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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02858
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 3/31/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02858
System ID: UF00084249:02858

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SUNNY AND
PLEASANT


The


Tribune


Volume: 103 No.109 SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007 PRICE 750




am-OCRPA
Al ed


-By NATARIO McKENZIE
) CO-URT.oAppeal President
Dame Joan Sawyer yesterday
lashed out against what she
called misinformation fed to the
public regarding the controver-
sial ruling by Supreme Court
Justice John Lyons, as lawyers
for the lawyers representing the
Attorney General withdrew the
appeal against the judge's rul-
ing.
The Court of Appeal Presi-
dent said that she found it
offensive that a judge should be
said to have told an untruth to
the public when in fact the
judge spoke the truth.
Justice Lyon's ruling on
November 6 last year raised
serious concerns over the inde-


pendence of the Bahamian judi-
ciary. Yesterday attorneys rep-
resenting Attorney General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson,,who
is listed as the appellant,
appeared in the Court of
Appeal yesterday to withdraw
the appeal against Justice
Lyons' ruling.
Justice Sawyer seized the
opportunity to also express her
strong feelings on the matter.
In the appeal, which was sub-
sequently dismissed yesterday,
the appellant had essentially
asked that the Court of Appeal
make certain declarations to
refute the assertions made by
Justice Lyons in his judgment.
In the appeal, the appellant
had sought a declaration that
the constitutionality of all tri-
als conducted by, judicial acts
performed by, judgments given
by, or orders made by the jus-
tice or justices of the Court of
Appeal or Supreme Court is
not affected by reason of the
fact that the Commission pur-
suant to the Judges Remunera-
tion and Pensions Act was not
appointed October 1, 2006.
"That is a total misunder-
standing of what the learned
judges said," Justice Sawyer
pointed out. The judge said that
the perception was created by
the press release issued by the
Attorney General purporting
to be issued by the Deputy
Director of Public Prosecutions
as saying that some judges in
the Supreme Court were lazy
when in fact they had no idea
what the work load of the
judges were."
"Just because a judge does
not sit beyond 2 pm because no
case is ready does not mean that
he does not have work to do in
his chambers," she said.
Furthermore she asserted
that a report to review the per-
formance of judges by anyone
who is not a judge is an insult.
"I find it offensive that a
judge should be said to have
told an untruth to the public
when in fact the judge told the
truth. They know that they, by
the very document, they admit
that they did not appoint a
Commission in 2003 or 2006 by
the time the judge spoke and
the appointment of the Com-
mission by the wording of the
section should have been done
before he judge spoke." she
said.
The appellant had also been
seeking to have the action set
down for trial before a justice of
the Supreme Court. To this
Dame Sawyer stated that the
SEE page 11


By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
TOURISM figures for 2006
may be down by almost 200,000
visitors compared to the previ-
ous year, The Tribune has
learned.
A year after government
boasted that it had attracted the
unprecedented number of five
million visitors to the Bahamas,
arrivals for 2006 appear to have
dropped significantly.
In its preliminary report on
foreign air and sea arrivals, the
Bahamas Tourism and Hospi-
tality Information Network
(THINK) estimated that the
country had 3.93 million arrivals
for the period of January 2006
to October 2006.
Some 2.9 million visitors
SEE page 11


Defaced signs
prompt MP's
respect call

By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
BLUE Hills MP Leslie Miller
petitioned for FNMs and PLPs
alike to go about the coming
general election with tact and
respect for each other after
signs in his area were defaced
yesterday.
Mr Miller said that the defac-
ing of his campaign posters is
nothing new to him as it hap-
pened in 2002 as well as in 1997,
and 1992.
"If this is any glimpse of the
future for this upcoming elec-
tion that means you are proba-
bly going to have a lot of this -
people smearing posters, and
billboards and the like. So I
would try and get both PLPs
and FNMs not to stoop to such
SEE page nine


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A BOMB threat held back the departure of
over two thousand cruise passengers bound for
Nassau on Thursday, forcing a mass evacuation.
Authorities eventually ruled that the threat,
called in shortly before the liner was due to depart
US shores, was "just a big hoax", however it


Ministry

responds

to report

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Ministry of Housing
has responded to further alle-
gations of corrupt practices
within the Ministry by stating
that it is ministry policy to allow
housing officials to build pri-
vate commercial properties on
government land.
Thursday's Tribune reported
claims, made by a ministry
insider, that certain senior hous-
ing officials were using govern-
ment land in the Jubilee Gar-
dens III housing subdivision for
their own commercial enter-
prises.
A two-storey property is said
SEE page 11


delayed the boat's departure by several hours,
CBS news reported.
Just over two thousand passengers, with 902
crew members, almost missed their four-day trip
through the Bahamas after an anonymous caller
told the US Coast Guard that there was a bomb
SEE page nine


Two


men


gunned


down
By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Two young
men were shot and killed on
Thursday when gunmen in a
dark-coloured SUV opened fire
on a group of men playing bas-
ketball in the Pinder's Point
area.
The double murders push the
homicide count to three for the
year on Grand Bahama, where
police have launched an intense
investigation into the shooting
incident.
The identities of the victims,
who are believed to be of Hait-
ian-Bahamian descent, have not
yet been released by police.
However, it is believed that the
men are known by their first
names as Max and Ele.
According to police reports,
the victims were playing bas-
ketball with a group of men
when a dark coloured SUV
pulled up and two men got out
of the vehicle and opened fire
on the group of men.
The suspects were wearing
camouflage outfits and initial-
ly appeared to look like offi-
cers, according to unconfirmed
reports.
Superintendent of Police
Clarence Reckley, acting press
liaison officer, said the matter is
under active investigation. He
reported that police received
information about a shooting
around 9.05pm on Thursday.
He said that an unidentified
man contacted the Police Con-
trol Room and reported that a
man was shot near the Church
of the Good Shepherd in Pin-
der's Point.
When officers arrived at the
scene, they discovered the body
of a black man with what
appeared to be gun shot
wounds to the head, lying on
the southern side of the main
road in Pinder's Point.
Supt Reckley said that the
victim, who was wearing a grey
T-shirt, a pair of short blue
jeans, white socks and black
Nike Air tennis, was already
dead.
He said that the second vic-
tim was found lying In a yard
opposite the church with what
appeared to be gunshot wounds
to the upper part of the body.
The victim, who was still alive
at the time, was wearing a black
pair of short pants. He was bare
back with a stocking cap on his
head. He was taken by ambu-
lance to the Rand Memorial
Hospital, where he was pro-
nounced dead a short time after

SEE page 11


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Sawyer hits


at government


over judicial


independence


This little boy shows his classmates part of his
science project yesterday during a Science Fair.
(Photo: Felip6 Major/Tribune Staff)


Airport

revamp

to cost

$400m
By KARINHERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE much anticipated
handover of the manage-
ment of the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport
took place yesterday with
Prime Minister Perry
Christie announcing that the
complete transformation of
the facility could cost up to
$400 million.
Government and Van-
couver Airport Services
(YVRAS) yesterday exe-
cuted agreements that
finalised the transfer of
management, operations
and the responsibility of
transforming the airport into
a world-class facility to the
Canadian company.
Although major work at
the airport is not scheduled
to begin until after the gen-
eral elections, a first vital
improvement was unveiled
yesterday in the form of two
flight information displays.
These displays in the
international arrival area
will allow persons to ascer-
tain the status of all flights.
Speaking yesterday at a
special ceremony for the
SEE page nine


Bomb threat delays


Nassau cruise arrival


Afh


^,-ir.si^, lIF.-- l .













PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





FNIM: PLP investments


are: not worth $20bn


By PAUL G T JRNQUEST
Tribune Staff F reporter
THE Progres i"e Liberal Par-
ty did not attrac S20 billion dol-
lars to the Bal amas as it has
previously toul -d, the opposi-
tion claims.
This stateme it was made by
FNM leader H ibert Ingraham
at the party's ai nouncement of
candidates on Thursdayy night,
where he dismi, sed one of what
the PLP clain s are its main
achievements.
Mr Ingrahai 1 said that the
direct foreign it vestment under
the PLP accounts for only $2.5
billion of whi h $1 billion rep-
resents "land s les to foreign-
ers".
"When we talked about
investment y(u could see it
going into the ground. But he
(Prime Ministe: Perry Christie)
has no guarant, e at all that the


chickens he is so gleefully
counting today will hatch in 15
to 20 years or ever.
"To hear him talk, you might
have thought the Baha Mar
deal was signed, sealed and
delivered. But lo and behold -
we now know that this chicken
ain't hatch yet. In fact, the egg
ain't been properly laid yet. The
first billion is not in the ground
at Baha Mar and this deal is
threatening to unravel," he said.
The much touted Baha Mar
deal has come under fire from
the FNM and other commen-
tators. Hotel workers have com-
plained of being forced to work
reduced work weeks, or accept
minimal severance packages to
leave their jobs. And it was
announced earlier this month
that the entire deal was under
threat allegedly after a cru-
cial agreement was not signed
by the government.


n HUBERT INGRAHAM


"Mind you, this is after a
heads of agreement has been
signed with much ballyhoo," Mr
Ingraham continued. "This is
after the most generous con-
cessions have been given.
"This is after Mr Christie sold
them our hotel and hundreds
of acres of prime public land
for only $43 million. When we
were in office we turned down
an offer of $55 million for the
Cable Beach hotel alone.
"I challenge anyone to show
where the billions have been
spent on Mr Christie's three
most frequently-mentioned pro-
jects: Ginn in Grand Bahama,
Baha Mar in New Providence
and the I-Group in Mayagua-
na. All three of them together
cannot account for the first bil-
lion in the ground. Talking it
don't make it so. And eggs
don't hatch before they are
laid," he said.


However Mr Ingraham said
that Mr Christie is now worried
that the public is "catching up"
with the serious long-term con-
sequences of the government's
once hailed, now often criti-
cised, Anchor Project develop-
ment.
"This is the model which fea-
tures the sale of land to for-
eigners to develop for sale to
other foreigners. So now he's
trying to obfuscate. But it is too
late. The Bahamian people
understand fully what they are
up to and how it will affect not
just this generation but our chil-
dren and grandchildren.
"He says I accused him of
selling public land to Ginn in
Grand Bahama. I never did
that. But I do accuse him of dis-
posing of public land to Baha
Mar and to the I-Group hun-
dreds of acres and thousands of
acres," Mr Ingraham said.


