic curricula for
grades 3 to 6. The resource
focuses on the Bahamas'
three major fishery resources;
conch, crawfish and grouper,
providing information on
their life cycle, habitat needs
and conservation.
Lynn Gape, deputy execu-
tive director in charge of edu-
cation and communication at
BNT, said Colinalmperial's
donation will firstly fund the
publication and production
of Treasures in the Sea which
is scheduled to take place by
the end of June.
Colinalmperial has made a
five year commitment to sup-
port educational initiatives
for the Bahamas National
T rusl.


'Treasures in the

Sea' serves as

educator's guide


"At Colinalmperial we
take our social responsibility
very seriously, and this is one
of many exciting projects that
we are taking part in." said
Montgomery Braithwaite,
president of the company.
He emphasised that Coli-
nalmperial will provide con-
tinual support to this particu-
lar venture over a period of
five years to ensure that the
project is completed.
He added that many chari-
ties receive assistance at the
beginning of projects, but the
key thing is to maintain
the level of support
throughout the project's
duration.
Mrs Gape explained that
the Bahamas Ministry of
Education has also provided
support to the Trust by allow-
ing science curriculum plan-
ners to assist in the develop-
nilnll of Ihi, new resource.


She expressed gratitude to
Colinalmperial for their will-
ingness to support the effort.
Lisa Codella, corporate
communications officer at
Colinalmperial, said the com-
pany is happy to be a partner
with the Bahamas National
Trust in this unique and
meaningful project.
She said that supporting the
environment and the natural
resources of the Bahamas is
vital to the preservation of
the country, and Colinalm-
perial makes every effort to
ensure that they are support-
ing positive ventures.
"Over the five year period,
Colinalmperial will support
the Bahamas National Trust
to the tune of $100,000 to
ensure that the development
and implementation of
Treasures in the Sea comes
to fruition," Mrs Codella
said.


iI
*J I






!*
i
0

33


PARTICIPATING STORES:
%at Maxx, Carmichael Buy 4 Less, Blue Hill & Buy 4 Less, Madeira Street Lil General, East St South
Jofin Chea #8, Carmichael Road Star Traxx, Carmichael Road Lucky Supermarket, Farrington Road


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


..:~g~ras





WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007 PAGE 11


THE TRIBUNE


This is what the PIP's $20 billion in


foreign direct investment

Co
CD
-J0
ci)
0^


like...


.3


Isn't it time for a change?
Under a new FNM government, agreements for foreign-direct
investment will lead to action, not just announcements.
We did it before and we can do it again.

Vote FNM


I


mlllil . .... ', .
,' e? R ",
?.RR F'.w" ."" '& "" ..."-:" ,





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


P


progressive Liberal Party

It's A Matter of Truth


1998


4.0

3.5

3.0

2.5

2.0

1.5

1.0


2003


ECONOMIC
GROWTH


S


FNM


1998
1999
2000
2001


1999


2000


6.8%
4.0%
1.9%
0.8%


2001


ECONOMIC
GROWTH

PLP ,


2003
2004
2005
2006


2004


2005


1.4%
1.8%
2,7%
4,0%


2006


SOURCE: The International Monetary Fund


More Opportunities


for Bahamians


I I ~ I1 I I I- I I d -


THE TRIBUNE










WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


SECTION


B


business@tribuemedia.et Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street


Financial industry


GBPA denies Bahamas


urged to specialisee Waste Freeport licence

i -_-IMi UAO'rKICB I s. Fp


Ex-BFSB chair
,S ir 'mnr an dr mnrp'


T H E y',
Bahamian f" investment managers
financial ser- 'n
vices industry. basing themselves in
has to "spe- '
cialise and -Bahamas and running
focus on" its s from here
core private operations from here
banking and
private wealth
management said.
areas, carving W PATON "We are better off being spe-
out a brand cialised in one area. That means
identity for we have to pay attention to the
itself rather than "diluting" its issues in those areas, paying
efforts, a former Bahamas attention to the Economic Part-
Financial Services Board nership Agreement with the EU,
(BFSB) chairman told The Tri- WTO and OECD."
bune yesterday. But, "over the last two to
Michael Paton, an attorney three years", Mr Paton said the
who heads Lennox Paton's Bahamas' tax-neutral'environ-
financial services practice group, ment has attracted "more and
said: "With the resources avail- more" interest from interna-
able to ourselves, we have to tional investment managers to
specialise and focus on private base themselves and run opera-
banking and private wealth man- tions from this nation.
agement. I think with the oppor- Although this trend was "not
tunities, for example in the a rush", he added: "We're start-
hedge funds and insurance busi- ing to see more and more inter-
ness, it's becoming increasingly est from investment managers
difficult to compete against the in locating here, and running
Cayman Islands and Bermuda." operations from here, setting up
The Cayman Islands has corporations to run business
become the dominant global from here.
player in the investment funds "That definitely seems to be a
and hedge funds industry, niche, getting investment man-
attracting numerous sponsors agers to locate here, because
and managers to domicile their their skills are portable, and
funds there, while Bermuda is once they've got a friendly tax
the market leader for corporate environment, dealt with the
captive insurance and offshore immigration laws and the Secu-
life insurance. rities Commission's registration
Mr Paton explained that both requirements, it's a good place to
jurisdictions were "consolidat- be. We offer more than basing
ing" -heiI rpimiions in these mar- operations in Bermuda and Cay-
kets, mdkinigit ihcTeas9ingly dti---fi man.
ficult for other nations such as The Bahamas' closer proxim-
the Bahamas to challenge their ity to the US, and location with-
dominance. in the eastern coast timezone,
The cost of capturing invest- give it a natural advantage when
ment fund and insurance clients it comes to dealing with the New
might be more than the net York markets, coupled with its
return for the Bahamas, and Mr Internet connectivity and tax
Paton also pointed out that this neutral platform.
nation did not have a sufficient Mr Paton said the Oxford
supply of skills in those sectors Economics study on the
that Bermuda and Cayman had Bahamian financial services
built up. industry's economic impact,
"We have successfully posi- which had been commissioned
tioned ourselves as a private by the BFSB, "supports some-
banking and private wealth man- thing we've been saying for quite
agement jurisdiction, and have
to play off that strength, rather
than dilute ourselves," Mr Paton SEE BFSB, page 5


BISX-listed company spends $400,000 on bio-diesel, green waste joint

ventures; says medical waste facility growing at 'a less than desirable level'


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BISX-listed waste
collection services
provider, has been
denied a licence to operate in
Freeport by the Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA), a move
that is likely to raise concerns
about a potential conflict of
interest.
Writing in the company's 2006
annual report, both Peter
Andrews, Bahamas Waste's
chairman, and its managing
director, Francisco de Cardenas,
expressed "disappointment" that
the GBPA had denied them a
licence to begin waste collection
services in the Bahamas' second
largest consumer market.
Mr Andrews said the compa-
ny had -.ilrc.adi\ started an active
campaign to have this decision
reviewed and reconsidered",
remaining optimistic that the
publicly-quoted company would
seen be able to provide services
in Freeport.
Mr dc Cardenas told share-
holders: "We are seeking clari-
fication, but will continue to
investigate ways that we can ser-
vice Grand Balhama."
Bahamas Waste's failure to
obtain a licence is likely to be
mystifying to I main\. given that
it is a w ell-established company
with a strong track record and
solid reputation.
The company generated net
income of $1.021 million in the


12 months to December 31,
2006, and has been consistently
profitable, so there should be no
concerns over its financial via-
bility. And because it is listed
on BISX, Bahamas Waste is sub-
ject to intense public scrutiny,
its quarterly and annual finan-
cials being published to
investors, while its activities are
regulated by the Government,
BISX and the Securities Com-'
mission.
Albert Gray, the GBPA's
president who is in charge of its
licensing activities, yesterday did
not return The Tribune's call
seeking comment before press
deadline, despite a detailed mes-
sage being left about the inquiry
being related to the failure of
Bahamas Waste's licensing
application.
The GBPA has often boast-
ed about the seamless nature of
its licensing process, and its
attractiveness to investors com-
pared to those faced in Nassau
and elsewhere in the Family
Islands. The process is said to
cut out red tape and bureaucra-
cy for investors coming into the
230 square mile Port area.
Carey Leonard, the GBPA's
in-house counsel, said at a Janu-
ary 2006 seminar in Nassau that
the GBPA had only rejected one
licence application in seven
years, showing how rare it is for
such submissions to be rejected.
Several sources, though, have
suggested that the reasons for.
Bahamas Waste's licence appli-
cation being rejected have their


roots in the apparent conflict
between the GBPA's licensing
obligations, and the private, for-
profit making activities of its
affiliate, Port Group Ltd.
Both the GBPA and Port
* Group are owned by the Hay-
ward and St George families.
Port Group Ltd, according to an
affidavit sworn by Rick Hay-
ward, Sir Jack's son, in the own-
ership battle with the St George
estate, is aid to own "a half share
or more" (meaning at least 50
per cent) in a number of com-
panies, one of which is Carrick
Ltd.
Carrick Ltd, in turn owns "a
half share or Urban Sanitation
and Sanitation Services", com-
panies that in Freeport provide
services that are the same as
Bahamas Waste.
This means, therefore, that if
Bahamas Waste was granted a
licence to operate in Freeport, it
would enter into direct compe-
tition with businesses in which
the GBPA's principals have a
stake, and rely on for income
and profits. Effectively,
Bahamas Waste would enter
into competition with the regu-
lator.
Meanwhile, as at December
31, 2006, Bahamas Waste had
committed $400,000, and
entered into memeorandums of
understanding, for joint venture
projects relating to the produc-
tion of bio-diesel fuels and the
recycling of green waste.
Mr Andrews said in the annu-
al report: "Early this year, we


expect to launcA joint venture
partnerships that will produce
biodisel fuels out of waste cook-
ing oil, and another that will
transform 'green waste' into
mulch and compost."
One of the joint venture part-
ners is thought to be Cape Sys-
tems, part of the Cape Eleuthera
Institute.
Bahamas Waste saw net
income more than double in fis-
cal 2006, increasing from $1.021
million to $462,314, something
that Mr Andrews attributed to
the growing economy and the
increasing demand for waste col-
lection services and, also, the
need for portable toilets, con-
tainers and compactors at con-
truction sites.
"Bahamas Waste's business in
Abaco continues to grow as we
place more and more bins at
local businesses, and our new
Marsh Harbour management
team is determined to generate
even more business on that
island," Mr Andrews said.
Mr de Cardenas added that
continued growth in the con-
struction industry during 2007
was likely'to further benefit
Bahamas Waste, which would
look to become "the company
of choice" for upcoming pro-
jects. However, he said Bahamas
Waste's medical treatment facil-
ity "continues to grow at a less
than desirable level", despite
having signed up Doctors Hos-
pital, the Public Hospitals
Authority and private physi-
cians.


Baker's Bay injects $4.5-$5.5m per month into Abaco economy


* By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE $175 million Baker's
Bay Golf & Ocean Club is
injecting between $4.5-$5.5 mil-
lion into the Abaco economy


per month, a senior executive
with the project told The Tri-
bune yesterday, with some 2(00)
persons working on the Great
Guana Cay project site.
Dr Livingstone Marshall, Bak-
er's Bay's vice-senior vice-pres-


l -iS7 -


ident for environmental and
community affairs, said a "criti-
cal mass of Bahamian contrac-
tors" were working on the pro-
ject's marina, upon which con-
struction was now well under-
way.
Among the Bahamian com-
panies working on the Baker's
Bay site, which is being devel-
oped by San Francisco-based
Discovery Land Company, are
Bahamas Marine and Bahamas
Hot Mix.
Dr Marshall said Abaco-based
contractors include Knowles
Construction, Big Cat, Pinder's
Plumbing, J & J Electrics, Aba-
co Tug & Towing, Miracle
Builders and Scandi Works.
He estimated that some 200
persons were currently
employed on the Baker's Bay
construction site, both by con-
tractors and Discovery Land
Company directly.
Contractors working on the
projects were collectivly receiv-
ing $4 million per month from
Discovery Land Company for
their services, while the salaries
paid to Baker's Bay employees
and spending on other econom-
ic spin-offs were injecting
between "several hundred thou-
sand, to close to a million dol-
lars" into, the Abaco economy
per month.
Overall, Dr Marshall estimat-
ed that Baker's Bak's economic
impact was injecting an addi-
tional $4.5-$5.5 million into the
island's economy per month.
On construction progress, Dr
Marshall said: '"We've put in
the bulkheads for the marina,
and within around-another 30 to
45 days from now, we will begin
vertical construction on houses
at the Marina Village.
"We're continuing with the
construction of our marina. We
have a consortium out there led
by American Bridge, but we
have a critical mass of Bahamian
contractors involved.
"We have cleared the general
area for the marina. We have
mulched a lot of the material
there, as opposed to burning it.
We are putting in a lot of the
bulkheads, dealing with the met-
al pieces, and have begun some
excavation of the channel and
flushing channel."
Dr Marshall added that "the
demand and interest has been


tremendous" from international
investors interested in purchas-
ing land and real estate at Bak-
er's Bay, prompting the devel-
opers to add another five bun-
galows where they can host
potential clients.
Apart from the marina, Dr
Marshall said the developers
were workingg on getting the
roads and bypass roads for con-
tractors in", in addition to mark-
ing out areas for preservation -
where there would be no con-
struction and other sites where
contractors can set up and store
their materials.
Shrubs and trees were being
relocated from the path of con-
struction, with the University of
Miami's team coming in every
month to monitor the environ-
mental impact of Baker's Bay.
"As we go about making sure
we do it correctly, we're com-
fortable with the construction
pace we're on right now," Dr
Marshall said. The golf course
site was also being cleared and
marked.
"We're also in the process of
drilling for wells associated with
the waste water treatment plant,
and are continuing discussions
with the various government
agencies such as BEC to bring
power to the cay," Dr Marshall
said.
He added that Baker's Bay
had hired several Bahamians
recently to senior positions, such
as Simmone Bowe as human
resources director. Other posi-
tions that the company was look-
ing towards Bahamians to fill
included food and beverage
director.
The fight over the Baker's
Bay project returns to the Court
of Appeal today, though, as the
Save Guana Cay Reef Associa-
tion seeks an injunction to stop
Discovery Land Company from
continuing work on the project
site until the appeal against Jus-
tice Norris Carroll's ruling on
the substantive issues raised by
the case is heard on May 17,
2007.
The Association said in a
statement issued yesterday that
it was also set to present its case
at a United Nations conference
dealing with development issues
that impact small island, devel-
oping states such as the
Bahamas.


* By NEIL HARTNEi I I:LL
Tribune Business Editor


+


HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010


I I -~ I ~-- i -


I












PAE2,WENSAAPRUNIG 25,2007TRUT HAETRBNEDUINS


FNM


1-7, Upon taking office, an FNM Government will:

Make public all agreements with
international investors
5eGive regular public reports on the state
of our country
N(Better enforce standards of conduct
for Ministers
SRequire the Public Service to be more
responsive to your needs
Answer questions asked by the
Opposition in the Parliament




It's a Matter of TRUST
www.freenationalmovement.org


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


I














BUSINESS


hc Illiamni Hcral 'WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE MARKETS --
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS., 7B
DOW 30 12,953.94 +34.54
S&P 500 1,480.41 -0.52 V
.NASDAO .2,524.54 +0.87 A
1Q-YR NOTE 4.62 -.03
CRUDE OIL 65.89 +1.78 A .



Strong


earnings


hoist


Dow

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associared Press
NEW YORK Wall Street
was mixed Tuesday, recovering
from an early loss as investors
shrugged off disappointing
housing and consumer confi-
dence data to focus on stronger-
than-expected quarterly earn-
ings. The Dow Jones industrials
set a new trading high, and
resumed their trek toward
13,000.
The market picked up
momentum in mid-afternoon.
Investors seemed to lose some
of the earlier caution they
adopted after the National
Association of Realtors
reported sales of existing homes
in March had their biggest one-
month decline since January
1989. Also, the Conference
Board reported consumer confi-
dence fell more than expected
in April due to higher gas prices
and broader economic con-
cerns.
"A general optimistic tone
related to better-than-expected
earnings is what's moving it,"
said Richard E. Cripps, chief
market strategist for Stifel Nico-
'laus, a broker based in St. Louis.
However, "it's not a market
that's necessarily very broad in
its advance."
He pointed out that the
Dow's strong gains in afternoon
trading were driven by only a
few companies, notably Inter-
national Business Machines and
Honeywell, which both made
dividend announcements. Also,
there were much smaller moves
in the broader Standard &
Poor's 500 and Nasdaq compos-
ite indexes which so far this
year have risen by greater per-
centages than the Dow.
The Dow rose 34.54,. or 0.27
percent, to 12,953.94. The index
set a new intraday high of
12,989.86, less than 11 points
away from 13,000.
Broader markets were
mixed. The S&P 500 index was
down 0.52, or 0.03 percent, at
1,480.41, and the Nasdaq rose
0.87, or 0.03 percent, to 2,524.54.
The Nasdaq is slightly above
the halfway point to its record
close of 5,048.62, while the S&P
is just 3 percent below its
record close of 1,527.46. Both
records were reached in March
2000, at the end of the dot-corn
boom.
"Where I think you'll get a
lot more excitement is when the
S&P pushes past the 2,000 level
That's going to be a real event,"
Cripps said.
Investors weren't buying
with abandon: Declining issues
outnumbered advancers Tues-
day by about 3 to 2 on the New
York Stock Exchange, where
consolidated volume came to
3.11 billion shares, up from Mon-
day's 2.56 billion.
In earnings news, Texas
Instruments surged $2.51, or 7.7
percent, to $34.92 after its first-
quarter results surpassed Wall
Street expectations.
DuPont posted a 16 percent
rise in first-quarter profit on
higher sales of seeds and
improved pharmaceuticals.
Shares of the chemicals maker
rose 67 cents to $49.86.
The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies was down
1.19, or 0.14 percent, at 826.36.
Overseas, Japan's Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.02
percent. At the close, Britain's
FTSE 100 was down 0.77 per-
cent, Germany's DAX index
was down 0.89 percent, and
France's CAC-40 was down 0.53
percent.


* Sales of previously owned
homes fell to the lowest level in
almost four years and declining
prices hurt consumer confidence
this month, indicating the U.S.
economy is struggling to pick up.
BY ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
Associated Press
NEW YORK The economy pro-
vided a sobering reminder Tuesday
that consumers are jittery and the
housing market is still a major cloud
over growth.
In February, U.S. home prices fell
their steepest in almost 15 years. Sales
of existing homes plunged in March
by the largest amount in nearly two
decades. And consumer confidence
in April crumbled to its lowest since
August.
It was a hat trick of bad economic
data that analysts said would trap the
Federal Reserve between inflation
pressures and tepid growth.
"The Fed is still talking tough on
inflation but I think they are watch-
ing the slowdown in the economy.
They would not want to raise rates if
the economy remains weak," said
Gary Thayer, chief economist at AG
Edwards.


"We are not out of the woods on
housing. And consumers are not feel-
ing good about the economy. I don't
think we will see a lot of spending on
the part of consumers," he said.
The National Association of Real-
tors reported on Tuesday that sales
of existing homes plunged in March,
reflecting bad weather and increasing
problems from loans to people with
poor credit. The group said that sales
of existing homes fell by 8.4 percent
in March, compared to February. It
marked the biggest one-month
decline since a 12.6 percent drop in
January 1989.
Also on Tuesday, a housing index
released by Standard & Poor showed
that U.S. home prices fell 1.5 percent
in February from a year ago, the
steepest decline in nearly 15 years.
The New York-based Conference
Board said its Consumer Confidence
Index dropped to 104.0, in April,
down from a revised 108.2 in March.
Analysts had expected a reading of
105. The April reading was the lowest
since August, when the index was at
100.2.
Given the plunge in housing, and
higher prices at the gas pump, con-
sumers have reduced their long-term


INTERNATIONAL EDITION


AUTO SALES


STAN HONDA/AFP-GE1
SALES KING: Toyota became the world's top selling automaker in the first quarter of 2007
overtaking rival General Motors. Above, a Toyota Camry hybrid is on display at the New
International Automobile Show earlier this month.


TOYOTA TOPS


JAPANESE CARMAKER'S FIRST-QUARTER SALES BEAT
GM'S PRELIMINARY NUMBERS FOR FIRST TIME EVER


BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO Toyota Camry, take a bow. Prius, bask in the limelight.
Strong demand for those models helped propel the Japanese carmaker
onto the throne as the world's largest auto seller at least for the first
quarter of 2007.


Through a shrewd combination
of investing in enyironment-
friendly vehicles, offering sharp
new models and wooing drivers
with brand power, Toyota has top-
pled GM from the top global sales
spot for the first time ever, sales
figured released on Tuesday show.
Whether it becomes the world's
No. 1 automaker depends on
annual worldwide vehicle produc-
tion, rather than sales, and final
bragging rights for that won't be
decided until production numbers
are tallied for the whole year.
But analysts say Toyota is
advancing precisely in those areas
that General Motors has fallen
behind, making it likely that Toy-
ota will snatch from GM the title it
has held for 76 years.
Toyota sold 2.35 million vehi-
cles worldwide in the January-
March period, surpassing the 2.26
million vehicles GM sold in the
quarter, according to preliminary
figures.
In 2006, Toyota's global output
rose 10 percent to 9.018 million
vehicles, while GM and its affili-


ates produced 9.18 million vehicles
worldwide a gap of about
162,000. In the first quarter, Toy-
ota made 2.37 million vehicles
worldwide, while GM has only
given a planned production num-
ber of 2.34 million vehicles.
But Toyota has long beaten GM
in profitability, racking up record
profits for the past four years, with
$11.8 billion profit for the fiscal
year through March 2006. GM lost
$2 billion last year.
Koji Endo, auto analyst with
Credit Suisse in Tokyo, believes
the trend of Toyota outdoing GM
is very difficult to reverse.
"Toyota sales are booming
because of its good image around
the world about reliability and
ecological technology," he said.
"It's just the opposite for GM, and
its image is deteriorating."
Toyota's fueT-etffiient cars,
such as the Corolla, Yarisand gas-
electric hybrid Prius, are big hits
because of surging gas prices.
General Motors, meanwhile, has
been forced to scale back produc-
tion in some regions to tackle a


BILL PUGLIANC
CUTTING BACK: A close
Motors plant is shown
Lansing, Mich. For the
years, GM has been th
automotive sales lead

turnaround.
GM said although Tc
the first quarter, the
-global leadership is no
the year. A company s
said it would not chase
.share solely to recapture
from Toyota, and it has
plan to retake the lead.
moves to boost overseas
tion could keep it in the


TELECOMS



V AT&T


profit




nearly







almost doubled after it reaped
$900 million in savings from
takeovers.
S BY MICHELLE ROBERTS
Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO Telecommunica-
tions heavyweight AT&T reported
Tuesday it doubled its profit and sales
*in the first three months of the year, pri-
S'- F omarily because of its completed acquisi-
TY IMAGES FILE :tion of BellSouth.
Profit reached $2.85 billion, helped
York by the BellSouth acquisition and growth
in wireless revenue. The earnings,
which included $2.3 billion in acquisi-
tion-related charges and a $409 million
gain from the sale of some assets,
amounted to 45 cents per share for the
period ended March 31. That was up
from $L45 billion, or 37 cents per share,
earned by AT&T in the first quarter of
2006, when it had not yet acquired Bell-
South.
First-quarter revenue rose 84 per-
cent to $28.97 billion, up from a pre-
merger tally of $15.76 billion in the same
period a year ago.
"It was an important three months
for us in terms of transition," said Chief
Financial Officer Rick Lindner in a call
with analysts. "I feel good about how
we started. Our integration is on track."
Had BellSouth and AT&T been com-
bined in the first quarter of 2006, they
would have reported roughly the same
amount of revenue at $28.9 billion, and
net income of $1.98 billion.
Still, Lindner said that it is important
to note the company grew revenue
aside from the BellSouth boost.
"When you take out all the noise
from the acquisition, we grew revenue,
- and that growth rate is increasing," he
k :, said.
/GETTY IMAGES The wireless unit, which is being
GETY IMAGES rebranded from Cingular to AT&T,
d General added 1.2 million customers, finishing
in the quarter with 62.2 million. It also
a last 80 generated higher revenue from non-
le voice services including text messaging,
Jer. Web browsing and content downloads.
He said the San Antonio-based com-
pany, which changed its name from
oyota won SBC Communications after the 2005
fight for acquisition of the AT&T long distance
t over for business, continues to wring savings
spokesman from that purchase and that the Bell-
se market South deal is on track to eliminate up to
re the lead $1.2 billion in overlapping costs in 2007.
no special Savings from the BellSouth acquisi-
But, GM's tion totaled $300 million in the first
as produc- quarter, while the AT&T-SBC merger
running. contributed an additional $600 million
in cost reductions.


RICH PEDRONCEL/AP
SUBPRIME TROUBLE CONTINUES: Sales of existing homes plunged in
March by the largest amount in 18 years. Above, a home for sale is
shown Tuesday in Antelope, Calif.


and short-term expectations for the
economy.
The Conference Board said that its
Present Situation Index, which mea-
sures how shoppers feel now about
economic conditions, decreased to
131.3 from 138.5 in March. The Expec-
tations Index, which measures con-
sumers' outlook for the next six
months, declined to 85.8 from 87.9.
"Unlike the decline in March,
which was solely the result of appre-
hension about the short-term out-
look, this month's decline was a com-
.. .. I i I T


bination of weakening expectations
and a less favorable assessment of
present-day conditions," said Lynn
Franco, director of The Conference
Board Consumer Research Center.
"Rising prices at the gas pump con-
tinue to play a key role in dampening
consumers' short-term expectations."
Franco noted that the decline in
the Present Situation Index the
first decline in six months needs to
be watched closely in the months
ahead as further drops would signal a
softening in economic growth.


wIPi.m .


ECONOMY.


Existing home sales,


confidence tumble


-II-


----------~I---------I---


I`-


vNIMIW F..-I -1- -


- -w! lwr~a ~ -q a g


GN












4B WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION


BUSINESS BRIEFS



* DEFENSE CONTRACTORS


STOCK OPTIONS



SEC files charges against ex-Apple officers


LM OTERO/AP FILE, 2006
FLYING HIGH: Lockheed Martin, producer of the Joint
Strike Fighter, said that first-quarter earnings jumped
17 percent because of higher sales.


Lockheed, Northrop


disappoint investors


From Herald Wire Services

Earnings at defense contractors Lockheed Martin (LMT)
and Northrop Grumman (NOC) rose in the first quarter as
both companies increased sales to military and government
customers. Both companies disappointed investors, however,
as Lockheed sales fell short of expectations and Northrop
delivered lower than forecast earnings because of a strike at
one of its shipyards.
Lockheed Martin, the world's largest military contractor,
said first-quarter earnings jumped 17 percent because of
higher sales at its technology unit and one-time gains.
Lockheed earned $690 million, or $1.60 per share, in the
three months ended March 31, up from $591 million, or $1.34 a
share, a year ago.


* N.Y. TIMES
INVESTORS WITHHOLD
VOTES FOR DIRECTORS
New York Times (NYT)
Chairman Arthur Sulzberger
Jr. acknowledged share-
holder frustrations at the
company's annual meeting,
where investors delivered
another rebuke to the com-
pany's financial perfor-
mance by withholding
42 percent of their votes for
four directors. The election
wasn't in jeopardy since
they each received about 58
percent of the vote and only
need a plurality of votes cast
to be elected.


* OIL
BP SAYS 1ST-QUARTER
PROFIT FELL 17 PERCENT
BP (BP), Europe's sec-
ond-largest oil company,
reported a 17 percent drop
in first-quarter earnings on
lower oil prices and declin-
ing production.
Net profit for the three
months ending March 31 fell
to $4.66 billion from
$5.62 billion in the first quar-
ter last year. Revenue
declined 3 percent to $62.04
billion. BP was the first of
the major European oil com-
panies to report quarterly
results.