Ingraham: I didn't force Sir Lynden from House


Sir Lynden Pinding
Sir Lynden Pindling


By PAUL G TURN-
QUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said it was
not he who forced Sir Lyn-
den Pindling from the House
of Assembly but Prime
Minister Perry Christie him-
self.
Mr Ingraham has been crit-
icised by the PLP on radio
advertisements for forcing Sir
Lynden out of parliament
through the passing of a
"wicked Pension Act".
The advertisement also
added that before doing this,
Mr Ingraham tortured the
"father of the nation"
through two commissions of
inquiry.
Mr Ingraham, at the FNM's
introduction of its slate of
candidates on Thursday, said
the truth of the matter is that
the early retirement of Sir
Lynden from politics was
good for the Bahamas.
"It was good for our par-
liament. And it was good for
Perry Christie and the PLP.
And we talked about it at the
time: Sir Lynden, Mr Christie
and I.
"Let me tell you what Per-
ry Christie said when he was
more familiar with the truth.
This was in the House in
June 1997. This is what he
said: 'I think it important,
Madam Speaker, for me to
say and say it now, since it
has arisen, that it was my
decision to recommend to Sir
Lynden that he move sooner

irngicid


Pet onro


Prime Minister Perry Christie


rather later to his retirement
because I felt and this is
important to the process -
that it would clear the way
for the kind of leadership that
I would wish to exercise in
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty'," he said.
Mr Ingraham paused
momentarily and repeated
the quote for emphasis.
"I know that with all the
lies they are telling now this is
hard to take in, so let me read
that again," he said.
"It was Perry Christie's
decision to recommend to Sir
Lynden that he move sooner
rather than later to his retire-
ment. That is what he said.
Those are words out of Perry
Christie's own mouth," he
said.
Mr Ingraham added that
the FNM is working hard to
get a copy of the statement to
put on their website.


m7

By PAUL G
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM has again
lashed out at the governing
PLP party this time for the
much lauded public unveil-
ing of an "incomplete" web-
site.
A statement on the
FNM's website, published
only hours after the PLP
launched their website on
Thursday night at the San-
dals Resort, states that the
PLP is struggling to catch up
with the FNM who had
launched their website
"months ago".
"Thisiss typical: they usu-
ally lag behind the FNM in
terms of policy and perfor-
mance. But, they're good at
copying our style. This is
why their website is curi-
ously similar in form to the
FNM's. That is where the
comparison ends," the state-
ment said.
"Regarding content and
ideas the site is as barren as
the PLP's record in office.
This is the PLP way: pomp
and circumstance, signifying
nothing. At our web launch
we offered detailed ideas on
an extraordinary range of
issues. In stark contrast, at
their launch, the Issues sec-
tion of their site contained
not a single item.
"Nothing new on crime.
Nothing new on protecting
our land. Nothing new on
jobs. Nothing new on immi-
gration. Nothing new on
good governance. It's rela-
tively easy to set up a web-
site. It takes vision and com-
petence to produce content
and ideas. On this, the PLP
will never catch up to the
FNM," the party said.
According to the FNM,
the PLP, so desperate for
content, has included scores
of old press releases and
statements as far back as
2003.
"This is to give an illusion
of content. A great.deal ,o
the information comes from.
government agencies such
as Bahamas Information
Services.
"An extraordinary num-
ber of stories have been bor-
rowed from The Bahama
Journal. In other words, the
PLP is borrowing content
written by public officers'
and journalists. This is no
surprise. Left on their own,
they have little to offer.
"The PLP is good at
karaoke: they can lip-sync
the words of others, but do
not possess the talent to pro-
duce their own material.
Instead of wasting time com-
plaining about the style of
the FNM website, the PLP
should follow our example
and provide more substance
and less fluff; more fire and
less smoke; and more origi-
nality and less photocopy-
ing.
"The various interest
groups behind Perry Christie
are afraid of losing the elec-
tion; cheap access to
Bahamian land and PLP
Cabinet Ministers; and the
run of the country."











THE T US R R
I ~m~m 1


Website

accuses

'pro-PLP'

hackers

AN anti-PLP website
which claims to be the
most popular in the
Bahamas says it is being
blocked by hackers who
are sympathetic to the
government.
The Bahamas B2B site,
which claims it gets a mil-
lion hits a month, is being
forced to take security
measures after an alleged
"all-out attack" by pro-
PLP computer raiders.
The site says the hack-
ers work for the PLP and
fear the world will hear
of what it calls "the cor-
ruption and injustice that
is crippling the true devel-
opment of our Bahamas."
The site is now "beef-
ing up" its server capaci-
ty to counter the attacks
and is asking users to be
patient and to keep try-
ing to access their infor-
mation.
The site says: "As traf-
fic on the Bahamas'
largest website approach-
es one million visitors per
month, the puppeteers
behind the PLP govern-
ment may have feared
that too many people
from around the world
would find out the truth
about the corruption and
injustice that is crippling
the true development of
our Bahamas."
The site accuses the
PLP government of try-
ing to keep the masses
poor, illiterate, sub-
servient and ill-informed.
Its leaders, it says, pre-
tend to be looking out for
the common man, "but
their tactics appear to
mirror those of cruel and
corrupt dictators like
Robert Mugabe, the Zim-
babwean president."
The site adds: "The
PLP's fear of being
exposed for what they
really are is also the rea-
son behind their interest
in eliminating foreign-
born Supreme Court jus-
tice John Lyons.
"It is the same disdain
for truth and justice that
fuels the PLP's evil
attacks on John Marquis,
the eloquent and articu-
late managing editor of
The Tribune, the nation's
only credible newspaper."
But organizers of the
site have vowed to
remain undaunted in
their quest "for justice
and economic empower-
ment for all Bahamians,
not just the politically
connected or selected
elite."
Three years ago, The
Tribune's phone-in "bal-
lot box" was halted by
alleged politically inspired
technical problems.
Later, the PLP hinted
strongly in a press release
that it had "put an end"
to the phone-in, which
invited readers to air their
views on topics of the
week.


Mitchell. aiti has





case against France


By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Republic of Haiti has a
legal case for reparations
against the French government
according to Foreign Affairs
Minister Fred Mitchell.
Mr Mitchell was speaking
yesterday at a panel discussion
at the College of the Bahamas
entitled "Abolition of the Slave
Trade: African-Bahamian Con-
nection."
The event was held in com-
memoration of the bicentenary
anniversary of the Abolition of
the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
and local historian Gail Saun-
ders and COB lecturer Thad-
deus McDonald presented
papers on the theme.
During the question and
answer period of the discussion,


By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter


THE Bahamas National
Trust is "extremely alarmed"
after reports have emerged that
a man clearing land for a road
in Crooked Island has
destroyed parts of an 18th cen-
tury historical landmark.
The BNT said it will be push-
ing for criminal charges to be
brought against those respon-
sible for the apparent levelling
of the gardens of a Loyalist
compound, Hope Great House
- with the finger initially point-
ing towards local government.
These reports come only a
week after it is alleged that a
man in the Cowpen road area
bulldozed the remains of anoth-
er Loyalist site, the Old Bat-
tery, causing outrage among
local conservationists.
Now the BNT is trying to put
together a group for an expe-
dition to Crooked Island to
assess the full extent of the
damage caused to the property,
according to director Eric
Carey.
Hope Great House had only
in recent years been entrusted
to the BNT by private benefac-


Mr Mitchell said that Haiti had
to pay a "terrible price" to gain
its independence, and as a
result, he said, the country's
society was broken.
The Haitian Revolution
(1791-1804) was the most suc-
cessful of the many African
slave rebellions in the Western
Hemisphere and established
Haiti as a free, black republic.
the first of its kind.
On January 1, 1804, Haiti was
declared a free republic.
Thus Haiti became the sec-
ond independent nation in the
Western Hemisphere, after the
United States. and the only suc
cessful slave lehellion in world
history.
However. the country had
been crippled by years of war.
its agriculture devastated, itl'
formal commerce rendered
non-existent, and the people leit


tors.
This family is said to be "very
upset" about the news, and are
pushing the Trust to "immedi-
ately intercede", said Mr Carey.
Just like nearby Marine
Farm, Hope Great House is an
18th century ruin, featuring a;
main house, a hurricane shel-
ter, a military battery and a
plantation.
The gardens provided,
according to BNT past presi-
dent Pericles Maillis, a unique
feeling thai wonen too had
lived on the compound grounds
- not just free and enslaved
men.
The BNT was only in the ini-
tial stages of examining the site
and fully appraising its archeo-
logical significance, said Mr
Carey.
Now a team will be sent:out
after Easter to ascertain: the
extent of the destruction. ;
"We're going to assess the
damage, talk to people in the
community, find out exactly
what's going on and then we'll
be in a position to develop a
report and recommendation.
"If anyone has illegally
crossed our property we'll stop
that access and if necessary we


Police apprehend


suspect in Andros

A man has been arrested in
Andros in connection with a
murder that took place in Fox
Hill earlier this year.
According to police Inspec-
tor Walter Evans, Ricardo
Edgecombe also known as
"Pebbles" was arrested in
Nicholls Town, Andros around
7am on Thursday.
Edgecombe was arrested for
questioning in the murder of.
Anthony Woodside on Febru-
ary 28.
The police said Edgecombe, B^ tee-
who was arrested without inci-
dent, was apprehended by offi-
cers from the Flying Squad of
the Central Detective Unit. Ricardo Edgecombe


SFRED MITC'(HELL


will lake legal action," said Mr
Carey.
Thc director said that the
Trust can only hope that who-
ever caused the destruction was
not aware of the significance of
the gardens.
V' Wc'er hopeful that the per-
peti actor sas not aware that this
was a historical and national
park property," he said.
Mr Maillis said that there is a
widespread problem in the
Bahamas resulting from a lack
of super vision of those working
heavy machinery.
"The problem in the
Bahamas is lhat what happens
('n ltl' "round is left lo the low-
Ces <_i>twi.ionI) dCle)nominator.
Nounc,' 1 I i poplc higher up
(whilo 'idJecrd tiie clearing to
take place) are checking," he
clainmd.


uneducated and mostly
unskilled.
In 1825, Haiti was forced to
make reparations to French
slaveholders in the amount of
90 million gold francs (a value
of $21 billion today) and the
Haitian government was forced
to pay France for the next 100
years for its independence.
In 2003, former Haitian Pres-
ident Jean Betrand Aristide
launched a vigorous campaign
for Haiti to be given back the
$21 billion dollars.
But in February 2004, Aris-
tide was overthrown by para-
military rebels and the United
Nations-installed interim gov-
ernment ended the reparations
campaign.
Haiti's interim leader Gerard
Latortue said the country would
not pursue an "illegal" and
"ridiculous" demand for repa-


rations from France that was
made by former President Aris-
tide.
"Haitian Independence was
attained at a terrible price and
the record of this is clear," Min-
ister Mitchell said yesterday.
"After they defeated
Napoleon, Haiti had to pay
what is believed to be about 90
million dollars to the French
government, in effect to pur-
chase their independence. It has
been argued and I think it must
be shown conclusively today
that it actually broke that soci-
ety and the society never recov-
ered."
The minister said that the
question of reparations for Haiti
is not theoretical, but real.
"The question," he said, "is
whether the French government
should not as a matter of law
repay restitution to Haiti."