I<)


BY MAY WONG
Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Calif. The
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission filed civil charges
Tuesday against two former
Apple officers over their
alleged roles in backdating
stock options. One of them
immediately settled the case
and cast some blame on
Apple's CEO Steve Jobs.
Former Chief Financial
Officer Fred Anderson, 62, has
agreed to pay about $3.5 mil-
lion in fines and penalties to
settle, the SEC said.
The case against former
general counsel Nancy Hei-
nen, 50, will proceed. Her
attorneys have vowed to fight
the charges.
The commission accused
Heinen of participating in
fraudulent backdating and
altering company records to
conceal the fraud. The charges
were in connection with two


large options grants that
caused the company to under-
report its expenses by nearly
$40 million, the SEC said.
The grants in question
were a February 2001 grant of
4.8 million options to Apple's
executive team and a Decem-
ber 2001 grant of 7.5 million
options to Jobs.
Anderson's attorney,
Jerome Roth, issued a state-
ment saying the former CFO
had warned Jobs of the imph-
cations of backdating the ex"c-
utive team's grant. Roth said
Anderson was reassured by
Jobs that the board of direc-
tors had given the necessary
approvals, and thus proceeded
with the conclusion that the
grant was being properly han-
dled.
The SEC concluded the
grant was fraudulently
accounted for and that Ander-
son should have noticed Hei-
nen's efforts to backdate the


executive team's grant. He
failed to take steps to ensure
that Apple's financial state-
ments were correct, the SEC
said.
Apple's spokesman Steve
Dowling declined to comment
on Anderson's claims but
pointed to how the SEC
named only two former offi-
cers in its lawsuit Tuesday. "It
did not file (charges) against
Apple or any current employ-
ees," Dowling said. He
declined further comment.
Anderson and Heinen both
left Apple last year as the
backdating scandal was unrav-
eling.
The two former officers
each personally received sev-
eral million dollars in unre-
ported compensation as a
result of the backdating,
according to the SEC, which is
seeking penalties and fines
against Heinen, as well as a
court order barring her from


serving as an officer or direc-
tor of a public company.
Under Anderson's settle-
ment, the former CFO did not
admit any wrongdoing.
Marc Fagel, an assistant
regional director of the SEC in
San Francisco, called the
charges "serious." The civil
lawsuit was filed at the U.S.
District Court of Northern
California in San Jose.
Heinen and Anderson
"were entrusted to ensure that
accurate financial statements
are shared with investors, and
they failed to do that," Fagel
said.
The SEC said it will not
pursue any further action
against Apple, partly because
of its "swift" and "extraordi-
nary" cooperation with the
probe. The Cupertino-based
company has also imple-
mented new controls to pre-
vent a recurrence of fraudu-
lent conduct," the SEC said.


DRIVING DESTINATION


OnStar, MapQuest team up on the road


BY JEFF KAROUB
Associated Press
DETROIT General
Motors' OnStar service is
working with MapQuest to let
drivers link their desktops
with the blacktop.
The automaker and the
online mapping service of Dul-
les, Va.-based AOL said the
expansion of OnStar's in-vehi-
cle navigation system is
designed to let its subscribers
plan their driving route at
MapQuest.com and send
information about their desti-
nation directly to their cars.
OnStar Web Destination
Entry will be launched in a
pilot program this summer
with a random sample of 3,000
customers, GM planned to
announce today. It's expected
to be available by the end of
the year on more than 2 mil-
lion GM vehicles with
OnStar's Turn-by-Turn Navi-
gation capability.
The navigation system was


introduced last year as part of
the decade-old OnStar system,
which offers driving direc-
tions, roadside assistance and
other services through about
2,000 advisors at three North
American call centers. The
system also alerts emergency
rescue officials when an air
bag deploys or the vehicle is
involved in a crash.
Web Destination Entry will
allow customers to log on to
MapQuest and create up to
five destinations, which are
then stored on secure OnStar
servers. The driver can send
them to and access them
through the vehicle's OnStar
system, which calculates the
route and provides voice-
guided, step-by-step direc-
tions from the vehicle's loca-
tion. Although drivers can
already get the directions by
calling an OnStar operator,
OnStar and MapQuest officials
said Web Destination Entry
'adids convenience.


"If you think about Web
destination planning end-to-
end today, you've kind of got a
static origin and static destina-
tion," said OnStar President
Chet Huber. "This allows the
origin to be serendipitously
determined at whatever point
you want to start that trip."
Jim Greiner, Denver-based
MapQuest's senior vice presi-
dent and general manager,
said the new service is
responding to customer
demand to expand the capabil-
ities of online mapping. "Our


mission, our vision, is to help
people find places, whenever
and wherever they need to
be," he said. "This partnership
is one giant step toward ...
fulfilling our vision."
The companies did not dis-
close financial details.
By teaming with MapQuest,
the GM subsidiary is making a
"leadership move" in the
North American market, but it
won't be alone for long, said
Phil Magney, principal analyst
with Telematics Research
Group.


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LAETRDN


MiamiHerald.com I THE MIAMI HERALD







THE TIBUN WEDESDA, APIL 2, 207,IPGESS


Financial sector clients




drive 30% of foreign




real estate purchases


UI By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter
C clients of the Bahamian financial
services industry have been
responsible for 30 per cent of the
real estate purchases made by foreigners
in this nation over the past five years, it
was revealed yesterday.
Adam Sacks, managing director of
Oxford Economics, the company which
conducted a survey of the financial services
industry's impact at the request of the
Bahamas Financial Services Board (BFSB),
an estimated 5-7.5 per cent of the real estate
sector's economic impact was driven by the
financial service industry.
Some 3,500 sales of Bahamian real estate
to clients of the Bahamian financial ser-
vices sector had taken place over the last
five years, he added.
Wendy Warren, the BFSB's chief execu-
tive and executive director, said the infor-
mation will be used as a tracking mechanism
to allow the industry to see where growth


BFSB, from 1


'.-a while; that the financial ser-
,,,vices industry is a significant con-
1tributor to the economy, and it
'.gives us the basis to seek more
,.. support from government".
The message had been given
added weight by the fact that
the Oxford Economics study
came from a "credible, inde-
- pendent, objective source",
. though Mr Paton added: "I still
-wonder whether it's appreciat-
ed at the grassroots level, the
impact of the industry.
"Nevertheless, it clearly shows
the fact that financial services is
very important. The value-added
by the international sector is


has occurred. She said the study's informa-
tion will be useful for them to assess
progress, assist in their negotiations and
discussions with other sectors of the econ-
omy, and for the Government to be able to
assess their polices as it relates to financial
services.
Mr Sacks presented some of his compa-
ny's findings at a briefing at the British
Colonial Hilton yesterday. He explained
that the results were a compilation of data
that currently existed, combined with the
addition of catalytic impacts on various sec-
tors of the Bahamian economy. The results,
he said, were pretty consistent with Depart-
ment of Statistics data.
Mr Sacks said real estate was one of the
areas directly impacted by the presence of
a strong financial industry in the Bahamas.
He indicated that tourism also saw an
impact, with financial services accounting
for 160,000 extra visitor nights per annum.
According to the survey, 41 per cent of
industry respondents said financial services
facilitated hotel and related real estate


very important, because it pro-
vides the high level positions,
careers and salaries.
"You look at what's driving
construction, the law firms, and
a lot of it is directly related to
this. If we did not have financial
services in the Bahamas, the
economy would have a much
different profile.
"Whether or not we'll be
more successful in getting more
resources for the industry and
BFSB is hard to tell." Mr Paton
said financial services always
seemed to be at the "low end of
priorities" for the Government,
although he acknowledged that
it had plenty of areas it could
focus spending on.
Given that the Oxford Eco-
nomics study estimated that for
every 100 jobs created by the


financial services industry,
another 100 were created in oth-
er sectors of the Bahamian econ-
omy as a result of spending by
institutions and their staff, it
would seem that financial ser-
vices should rank highly when
attention is given to generating
employment.
The study also found that for
every extra $1 million in output
generated by the financial ser-
vices industry, another $0.6 mil-
lion in output was created in oth-
er economic sectors.
A 13FSB member survey, part
of the study,. also indicated that
foreign clients of the Bahamian
real estate industry had made
over 3.500 real estate purchases
in the Bahamas over the past
five years. Oxford Economics
said that even conservatively


development; 62 per cent said it brought
high-end visitors to the Bahamas for
tourism; some 38 per cent said it brought
high-end real estate investors to the country;
and 21 per cent accounted for others.
In total, financial services accounted for
some 21,000 jobs, with 9,300 coming from
direct employment in the sector, and the
remainder being in industry partners and
suppliers. Financial services was responsible
for 27 per cent of GDP, and provided the
Government with $230 million in revenue
through various permits, licenses and fees.
Mr Sacks said further catalytic impacts
included the 70 per cent of respondents
who said their services have led their cus-
tomers to increase their investments here,
while 63 per cent stated they helped their
clients in making better investment choices.
Some 26 per cent stated that their services
encouraged entrepreneurial activity by their
clients. The next steps in the process will be
to conduct reviews with the Department
of Statistics and deliver models and training
to that department for continued updates.


assuming that 10 per cent, or 70
per year, of these transactions
were directly attributable to
financial services, "this boost the
value added of the real estate
services sector by five per cent to
7.5 per cent, contributing around
a further 0.8 per cent to 1.2 per
cent to total Bahamian GDP".
Mr Paton, though, suggested
, that financial services was a rel-
atively small part of the attrac-
tion that the Bahamas held for
foreign and second home real
estate buyers.
The key factor, he said, was
this nation's tax neutral plat-
form, making it attractive for
Americans and Canadians who
wanted to become non-resident
for tax purposes in their native
country, but remain just a short
flight away.


MESSAGE FROM:





THE CLEARING


BANKS ASSOCIATION


The Clearing Banks of the

Bahamas advise that






Election Day


Banking hours will be as follows:






WEDNESDAY, MAY 2nd


9:30 a.m.


- 1:00 p.m.


Regular banking hours will resume on

THURSDAY, May 3rd from

9:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 1996
IN THE SUPREME COURT FAM/divi33
Family Division
BETWEEN

MARIE DARLING

Petitioner

AND


JULIUS DARLING


Respondent

NOTICE


TO: JULIUS DARLING
Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that, by Order of Mr. Justice
Maynard, Acting Justice of the Supreme Court,
dated 19th day of April, A.D., 2007, it was
ordered that personal service upon you of the
Summons in the is action which is scheduled to
be heard before the said Justice on Wednesday the
6th day of June, A.D., 2007 at 11:00 o'clock in
the forenoon, in Chambers at the Supreme Court,
Supreme Court Building, Garnet Levarity Justice
Centre, Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama be
dispensed with and it was ordered that publication
once in The Nassau Guardian and The Tribune
of this Notice and of the reciting Order, should
be deemed good and sufficient service upon you.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that should you
fail to appear on the hearing at the time and place
stated above the Court may make such Order and
such judgment against you as the Court deems just.



LOCKHART & MUNROE
Attorney for the Petitioner


TWO (2) VACANCIES FOR
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) BASIC
Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post Emergency
Medical Technician Basic, Corporate Office, Public Hospital Authority.
Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-
A minimum of two (2) subjects at the B.G.C.S.E. level at grade "C" or above, or equivalent
(including Math, English, Science); good oral, writing and reading skills; Certification
as an emergency Medical Technician, Basic with three years relevant experience; Must
be able to communicate and interact with members of the public and other public safety
and health professionals during times of extreme stress, while maintaining composure.
LICENSES CERTIFICATIONS
1. Obtains certification equivalent to US National Registry EMT-Basic.
2. Maintains certification in Basic Life Support (BLS); Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support
(PHTLS); American Heart Association (AHA) and Cardio Pulmonary Recitation
(CPR) for the Professional Rescuer.
3. Registered and licensed with the Health Professions Council (Bahamas).
JOB SUMMARY
Responsible for providing timely pre hospital care to patients who require emergency
medical assistance; Secure scene and maintains safety.
DUTIES:
1. Responds immediately to emergency calls.
2. Secures the scene of an emergency situation and maintains safety.
3. Performs basic life support and other medical assistance until the patient arrives at
the hospital.
4. Completes required reports related to patient care and provides electronic, verbal and
written report to medical staff.
5. Communicates with hospitals and dispatch center using various radio / telephone
equipment.
6. Ensures that all emergency equipment are in the ambulance at all times.
7. Prepares and submits an inventory of supplies at the end of each shift.
Letters of Application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3)
references should be submitted, no later than 11th May, 2007, to the
Human Resources Director, Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200
or 1st Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West.Bay Street.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 5B


THE TRIBUNE








PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JULIENNE SANON OF
HAMPTON ST. OFF MONTROSE AVENUE, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registrar. -naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, NICKEISHA ANNA-
KAY PALMER of Robinson Road Nassau,Bahamas
intend to change my name to NIKA DEANDRA
DELANCY. If there are' any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box SS-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OSARUMWENSE IDAH OF
COLONY CLOSE, P.O. BOX N-7536, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of April,.2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


The Anglican Centre Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Teachers for the
following positions available in Anglican Schools
for September 2007. The public is advised Lhat
these positions are being advertised in accordance
with the policies of the Immigration Authorities
beforeApplication for the renewal of Work Permits is
submitted. Bahamians are encouraged to apply.

Spanish Teachers
French Teachers
Home Economics Teacher
Commerce/Economics Teacher
Social Studies Teachers
Primary Teachers;
Language/Literature Teachers
at ematics Teachers
Computer Teachers
Chemistry Teachers
Physics Teachers
Physical Education Teacher
Religious Knowledge Teacher
Biology Teacher
General Science Teacher
Music Teacher
Art Teacher



Only qualified Teachers with Bachelor's Degree and
Teacher Training need apply. A minimum of two .ars
teaching experience is required. Teachers should have a
working knowledge of computers.
For further details please contact the Anglican
Central Education Authority on Sands and East Street
at telephone (242) 322-3015 or write to:

The Director of Education
The Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O.Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas


Businesses voice concerns




on ACH, work permit fees


* By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter
The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce's presi-
dent yesterday said the
Bahamian business community
was eager to see the commercial
banking system implement an
Automated Clearing House
(ACH) to modernise the coun-
try's payments system, as she
suggested that work permit fees
be lowered for industrial enter-
prises that held the prospect of
offering mass employment for
Bahamians.
Tanya Wright said Chamber
members had voiced four ideas
and concerns they hope the new
government will seriously con-
sider.
In an interview with Tribune
Business, Mrs Wright said the








bein-te es,-

n ea Inih


* TANYA WRIGHT


(FILE photo)

recommendations were not tar-
geted at either of the two main
parties, but instead at whichev-
er government assumed office.
The first issue, she said, was
the roll back of exchange con-
trols, which were causing hard-
ship fOr the Bahamian business
community.
Mrs Wright explained that
the current exchange controls
limit Bahamian businesses from
doing business effectively with
the rest of the world.
"In order to offer goods inter-
nationally, the most effective
way is to have a web site," the
Chamber president said. How-
ever, she explained that some
facility would have to be in
place locally to process the


Bahamas Co-operative League Limited
&
Bahamas Co-operative League
Insurance Brokerage Limited


will be relocating
to our new office complex at

Russell Road
(Oakes Field across from COB campus through
the corner of McDonald's-we're right next door)

On Monday April 23,2007


Our new telephone number is

302-0100


We look forward to serving you
at our new location.


sales.
At present, Mrs Wright said
that is not available in the
Bahamas, and should a mer-
chant wish to access the world
market and open an account in
another jurisdiction to process
transactions, they would be in
contravention of the existing
exchange control laws.
Mrs Wright said it was impor-
tant that the Bahamas operate
in a climate where businesses
can attract consumers from all
over the world.
The second issue she high-
lighted was the current tax
structure, which she said needs
to be restructured.
"We have had quite a lot of
talk, but there has not been
enough action," Mrs Wright
said. She indicated that while
there had been some talk of
introducing a Value Added Tax
(VAT) to replace the current
customs duties regime, until a
solution was decided, Bahamian
businesses could not remain
competitive with their regional
counterparts because import
taxes make goods prices far too
high.
Another issue which needed
to be re-examined was work
permits. Mrs Wright said it


might prove beneficial to lower
the cost of work permits for
businesses who wants to
explore industrial ventures that
had the potential to employ
mass labour.
She added that lowering costs
was the only way to encourage
such ventures.
Mrs Wright said the business
community was also eager to
see the Automated Clearing
House (ACH) up and running.
Once this is done, Mrs Wright
said businesses, would have the
ability to clear cheques faster,
taking away much of the cash
environment, which can only
aid in the reduction of crime.
In addition, Mrs Wright said
it would allow small to medi-
um-sized businesses an oppor-
tunity to free their access to
income. She said the new gov-
ernment needed to pay close
attention to the acceleration of
opportunity for Bahamian busi-
ness.
Mrs Wright added that all
these measures were really
about empowering Bahamian
businesses, particularly small
to medium-sized businesses, and
providing the best access to
world markets to become com-
petitive.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ALISHA PROPHETE OF
KENNEDY SUBDIVISION, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 25th day of April, 2007 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHYAN SATASHA CLARKE OF
FIRETRAIL ROAD (EAST), P.O. BOXCR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANCOIS SAUVEUR
MATHURIN OF HOSPITAL LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of April, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ADINA MATHURIN-SAINT-
PHARD OF HOSPITAL LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalizatioi i as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 18th day of April, 2007 to the .
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SYLVANE HONORAT OF
COWPEN ROAD, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
April, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





Computer Company Seeks Person to fill the position of
Receptionist, Sales Clerk.