M2 11


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SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007


THE TRIBUNE ,


EDITOR IAULE6T RnS TO THE EDITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Mugabe may yet win his endgame


TO THOSE who ask how long President
Robert G. Mugabe can remain in control of
Zimbabwe, given its wildfire inflation, the grow-
ing desperation of average people and the oppo-
sition's increasingly open hatred of the gov-
ernment, a former member of that government
has an answer: longer than one might think.
"He will not go," said the former official,
who was once a loyal lieutenant in Parliament
and remains a member of Mugabe's ruling par-
ty. "Everyone wants him to go. In the party
everyone wants him to be gone. But who will
stand against him? He is too powerful.
"You put my name in your newspaper and I
am dead. That is how powerful he is."
There is a potent whiff of Potemkin in Zim-
babwe now. Mugabe, the nation's only leader
since white rule ended 27 years ago, boasts that
he has crushed his critics and will ride popular
adulation to a new term as president next year.
But his bravado is belied by everyday scenes
here: The 13 Chinese-made water cannons that
encircled the soccer match on Sunday between
Zimbabwe and Morocco, poised to put down
rioting; the warnings on state radio to "leave
politics to the politicians"; the crackdown in
urban slums, where the police break up gath-
erings of more than four or five people and
arrest anyone who is spotted carrying gasoline,
apparently fearing that it may be used in fire-
bombs.
Among political analysts and dissidents alike,
Mugabe's situation is reduced to a single buzz-
word: endgame.
He presides over a nation crushed by inflation
of about 1,700 per cent a yeai. People revile
hiia, his party grasps for a way to force him
from office, and even his southern African
neighbours, long his enablers, are meeting with
him in Tanzania this week, hoping to ease him
into retirement, many analysts say.
Yet it is unclear how easily anyone could pry
loose Mugabe's grip on power.
In interviews here, politicians aligned with
the government, opposition leaders, an army
deserter and a former police official all
described a rising tide of unhappiness in the
political and security organs that sustain his
rule.
Many acknowledged the possibility of his
departure, but none said the opposition or ele-
ments of Mugabe's own government had the
will or ability to topple him at least for now.
The governing bodies of the ruling Zimbab-
we African National Union-Patriotic Front are
expected to endorse Mugabe's bid to run again
for president at meetings on Friday, despite


deep dissatisfaction with his rule. Nor do the
police and military appear to be abandoning
him, even though conditions are so bad that
soldiers must buy light bulbs for their own bar-
racks.
"Most of the police I interact with, they hate
the government," said the former police official,
who recently left his post. "But they will carry
out orders, most of them. I think the police are
loyal."
The source of the president's longevity is no
secret. The former police official and others
described a system of perquisites that keeps
government officials and political allies per-
sonally beholden to Mugabe, and an arsenal of
threats and reprisals that keeps potential dis-
senters from acting on their desires.
Mugabe long ago won the loyalty of a pow-
erful force the guerrillas who fought in Zim-
babwe's liberation struggle in the 1970s by
granting them huge pension bonuses and, in
2000, allowing them to seize the nation's best
farmland from white commercial farmers.
Since then, the veterans have become a rogue
force' in Zimbabwean politics, staging raids on
the homes of opponents and beating and intim-
idating them, according to human rights groups
and critics of the government.
But the land seizures served another pur-
pose as well. Countless officials in the govern-
ment, Parliament, the judiciary, the military
and the police have been given their own farms
as a reward for their loyalty and stand to
lose their land should they stray.
Virtually every Zimbabwean interviewed
suggested that Mugabe's authority might in fact
be a fiction that would fold in the face of a real
public challenge or a revolt within his party.
The police and the military would not flinch at
gunning down 200 demonstrators if ordered,
they said; shooting at 10,000 might be another
matter.
"Maybe if people demonstrate for real, show-
ing that they are angry, the soldiers will have a
chance to turn against the government," the
army deserter said, echoing others. "But people
fear too much."
So do the rank and file of Mugabe's ruling
party. "He has files on everyone," the former
member of Parliament said, "and if anyone
expresses dissent, those files come out. 'You
did this, or you did that,' and you are ruined -
just like that." He chuckled. "Maybe something
unnatural will happen," he said. "Maybe a bomb
will fall from the sky."
(This article was written by Micahel Wines -
c.2007 New York Times News Service).


Defending


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the naim e4u


of my late




grandmother.

EDITOR, The Tribune. ty like Crooked Island. What-
we can't do is feed the agents ot,
IN reference to the editorial destruction of Crooked Island&a
printed on page four of the Do what you have to do tX<
March 23rd Tribune, please be move on.
so kind to indulge my reply and Mary G Moss realized what My grandmother has move ,
print in the next issue of The business was all about. That on to a bigger and better place ,
Tribune. Thank you kindly, sometimes things worked in I would appreciate it if those \C
I am a daily supporter of your favour and other times it who do not know about ho.
news in the Bahamas, as I feel it didn't. She realized that tides legacy, ask somebody. In tlih,4
s necessary for the people of change, and that you must be interim, leave her and her nam %
:he Bahamas to be educated prepared to handle it. But more to rest in peace. Take up greater '*
ad informed. In my entire life, than this she helped people challenges that propel the
[ have never felt the desire or despite their political affilia- development of Crooked
:he need to address any of the tions. In the aftermath, people Island, get involve in the. ,
articles and editorials ever print- are not willing to look at the Crooked Island Developmedt p-
ed in The Tribune, until I read reality when the goal is to drag Association. Talk to the peo-
:he editorial written on Friday. someone's reputation through ple! You might learn a thing or
When my grandmother died the dirt! When the editorial two about how to handle
nore than five years ago her talks about "even the score," it change, how to develop one, :
inal words were, "I shall fear should be saying "victimisa- and what a contract is.
no ill as thy rod and staff pro- tion." Don't pretty it up! Call "Our greatest fear is not that 4
ects me." I am assured that she a spade a spade, and speak with we are inadequate our greatest
s resting in peace. To think that the words of integrity, or not at fear is we are powerful beyond
someone would stoop to the all. measure," said Nelson Mandela. ,,
evel to use her as a deploy to What we all need to realise
,ropel whatever agenda is try- and a~ree non is that it is'


ing to be pursued shows the
ability to not understand a few
things, so I feel it is fitting and
more so necessary to make
everyone aware, and clear the
air, once and for all.
Tony Ferguson wants to take
up the challenge by Alfred Gray
on behalf of the late Arnold
Farquharson, but the reality is
this is a non-issue. You do not
need to be a financial tycoon to
realise that when a contract is
ended it ends. They took every-
thing from my grandmother
down to the telephone out of
her house. She was a diabetic,
with no way to call a nurse if
she had gotten ill. She also was
left jobless with the change of
government. No one ever
speaks about that victimisation.
Who challenges that?
My motive is not to challenge
that either, but to remind those
who have forgotten or don't
know that the Crooked Island
culture depicts that when the
rug is pulled from under your
feet, your heels will still be
planted on the Solid Rock of
God. I guess what I thought was
a natural trait of descendants
of Crooked Island is not with-
out its exceptions.
What Tony forgot to mention
in his harangue of taking up the
challenge was that my grand-
mother hired as a bus driver his
own relative, and provided him
a stable and consistent income
for years. This was the same
person who drove under his
grandfather's contract. I guess
that was victimisation too.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ENVERLY MANACE
PIERRE OF WILSON TRACT, P.O. BOX N-8889, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day
of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.







BKGi410.03
ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$53,000,000.00 of 91-Day
Treasury Billswill be received by the banking manager,
The Central Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick Street,
Nassau up to 3:00 p.m on Tuesday, April 3, 2007.
Successful tenderers, who will be advised should take up
their bills against payment on Thursday, April 5, 2007.
These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00.

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the
Central Bank of The Bahamas or Commercial Banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked '"Tender". The Central Bank of
the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



0.


about time we stop digging up
mud to throw at each other,
especially if we are not willing
to see things for what they real-
ly are. We do not need
advanced degrees'in Political
Science, Economics and Busi-
ness to realise what politics is
doing to a close knit communi-


EDITOR, The Tribune

It's Raynard again!
Raynard! Raynard! Ray-
nard!
If making a dupe of your-
self last week was not enough,
your brain now tells you to
criticise The Tribune for being
efficient. It is baffling!
Why should any company,
permit a political party (be it
the PLP or FNM) to cause it
to operate in an untimely
manner.
Do you know what man
hours are? Sorry should not
have asked you that question.
Please, be still and be qui-
et!
To my well informed and
strong Bahamian Brothers out
there, tell Raynard to "Take a
Breath".


I
V
'LU


GEVON R MOSS
Grandson of
the late
Mary G Moss
BA Political
Science,
BS Economics
Nassau,
March 26, 2007.


1'
)I.,,'


It is obvious to the Bahamil
an people that you don't have'
any discernment of the Eng-'
lish language, now we also'
know, that you don't under-
stand how the world turns..
You're probably watching too
much "As The World
Turns". Last, but definitely!
not least, you have also
recently enlightened us that:
you have no clue about gov-
ernance.
Again I ask, are you not
ashamed of yourself?
Your press releases are'
comedic to say the least.
I want to say stick with
your day job but that is
daunting!

MARIA D. SMITH
Nassau,
March 30, 2007.


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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PHONISE JEAN GREEN 64A
POLARIS DRIVE, CARAVEL BEACH, P.O.BOX F-60488,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH
day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.


WANTED

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Visiting Tourists.