Applicants should possess the following:-
Good Organization Skills
Be (Computer Literate
Be Punctual

Previous experience in computer equipment sales industry a
plus.

Interested applications should send resumes
and other information to
nassautecjjob@yahoo.com


BINE ] ssss
Pricing Information As Of:
Tuesday, 24 April 200 7
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW BISXBAIHAP.AS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1.785 56 CHG 00 37 / ".,CHO 00.02 / YTD 109.37 / YTD % 06 62
"e .K,.-h .". .L.A,- ..r5 , Prp.,, .:,.,_ T._.J., ,_l..:.. --... ,- ,.1.i .-:,l P._", z,. t P E_ =13,
1.85 0.54 Abaco Markets 1.03 1.10 0.07 1.005 -0.282 0.000 N/M 0.00%
12.05 10.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.59 11.59 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.9 3.45%
9.00 7.10 Bank of Bahamas 9.00 9.00 0.00 0.737 0.260 12.2 2.89%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 4,000 0.265 0.020 3.2 2.35%
2.50 1.26 Bahamas Waste 2.50 250 0.00 0.243 0.060 10.3 2.40%
1.49 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 200 0.170 0.050 7.6 3.85%
10.41 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.41 10.41 0.00 6 0.915 0.240 11.4 2.31%
2.20 1.67 Collna Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9 I 90%
14.26 9.99 Commonwealth Bank 14.26 14.26 0.00 3,141 1.084 0680 13.2 4.77%
6.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.02 5.02 0.00 261 0.118 0.045 42.6 0.89%
2.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.43 2.43 0.00 9.100 0.295 0 000 8.2 0.00%
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.522 0.240 11 4 4.04%
12.49 10.99 Finco 12.49 12.49 0.00 0.779 0 570 15 7 4.58%
14.70 11.50 FirstCaribbean 14.1 14 62 0.00 15 0.977 0.500 15.0 3.40%
17.11 10.42 Focol 17. : 17 11 0.00 1.644 0.510 104 2.98%
1.15 0.54 Freeport Concrete 0.54 0.54 0.00 -0.432 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 725 0.00 3,035 0.532 0.100 13.6 1.38%
9.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.570 15.4 6.30%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 7.95%
"-" Fidelity COver-The-CourrIPr SPr'.urlies
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS $ Div $ P/E Yield
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.234 1.125 12.6 7.71%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0 3 0 20 RND Holdirngs 0 'j' 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 0.00%
.;. Collnla Over-The-Counler ',i.urh.snla
43.00 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0.000 19.4 0.00%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0 55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
....... 7'." BISX Listed Mtulual Futnds
52.l,.1-F. 52wk-Lo, Fund Narr,.e r-. I i l r I-. ,. '. Yield %
1 331.6 1 2841 Colra Mone, r.larkel Fur,.. 1 "3~3ol, "
3.1424 2.7451 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.1424"**
2.6492 2.3294 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.649189**
1.2386 1.1643 Colina Bond Fund 1.238600.***
11.4467 10.7674 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.4467**.**
..^'M, ..-, .. FINDEX. CLOSE 796.03 / YTO 07.27% / 2006 34.47% ,
'- .. -L e- X Dec 2 1 r. i "i,,' ". '2 i L'.. YIELD l' .t 12 oll ,tii dh vl iorlnl; llvl Ii bhy ,riosing pl:o NAV KIY
52wk-HI Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buyin pri, of Colina al Fldellly
52wk-Low Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask $ Snilin p 1 i, or) Col 1,1 fnd hllillly - 13 Apill 200t7
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last PrI:,I snstl l ,aind ov I r- thl -countor price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol I reading vol ume of thi prior week 31 Mnrch 2007
Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS $ A conmpa.y'-, rolitod earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Not As,,t Vlu, i 31 M-ar0h 2007
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the la t 12 months N/M Not Momningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX 11. I I,1llty ni.,lui m.. Stock Indnx January 1, 1994 = 100 .. 31 Ma.rch 2007
-** 31 M.aunch 2',o
TO T9TRAPCrt IM'I)NA 241-502-?010 / FIDELITY 2.12-350 770. r1F0 r,,oFE DTL INFORMATION CALl (24t21 3.4 2503.


BUSINESS I


We're Moving

to Russell Road Oakes Field








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007 iVArU 7b


KPMG Telophone 242 393 2001
PO Box N 123 Fax 242 393 1772
Montague Serang Centre intornat wwwkpmg.com.b.
East Bay Suoee
Nassau, ahanma





AUDITORS' REPORT TO THE SHAREHOLDERS



We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of BAC Bahamas Bank, Limited
(the "Bank') as of December 31, 2006. This balance sheet is the responsibility of the
Bank's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this balance sheet
based on our audit

We conducted our audit In accordance with International Standards on Auditing as
promulgated by the International Federation of Accountants. Those Standards require
that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the
balance sheet is free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test
basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the balance sheet, An audit
also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall balance sheet presentation. We believe
that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

in our opinion, the balance sheet referred to above presents fairly, in all material
respects, the financial position of the Bank as of December 31, 2006, in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards promulgated by the International Accounting
Standards Board.



Chartered Accountants

Nassau, Bahamas
February 14, 2007








BAC BAHAMAS BANK, LIMITED
Balance Sheet ,

December 31, 2006, with corresponding figures for 2005
(Expressed in United States dollars)

2006 2005

ASSETS

Loans from customers, net (notes 5 and 7) 282.338.389 237,923,225
Investments (note 8) 40,684,991 30,601,702
Accrued interest receivable 1,507,857 1,281.034
Furniture and equipment 79,563 79,472
Asset held for sale, net 128,356 405,022
Other receivables and assets (note 17) 77,932 146,033
Intangible asset net (note 9) 165,060
$ 348,201,648 272,980,784
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Liabilities:

Demand deposits from customers (notes 4 and 10) $ 60,219,836 36,053,964
Time deposits from customers (notes 4, 5 and 11) 223.291,262 188.319,386
Loans payable (notes 4, 5 and 12) 18,698,561 14,270.646
Accnud interest payable (note 4) 2,608,103 1,903.570
Other liabilities tnots 17) 4,914,138 935,904
309,731,900 241,483,470

Vhareholders' equity

Share capital (note 13) 24,000,000 12,000,000
Contributed surplus 6.000.000 6,000.000
Unrealised gai n on available-for-sale investments 220,519 27,083
Retained eamings 8,249,229 13,470,231
38.469,748 31,497.314
Commitments and contingencies (note 14)

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity $ 348,201,648 272,980,784

See accompanying notes to balance sheet.


This balance sheet was approve on behalf of the Board of Directors on February 14. 2007
by the following:


Notes to Balance Sheet

December 31, 2006
(Expressed in United States dollars)


1. Reporting entity

BAC Bahamas Bank, Limited ("the Bank') was incorporated under the laws of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas on August 13, 1992 and was granted a banking license
on December 16, 1992 by The Central Bank of the Bahamas. The Bank's registered
office Is located at Nokfolk House, Frederick Streets, Nassau, Bahamas.

Credomatic International, S.A. owns 75% of the share capital of the Bank, while
Corporaci6n Tenedora BAC San Jose, S.A. (formerly Corporaci6n Tenedora San Jose.
S.A.) owns the remaining 25%. Credomatic International, S.A. is incorporated in Panama
and Corporaci6n Tenedora BAC San Jos6, S.A. is incorporated in Costa Rica.

At a Board of Directors meeting of U.P. Bank and Trust Limited ("UPBT") held on
November 15, 2002, an agreement was reached to merge the Bank and UPBT, a related
party, which at the date of the merger was owned by the same shareholders of the Bank in
the same proportion, the Bank being the surviving entity. Effective November 27, 2002,
the Bank absorbed all the assets, liabilities, rights, and obligations of UPBT

The Bank is primarily involved in investment, corporate and retail banking.

2. Basis of preparation

(a) Statement of compliance

The balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with International Financial
Reporting Standards (IFRSs).

(b) Basis of measurement

The balance sheet has been prepared on the historical cost basis except for the following:

derivative financial instruments are measured at fair value
I available-for-sale financial assets are measured at fair value

(c) Functional and presentation currency

This balance sheet is presented in United States dollars, which is the Bank's functional
currency.

(d) Use of estimates and judgements

The preparation of balance sheet requires management to make judgements, estimates
and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported
amounts of assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to
accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised and in
any future periods affected.

In particular, information about significant areas of estimation uncertainty and critical
judgements in applying accounting policies that have the most significant effect on the
amounts recognized in the balance sheet are described as follows:

Fair value measurement (note 3(b) (vi))
Derivate financial instruments (note 3(d))
Investments (note 3(e))
Loans recelvables(note 3(f))

3. Significant accounting policies

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods
presented in this balance sheet.

(a) Foreign currency

The Bank's functional currency is the United States dollar. Assets and liabilities in foreign
currencies are translated at prevailing exchange rates at the balance sheet date

(b) Financial instruments

(i) Classification

Loans and receivables are classified as originated loans and receivables, as these
were created by the Bank providing money to a debtor and were not established
with the Intent of short-term profit taking.

Held-to-maturity assets are financial assets with fixed or determinable payments
and a fixed maturity that the Bank has the intent and ability to hold to maturity.

Available-for-sale investments are financial assets that are not held for trading
purposes, originated by the Bank, or held to maturity.


(li) Recognition

The Bank Initially recognizes loans, deposits, debt securities issued and
subordinated liabilities on the date that they are originated. All other financial
assets and liabilities are initially recognized on the trade date at which time the
Bank becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the instrument

(lii) Derecognition

The Bank derecognises a financial asset when the contractual rights to the cash
flows from the asset expire, or it transfers the rights to receive the contractual
cash flows on the financial asset in a transaction in which substantially all the risks
and rewards of ownership of the financial asset are transferred. Any interest in
transferred financial assets that is created or retained by the Bank is recognized
as a separate asset or liability.

The Bank derecognises a financial liability when its contractual obligations are
discharged or cancelled or expire.

The Bank enters into transactions whereby it transfers assets recognized on Its
balance sheet, but retains either all risks and rewards of the transferred assets or
a portion of them. If all or substantially all risks and rewards are retained, then the
transferred assets are not derecognised from the balance sheet.

The Bank also derecognises certain assets when it charges off balances
pertaining to the assets deemed to be uncollectible.

(iv) Offsetting

Financial assets and liabilities are set off and the net amount presented in the
balance sheet when, and only when, the Bank has a legal right to set off the
amounts and intends either to settle on a net basis or to realise the asset and
settle the liability simultaneously.
(v) Amortised cost measurement

The amortised cost of a financial asset or liability Is the amount at which the
financial asset or liability is measured at initial recognition, minus principal
repayments, plus or minus the cumulative amortisation using the effective Interest
method of any difference between the Initial amount recognized and the maturity
amount, minus any reduction for impairment All non-trading financial assets and
liabilities, originated loans and receivables, and held-to-maturity investments are
measured at amortised cost, less Impairment losses. Premiums and discounts
are included in the carrying amount of the related Instrument.

(vi) Fair value measurement

The determination of fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities is based
on quoted market prices for financial instruments traded in active markets. For all
other financial instruments, fair value is determined by using valuation techniques.
Valuation techniques include net present value techniques and the discounted
cash flow method.

(vii) Identification and measurement of impairment

At each balance sheet date the Bank assesses whether there is objective
evidence that financial assets are impaired. Financial assets are impaired when
objective evidence demonstrates that a loss event has occurred after the initial
recognition of the asset, and that the loss event has an Impact on the future cash
flows on the asset that can be estimated reliably.

The Bank considers evidence of impairment at both a specific asset and collective
level. All individually significant financial assets are assessed for specific
impairment. All significant assets found not to be specifically Impaired are then
collectively assessed for any impairment that has been incurred but not yet
identified. Assets that are not individually significant are then collectively assessed
for impairment by grouping together financial assets (carried at amortised cost)
with similar risk characteristics.
(vii) Identification and measurement of impairment

At each balance sheet date the Bank assesses whether there is objective
evidence that financial assets are impaired. Financial assets are Impaired when
objective evidence demonstrates that a loss event has occurred after the Initial
recognition of the asset, and that the loss event has an impact on the future cash
flows on the asset that can be estimated reliably.

The Bank considers evidence of impairment at both a specific asset and collective
level. All individually significant financial assets are assessed for specific
Impairment. All significant assets found not to be specifically impaired are then
collectively assessed for any Impairment that has been incurred but not yet
identified. Assets that are not individually significant are then collectively assessed
for impairment by grouping together financial assets (carried at amortised cost)
with similar risk characteristics.

(vii) identification and measurement of impairment, continued

Objective evidence that financial assets (including equity securities) are Impaired
can include default or delinquency by a borrower, restructuring of a loan or
advance by the Bank on terms that the Bank would not otherwise consider,
indications that a borrower or issuer will enter bankruptcy, the absence of an
active market for a security, or other observable data relating to a group of assets
such as adverse changes in the payment status of borrowers or issuers in the
group, or economic conditions that correlate with defaults In the group.

Impairment losses on assets carried at amortised cost are measured as the
difference between the carrying amount of the financial assets and the present
value of estimated cash flows discounted at the assets' original effective interest
rate. Losses are reflected in an allowance account against loans and advances.
Interest on the impaired asset continues to be recognized through the unwinding
of the discount.

Impairment losses on available-for-sale investment securities are recognized by
transferring the difference between the amortised acquisition cost and current fair
value out of equity.

(viii) Gains and losses on subsequent measurement

Gains and losses from a change in the fair value of available-for-sale investments
are recognized directly in equity until an asset is considered to be impaired, at
which time the loss is recognized.

(c) Cash and cash equivalents

The Bank considers due from banks with original maturities of three months or less, to be
cash and cash equivalents which are subject to Insignificant risk of changes in their fair
value, and are used by the Bank in the management of its short-term commitments.

Cash and cash equivalents are carried at amortized cost in the balance sheet.

(d) Denvate financial instruments

The Bank uses derivate financial instruments to hedge its exposure to interest rate risks
arising from financing and investment activities. The Bank does not use hedge accounting.

Derivate financial instruments are recognized initially at cost Subsequent to initial
recognition, derivate financial instruments are state at fair value.

(e) Investments

Investments are initially measured at fair value plus incremental direct transaction costs
and subsequently accounted for depending on their classification as either held-to-maturity
or available-for-sale.
(i) Held-to-maturity

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturity that the Bank has the positive intent and ability to
hold to maturity.

Held-to-maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective
interest method. Any sale or reclassification of a significant amount of held-to-
maturity investments not close to their maturity would result in the reclassification
of all held-to-maturity investments as available-for-sale, and prevent the Bank
from classifying investment securities as held-to-maturity for the current and the
following two financial years.

(11) Available-for-sale

Available-for-sale investments are non-derivative investments that are not
designated as another category of financial assets. Unquoted equity securities
whose fair value cannot be reliably measured are carried at cost. All other available-
for-sale investments are carried at fair value.

Other fair value changes are recognized directly in equity until the investment is
sold or impaired.

(f) Loans receivable

Loans receivable are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments
that are not quoted in an active market and that the Bank does not intend to sell
immediately or in the near term.


Loans receivable are stated at the amount of outstanding principal, and are presented net
of specific and general allowances for collectibility.

Specific allowances are made against the carrying amount of loans that are identified as
being impaired based on regular reviews of outstanding balances to reduce these loans to
their recoverable amounts. General allowances are maintained to reduce the carrying
amount of portfolios of similar loans to their estimated recoverable amounts at the balance
sheet date. The expected cash flows for portfolios of similar assets are estimated based
on previous experience and considering the credit rating of the underlying customers and
late payments of interest or penalties. Once a loan is determined to be uncollectible, all
necessary legal procedures have been completed, and the final loss has been quantified,
the loan is written off.
(g) Assets hold for sale

Assets held for sale represent assets assigned to the Bank in payment of loans. The
Bank has legal title to these assets, which primarily comprise property. These assets are
recorded at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Cost is determined as the carrying
amount of the loan and accrued interest on the date prior to foreclosure. Net realizable
value is determined based on the selling price of the asset net of direct selling costs.


I .


I' -


I










PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


(h) Furniture and equipment

Furniture and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment
losses.

The estimated useful lives for the current and comparative periods are as follows


* IT equipment
* fixtures and fittings


3 5 years
5 10 years


Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values ire leassssed iat the reporting
date.
Cost of renewals and iiiiprovements are added to funilurle and equipment At the tine of
disposal or retirement of assets, the cost and related iiccumulated depreciation are
eliminated, and any resulting profit or loss is recognized



(i) Intangible assets

The intangible asset is stated at cost less accumulated amortisation and impairment
losses, if applicable. It is amortised on a straight-line basis over a period of five years.

j) Impairment of non-financial assets

The carrying amounts of the Bank's non-financial assets are reviewed at each reporting
date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment If any such indication
exists then the asset's recoverable amount is estimated.

An impairment loss is recognized if the carrying amount of an asset or its cash-generating
unit exceeds its recoverable amount. A cash-generating unit is the smallest identifiable
asset group that generates cash flows that largely are independent from other assets and
groups.

The recoverable amount of an asset or cash-generating unit is the greater of its value in
use and its fair value less costs to sell. In assessing value in use, the estimated future
cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects
current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset.

Impairment losses recognized in prior periods are assessed at each reporting date for any
indications that the loss has decreased or no longer exists. An impairment loss is reversed
if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An
impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset's carrying amount does not
exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or
amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognized.

(k) Deposits and loans payables

Deposits and loans payables aie the Banmi s sources of debt funding

Deposits and loans payables are initially measured at fair value plus transaction costs,
and subsequently measured at their amortised cost using the effective interest method.

(I) Business combination

A business combination in which the Bank obtains control over the net assets and
operations of another enterprise, is accounted for as an acquisition using the purchase
method of accounting, whereby the purchase price is allocated to the fair value of the
assets acquired.

(m) New standards and interpretations not yet adopted

A number of new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations are not yet
effective for the year ended 31 December 2006. and have not been applied in preparing
this balance sheet:

IFRS 7 Financial Instruments Disclosures and the Amendment to International
Accounting Standard ("IAS") 1 Presentation of Financial Statements: Capital
Disclosures require extensive disclosures about the significance of financial
instruments for an entity's financial position and performance, and qualitative and
quantitative disclosures on the nature and extent of risks. IFRS 7 and amended
IAS 1, which become mandatory for the Bank's 2007 balance sheet, will require
extensive additional Jisb'losures with aspectt to 'Bank's financial instruments and
share capital.

IFRIC 7 Applying the Restatement Approach under IAS 29 Financial Reporting in
Hyperinflationary Economies addresses the application of [AS 29 when an
economy first becomes hyperinflationary and in particular the accounting for
deferred tax. IFRIC 7, which becomes mandatory for the Bank's 2007 balance
sheet, is not expected to have any impact on the Bank's balance sheet.

IFRIC 8 Scope uf IFRS 2 Share-based Payment addresses the accounting for
share-based payment transactions in which some or all of goods or services
received cannot be specifically identified. IFRIC 8 will become mandatory for the
Bank's 2007 balance sheet, with retrospective application required The Bank has
not yet determined the potential effect of the interpretation

IFRIC 9 Reassessment of hminoeeoa Denvatives requires that a reassessment of
whether embedded derivative should be separated from the underlying host
contract should be made only when there are changes to the contract. IFRIC 9,
which becomes mandatory for the 'Bank's 2001 balance sheet, is not expected to
have any impact on the Bank's balance sheet

IFRIC 10 Interim Financial Reporting and Impairment piunibits the reversal of an
impairment loss recognized in a previous interim period in respect of goodwill, an
investment in an equity instrument or a financial asset carried at cost. IFRIC 10
will become mandatory for the Bank's 2007 balance sheet, and will apply to
goodwill, investments in equity instruments, and financial assets carried at cost
prospectively from the date that the Bank first applied the measurement criteria of
IAS 36 and IAS 39 respectively (i e., 1 January 2004). The Bank does not expect
the interpretation to have any impact on the Bank's balance sheet




IFRIC 11, IFRS 2 Share-based Payment Company and Treasury Share
Transactions. This interpretation addresses the classification of a share-based
payment transaction (as equity- or cash-settled), in which equity instruments of
the parent or another group entity are transferred, in the financial statements of
the entity receiving the services. IFRIC 11, which becomes mandatory for the
Bank's 2007 balance sheet, is not expected to have any impact on the Bank's
balance sheet.

IFRIC 12, Service Concession Arrangements. This interpretation provides
guidance to private sector entities on certain recognition and measurement issues
that arise in accounting for public-to-private service concession arrangements.
IFRIC 12, which becomes mandatory for the Bank's 2008 balance sheet, is not
expected to have any impact on the Bank's balance sheet.

4. Related party balances

Related parties comprise entities under common ownership and control. Balances with
related parties are shown below:

2006 2005

Assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 17,403,815 2.379,236
Loans 712,358 -
Accrued Interest receivable 5,203 -
$ 18,121,376 2.379236

Liabilities
Demand deposits $ 462,485 4,572.195
Time deposits 6,722,475 500,000
Loans payable 3,000,000
Accrued interest payable 72,001 3,017
$ 7,256.961 8,075,212

5. Maturities of significant assets and liabilities

At December 31, contractual maturities of significant assets and liabilities not disclosed
elsewhere in the balance sheet are summarized as follows.


Maturity 2006
_______ _2005

Loans Within one
year $ 198,278,718 158,266,118
Thereafter 87,428,765 82,405,650
285,707,483 240,671,768


Time deposits (payable) Within one
year 208,303,516 183,864,102
_________________Thereafter 14,987,746 4,455,284
223,291,262 188,319.386

Loans (payable) Within one
year 18,698,561 14,270,646


6. Cash anrd cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are detailed as follows:
S2006 2005


Due from banks $ 23,384,.560 4 ,988,777
Overdraft- (,_609,5 41L
$ 23,384,560l 2,379,236


The geographical distribution of cash and cash equivalents by country of the head office is
detailed as follows,

2006 2005

Costa Rica $ 936,391 (2,604,541)
United States-of America 22,428,332 4,983,777
Germany 19,8373 31 9 3
$ 23,384,560 2,379,236


7. Loans, net

At December 31, 2006, the loan portfolio is segmented by industry as follows:

2006 2005

Personal consumption $ 54,061,748 41,259,708
Services 49,044,124 47,413,271
Commerce 45,582,180 55,327,200
Industry 51,355,381 32,452,836
Housing 47,077,611 37,505,917
Agriculture 17,787,067 10,924,983
Tourism 8,448,436 6,794,788
Construction 12,202,716 8,459,808
Transportation 148,220 533,257
285,707,483 240,671,768
Less provision for loan losses (3,226,316) (2,510,244)
Less unearned commissions (142,778) (238,299)
$ 282,338,389 237,923,225


At December 31, 2006, the Bank has non-accrual loans amounting to $561,343 (2005:
$121,762). Accrued interest receivable on those loans amounts to $ 19,209 (2005:
$4,695).
At December 31, 2006, loans earn interest at rates ranging between 4.33% to 14.75%
(2005: 2.33% to 13.25%) per annum. Al loans are due from entities and individuals
domiciled in Costa Rica.

At December 31, 2006, the loan portfolio is secured as follows: mortgages 23.94% (2005:
25.89%), chattel mortgages 1.87% (2005: .8% 82%), securities 30.5% (2005: 32.52%),
unsecured 20.14% (2005: 23.86%) and other 23.55% (2005: 13.91%).

The movement in the provision for loan losses is shown below:

2006 2005

Balances at beginning of year $ 2,510,244 1,788,736
Provision for loan losses 716,072 996,201
Wnte-offs (274,693)
$ 3,226,316 2,510,244

8. Investments

At December 31, 2006, investments comprise securities available-for-sale, detailed as
follows:


2006 2006
Region Interest Maturity Cost Fair value

United States of America -
Government Bond 2.63% Mar/2007 $ 31,434,662 31,437,159
Gran Cayman-Other 7.98% Apr/2007 5,798,988 6,015,513
Republic of Panama -
Government Bond 6,75% Mar/2007 2,619,268 2,619,268
Republic of Costa Rica -
Government Bond 4,78% Mar/2007 611,554 613,051
Total investment available-
for-sale $ 40,464,472 40,684,991


2005 2006
Region interest Maturity Cost Fair value

United States of America -
Government Bond 2.50% May/2006 $ 26,375,818 26,375,818
United States of America -
Bank Bonds 3.90% Jun/2006 3,002,632 3,002,632
Republic of Panama -
Government Bond 6.75% Mar/2007 619,316 634,400
Republic of Costa Rica -
Government Bond 6.80% Apr/2007 576,853 588.852
Total Investment available-


9. Intangible asset

The intangible asset represents the amount allocated to customers relationships on the
merger that took place between the Bank and UPBank and Trust Limited in 2002. The
movement in intangible asset is shown below:

2005 2005

Balance at beginning of year $ 900,329 900,329
Accumulated amortisation (900,329) (735,269)
$ 165,060


10. Demand deposits

AT December 31, 2006 demand deposits are from customers primarily domiciled in Costa
Rica. Demand deposits bear interest at rates varying up to 4.25% (2005: 1.25%).

11. Time deposits

At December 31, 2006, the majority of the time deposits were due within one year with
annual interest ranging between 1.11% to 10.09% (2005: 1.61% to 12.75%) and are from
customers primarily domiciled in Costa Rica.

12. Loans payable

At December 31, 2006, the loans payable are detailed as follow:

2006 2005

Related party domiciled in Panama: (2005:
5.37%), (2004:5.25%) $ 3,000,000
Banks (2096: 5.33% to 5.3%), (2005:
3,78% to 6,41%) 18,100,000 8,215,375
Due to banks -Letters of credit issued 598,561 3,055,271
$ 18,698,561 14,270,646

13. Share capital

At December 31, 2006, share capital is represented by 24,000,000 ordinary registered
shares of $1.00 par value each, for a total of $24,000,000 (2005: 12,000,000 shares for a
total of $12,000,000).
In 2006, the Company agreed to increase its authorised and issued share capital by
US$12,000,000 (12 million shares of $1.00 par value each) by capitalizing an equivalent
amount of retained earnings.

14. Commitments and contingencies

2006 2005

Commercial letters of credit $ 3,612,296 7,117,144
Credit commitments 434,000 993,541
Other 259,0468-
$ 4,305,342 8,110,685

Commercial letters of credit include exposure to some credit loss in the event of non-
performance by the customer. The Bank's credit policies and procedures to approve
credit commitments and financial guarantees are the same as those for granting loans.
The Bank does not expect to incur losses as a result of these commitments.

15. Fair value disclosure of financial instruments

At December 31, 2006 and 2005, the following methods and assumptions were used by
management to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments.

(a) Cash and cash equivalents

Due from banks: the carrying amounts approximate fair value because of the short
maturities of these instruments.

(b) Investments available-for-sale

Carrying amounts approximate fair value because these investments are carried
at market value.

(c) Loans, net

Carrying amounts of loans receivable approximate fair value because interest
rates on all loans are adjusted to market rates either monthly or quarterly letters of
credit.

(d) Letters of credit

The fair value of letters of credit is based on fees currently charged for similar
agreements or on the estimated cost to terminate them or otherwise settle the
obligat',ns with the counterparts at the reporting date.

(e) Interest receivable and interest payable


These instruments have substantially short maturities and bear no interest,
accordingly, carrying amounts approximate fair value.