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THE TRIBUEC STrDA Mh 32
.OPP.-


4 -- --'


I


Roger Kelty



Foundation



in scholarship



cash increase


With a March 31 deadline for
applications for academic schol-
arships approaching, the Lyford
Cay Foundation today had
good news for those hoping for
financial assistance it has
increased annual scholarship
awards to $7,500.
The increase is a 50 per cent
jump over the current $5,000 a
year Award at the undergradu-
ate and graduate levels.
Technical training scholar-
ships are already at the $7,500
threshold with higher amounts
offered under special circum-
stances.
"Thecost of-higher educa-
tion i6reasing almost expo-
nentially with the cost of four
years1 tuition and fees leading to











SATURDAY
MARCH 31ST


12:3)
1:00'
1:30.
2:30,
3:00'
5:00'
5:30!
6:00,-
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
10:00
11:00
11:30
12:3q


Bullwinke & Friends .
King Leonardo
The Fun Farm
The 411
Matinee: "Welcome To Hard
Times"
Cricket World
Gillette World Sports
In This Corner
Sports Lifestyle
The Bahamas Tonight
Native Show
Peace Fest
55 Degrees North
The Bahamas Tonight
Hustle
Comm. Pg. 1540AM


SUNDAY
APRIL 1ST
6:30dm Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00: In His Image: Change
SMinistries International
8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00, E.M.PA.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
SThe Difference
10:0od Effective Living
10:30 This Great & Holy Week
11:00 Zion Baptist Church
1:00' Gillette World Sports
1:30 Sports Desk
2:00 Video Gospel Countdown
3:00 Taking Dominion
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 .- Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
5:00 : Walking In Victory
6:00 Christian Tabernacle
Church
6:30 This Week In The Bahamas
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Practical Principles
8:00 Higher Ground
8:30 Ecclesia Gospel
9:00 Movie: "The Bible"
11:001 Bahamas Tonight
12:m/h Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13reserves--the
rih t ak0 as int
program hanes


a bachelor's degree at a private
university well above $100,000
and state schools far more cost-
ly than they were a decade
ago," said'Lyford Cay Founda-
tion director of educational pro-
grammes Roger Kelty. "This
puts an immense burden on a
family trying to ensure that their
son or daughter has the best
education possible and we at
the Lyford Cay Foundation are
pleased that we are able to
announce this increase which
will come into effect for recipi-
ents starting college in the Fall
of 2007."
Since the mid-1980s, scholar-
ships awarded by the founda-
tion have helped fund more
than 1,300 Bahamians attend-
ing colleges and universities in
the United States, Canada,
Europe and the West Indies.
Once set at $2,500, awards
have increased steadily and spe-
cialised scholarships for specif-
ic disciplines often provide high-
er amounts of funding.
In total, the foundation has
awarded nearly $13.5 million in
financial assistance with the
only repayment a pledge each
recipient makes to bring his or
her skills back home to the
Bahamas after completing study
and appropriate experience
abroad.
In addition to the awards it
makes to students going off-
shore, the foundation has assist-
ed 835 studying locally on schol-
arships provided by a $5 mil-
lion College of the Bahamas
Scholarship Fund endowment
undertaken by the Lyford Cay
Foundation and the Canadian
Lyford Cay Foundation.
Another 350 students have
earned vocational training cer-
tification through the Techni-
cal Training Scholarship Pro-
gramme.
Scholarship students have
returned to pursue careers in
every field. They have become
doctors, educators, nurses,
health care workers, law
enforcement officers, diesel
mechanics, aquaculture spe-
cialists, airplane maintenance
specialists and veterinary prac-
titioners.
"It is our hope that by inde-
pendent and careful screening
of candidates, and by funding,
we can have a positive impact
on the diversity of the Bahami-
an economy and the provision
of skilled, competent and edu-
cated persons to help grow the
Bahamas," Kelty said.


at-risk boys the way




to disciplined success


NICHOLLS TOWN, Andros
When Deacon Jeffrey Lloyd
and Defence force officer Law-
son Clarke first collaborated to
help at-risk boys, neither
expected it to be such a success.
Eight years later, the involve-
ment of Defence Force Marines
in the Youth Empowerment
and Skills Training Institute
(YEAST) Programme, which
Deacon Lloyd heads, has
helped the programme to meet
its vision of helping ordinary,
imperfect, hope-drained indi-
viduals become agents of social
change in their journey towards
total human development.
"It's all about building con-
fidences, leadership training,
education and skills training,
team play and the like, and basi-
cally that is what we try to
enforce. Discipline, respect for
self and others and the need to
be good, productive citizens of
the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas," Petty Officer Clarke
said.
"We take them through vari-
ous situations so that when
adversity hits their lives once
they leave this camp, they will
be able to rise to the top and
overcome those situations.
"The majority of these boys
are going back to the same envi-
ronment; the same neighbor-
hoods and the same peer pres-
sures that got them to be
involved in the gang-banging,
the drugs and the criminality
that got them here in the first
place and all of those things are
still going to be there.
"What we have done is that
we have developed situations
here; we have developed the
programmes here that speak to
their physical, educational and
psychological development in
order to prepare them not to
crack under those pressures
once they return to their homes
and families," he added.
The relationship between the
two men began in 1999 when
-.

* In brief


46 killed
in Guinea

boat capsize

By KOUNKOU MARA
Associated Press Writer
CONAKRY, Guinea (AP)
- A motorized wooden boat
crowded with passengers and
merchandise capsized offshore
from this West African nation's
capital, drowning at least 46
people and possibly dozens
more, Guinean officials and sur-
vivors said Friday.
The boat captain said the ves-
sel was carrying 80 people when
it sank heading to a dock in
Conakry and only 34 survived.
But local marine officials said
as many as 100 people may have
been aboard.
Ten bodies had been recov-
ered by late Friday, said Ibrahi-
ma Sangare, police commis-
sioner at the Conakry port.
The captain, Mamadouba
Camara, said the boat which
ferries people and goods such
as sacks of rice and salt ran
into strong winds as it
approached a Conakry dock
and started to take on water,
then overturned.
"The passengers panicked.
They were going on all sides of
the boat.
"We threw the cargo into the
water, but it did nothing," he
said.
A nearby fishing boat initial-
ly refused to risk approaching
the sinking vessel, but its crew
then moved in and pulled strug-
gling people out of the water.


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Deacon Lloyd allowed Petty
Officer Clarke to enroll some
of the YEAST programme boys
in the Governor General's
Youth Award Programme.
"Deacon Lloyd was so
impressed with the results that
She suggested we develop a pro-
gramme that could be used as
part of the YEAST programme
and that was how the Defence
Force's involvement with the
programme began," he
explained.
The YEAST Programme, an
adolescent development pro-
gramme, is divided into two
parts: a personal development
course (PDC) and a skills train-
ing course (STC). *
There are two age-groups in
YEAST. The Junior Life Pro-
gramme for 12 to 15-year-olds
and the Senior Life Programme
for 16 to 19-year-olds.
S The Junior Life Programme
is a three-term module while
the Senior Life programme is a
two-term module.
The first semester for the
Senior Life programme is dedi-
cated to self-awareness, coun-
selling, literacy, spirituality,
health education, parenting,
physical education, cooking,
civics, arts and crafts and life
skills.
Students participate in skills
building activities such as car-
pentry, computer technology,
small engine repair, plumbing,
seamanship, electrical installa-
tion and boat handling in the
second semester.
The Junior Life programme
consists of instruction in self-
awareness, health education,
civics, personal development,
literacy, computer applications,
general science and counseling.
Ten officers from the
Defence Force work as instruc-
tors in addition to managing all
of the disciplinary sections,
practical applications courses
and basic skills training pro-
, g:gramme, which involves instruc-


tion in carpentry, plumbing, us feel ecstatic to know that we
electrical installation, boat han- are making some positive
dling and scuba diving, among impact on these boys' lives and
others. that we have helped to turn a
They are assisted by a num- bad situation around," Petty
ber of civilian personnel who Officer Clarke said.
work on the academic section There are some people who
of the programme. like to paint a picture of gloom
Petty Officer Clarke says the and doom when it concerns our
programme has achieved many young men, but I really don't
buy into that. What has hap-
pened, in some instances, is that
some of the approaches to
teaching discipline and instill-
"It's all about ing the need for education have
building conf- not changed in a very, very long
u ln- time which can cause some fric-
dences leader- tion.
denceS, leader- !"What may have motivated
ship training me when I was growing up may
s, not motivate today's young men
education and and boys and so what we have
to do, and what we are doing
skills training here at this facility, is finding
Strcreative ways, more cha'!:ng-
team play and ing ways, of getting the boys to
understand the need for disci-
the like, and line, for self-awareness, respect
for self and others, for the need
that basically is for them to be quality leaders in
our society and not followers
what we try to and on and on," Petty Officer
Clarke added.
enforce." He singled out the contribu-
tions of Mary Hall as one of the
great stories of the camp. He
said that as a result of the
"excellent and selfless" work
successes over the years as a performed by Ms Hall, some of
number of the boys who were the students have advanced
"academically challenged" have three to four grades in six
gone on to excel in school while months which professionals
others have established their and experts "will tell you is
own trucking; electrical, SCU- impossible."
BA diving and boating compa- He said the camp administra-
nies as a result of their time at tors are prepared to have any of
the camp. the boys tested to prove the
Many others, he said, have truth of the story.
secured employment in many "I know it sounds a bit much,
of the skilled areas taught at the but we have no reason to tell
camp while others have found tales," Petty Officer Clarke said.
employment as lifeguards "Ms Hall has been doing a
throughout the tourism industry tremendous job with some of
and are performing at high lev- the boys who came here at a
els on those jobs. very, very low level, but are now
"When you see these kinds reading at levels that people
of things happening, it makes "'oild find difficult to believe."


A
0 0 0 0 0






MAXIMUS


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE













P6IAGE SAURDYMI SATRDAI AH 3THE TRI


Nun proclaims





Pope cured her


By ELAINE SCIOLINO
c.2007 New York Times News
Service

PARIS If the story Sister
Marie Simon-Pierre told Friday
is true, then Pope .lohn Paul II
exercised miraculous powers
from beyond the grave.
A proven physical miracle is
an inipoi plant qualification on
the road to sainthood.
SiItilumI. and strong-voiced,
the 46-year-old nun stepped out
of her quiet life of prayer and
good works and stood in front
o01 a Ji 0 caelnra, to pioclaiiii
that thu polpe cured her of
Parkinson's dis ase two months
after his death in 2005.
"1 have beue cured," she told
journal t gathered for a news
conference in Aix-en-Provence.
"My healing was the work of
God through the intercession
of Pope John Paul II."
But sh, refused to call her
rccoveiy a "miracle," saying
such a dli.Ignaition is the respon-
sibility of the Vatican.
"All I can say is that I was ill
and now I am cured," she said.
"It is for the church to say and
to recognize whether it is a mir-
acle." The veracity of her story
is crucial to making Pope John
Paul 11 a saint.
The pope has already been
put on a fast track to sainthood.
Only 26 days after the pope's
death, Pope Benedict XVI, his
successor, waived the five-year
waiting period to begin the
process of beatification, the first
step toward sainthood.
But John Paul needs one ver-


ifiable miracle to be beatified,
which means that one has
reached heaven and can be
referred to as "blessed." Sister
Marie Simon-Pierre's case has
been chosen as the first poten-
tial miracle.
A second miracle is generally
required for canonization as a
saint. Miracles can be waived
for those who die as "Christian
martyrs."
The French nun's case had
been revealed during the course
of a Vatican investigation on
behalf of Pope John Paul's
sainthood, but only on Friday
did she publicly recount her sto-
ry.
Dressed in a white nun's
habit and veil with a black
sweater, and carrying a knap-
sack over her shoulder as she
walked through a garden, she
seemed slightly overwhelmed
by the media attention.
She was told in 2001 that she
was suffering from Parkinson's,
a degenerative disease of the
nervous system. Over time, she
said, her symptoms worsened
until she had difficulty walking,
writing and driving a car. She
could not sleep. Her hands
trembled. Her body was racked
with pain.
The late pope became an
inspiration for her because of
his own very public suffering
from Parkinson's disease in the
decade before his death on
April 2, 2005.
It also became too painful for
her to watch him on television,
because, she said, "to be honest,
I saw myself in the years to


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY APRIL 1ST, 2007

No Services At Central Gospel Chapel
Join us in our

63rd Annual Missions Conference
10:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.
At Emmanuel Gospel Chapel
Malcolm Allotment, Off Soldier Road

Speaker: Pastor Rex Major
week-night services at 7:30 p.m.