(I) Demand and time deposits

The fair value of demand and time deposits is the amount payable on demand at
the balance sheet date. The fair value of time deposits is estimated by discounting
future cash flows using the rate offered for deposits with similar remaining
maturities. All demand deposits have maturities of less than one year, accordingly,
carrying amounts approximate fair value.

(g) Loans payable

The carrying value of loans payable is equivalent to their fair values at the balance
sheet date because interest rates on all loans are adjusted to market rates either
monthly or quarterly.

Fair value estimates are made on a given date, based on relevant market information and
information about the financial Instrument. These estimates are subjective in nature and
involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and, therefore, cannot be
determined with precision. Changes In assumptions could significantly affect the
estimates.


I 1 T _


I L I I









16. Risk management disclosures
This section provides information of the Bank's exposure to risk and describes the
methods used by management to control risk. The most significant types of financial risk
to which the Bank is exposed are credit, liquidity, and price risk. Price risk includes
currency risk, interest rate risk and market risk.
Credit risk
The Bank is subject to credit risk through its trading, lending and investing activities, and in
transactions where it acts as an intermediary on behalf of customers or other third parties
or issues guarantees. The Bai k's primary exposure to credit risk arises through the
granting of loans. The amount of credit exposure is represented by the carrying amounts
of the assets in the balance sheet plus commitments to extend credit.
Concentrations of credit risk that arise from financial instruments exist for groups of
counterparties when they have similar economic characteristics that would cause their
ability to meet contractual obligations to be similarly affected by changes in economic or
other conditions. The major concentrations of credit risk arise by location and type of
customer in relation to the Bank's investments, loans, and guarantees issued. The Bank
has no significant exposure to any single customer or counterpart.
The Bank's policy is to require suitable collateral to be provided by certain customers prior
to the disbursement of approved loans. On average, 60 percent of the balance of
outstanding loans is collateralised Guarantees and letters of credit are also subject to
strict credit assessments before being provided. Periodic reviews of cardholder
creditworthiness are made and card limits are adjusted where necessary. Collateral for
loans, guarantees, and letters of credit is usually in the form of cash, inventory, securities,
or other property.
The risk that counterparties might default on their obligations is monitored continually. In
monitoring credit risk exposure, consideration is given to trading instruments with a
positive fair value and to volatility of the fair value of trading instruments. To manage the
level of credit risk, the Bank deals with counterparties in good standing.
Liquidity risk
Liquidity risk arises in the general funding of the Bank's activities and in the management
of positions. It includes both the risk of being unable to fund assets at appropriate
maturities and rates and the risk of being unable to liquidate an asset at a reasonable
price and within an appropriate timaframe. The Bank has access to a diverse funding
base. Funds are raised using a broad range of Instruments including deposits, other
liabilities evidenced by paper, subordinated liabilities, and share capital. This enhances
funding flexibility, limits dependence on any one source of funds, and generally lowers the
cost of funds. The Bank strives to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and
flexibility through the use of liabilities with a range of maturities. The Bank continually
assesses liquidity risk by identifying and monitoring changes In funding required to meet
business goals and targets set in terms of the overall Bank strategy. In addition the Bank
holds a portfolio of liquid assets as part of its liquidity risk management strategy.
Interest rate risk
The Bank's operations are subject to the risk of interest rate fluctuations to the extent that
Interest assets (including investments) and interest liabilities mature or reprice at different
times or in differing amounts. In the case of floating rate assets and liabilities the Bank is
also exposed to basis risk, which is the difference in repricing characteristics of the various
floating rate indices. Risk management activities are aimed at optimising net interest
income, given market interest rate levels consistent with the Bank's business strategies.
Currency risk
The Bank is not exposed to currency risk, as all transactions are in US dollars.
17. Derivatives
.In the normal course of business, the Bank uses interest rate derivatives including interest
rate swaps primarily for hedging purposes in its balance sheets management activities.
The Bank has designated these derivative instruments as freestanding derivatives.
During 2006 and 2005, the Bank entered into four Interest rate swaps (two In 2005) and
one cap. The notional amount of the swaps are $35,000,000 and the cap is $7,000,000
(2005: $7,000,000 in swaps). The swaps mature between April and November 2011. The
cap matures on November 2011. The Bank diaslsfies the fair value of interest swaps and
caps as other assets and liabilities. The fair value is based on their quoted market price at
the balanced sheet date, which is $30,346 included in other assets and $520,121 (2005:
$102,619) included in other liabilities.
18. Dividends
On July 20, 2005, the Bank declared dividends of $1,000,000 ($0.08 per share)


The ugly face of terror-
ism continues to show
its itself, questioning
the concepts of peace, safety
and privacy. Random, unpro-
voked acts of terrorism are
forcing action and laws upon
the global community, with
governments demanding that
they be allowed more access in
to our private lives for the sake
of protecting us. Take, for
example, the USA PATRIOT
Act, which was passed by Con-
gress within days of the Sep-
tember 11 attacks. This is a law
that gives the US government
the 'right' to

Access your medical
records,
Tax records,
Information about the
books you buy or borrow
The power to break into
your home
Conduct secret searches
without telling you for weeks,
months or 'indefinitely'

In a Wednesday, April 27,
2006, article appearing in the
Washington Post, headlined US
Figures Show Sharp Global
Rise In Terrorism: State Dept
Will Not Put Data in Report,
Susan B. Glasser states: "The
number of serious internation-
al terrorist incidents more than
tripled last year, according to


Safe &
Secure

al3B8E B


US government figures, a sharp
upswing in deadly attacks that
the State Department has
decided not to make public in
its annual report on terrorism
due to Congress this week."
If this is to be taken serious-
ly, what implications does it
have for the Bahamas? I now
take you back to October 11-12,
2001, when the Caribbean
Heads of Government met in
Nassau in a Special (Emer-
gency) Session due to the Sep-
tember 11, 2001, terror attacks
on the US. From this meeting
we have what is called the Nas-
sau Declaration, from which
the following quote is taken:
"Extraordinary vigilance and
co-ordination in the future, to
ensure that our territories, our
institutions and our citizens, are
not used in any manner to facil-
itate the activities of terrorists
or to undermine our national
and regional security."

Further, it goes on to state:
"We are concerned that the
attacks and subsequent devel-
opments have been especially


SALESPERSONS NEEDED

Tropical Companies are in search of highly motivated sales persons
and stock room helpers for a number of vacancies. If you love
working with tourist or have at least one year's experience in retail
sales, are computer literate and have a good work ethic

Call Ph: 326 7791 between 9-3pm
M-F deadline Mar 15th



Legal Notice



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)


CORAL TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED

In Voluntary Liquidation

"Notice is herchy given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
CORAL TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED is in Dissolution."

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 23rd day of January,
2007.

Mark James Shortland
Vannin, Fairy Cottage
Laxey, Isle of Man,
IM4 7JB
Liquidator





JULIUS BAER BANK & TRUST

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED

Julius Baer Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited, a leading
financial institution, is seeking candidates for the following
position:

COMPLIANCE / MONEY LAUNDERING
REPORTING OFFICER

Requirements:
At least 5 years banking experience
CPA designation or equivalent
A broad understanding of Bahamian laws and regulations
applicable to banking and trust administration
Excellent communication and computer skills
Ability to work with strict deadlines and little supervision

Duties include:

Oversight and review of the Bank's AML/KYC policies,
porcedures and transaction monitoring systems
Liaising with regulators and auditors including follow-
up on findings
Conducting investigations
Regular interaction with the Bank's legal counsel
Reporting on compliance issues to management and the
Board of Directors
Coordinating and administering compliance training for
key regulations
Maintaining the Bank's compliance with Group's standards
Rviewing new products. business relationships and
contracts

Interested person meeting the above criteria should apply in
writing, on or before May 4th, 2007 enclosing a full r6sum6t
with cover letter to:


BY MAIL
Personal & Confidential
Deputy Resident Manager
P.O. Box N-4890
Nassau, Bahamas


BY HAND
Personal & Confidential
Deputy Resident Manager
Julius Baer Bank & 'Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore
Nassau, Bahamas


devastating to our tourism, avi-
ation, financial services and
agricultural sectors, which are
the major contributors to our
GDP, foreign exchange earn-
ings and to employment in the
countries of our region."
Almost six years later, one
asks the question: "What has
happened since this realisation
and admittance of the critical
state of affairs that we find our-
selves in?" Well, there has been
a lot of talk but, apparently,
very little action, and the action
which has transpired has been
focused on fighting terror
financing. What about events
happening on the ground, espe-
cially with tourism? It is inter-
esting to note this, considering
that our major source of for-
eign currency is received via
tourism. Yet very little is being
done to protect it.
The economic importance of
tourism is undeniable. Accord-
ing to the World Tourism
Organisation (WTO), interna-
tional tourism receipts in 2003
represented in 2003 about 6 per
cent of worldwide exports of
goods and services, a figure that
accounts for roughly one-tenth
of global total tourism revenue.
This suggests that, with domes-
tic revenue, current total
tourism revenues could be as
high as five trillion dollars.
This report by Jonathan Ess-
ner for the World Tourism
Organisation, called Security
and Development, also states:
"For many countries in the
developing world, tourism is a
critical source of revenue gen-
eration, and therefore a major
component of economic devel-
opment, a relationship that
rewards states when positive
conditions such as a strong
global economy exist. But what
happens when negative condi-
tions exist, such as terrorism?"
Yes, what happens, especial-
ly when the proverbial writing
is on the wall? As we prepare
new investments in the billions
from Grand Bahama in the
north to Ingaua in the south.
the next three articles will dis-
cuss how the increased poten-
tial for terrorist activity can
have a negative impact on
tourism.
The ability to gain wealth is
not the point here, but rather
the ability to protect assets. We
do not recognize the value of
freedom until it is taken away
from us or threatened. Most
governments guarantee their
citizens' right to life, privacy.
speech, movement, thought and
a host of other things. But in
this present state of affairs ,are
we able to continue with such a
free, liberal society, and to have
such rights? Are we slowly but
surely moving to a police state,
where the powers that be
ensure we have the fundamen-
tal rights and freedoms, no mat-
ter what the cost?
Some would argue that with
the fall of the Soviet Union, a
powerful communist state
brought with it a 'free for all'.
On the other hand, democracy
and capitalism has brought with
it a type of freedom to the
masses that maybe they have
not been able to deal with.
Maybe, just maybe, we need to
be controlled by just a few who
know what is best for us.
Never, you say, as are we not
controlled by just a few, with
our choices controlled by what
the media, inclusive of the
movies, the press, want us to
see. Is not our picture of the
world shown to us by the pic-
ture on the TV or in the news-
papers'? Let us not forget such
ideals as the United Nations,
with its membership of 191. Is it
really controlled by the UN
Security Council, which is dom-
inated by the five permanent
'members.
The Security Council is the
United Nations' most power-
ful body. It has "primary
responsibility for the mainte-
nance of international peace
and security". Five powerful
countries sit as "permanent
members", along with 10 other
member states, elected for two-
year termtns.
Talk about power to the peo-
ple. Yes, the people who want
to be safe. It is my opinion that
the present President of the US
and future world leaders will
lead based on their ability to
present a safe and secure soci-
ety, not on how many jobs are
created.


So, as we look over our
shoulders and wonder where
the next attack will be may be
in the Middle East, or even
East Street we must consider
what price we are prepared to
pay for safety and freedom.


The price we are prepared



to pay for tourist safety


PUBLIC HOSPITALS AUTHORITY
GRAND BAHAMA HEALTH SERVICES

VACANCY
Manager II (Human Resources)

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post of Manager
II, Human Resources, Grand Bahama Health Services, Public Hospitals Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration, Management or equivalent and at
least three (3) years post qualification experience in Human Resource Management.
Computer skills a must.

The Manager II will report to the Manager I, Human Resources and as a part of
the Human Resources team at the Grand Bahama Health Services, will share
responsibility for the day-to-day administration of Human Resources transactions
and services in support of the organization.

DUTIES:

1. Processes all recommendations in connection with:

" Appointments
* Confirmations
* Pensions/gratuity benefits
" Promotions
" Disciplinary actions
* Dismissals
* Transfers
* Reassessments of salaries
* Retirement
" Reemployment and renewal of contracts
* Salary progression
* Resumption of duty after study leave and un-coding of increment month.

2. Researches all matters of complaints from assigned areas, prepares
documentation and submit recommendations for consideration.

3. Reviews Human Resources systems and makes recommendations for update
periodically.

4. Assists with annual Budget preparation of Personal Emoluments.

5. Liaises with the Payrolls Unit in connection with matters relating to salary
adjustments and financial clearance.

6. Participates in the recruitment and selection process, as well as, completes
background checks on prospective employees.

Opportunities will also be given for the involvement in Human Resources Strategic
Planning.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three
(3) references should be submitted, no later than 11th May, 2007 to the
Director of Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority,
P.O. Box N-8200
or 1st Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House,
West Bay Street (serving officers must submit their application
through the Head of Department)


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 9B


THE TRIBUNE







PAEI B._ W5 I


GN-494


GOVERNMENT NOTICE


Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister


& Ministry Of National Security


Office Of The Parliamentary Commissioner


NEW'PROVIDENCE POLLING LOCATION

THE BAIN & GRANTS TOWN CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No I
Polling Division No 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No I 1
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place

College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
C. R Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
C. R Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
C. R. Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
C. R. Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
C R. Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
C. R. Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road
College of the Bahamas, Poinciana Drive
C. R. Walker Secondary School, Blue Hill Road


THE BAMBOO TOWN CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Prince Williams High School, Cowpen Road
Pnnce Williams High School, Cowpen Road


THE BLUE HILLS CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place
Garvin Thynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Garvin Tynes Primary School, Flamingo Gardens


THE CARMICHAEL CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10


Polling Place
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Gerald Cash Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Gerald Cash Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary School, Flamingo Gardens
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road


THE CLIFTON CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division N6. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10


Polling Place

Adelaide Primary School, Adelaide Village
Adelaide Primary School, Adelaide Village
Church of God of Prophecy, Mt. Pleasant
Church of God of Prophecy, Mt. Pleasant
Adelaide Primary School, Adelaide Village
Gambler Primary School, Gambier Village
Gambier Primary School, Gambier Village
Gambier Primary School, Gambier Village
Gambier Primary School, Gambier Village
Adelaide Primary School, Adelaide Village


THE ELIZABETH CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place

Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Thelma Gibson Primary School, Elizabeth Estates
Thelma Gibson Primary School, Elizabeth Estates
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Thelma Gibson Primary School, Elizabeth Estates
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Thelma Gibson Primary School, Elizabeth Estates
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive
Faith Temple Christian Academy, Prince Charles Drive


THE ENGLERSTON CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15



THE FARM ROAD


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15



THE FORT

Polling Division
'Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9.
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue.
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road
E. P. Roberts Primary School, Balfour Avenue
R. M. Bailey Senior High School, Robinson Road


AND CENTREVILLE CONSTITUENCY


Polling Place
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Our Lady's Primary School, Deveaux Street
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue
Centreville Primary School, Collins Avenue


CHARLOTTE CONSTITU Y


Polling Place
St. Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
St Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
St. Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
St. Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
C. C. Sweeting Sr. High School, College Avenue
St. Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
C. C. Sweeting Sr. High School, College Avenue
C. C. Sweeting Sr. High School, College Avenue
C. C. Sweeting Sr. High School, College Avenue
St. Francis/Joseph Primary School, Boyd Road
C. C. Sweeting Sr. High School, College Avenue


THE FOX HILL CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place
Sandilands Primary School, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
Sandilands Primary School, Bernard Road
Sandilands Primary School, Bernard Road
Sandilands Primary School, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Roid
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road
St. Augustine's College, Bernard Road


THE GARDEN HILLS CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
S. C. McPherson Jr. High, Blue Hill Road
S. C. McPherson Jr. High, Blue Hill Road
A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
A. F. Adderley Secondary School, Blue Hill
S. C. McPherson Jr. High, Blue Hill Road
S. C. McPherson Jr. High, Blue Hill Road
S. C. McPherson Jr. High, Blue Hill Road


THE GOLDEN GATES CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carlton Francis Primary School, Seven Hills
Carmichael Primary School, Carmichael Road


I ,, ~LU.