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
t o Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
kiaalaw CHURCH SERVICES
M SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2007
PALM SUNDAY
SIE AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC
ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Shardn Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
7:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Evening of Music
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Phillip Stubbs
S9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
S 11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
S6:00PM Rev. William Higgs
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Dr. Reginald W. Eldon
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Dr. Reginald W. Eldon

Curry vMemorial Methodist Church will be holding their Annual Good
f 1. ddiJa\ L.nchiell on i,'ida\ April 6. 2007 on the Cihurh aroundnd. 7.io
li iik'.i ard from 1 l.)0- i i.l' ip.in Doiiltion. S (l.O0
Thie Nassau Ragion of the Winien's Fellow htlp \\ill be holding a Ihiiiburger
I r on Friday. Apiil 27. 21007 oni 6 1)1) 8 iat [Epv.rth Hall. East Shlrle
o--, t Donation: S5.00


orant's Eoton l cslep iRetjbbi5t CIajtrcb
iBalelu Hn R r Crpei Stre"n P0.8ox CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley org)
SUNDAY APRIL 1ST, 2007
7:00 am. Rev. Carla Culmer/ Bro. Erest Miller
11:00 am. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
6:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/ Board of Property

t aliBBS i


come in a wheelchair."
But her fellow nuns, the Little
Sisters of Catholic Maternity
Hospitals in Puyricard near the
southeastern town of Aix-en-
Provence, prayed to the pope
for her recovery.
In June 2005, exactly two
months after the pope's death,
she asked to be relieved of her
duties as supervisor of a 40-bed
maternity ward. Her mother
superior told her to write John
Paul's name on a piece of paper,
but the words were illegible.
Later that night after her
evening prayers, she heard a
voice from within telling her to
pick up a pen and write. She
followed her lights, and was
stunned to see that she could
write legibly again.
When she awoke early the
next morning, she said she felt
"completely transformed."
"I felt that my body was no
longer the same, and that I was
no longer the same," she said,
adding that it was "a bit like a
second birth." After her recov-
ery, she told one of her fellow
nuns: "Look at my hand. It is no
longer trembling. John Paul II
has cured me."
She said that her neurologist
was astounded when he saw her
soon after her transformation.
She has not had to take med-
ication or seek treatment since.
Last year, she was transferred to
another maternity hospital in
Paris run by her order.
Only once before has a pope
put a candidate for sainthood
on a fast track. In 2003, Pope
John Paul II accelerated the
canonization process for Moth-
er Teresa, the winner of the
Nobel Peace Prize for her care
of the poor of Calcutta who
died in 1997.
But a grass-roots campaign
to make the late Pope John


Paul II a saint began immedi-
ately after his death. Cries of
Santo subito! Sainthood
now! filled Saint Peter's Square
during his funeral.
Monsignor Slawomir Oder, a
Polish cleric in the diocese of
Rome, has organized an official
campaign to push for quick
sainthood. He has said he has
received reports of more than
130 miracles attributed to the
late pope. But he is focusing on
the case of Sister Marie Simon-
Pierre because other cases may
take longer to verify.
"The scientific evaluation of
cancer cures would have
required a wait of 8 to 10
years," he said recently.
Pope Benedict has given
mixed signals on his view of
sainthood.
In addition to putting the late
pope's canonization on a fast
track, he fueled speculation that
sainthood was imminent when
he expressed hope last May dur-
ing a trip to Poland, John Paul's
homeland, that the process
would conclude "in the near
future."
As a cardinal, however, Pope
Benedict said several times that
he was not in favor of naming
an excessive number of saints.
He was believed to have been
aligned with conservatives who
looked askance on Pope John
Paul's record canonization of
saints during his 26-year papacy.
Sister Marie Simon-Pierre
and Archbishop Claude Feidt
of Aix-en-Provence are now
heading to the Vatican, where
her case will be presented. They
will attend a Mass in Saint
Peter's Square marking the sec-
ond anniversary of John Paul's
death, when the dossier of doc-
uments for beatification will be
turned over to the Vatican's
congregation for saints.


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Pastor:H. Mills
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2 Pas .
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
9 Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future


Worship Time: 11am & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on
Jov 101.9 at 8:30a.m
Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


fiLL RRE WELCOME TO RTTfElD
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
PO. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs










Praver hime: 10:l5um to 10:.-5uln
Chilch School during Worship Service

Special Events
Lenten Tea March 31st a, 4-6p.im.
Pal m Sunday April 1st i lhla .
1; ol lV'eek Service A1pril 4th i ':30p.m. I //
Maunud Thursday-, lpril S a :30p.m. "

Good Friday Service .pril 6 a, 11a.m.
Easter Sunday -, April 8 ia I la. im

Place: Tvwiatz lteighls
of(fPrince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538 Telefax number: 324-258?
COME TO WORSHIP LE. I'E TO SERIES


By ALAN COWELL
c.2007 New York Times
News Service

LONDON As the con-
frontation over British mili-
tary prisoners in Iran entered
a second week, Iran stepped
up its propaganda campaign,
broadcasting new video on
Friday of a captured British
marine and releasing a third
letter from the only woman
in the group of captives.
The marine was shown
seeming to apologize
"deeply" for entering Iranian
waters without permission,
and the letter supposedly
signed by Faye Turney, a
female sailor, complained of
being "sacrificed" to British
and American policies in the
region.
The newest moves by Iran
added to a deepening sense
of frustration among British
officials, underscoring the lim-
its of their ability to end the
standoff, and offering no pub-
lic indication that it might be
close to resolution. At the
same time, some analysts said,
the Iranian campaign may
reflect tensions among fac-
tions in Tehran over the tim-
ing of the Britons' release.
Iranian television identified
the latest Briton to be shown
as Nathan Thomas Summers,
a marine rifleman. He was
one of 15 British sailors and
marines seized on March 23
in the northern Persian Gulf.
Prime Minister Tony Blair
expressed "disgust" at British
personnel being "paraded"
and "manipulated." But he
also urged patience, saying,
"There is only one possible
conclusion to this, and that is
that our personnel are
released safe and sound."
Blair is seeking to mold a
triumphant legacy before his
retirement as prime minister
in a few months, and he is
under pressure to ensure the
captives' release. But the crisis
underscores for some critics
the constraints on British
power after military cam-
paigns in Iraq and elsewhere
as an ally of the United States,
which have been a hallmark
of his years in office.
"What is crystal clear is that
Iran would never have dared
so blatant an act of brinks-
manship were it not con-


vinced, quite correctly, that
the Iraqi misadventure has
rendered Britain too nervous
and demoralized, not to men-
tion militarily overstretched,
to respond with serious
force," Matthew Norman, a
columnist, wrote Friday in
The Independent, a British
daily newspaper.
"The days when Britain
had the stature, self-confi-
dence and facade of moral
authority to play sergeant to
the U.S. chief inspector on the
global stage are over, and the
villains know it," he wrote.
Summers was shown wear-
ing olive-and-sand-colored
camouflage fatigues with the
words "Royal Navy" and a
small Union Jack badge on
the shirt. He was seen sitting
next to Turney and another
marine identified by the BBC
as Adam Sperry. Their where-
abouts in Iran have not been
disclosed.
Britain insists that the
sailors were "ambushed"
while operating under U.N.
and Iraqi authority, 1.7 nauti-
cal miles within Iraqi waters,
while Iran insists that the
Britons were captured about
500 yards inside Iranian
waters.
In video that seemed to
jump between camera angles
as if it had been edited, Sum-
mers said that Britain had
promised after a similar
episode in 2004 that its naval
vessels would not trespass in
Iranian waters. "Again I
deeply apologize for entering
your waters," he said,
addressing an unseen inter-
viewer.
In what was said to be Tur-
ney's third letter, the 26-year-
old sailor went further than
she had in previous missives
addressed to her family and
to Parliament.
Addressed "To British Peo-
ple," the latest letter said: "I
am writing to you as a British
serviceperson who has been
sent to Iraq, sacrificed due to
the intervening policies of the
Bush and Blair govern-
ments.""Whereas we hear
and see on the news the way
that prisoners were treated in
Abu Ghraib and other Iraqi
jails by the British and Amer-
ican personnel, I have
received total respect and
faced no harm," the letter in


The Liz) Lfod'sSipper
Dramatisation ,


ir w1 31
lrfe~(c "LI


pril 6r207 @.1030.aio.m.


A Worship Musical for Easter
SEaster Sunday, April: 2007 @ 8:30 & 11:00 a.m.


.] JOPPORTUN 1 ITIES FO
WORSHIP AND MINISTRY


SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning Worship Service .......
Sunday School for all ages,..
Adult Education ...............
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Spanilh Service .....
E.ening .'orsnip Se,,;ce ........


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Selective Bible Teaching
Ro'al Rangers (Boys C'CO b) 4 16 it;.
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FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth /ir':!t/ Meetirg
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heat ovec 1 4~r 115)
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THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007










SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCALNEWS


Mexico expected to




make abortion legal


By JAMES C. McKINLEY
Jr.
Yazmmn Quiroz, Elisabeth
Malkin and Antonio Betan-
court contributed reporting.
c.2007 New York Times News
Service

MEXICO CITY Domi-
nated by liberals, Mexico City's
legislature is expected to legal-
ize abortion in a few weeks. The
bill would make this city one of
the largest entities in Latin
America to break with a long
tradition of women resorting to
illegal clinics and midwives to
end unwanted pregnancies.
But the measure has stirred a
vicious debate and shaken this
heavily Roman Catholic coun-
try to its roots. In recent days,
the bill has dominated conver-
sations from family dinner
tables to the president's office.
Celebrities and politicians of all
stripes have lined up on both
sides, throwing verbal darts at
one another. Catholic and fem-
inist groups have staged duel-
ing protests and marches.
The contours of the debate
are familiar to veterans of sim-
ilar battles in the United States.
But Mexico City's law would
be groundbreaking in Latin
America, where most countries
allow abortion only under strict
conditions, like when the life of
the mother is in danger or when
the mother is a victim of rape or
incest. Only in Cuba, Puerto
Rico and Guyana can women
have abortions on demand dur-
ing the first trimester. Three
countries Chile, Nicaragua
and El Salvador ban it with-
out exception.
The Mexico City bill would
make it legal to have an abor-
tion during the first trimester
for any reason. The procedure
would be free at city health
facilities. Private hospitals
would be required to provide
an abortion to any woman who
asks for one, though doctors
with religious or ethical objec-
tions would not be required to
perform abortions.
Catholic leaders and church
officials have denounced the
proponents as "baby killers"
and have warned that the law
could provoke violence against
doctors who agree to provide
the service. A group of Catholic
lawyers are pushing for a city-
wide referendum on the issue,
hoping to avert the vote in the
city Legislative Assembly.
, The debate in Mexico threat-
ens to revive tensions between
President Felipe Calderon, a
conservative who opposes abor-
tion, and the leftist Party of the
Democratic Revolution, whose
candidate narrowly lost the
election last year and still refus-
es to concede.