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 10B. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25. 2007








THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


-V Si i i i ,TIE


THE GOLDEN ISLES CONSTITUENCY


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Polling Place

Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens
Gerald Cash Primary, Flamingo Gardens


THE KENNEDY CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13


Polling Place

Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road
Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute, Old Trail Road


THE KILLARNEY CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15



THE MARATHON


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive
H. 0. Nash Secondary School, Dolphin Drive



CONSTITUENCY

Polling Place

Claridge Road Primary School, Claridge Road
Claridge Road Primary School, Claridge Road
Claridge Road Primary School, Claridge Road
Claridge Road Primary School, Claridge Road
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates
C. I. Gibson High School, Marathon Estates


THE MONTAGU CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Kings Way Academy, Bernard Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Kings Way Academy, Bernard Road
Kings Way Academy, Bernard Road
Kings Way Academy, Bernard Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
Queens' College High School, Village Road
St. Matthews Primary School, Church Street


THE MOUNT MORIAH CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
St. John's College, Bishop Eldon Drive
St. John's College, Bishop Eldon Drive
St. John's College, Bishop Eldon Drive
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
St, John's College, Bishop Eldon Drive
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
Government High School, Yellow Elder Way
St. John's College, Bishop Eldon Drive


THE PINEWOOD CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling.Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens
Cleveland Eneas Primary School, Pinewood Gardens


THE ST. ANNE'S CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road
St. Anne's School, Fox Hill Road


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St: Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
Ridgeland Primary School, Ridgeland Park
Ridgeland Primary School, Ridgeland Park
St. Cecilia Primary School, Third Street the Grove
Ridgeland Primary School, Ridgeland Park
Ridgeland Primary School, Ridgeland Park


THE ST. THOMAS MORE CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division
Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15
Polling Division No. 16


Polling Place

Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
St. Thomas More Primary School, Madeira Street
St Thomas More Primary School, Madeira Street
St. Thomas More Primary School, Madeira Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
St. Thomas More Primary School, Madeira Street
St. Thomas More Primary School, Madeira Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street
Palmdale Primary School, Bradley Street


THE SEA BREEZE CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No 12
Polling Division No. 13


Polling Place

Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village
Sadie Curtis Primary School, Nassau Village


THE SOUTH BEACH CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division'No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South
C. V. Bethel High School, East Street South


THE YAMACRAW CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. I I
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place

St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw
St. Andrews School, Yamacraw


THE ST. CECILIA CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 11 B






THE I-HIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 12B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


GOERMET OTCE


FREEPORT GRAND BAHAMA


THE EIGHT MILE ROCK CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15


Polling Place

Lewis Yard Primary School
Lewis Yard Primary School
Church of God Hawksbill
Church of God Hawksbill
Hugh Campbell Primary School
Bartlett Hill Primary School
Bartlett Hill Primary School
St. Stephen's Anglican Church Parish Hall
Eight Mile Rock High School
Eight Mile Rock High School
Eight Mile Rock High School
Eight Mile Rock High School
St. Vincent De Paul Catholic School
St. George's High School
St. George's High School


THE LUCAYA CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15
Polling Division No. 16
Polling Division No. 17


Polling Place

St. George's High School Gym
Walter P. Parker Primary School
Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School
Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School
St. George's High School
St. George's High School
Bishop Michael Eldon School
Walter P. Parker Primary School
Bishop Michael Eldon School
Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School
Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School
St. George's High School Gym
St. George's High School Gym
Walter P. Parker Primary School
Bishop Michael Eldon School
Walter P. Parker Primary School
St. George's High School Gym


THE HIGH ROCK CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place

Sweetings Cay Primary School
High Rock Primary School
Eric L. Sam Center
Free Town Primary School
Water Cay All-Age School
McCleans Town Primary School
Freeport Primary School
Maurice Moore Primary School
Freeport Primary School
Maurice Moore Primary School
Walter P. Parker Primary School
Freeport Primary School
Freeport Primary School
Eric L. Sam Center


THE MARCO CITY CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place

Maurice Moore Primary School
Freeport Gospel Chapel School
Jack Hayward High School
Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School
Sunland Baptist Academy
Sunland Baptist Academy
Bishop Michael Eldon School
Bishop Michael Eldon School
Jack Hayward High School
Jack Hayward High School
Jack Hayward High School
Jack Hayward High School
Grand Bahama Catholic High School
Jack Hayward High School


THE PINERIDGE CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. I11I
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13


Polling Place

Hugh Campbell Primary School
Genesis Academy
Grand Bahama Catholic High School
St. Paul's Methodist College
St. Paul's Methodist College
Grand Bahama Catholic High School
St. Paul's Methodist College
Foster B. Pestaina Center
Foster B. Pestaina Center
Central Church of God
Grand Bahama Catholic High School
Tabernacle Baptist Christian Academy
Tabernacle Baptist Christian Academy


THE WEST END AND BIMINI CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

West End Primary School
West End Primary School
West End Primary School
Holmes Rock Primary School
Holmes Rock Primary School
Martin Town Primary School
Martin Town Primary School
Public School, Alice Town
Anglican Parish Hall, Bailey Town
Holy Name Catholic School, Bailey Town
Mount Zion Baptist Sunday School Hall, Bailey Town


FAMILY ISLANDS


THE NORTH ABACO CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

Grand Cay All Age School
Fox Town Primary School
Teacher Residence, Cedar Harbour
North Abaco High
Cooper Town Primary
Leasure Lee, Marsh Harbour
Green Turtle Cay School
Abaco Central High
Abac6 Central High
Abaco Central High
Abaco Central High


THE SOUTH ABACO CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


Polling Place

Guana Cay All Age School
Man-O-War Cay Public School
Hope Town Public School
Marsh Harbour Primary School
Marsh Harbour Primary School
Marsh Harbour Primary School
Old School, Spring City
Cherokee Cay, Spring City
Different of Abaco
Crossing Rocks Public School
Sandy Point Public School
Moores Island Public School


BERRY ISLANDS


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13



THE SOUTH


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


CONSTITUENCY


Polling Place

Lowe Sound Community Center
Eastern Daylight Burial Society Hall
Nicholls Town Primary School
Nicholls Town Primary School
Conch Sound Community Center
Red Bay's Primary School
Yeast Headquarters
R. N. Gomez All Age School
Mastic Point Primary School
Mastic Point Primary School
Old School Building, Blanket Sound
Stafford Creek Primary School
Staniard Creek Primary School


ANDROS CONSTITUENCY


Polling Place

Mars Bay Post Office
Deep Creek Primary School
South Andros High School
High Rock Primary School
Long Bay Cays Pre-School
Old Driggs Hill Primary School/Community Center
Victoria's Point Pre-School
Burnt Rock Primary School
Behring Point Primary
Bowen Sound Primary School
Fresh Creek Primary School
Central Andros High School


THE CAT ISLAND, RUM CAY &
SAN SALVADOR CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11


Polling Place

Arthur's Town High School
Orange Creek Primary School
Bennett's Harbour Primary School
Media Centre, The Cove
New Bight Primary School
Old Bight Primary School
Porte Howe, Primary School
Devil's Point Post Office
Rum Cay All-Age School
Catholic Church Hall
San Salvador Elewating Assoc. Lodge Hall


THE NORTH ELEUTHERA CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. I11i
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14


Polling Place

Government House Harbour Island
Catholic School, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
Public Library, Harbour Island
P. A. Gibson Primary Alice Town
Primary School, James Cistern


THE SOUTH ELEUTHERA CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1I
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. II


Polling Place

Tarpum Bay Primary
Preston H. Albury High School
Rock Sound Primary
Green Castle, Primary
Wemnyss Bight Primary
Deep Creek Primary
Administrative Building
Administrative Building
Governor's Harbour Primary
Magistrate's Court Governor's I larbour
Emma E. Cooper Primary School


THE NORTH ANDROS AND


-- J L~ I I -- I I












THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


WEDNESDAY, Al'IIll 2, ,


A GOVERNMENT NOTICE

Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister

S& Ministry Of National Security
Office Of The Parliamentary Commissioner

THE EXUMA CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12
Polling Division No. 13
Polling Division No. 14
Polling Division No. 15




RAGGI


Polling Place

Staniel Cay All Age School
Black Point All Age School
Farmers Cay All Age School
Barraterre School Building
Stuart Manor Primary School
Rolleville Primary School
Rokers Point Primary School
Forest Primary School
Mt. Thompson Primary School
Moss Town Primary School
George Town Primary School
Roll Town Community Centre
Williams Town Public School
Exuma Resource Centre
St. Margaret Anglican Church Community Centre



THE LONG ISLAND &


ED ISLANDS


CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division Polling Plh

Polling Division No. 1 Morrisville Primar
Polling Division No. 2 Community Centr
Polling Division No. 3 Mangrove Bush Pi
Polling Division No. 4 Lower Deadmans
Polling Division No. 5 Resource Centre, (
Polling Division No. 6 Miller School Buil
Polling Division No. 7 Simms Primary Sc
Polling Division No. 8 Glintons Primary S
Polling Division No. 9 School Building, R
Polling Division No. 10 NGM Major High




THE MICAL CONSTITUENCY


Polling Division

Polling Division No. 1
Polling Division No. 2
Polling Division No. 3
Polling Division No. 4
Polling Division No. 5
Polling Division No. 6
Polling Division No. 7
Polling Division No. 8
Polling Division No. 9
Polling Division No. 10
Polling Division No. 11
Polling Division No. 12


ace

ry School
e, Clarence Town
-imary School
Cay Primary School
Grays
ding
hool
School
.agged Island
School


Polling Place

Public Library Landrail Point
Cabbage Hill Primary School
Colonel Hill High School
Primary School Lovely Bay
Primary School Snug Comer
High School Pompey Bay
Primary School Salina Point
Post Office, Long Cay
Abraham's Bay High School
Pirates Well Primary School
High School, Matthew Town
Primary School, Matthew Town


Office of the Parllam ntary Commnissiorno

Parliamentary Registration DOpartment

PUBLIC NOTICE


The Public is notified that replacement (of v o.i ;i ii ,-, II ....

stolen or destroyed can be issued up to ,wvenvnr ,l pi(,i ';o ,

Election.
] ttr~ittltui D' r' i ';nf in,',


Is;


Office of the Deputy Prime Minister & Miimstry i/ Nf tin rl .a >'c' ,

Office of the Parliamentary (ommissioner

PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLICATION OF MAY 2ND, 2007
GENERAL ELECTION REGISTER


In accordance with Section 26 (3) of the Parliamentnry I;lt. (i,,n \ i. i. "


Parliamentary Commissioner wishes to inform the publc
forth May 24, 2007 General Elections has been published a. of' t A, i ."

Certified copies of the register or parts thereof, May he pIcha. d ; r,


of the Parliamentary Commissioner, Farrington Road. Persons i',i v,

the register or parts thereof may do so at :-


(i) The Parliamentary Registration Department, Farrington .. P- .

(ii) The Parliamentary Registration Department, Freeport: or


(iii) At any Administrator's Office in the Family Islands.


Parliamentary Commissioner


Office of the Parrlai mentary Comrmi.sioner

Parliamentary Registration Departme*nt

PUBLIC NOTICE


The Public is reminded that if a voter cnim,)tiot find hi' i .

General Election day, he/she miay be iC 1 in&iiit' e .z .

production of some sufficient natns of id~rn .t ,

Passport, Driver's Licence. a Birth (e.",rti -t. I.ljise:l '. :.

letter from a Justice of the Peace.


F'arlianen far; ( 'e~.~n~nis.~ ia.~uie~'


I.


Office of the Depu, Prime, .litnitser .4 n initry, vqf '.,ti n Vctv. nr

Offlee of the Parliamentary Commissioner

PUBLIC NOTICE
ALLOCATION OF SYMBOLS FOR
GENERAL ELECTIONS, MAY 2N 2007



In accordance with Regulations 3 and 4 of the Par:lia-i n v :
(Symbols, and Time Off) Regulations. 2002',. t. .W
Commissioner has assigned the following symbols t,.' i!-' ,' :'
political parties and individuals for use by cpndidalntc ii th M.v "
General Elections.


THE BAHAMAS DEMOCRATIC MOVEMENT

THE FREE NATIONAL MOVEMENT

OUR. SURVIVORS POLITICAL PARI Y


THE PROGRESSIVE LIBERAL PARTY

INDEPENDE] 41 A.4I.II).- I R


MOSS CARLTON 'CO

STRACHAN PFINCC A

WEULS TENNYSON

ROUIE PAUL M

-AHMMING TROY 0

DUNCOMBE CLeVER

WWLLIAMS MARVIN K

HEP'URN GEORGE A


MOSS EDWIN A.
EIWAROS MIICHAEL

O(ARIOOe KWNNE TH N


MILLS CAY &


BASTIAN WHITNEY
MILLER JAMES


Or


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TIT1 H1AN'


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MINISTY OFLOCAL GOVEMNT AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
TIME NICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAfER339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE A DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMEl) REGULATIONS, 2002


The pubi is advised at pieces s shown in the Schle for LEAD FREE
GASOLNE and DIESEL OIL sold by TEXACO will becomeffeive Tusday,
April24,27.