Calderon has tried to stay
above the fray, but he said last
week, "I am in defense of life."
His health minister and other
surrogates in the conservative
National Action Party, howev-
er, are in the thick of it. They
have proposed streamlining
adoption laws, improving sex
education and providing subsi-
dies to unwed mothers as alter-
natives.
Leftists and feminists, mean-
while, have accused opponents
of turning a blind eye to reality.
They say millions of women
here, and indeed throughout
much of Latin America, already
ignore the law and choose to
abort fetuses, often in dingy
underground clinics or the pri-
vate homes of midwives. They
risk infection, sterility and
sometimes death.
"Women are dying, above all
poor women, because of unsafe
abortions," said Maria Consue-
lo Mejia, the director of
Catholics for the Right to
Decide. "What we would like
is that these women never have
to confront the necessity of an
abortion, but in this society it's
impossible right now. There is
no access to information, to
contraceptives.
Nor do most women have
the power to negotiate the use
of contraceptives with their
partners."
Conservatives respond that
abortion is tantamount to mur-
der. "This law is a law that will
cost many lives," said Jorge Ser-
rano Limon, the head of Provi-
da, an anti-abortion group. "If it
is signed, it will spill a lot of
blood, the blood of babies just
conceived in the maternal
womb."
Serrano Limon and other
opponents also dispute that the
law will end illegal abortions.
The procedure carries such a
stigma here, they say, that
whether legal or not, many
women will seek out under-
ground clinics to keep their con-
dition secret from their friends
and families anyway.
The bill, tentatively sched-
uled for a vote on April 19, is
likely to pass the 66-member
city Legislative Assembly with a
solid majority, and the mayor,
Marcelo Ebrard, has said he will
sign it, the sponsors say. It
would legalize abortion in the
capital, which has eight million
residents, and could make Mex-
ico City a magnet for women
seeking abortions across the
country.
The debate roiling Mexico
right now would have been
nearly unthinkable a decade
ago, proponents of the law say.
The topic was so taboo that the
church once excommunicated
actresses and television pro-


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ducers for bringing it up in a
soap opera.
"People are talking about
abortion openly for the first
time in Mexico." said Lilian
Sepulveda, a lawyer with the
New York-based Center for
Reproductive Rights who tracks
the issue in Latin America. "It is
historic."
Still, lawmakers in the
Assembly are bracing for an
ugly fight, and each side has
held competing rallies.
Several hundred people in
favor of the law marched on
Thursday afternoon through the
narrow streets of the historic
downtown. The crowd was
made up mostly of women,
largely from women's rights
groups and political parties that
support legalizing abortion.
Last Sunday, Cardinal Nor-
herto Rivera was among the
church leaders who joined a
protest march down the boule-
vard to the Basilica of the Vir-
gin of Guadalupe. Despite a
ban on the clergy taking part in
politics, the cardinal told the
crIod of several thousand, "We
are united here so that they
hear our voice, the voice of
life."
"They say that it's a problem
of a woman's rights over her
body, but they ignore the right
over their bodies that all the
aborted girls and boys have,"
he said later in his homily.
"They deny them the funda-
mental right, which is the right
to life."
Vmctor Hugo Cirigo
Vasquez, the majority leader of
the Assembly, said many of the
34 legislators from his Party of
the Democratic Revolution who
support the measure had
received threatening calls and
messages on their cellphones,
as well as nasty e-mail. They
were told they would be excom-
municated or go to hell if they
approved the law.
"There is a media lynching
campaign that has been orches-
trated by clerical groups from
the very, very far right," he said.
He added, "It's a black dam-
paign that's coming hard."
The bill's prime sporistar,
Jorge Diaz Cuervo of the Alter-
native Party, said church leaders


had broken Mexican la\\ hy
meddling in the legislaim\e
process. "This is a layman;'s
state," he said. "There is no rea-
son to impose the beliefs of one
church on 100 percent of the
people."
Many women here are watch-
ing the political battle with a
mix of trepidation and hnop,.
Like many laws in Mexico. Ithe
abortion law is honored ;is
much in its breach as its obsei -
vance.
Government officials esti-
mate at least 110,000 women a
year seek illegal abortions in
Mexico, and many abortion
rights groups say the numnbei is
much higher. At least 88 women
died in 2006 from botched abor--
tions, the Health Ministry says,
though it is far from clear that
all cases were reported.
For the well off, it is com-
mon knowledge that certain
gynecologists perform illegal
abortions in private hospitals,
disguising the procedure as
something else on documents.
The story of one woman.
Dolores, who did not want her
full name used, is typical. When
she was 18, she became preg-
nant after her first sexual
encounter.
"I was alone and had no
help," she said in an interview.
"In fact, I thought about it a lot
before I made the decision, but
in the end there was no other
way. I wasn't in the economic
position to face the situation."
Panicked, she visited a mid-
wife, who inserted a flexible
tube into the womb to let air in
and provoke a miscarriage.
Dolores was told to wait three
days before removing the tube.
She started bleeding within
15 minutes of leaving the mid-
wife's house.
The bleeding continued
unabated for a month. At last,
she fainted in front of her par-
ents from a loss of blood and
they took her to a hospital,
where she recovered slowly
after a week of treatment. "I
almost died," she said.
Now 41, she has never car-
ried a baby to term since. Two
of her pregnancies ended in pre-
mature births, and both infants
died.


UN chief calls for


secure Lebanon


By WARREN HOGE
c.2007 New York Times
News Service
REIRUIT. Lebanon -
Secel
;iI\ generall Ban Ki-moon
called l idaii for the fulfill-
mcinit of Ihe U.N. Security
S('counIil itsolution in August
ending the war between
Ilczholl:ih and Israel and
Spioposing steps to rid
Leban iof' illegal arms and
secure its orders.
In a ioi t news conference
with Lebanon's prime minis-
ter, Fouad Siniora, he said
Lebanon's capacity to stop
arms smuggling into the coun-
trv had to he strengthened.
Ban, on the seventh day of
a Middle East tour, said he
had heard from Ehud Olmert,
the Israeli prime minister, in
Jerusalem on Monday that
SIcl/btllalh was rearming with
materiel brought across the
Syriian bolder.
In reply, Siniora said there
had rnot been a single incident
of smuggling uncovered since
the end of the war in August.
But he agreed that border
conlrl nededed improvement.
Ask<"d if the Lebanese
arni i keeping with the
Secirit council's s demands,
was disai inig Hezbollah, Sin-
iora replied that Lebanon
would bring about that result
through dialogue.
On Satur day, Ban is expect-
ed to toIt southern Lebanon,
\ visiting the headquarters and
outposts of a 3,000-member
U.N. force that has been
patrolling a weapons-free
zone alongside the Lebanese
army.
Saying he had met in
Jerusalem with the families of
two soldiers captured by


'l.i.r 4l II u u .I ui2JLtA.) L ,,UJLLUUI
4L


Hezbollah in July, Ban said
he was disappointed that they
had not been released and
that their captors would not
even confirm if they were
alive.
Lebanese politics weic h ac-
tured last November when six
pro-Hezbollah ministers
resigned from the cabinet, set-
ting off a crisis that still threat-
ens the Siniora government.
As Ban's convoy swung into
the grounds of the hillside
presidential compound,
chants could be heard from
demonstrators who had been
camped there since Decem-
ber. They have pledged to
maintain their protest until
Siniora resigns.
At the news conference,
Ban said, "One of my main
messages here, to all
Lebanese leaders I meet with,
is that the path of dialogue
and compromise has to be the
way forward out of this
impasse."
Mohammed Fneish, a pro-
Hezbollah legislator, said he
told Ban in a meeting that
there had not bee, any
Hezbollah violations of the
border with Israel. while the
Israelis had crossed the bor-
der by air, sea and land more
than 1,000 times. Ban told
Siniora earlier that he had
complained to Olmert in
Jerusalem about the high
number of Israeli flights over
the border reported by the
U.N. command in southern
Lebanon.
Questioned about why
Hezbollah would not give a
"sign of life" indication that
the families of the captured
soldiers were seeking, Fneish
said that would be a matter
for negotiation.


A Featured Artst Featured Ams,
SNEW
- "9 .r
71.A.)~ftai rtiTia^i^^^^tlf ^tue ril FTedA


SI HE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS ,
rPtr--7 CONFERENCE
1 OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
.'I(EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432: Far:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelhet.bs
MEIITHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
;00), 10 REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
rIHE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
1HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)

"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
\vitv'ss for Christ in The Bahamas"
P\M i /PASSION LORD'S DAY, APRIL 1, 2007
('1, .1,1('C I':
lord .Iesus Christ, you humbled yourself in taking the form
of a ser rant, and in obedience died on the cross for our
salvation: give us the mind to follow you and to proclaim you
ais I ordl and King, to the glory of God the father.

\WI' l,1i: METHl11ODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 ;.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
:30( a.m Rev. Edward J. Sykes
RIOIDES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose \ve. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 ;.m. Rev. Mark S. Christmas (Holy Communion)
:10:() a mI Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
I I:0 a.m. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly/ Rev. Emily
A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
6:30 p.m. 11 a.m. Worship Leaders
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
1 1:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts (Holy Communion)
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
I 1:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia Williams-Christmas (Holy
('Comimnion)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
( 'lR(CH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
.,W) ili. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
10.00 ;.'ln Rev. Mark. S. Christmas
MLEII11HDIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
XS00tl am.. Bishop Dr. Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
( ilmmuinion)
( R OI X-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
W l 'i Fridays Children's Club
1o n. Suntiday Rhodes Memorial Prayer Band
MII I IIODIS I MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
iad tlher Ministries
,H1 IN W' ESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
's., ()kes Field) Reception to Primary

IPEA( AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
pi eiail in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly after
the 'v"ning meal on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday.
I his ve proclaim unswervingly: "My God and My Right."

NASSAU CIRCUIT FAIR Saturday, April 28, 2007 from 12
noon to 6 p.m. R.M. Bailey Park

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns
of Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
1"amily \ ibes" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; "To God be the
(r;,,)\ 7NS- 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


-- ----~


u








THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007


LCLNW


&7 :9a1fS cone f^W


January 9, 1989 The late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling greets Premier i a~ur- .
ing a brief ceremony at Na.sau
International Airpor.


THIS week, In Days Gone By looks back at the four (lay visit of
the former Primer of Taiwan, the late Yu Kuo-Hwa, who died
from leukemia at a Taipei hospital in 2000.
Yu, an internationally known financial expert, served as pre-
mier from 1984 to 1989.
During his career, the Harvard-educated economist represented
Taiwan in a number of international financial organizations includ-
ing the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the
Asian Development Bank.
He also held several cabinet posts including finance minister, cen-
tral bank governor and chairman of the Council for Economic
Planning and Development before becoming premier in 1984.






I IJQi[J1-IIu iMk


SBARRO THE ITALIAN RESTAURANT HAVE
OPENINGS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSI-
TIONS:

COOKS


PREP COOKS


CASHIERS


SERVERS


PLEASE REPORT TO THE COB CAFETERIA
SITE ON ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DATES
AND TIME FOR AND INTERVIEW.


THURSDAY
FRIDAY
MONDAY


MAR 29TH 2007
MAR 30TH 2007
APR 02ND 2007


2 P.M.- 5 P.M.
2 P.M.- 5 P.M.
10 A.M-1 P.M.
2 P.M.- 4 P.M.


LEADING TRUST COMPANY is seeking a candidate for
the position of Trust Officer.

The position reports to the Vice President, Client Services
and is responsible for the ongoing administration of trusts and
other fiduciary products and services, including:

* Liaising with senior management in the provision of
informationiexecution of transactions and problem resolution
* Managing all associated risk and escalating as appropriate
* Preparing periodic administrative reviews of trusts and
companies
* Liaising with ComplianceiBusiness Risk Management,
internal/external auditors and regulators as required to ensure
adherence to all internal policies/procedures and regulatory
requirements
* Ongoing updating and maintenance of trust administration
system as it relates to account management
* Projects as assigned from time to time.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED:

* Bachelors degree in law, business administration, accounting
or related field
* Minimum 3-5 years experience in trust and company
administration or related experience
* Strong oral and written communication skills :"-''
* STEP qualification is desirable
" Sound knowledge of fundamental trust and company laws
and related administrative practice
* Basic knowledge of banking and investment products and
their application in overall management and administration
of wealth
* Basic understanding and working knowledge of accounting
concepts and their applications
* Ability to identify potential risk issues and solutions and to
communicate these effectively to senior management
* Excellent time management, organization and administrative
skills
* Strong analytical and problem-solving skills
* Strong PC skills; knowledge of 4Series an asset
* Strong interperspnal skills and excellent team player

Salary commensurate with qualification and experience and
interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of their
resume to:
Human Resources
PO. Box N-10697
Nassau, Bahamas or
Fax: (242) 325-0911 or
E-mail: smith@experta.bs


Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 30 March 2007
MBSX fi O..,. EQ .8- V IS.GcOM FOR MORE DATA & INF.FORMATIONI
C .92 'I%C-IG 0,'05 I YTD 104.44 I Y-TD % 06 23
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Change Daily Vol. EPS $ Div $ PIE Yield
1.85 0.54 Abaco Markets 0.90 0.92 0.02 2,000 -0.282 0.000 N/M 0.00%
12.05 10.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.50 11.50 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.56%
8.65 6.95 Bank of Bahamas 8.65 8.65 0.00 0.737 0.260 11.7 3.01%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.2 2.35%
2.19 1.26 Bahamas Waste 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.199 0.060 10.6 2.86%
1.49 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.0 3.85%
10.33 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.35 10.35 0.00 0.915 0.240 11.3 2.32%
2.20 1.67 Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9 1.90%
14.19 9.50 Commonwealth Bank 14.00 14.19 0.19 1,250 0.998 0.680 14.2 4.79%
6.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.75 4.74 -0.01 0.118 0.045 40.3 0.95%
2.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3 0.00%
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.8 4.04%
12.45 10.70 Finco 12.45 12.45 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.58%
14.70 11.00 FirstCaribbean 14.61 14.61 0.00 0.977 0.500 15.0 3.40%
17.06 10.40 Focol 17.06 17.06 0.00 1.644 0.510 10.4 2.99%
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 600 0.532 0.100 13.6 1.38%
9.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4 6.19%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 7.95%
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Socuraties
52wk-H-i 52wk-Low Symbol Bid $ Ask $ Last Price Weekly Vol FPS $ Div S P/E Yield
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.60 16.00 1.76 1.125 8 8 7.71%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.-40 Ir N 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 0.00%
Colina Over-Tt~e-Couller Securllies
4300 28.00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41.00 2.220 0 00 19J 4 0.001%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.770 1 321 8 3 9.04%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0 001 N/M 0 00%
,' .. BISX Listed Mutual Funds
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA V YTD% Last 12 Months Div S '. iJ __
1.3337 1.2806 Colina Money Market Fund 1.333665"
3.0988 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.0988**
2.6254 2.3312 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.625419"
1.2338 1.1592 Colina Bond Fund 1.233813**"
11.3945 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.3945*".
f.,INDEX CLOSE 789.93 / YTD 06 45% / 2006 34.47%/
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000 00 MARKET TERMS YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing, '
52wk-Hi Highest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price ol Collna and Fidelity
52wk-L.ow Lowest closing pnce in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Previous Close Previous day's weighted pnce for daily volume Last Price Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Curlent day's weighted pnce for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior wck >
Cl,3nO Change in closing pnce from day to day EPS S A company's reported earnings per share ori th, la. i 12 intir,
Djiy Vol Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 1 r 107
DIV $ Divdends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
P/E Clo.iig price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1 1994 = I100 o- r ry ;007
..... 8 F bruary 2007
TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010'1 FtDELITY-242-35e-7764 ; FOR F.qfRE LDTa f. I)"*,.; .T ', .- *' -L ?^ 3e'.---2I03


January 11, 1989 A cheque for $20,000 was presented to Lady Pin-
dling by Madame Yu, headed for the coffers of two worthy charities.



0


January 12,1989 Premier Yu (hat in hand) waves good-bye as his
four-day visit to the Bahamas comes to an end. Immediately behind
him is his wife. During the meeting, the Bahamas and Taiwan decided
to establish diplomatic relations.


January 10, 1989 Dame Marguerite Pindling (centre) and Lady May-
nard (left), wife of former deputy prime minister, Sir Clement Maynard,
speak with Madame Yu at a reception in the gardens of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNETTE JOSEPH OF
DRY HILL ROAD, NORTH PALMETTO POINT, ELEUTHERA,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that I, DONAVON JOSPEN
of Stapledon Gardens, CB-11216, Nassau, Bahamas
intend to change my name to DONAVON MURPHY.
If there are any objections to this change of name by
Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no
later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of
this notice.







The Mall At Marathon has full or

part time positions available for

experienced officers only at $6.00

per hour apply in person with all

paperwork at mall offices.

No Phone Calls Please.


TRUST OFFICER


:NO ELEPONEN W.IEW


.s W .SW.
'
















MP: Damage t0s


election signs


uncalled for


FROM page one

levels," he said.
Mr Miller said besides the
fact that such acts are illegal,
the mere fact of doing some-
thing so petty is uncalled for.
"I guess it is par for the
course. I guess because of the
emotions that were running last
night, someone passing thought
it was as good a time as ever to
smear the poster so what the
hell. But posters don't vote.
And the people of Blue Hills
know what I have done for
them over the last several years.
So they can deface all the
posters we put up. That will not
affect the outcome of the elec-
tion," he said.
Jesting, Mr Miller said he
would be grateful if persons
who had to deface his signs,


Leslie Miller
would use water-based paintro
that it can be washed off wit-
out destroying the sign i(set
"I would be grateful if 1
do. Of course I would be mmin
grateful if they didn't hawvg.
do it at all," he laughed. ,-


From L to R: Melanie Roach, director of Public Works; Archie Nairn, permanent secretary, Ministry of Transport and Aviation; Anthony Kikivarakis,
chairman of the Airport Authority; and George Casey, president of Vancouver Airport Services, sign several documents for the official handover of man-
agement of the Lynden Pindling International Airport to the Canadian-based Vancouver Airport Services Friday, March 30, 2007. (BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)


Airport handover finally complete


FROM page one

handover of LPIA's manage-
ment, Transport and Aviation
Minister Glenys Hanna-Martin
said that this is a "red letter
day" for the Bahamas.
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that
this is the first time in the his-
tory of the country that the
redevelopment of the airport
was approached in a compre-
hensive fashion.
With tourism being the coun-
try's lifeline, Prime Minister
Christie described the decision
to transform the airport as a
"defining intervention in the
history of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas."
As of yesterday the Nassau
Airport Development (NAD)
- a subsidiary of the Airport
Authority and YVRAS will
handle the day-to-day opera-
tions of the airport and rede-
velop the airport into a premier
facility.
Last October government


signed a $225 million contract
with NAD for a 10-year peri-
od.
The transformation of the air-
port is envisaged to take place
without financial guarantees by
the government, with NAD also
taking over the debt of the Air-
port Authority.
To help finance the large-
scale project, passenger facili-
ty and security fees are being
introduced.
Passengers departing for
international destinations will
be asked to pay a $15 facility
fee, while domestic travellers
will be charged $5 for the use of
facilities.
Every departing passenger
will also be asked to pay a $7
security fee.
The prime minister yesterday
reiterated that construction and
management objectives for the
redevelopment of the airport
will be carried out in two phas-
es, with Phase I anticipated to
be completed at the end of 24
months.


Phase I will include the "exe-
cution of high-priority projects,
such as improving the physical
and sanitary conditions of the
airport, alleviating congestion
associated with US pre-clear-
ance, alleviating parking condi-
tions and air side congestion,
managing adequate check-in
spaces for additional air traffic
growth, facilitating group travel
and minimising and streamlin-
ing passenger security checks,"
Mr Christie said.
Phase H is divided into four
stages and includes the con-
struction of new facilities and
the renovation of existing ones.
During the first stage of
Phase II a new US pre-clear-
ance building will be designed,
constructed and opened, the
prime minister said.
The second stage will encom-
pass the construction and com-
pletion of new US and interna-
tional arrival facilities. Then, in
the third stage, the airport will
receive new international and
domestic departure facilities.


Stage four includes the
improvement to the general
area of the airport, such as the
landscaping of the premises,
and will take place during the
stages already mentioned.
Mr Christie also once again
emphasised that preference will
be given to Bahamian firms to
participate in any tenders for
financing, capital works, or any
other airport contracts.
Ownership and operation of
retail businesses at the airport,
he said, shall be given to
Bahamians who demonstrate
international best practices.
Government will continue to
be responsible for Customs and
immigration, air traffic control,
police, security and passenger
screening at the airport, but
may decide at a later date to
delegate some of the passenger
screening and security to NAD,
Mr Christie said.