GASOLINE SCHEDULE

MAXIMUM WHOLESALE MAXIMUM
SELLING PRICE PER US. RETAIL
GALLON SELLING PRICE
PLACE ARTICLE PER U.S
MAXIMUM MAXIMUM GALLON
SUPLIRS' DISTRIBUTORS'
PRICE PRICE
$ $ S

NEWPROVIDENCE INCLUDING SEA FREIG H T


TEXACO LEAD FREE 4.16 4.16 4.60
(95)

DIESEL OIL 3.15 3.15 3.34


GRANDBARAMA INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
(NOT FREEORT)

TEXACO LEAD FREE 4.06 4.24 4.66

DIESEL OIL 3.03 3.19 3.38

PART12
ABACO,ANDROS NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT




TEXACO LEAD FREE 4.16 4.39 4.78

DIESEL OIL 3.16 3.32 3.51

PART-------------------
ALLOTHER NOT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT
FAMILY ISLAND


TEXACO, LEAD FREE 4.17 4.41 4.81

DIESEL OIL 3.17 3.32 3.52


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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 14B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


GN-490


SUPREME COURT


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
April 26, 2007
Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00005

IN THE ESTATE OF ELLEN R. BLACKBURN,
late of Sumter County in the State of South
Carolina, one of the States of the United States
of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
DWAYNE A. GIBSON of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant
of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to STEPHEN J. BLACKBURN II the
Executor of the Estate, by the State of South
Carolina, County of Sumter, on the 6th day of
March, 1987.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


SUPREME COURT
S. PROBATE-REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
April 26, 2007
Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00187

IN THE ESTATE OF ERIC C. BAYER, late of
Hillsdale in the State of Michigan, one of the
State of the United State of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
PEMBROKE H. WILLIAMS of the Ruby
Avenue in the Western District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to
ERICA BYRNE, the Executrix of the Estate,
by the State of New Jersey, Bergen County
Surrogate's Court, on the 25th day of May
2005.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
April 26, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00189

Whereas, ELAINE L. EWING of Freeport on
the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of WALTER EWING
SR. (a.k.a) WALTER A. EWING (a.k.a.)
ALBERT EWING late of Matthew Town on the
Island of Inagua, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications


will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 21 days from the date hereof.
Sign
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00191


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
April 26, 2007


IN THE ESTATE OF JAMES R. KNOX, late of
414 Lake Shore Drive in the City of Lake Park,
Palm Beach County in the State of Florida, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
LORI ELIZABETH LOWE of Lakeview Road
in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of
Administration (single personal representative)
in the above estate granted to HUBBARD
KNOX the Personal Representative of the
Estate, by the circuit Court of Palm Beach
County, Florida, Probate Division, on the 18th
day of April, 2006.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00193


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
April 26, 2007
."Jii


IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN COLIN TUOHY,
late of 48 Hasker Street, London in the United
Kingdom, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
WILLIAM P. HOLOWESKO of East Lyford Lane
in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authoried Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to
GAVIN TUOHY, SARAH KATHERINE TUOHY
and DARREN TUOHY the Personal
Representatives of the Estate, by the High
Court of Justice, Principal Registry of the family
Division, on the 23rd day of October, 2003.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar




COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
April 26, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00196

Whereas, RENEE DARVILLE-TURNQUEST
of Turnquest Lane in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has
made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RUBY KNOWLES-
DARVILLE (a.k.a.) RUBY DARVILLE (a.k.a.)
VIRGINIA RUBY DARVILLE late of Freeport
on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration


of 21 days from the date hereof.
Sign
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00199


SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
April 26, 2007


IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH J. DIETZ,
late of 622 Bascom Avenue in the City of
Pittsburgh in the County of Allegheny in the
state of Pennsylvania, one of the States of the
United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the
expiration of fourteen days from the date hereof,
application will be made to the Supreme Court
of The Bahamas in the Probate Division by
ADAM D.R. CAFFERATA of the City of Freeport
on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in
The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant
of Letters Testamentry in the above estate
granted to FREDERICK DIETZ JR. and
RAYMOND T. DIETZ the Executors of the
Estate, by the Register of Wills of Allegheny
County, Pennsylvania, on the 6th day of April,
2005.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
April 26, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00202

Whereas, CYRL GEORGE BAKER of Garden
Hills Estate in the Southern District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of FLORINE
JUANITA BAKER late of 1249 Fifth Avenue in
the City of New York, in the State of New York,
one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.
Sign
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
April 26, 2007
No. 2007/PRO/npr/00203

Whereas, JOANNE HEPBURN of Second
Street, The Grove on the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of HERBERT
GEORGE BOWLEG late of Second Street, The
Grove on the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications
will be heard by the said Court at the expiration
of 14 days from the date hereof.
Sign
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar


*1


I I









THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007, PAGE 156
II ~BUINESS i I


What is the large rally





turnout really telling us?


We now have a mere
seven days to go
before the 2007
General Election is held. In past
elections, by this time the plat-
form document would have
been in the public's hand for
many weeks. Analysts would-
have had the opportunity to
review and comment upon the
platforms of the major parties.
Last time around, we had man-
ifestos published by the PLP,
FNM, BDM and CDR. Today,
the Police, Defence Force and
Election Poll Workers will cast
their ballots, and it is most
unfortunate that they will not
have had much time to study
and compare the manifesto
promises of the major parties.
The PLP will be fielding 39
candidates, the FNM 41 candi-
dates and the BDM 15 candi-
dates. There will, once again,
be a handful of candidates seek-
ing election as independent can-
didates. I am uncertain whether
the CDR continues to exist as a
political organisation, as it
appears that most of their mem-
bers have either joined the
FNM or the PLP.
By the time you read this arti-
cle, I have been told that both
major parties will have their
manifestos publicly available.
For me, reading a party's man-
ifesto has always been a very
useful exercise, as it not only
succinctly articulates a party's
plan should they form the next
government, but it also provides
a means of benchmarking a par-
ty's performance.
Given the lateness of the pub-
lication of the political parties'
manifestos, I will attempt to
offer commentary on the mani-
festos of the two major parties
here in this column next week,
as many independent-thinkers
with an interest in learning pol-
icy differences would not have
the time to do an objective com-
-parison of their plans.
Battle of the Rallies
During the past two weeks,
the main political parties, the
FNM and the PLP, have hosted
rallies that have been extreme-
ly well-attended. In all my years
following general elections, I
cannot recall such large
turnouts. Historically, the
largest crowds were reserved
for the final 'mother of all ral-
lies' held prior to Election Day.
So far, the numbers have-
been very impressive indeed,
and they are likely to get larger
as Election Day nears. Another
feature this time around is that
there seems to be a deliberate
strategy to 'go head-to-head'.
That is, to have competing ral-
lies on the same night on the
same island. In the past, this
rarely occurred as there are
compelling 'big picture' reasons
worthy of consideration:
1. Competing mega rallies
further stretch the capacity of
our police resources at a time
when crime remains a major
issue.
2. There are a limited amount
of suitable open spaces that can
host a mega rally.
3. The technical aspects of
mega rallies require more
mobilisation time than before.
The sophisticated stage systems,
sound systems.and lighting sys-
tems that we take for granted
require literally a full day to set
up and a full day to dismantle.
4. While the actual rallies take
place in the evening well after
working hours, they are now
routinely being preceded by
motorcades beginning at 3pm
in the afternoon, travelling
along the major road arteries
and adding to our existing levels
of traffic congestion. This also
begs the following questions:
a) How much productivity is
being lost due to the added traf-
fic congestion?
b) How many motorcade par-
ticipants are 'sneaking off early'
in order to participate in these
motorcades?
What are these large
numbers telling us?
This is the $64,000 question
that will be answered on elec-
tion night. I have been trying
(as much as possible) to have
conversations about the likely
election outcome with persons
as I move about, simply because
it seems virtually impossible to
have meaningful political con-
versations with even 'the slight


est tint' of objectivity. Diehard


Fi


I we are in the business of simul-
nancial 'taneously broadcasting rallies
via the Internet, it would be
FOCUS I good if our international audi-
ence also gets a full cultural
experience, complete with
Junkanoo music and other
uniauelv Bahamian elements.


PLPs are forecasting winning
41 seats (even though the PLP
only has 39 candidates), and
diehard FNMs are predicting a
sweep of all 41 seats. It follows,
therefore, that on May 3, we
will have 82 newly-elected
Members of Parliament.
Removing partisan politics
from the issue, and trying to
objectively understand what the
large turnout at rallies could
possible mean rather than get-
ting caught up in saying that we
had 15,000, 25,000 or even
50,000 at our rally means
objective political analysts need
to find ways to determine how
many among those crowds are:
a) Registered voters
b) Under the age of 18 years
old
c) How many actually intend
to vote
d) How many are there sim-
ply for the 'free concert' or
courtesy of 'rent-a-crowd' ini-
tiatives.
If we knew the answers to
those questions above, then we
would have a meaningful and
objective basis of determining
the likely impact of the large
rally crowds on election out-
comes.
In the absence of such refined
information, candidates are
urged to work their constituen-
cies vigorously, instead of rely-
ing solely on the large turnout
at rallies.
On the latter point regarding
the concert element, while we
are pleased to see the extensive
use of live Bahamian perform-
ers, much of the other music
played by the DJs before, after
and during interludes is still
largely foreign music. Now that


Odds and Ends
The other day, I overheard a
group of Bahamians lamenting
the fact that our election cam-
paigns are becoming more and
more like foreign election cam-
paigns. There is a reason for
this, and that reason is because
the major political parties now
hire high-level election strate-
gists to help them identify
issues, craft messages, develop
official positions, poll voters and
design campaigns among their
various duties. Quite frankly, I
am not sure whether this is
good or bad...but it is certainly
different.
Another prevalent discussion
point is that it seems as though
Mr Christie and Mr Ingraham
are the candidates for every
constituency in the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas. Perhaps
a by-product of the foreign con-
sultancies is the fact that our
campaigns are looking more
and more like a US-style presi-
dential election.
Under the Westminster sys-
tem of government, the leaders
of political parties play an
important role, but they also
have to rely on a team of capa-
ble ministers. There really ought
to be more focus on the respec-
tive teams under the leadership
of Messrs Christie and Ingra-
ham, as opposed to the overly
lop-sided focus on just the lead-
ers. Let us not forget that while
both leaders appear to be in
very good health, they both
have had major health issues in
recent years.
By skewing the emphasis-"
unduly on to the leaders, it
obfuscates the fact that there
are capable persons on the
bench should something unfore-


PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, VICTORIA MARIA
MINNIS of Nassau,Bahamas intend to change my name
to PERALEE ANN MINNIS. If there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the
date of publication of this notice.




4UBS


UBS (Bahamas) Ltd., a leading global wealth manager, is
seeking to employ an experienced professional to join their
team as:


.Portfolio Specialist


The main tasks of this position are:

S.Monitor and implement global investment templates and
systems for wealth management clients;
Execute trades and control procedures for portfolio
managed client base across fixed-income, equity and FX
markets;
Implement Portfolio Management policies, procedures
from head office,
Market portfolio management services to prospective and
current clients.

The successful candidate will have:
Minimum three years experience in portfolio management
or product specialist function in a wealth management
context;
Bachelors Degree in Finance or Economics, further
education is a plus (e.g. Series 7 or CFA);
Strong analytical skills;
Fluent in Portuguese and English.

Interested persons meeting the above criteria should apply in
writing, on or before April 27th, 2007 enclosing a full resume
with cover letter to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N 7757
Nassau, Bahamas
Or
hrbahamas@ubs.com


seen happen. Unlike the US
presidential system, where there
is a clearly defined order of suc-
cession President, Vice Presi-
dent and Speaker of the House
of Congress under the West-
minster model, it does not auto-
matically follow that a Deputy
Prime Minister will complete
the term of a Prime Minister
should something happen.
Finally, the Catholic Arch-
diocese of Nassau recently
issued a communication enti-
tled A Pastoral Letter in Prepa-
ration Jfor the 2007 General Elec-
tion, which one of my colleagues
shared with me. I found this
communication to be scholar-
ly, insightful and thought pro-
voking. In fact, I keep it on my
desk and refer to it frequently.
It is my prayer that His Grace,
the Most Reverend Patrick Pin-
der, would seek to have that
communication shared with the
wider Bahamian community
prior to the general election.
My wish is for a safe election
free of violence and conflict. On
May 3, 2007, we still have a
country to run, and it is imper-
ative that all available hands be
on deck to move this great little
nation that we all love forward,
upward and onward together.
Until next week...
NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas. The views expressed
are those of the author and do
not necessarily represent those
of Colonial Group Internation-
al or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or con-
ments to rigibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs ,


HARBORSIDE
RESORT
AT
ATLANTIS
THE ATLANTIC VACATION CLUB


JOB OPPORTUNITY

AVAILABLE

Director of Sales

SALES DEPARTMENT

Job Summary
Interested candidates must have the ability to:
Direct, coordinate, and staff the sales operation at Harborside
Resort at Atlantis.
Work in coordination with the Marketing department on the,
development of Marketing and Sales Programs.
Deliver results by meeting targeted sales goals, budget
management, staff and personal development.
Participate in weekly Yield Meetings and is proactive in
developing the SVO culture at The Harborside Resort at 3
Atlantis.
Direct the hiring and development of the leadership talent
necessary to achieve the goals.
Communicate all necessary' information in a timely fashion to
the Project Director.
Establish and maintain a consistent, relevant training program(sy)
utilizing company resources
Schedule management and sales executives in a manner that"
will create a-smooth-flow-andprocess to achieve company .
goals.
Lead the sales operation in a constancy of purpose striving to
maintain our corporate vision and culture.
Anticipate the needs of the operation and the customer.
Create a synergistic environment with Operations, Marketing,`
SVO corporate. .
Constantly strives to operate the Sales department profitably.
(NOTE: Always seeking the most efficient ways to operate
the sales function.)
Direct the planning, organization, and coordination of the
morning sales meeting "Pump Sessions".
Train Sales & Leadership talent according to SVO and brand!
guidelines.
Qualifications:
Proven successful track record of directing Sales and Marketing
teams.
A minimum of proven 5 years recent vacation ownership
experience at a Director level position. Starwood Vacation
ownership experience is a plus.
Experience gained through increasingly responsible
management positions i within sales.
Strong leadership skills.
Excellent communication, listening and organizational skills.
College degree preferred.
All interested candidates should submit their resumes by
May 11th, 2007. Fax number- 242-363-6822
\I


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EVERY MONTH


GETS YOU


CLOSER TO,


4Open a Scotiabank Home Savings Plan today
You save a little every month for your home purchase
and we'll top it up with as much as $2,000.


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*Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
t Conditions apply, Subject to credit approval.


--I-----






THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS


PAGE 16B, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2007


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A new FNM government will construct new schools
and school additions to meet the demand of communities
and prepare Bahamian children for the future.


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