Investigation into vessel threat


FROM page one

on board the Carnival Cruise
Lines Sensation ship.
The threat was called in at
about 3.45pm, just after most
of those scheduled to leave on
the trip had boarded.
The port authority, Coast


Guard and Brevard County
Sheriff's office spent two hours
performing a bomb sweep.
According to the Orlando
Sentinel, a ship employee did
identify a package which
seemed "out of place", but it
was dismissed after an x-ray
confirmed it contained person-
al items.


Between 5pm and 6pm pas-
sengers were permitted to re-
enter the luxury liner, and their
vacation eventually got under-
way after 8pm.
The sheriff's office and Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation will
conduct an investigation into
the incident, according to the
Orlando Sentinel.


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS


1998


IN THE SlUPREME COURT


No.221


Equity Si,.c

IN THE MATTER of Socimer International
Bank Limited
(In Liquidation)

AND

IN THE MATTER of the Companies Act 1992

NOTICE OF INTENDED DIVIDEND

Rule 68 of The Companies (Winding-Up) Rules, 1975


Name of Company:


Address of Registered Office:


Nature of Business


Court:


Number of Matter:


SOCIMER INTERNATIONAL
BANK LIMITED
(IN LIQUIDATION)

Charlotte House, Charlotte Street,
Nassau, Bahamas


Banking Company


Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas,
Equity Side


221 of 1998


Last day of Receiving Proofs:


Name of Liquidator:


Address:


27th April, 2007


Paul Frederick Clarke


One Montague Place, Nassau, Bahamas


Dated this 28th day of March, A.D., 2007

Paul F. Clarke
Liquidator


-1 *~ud U



~~MNiD
~d~e/


$3


(00


MITSUBISHI
,Aw MOTORS

wake up and drive *


Bahamas Bus and Truck Company Lim
Montrose Avenue
Phone: (242) 322-1722
Fax: (242) 326-7452
44 Montrose Avenue


2.4L Engine
Power Window*
Air Conditioner
Radio/CassePtt
Keyless Entry
Central Lock
Roof Rails


ited


tKLE UP'h


I I I


-I-I


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007, PAGE!:,


THE TRIBUNE







THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007


The Tribune's & Kelly's


EASTER

Coloring Contest


IFA:


'11


0,


11:I


1 Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives of The Tribune and Kelly's are not eligible to enter.
2 Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or an older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLbRING THE ENTRY.
3 Enter as many times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 5 pm on Friday March 30, 2007. Winners will be contacted April 3 and winners
published Thursday, April 5, 2007.
4 There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age group.
5 All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.


Child's Name:


.Parent/Guardian Signature.


Address:


-I


Tel: (hm) (cell) Age:


NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY


=I











Tj~E TRIBUNE SATURDAY, MARCH 31,2007, PAGE 11.


IL


Public's faith' in judicial independence hit

,ROM pae oe mised the independence of the not for our benefit. We must eral education leaves much to what Justice Lyons had ru
fRO M page one Judiciary and the Judiciary is guard the rights of citizens and be desired," Justice Sawyer said. That was told to the public
i u y'" c i acun,, i m n. hi r nln Idi dh h drl


court does not manage the
Supreme Court, but rather the
CIef Justice has that authority
ana she would not undermine
his authority. One of the
grounds of the appeal had been
that Justice Lyons had erred in
la holding that by neglecting,
oriefusing to nominate intend-
edCommissioners to the Gov-
er4or-General for appointment
urlder section four of the
Judge's Remuneration and Pen-
sions Act, Chapter 45, that the
Cabinet has stripped the judi-
ci ry of the right essential to its
independence and plunged the
nation into a constitutional cri-
sis;-
.'That is an admission in
itself," Justice Sawyer said, "and
they had not been appointed on
twg separate occasions, 2003
and 2006. That in itself validates
wliat the learned judge found.
AAither ground had been that
JuStice Lyons had erred in law


FROM page one
to be built on land that was des-
igirated in the subdivision plan
to.be "green space" for the
entyment of residents.
yesterday, rather than deny-
ingIthe claims, a response from
Minister of Housing Neville
Wisdom said that the property
referred to in the article is "not
anrexception in the planning
ankuse of government housing
developments."
The statement said: "The
Minister...wishes to advise that
thc43overnment's housing sub-
divsions all provide for service
lots, commercial and commu-
nity properties to assist young
Bahamians to explore business
an investment opportunities."
Furthermore, land is on occa-
siohs allocated "to provide for
ne.y established churches, to
secure land for building pur-
poss, and' for charitable insti-
tutions to provide various com-
mietity services."
jubilee Gardens II and
,.


EROM page one

arrted in New Providence, just
over 50,000 in Grand Bahama
and a little over a million chose
one; of the Family Islands as
the'r port of entry.
9n the year 2005 the
Bahnaas received some 4.1 mil-
lion.visitors in the time period
froM1 January to October of that
yeas. The report shows a 4.7 per
cernt drop of arrivals from 2005
to $06 for the entire Bahamas
andpa 6.7 drop in visitors to New
Providence.
Observers are saying that
although the numbers have not
yeteen finalised to include the
tinm* period up until December
2006, it is highly unlikely that
thefive million mark can be
reached even after the arrivals
for,~he two missing months are
corapiled.
Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, tourism director gen-
erakVernice Walkine said that it
woild not be fair for her to
coi6ment on the report by
THINK because she would not
be able to say if the industry
was able to "recoup that addi-
tional million in those final
months."
Officials from the Ministry
of Tourism told The Tribune
this" week that they are
"befiind" on compiling the data
for'the 2006 arrival statistics,


IRROM page one
his rival.
Grand Bahama Police are
alsomstill investigating the death
of a man found dead in a
parked vehicle on Barbary
Beach last Saturday.
The victim, 31-year-old
Desmond Butler, also known
as Druma Alexander Carey, a


(Photo: Franklyn
G Ferguson)
when he claimed that the failure
of the Cabinet to act timely in
relation to the appointment of a
Commission pursuant to the
Judges Remuneration and Pen-
sions Act completely compro-


Emerald Gardens contain com-
mercial businesses, said the min-
ister.
"The commercial property
referred to in the article is
therefore a part of this exer-
cise," said the statement.
However, the statement did
not address the claim that the
property had been built on land
which the ministry insider
claimed had been set out in the
plan to be preserved as "green
space."
Residents in the area have
been to their local MP, Leslie
Miller, to complain about the
structure, as they were dis-
turbed that a commercial struc-
ture has been built on land that
they were made to understand
would be left empty for recre-
ational use.
The statement also did not
state which individuals in the
ministry have the authority to
determine who is deemed eli-
gible to benefit from this policy,
and based on what criteria, oth-
er than to say that the policy


but hope to be able to release
the numbers in the next few
weeks.
Representatives from the
tourism industry have in the
past year raised concerns that
the implementation of the
Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative (WHTI)
would have disastrous effects
on the country's tourism indus-
try. However, the arrival statis-
tics from 2006 show that the
numbers have been declining
steadily in the past year before
the WHTI ever came into
effect.
Earlier this week, US Ambas-
sador John Rood told the media
that air traffic into Nassau had
decreased by eight to nine per
cent since
last June. The ambassador
speculated that the declining
number of rooms at the Cable
Beach resorts and the opening
of hotels in other
destinations, such as Cancun,
have contributed to the drop in
air traffic.
In the Ministry of Tourism's
draft of its business plan sum-
mary for the time period of Jan-
uary 2005 to June 2006 the high
cost of doing business in the
Bahamas is cited as an obsta-
cle which prevents the country
"from going after markets that
are flocking to competing des-
tinations in our region."
"Service quality is still weak


resident of Gordon Avenue,
was discovered slumped back
in the driver's seat of a bur-
gundy-coloured 1999 Buick
Regal with a wound to the tor-
so.
Supt Reckley said that But-
ler's death has not been classi-
fied as a homicide, and that
investigations are still continu-
ing into that matter.


therefore at mte will or he gov-
ernment for the restoration of
its independence.
"I have personal reason to
agree with the judge on that
point," Justice Sawyer said. "I
have personal experience of the
Executive trying to manipulate
the Judiciary."
Justice Sawyer said that there
should always be a perception
of the independence of the judi-
ciary. "Since this whole thing
has come about we have had
people come to this court and
tell us to our faces that we have
been unfair to them."
"When you have destroyed
the public's faith in the inde-
pendence of the judiciary to
which court do you take your
case?" she asked.
"If justice does not belong
to everyone, then it belongs to
none. People must understand
that and understand that those
of us who are called to serve in
these offices are given powers


was there to allow "young
Bahamians to explore business
and investment opportunities."
The Tribune contacted Mr
Wisdom to find out how many
ministry employees have been
given the go-ahead to benefit
from building commercial prop-
erties on government land. His
advice was to contact the per-
manent secretary.
However, the permanent-sec-
retary is on vacation, and the
acting Permanent Secretary was
unavailable.
A source responding to the
article yesterday confirmed that
in most cases the minister would
be the individual who would be
required to sign off on
approvals for all of those seek-
ing to start such ventures.
This would usually be done
on the recommend tpono.f....
senior housing officials, con-
firmed the source.
Attempts fiteek comnimet '
from the Director of Housing,
Gordon Major, were unsuc-
cessful.


and training in the fundamen-
tals of service together with bet-
ter supervision are needed to
improve existing service quality.
This matter is urgent," the plan
summary said.


do Justice ubewee citiizeIns and
the state," she said.
"This is serious business, this
is not a game. This is not about
me, this not about the other
person. This is about the admin-
istration of justice in a small
society where the level of gen-


I m saying t is aiUone, m i
the head of this court and I take
responsibility for what I do,"
Justice Sawyer said in court yes-
terday. "It was represented to
the public that the executive
expected to be fully vindicated
by the appellate process from


ile(.
over
i-


auu uover again alu il e juuicLa-
ry had no voice. No one stood
up for the judiciary other thahi
the Bar Council to say anything
to safeguard the administratiol'f
of justice in this country. I have
a voice now and I will use it',
she said yesterday.


family guardian's calendar photo contest

a celebration of nature
14 winning entries will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar.
Winning entries receive a gift certificate valued at $400 each.
Entry deadline is May 31, 2007
RULES
1 Family Guardian's Annual Calendar Photo Contest is open to all photographers. The title for the company's 2008 calendar will be
"A CELEBRATION OF NATURE." Photographs may be of any subject (animate or inanimate) or a scene which is a striking example of nature as found In
The Bahama Islands. All photographs must be taken in The Bahamas.
2 DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS MAY 31, 2007.
3 All entries are to be delivered to Family Guardian's Corporate Centre, Village and Eastern Road Roundabout, Nassau, between 9:00am and 5:00pm
weekdays only. Envelopes should be marked "Calendar Contest."
4 All entries must be accompanied by an official entry form, available at any Family Guardian office or when published in the newspapers.
5 Only colour images in horizontal format will be considered. Images must be provided as 35mm film or digital images on CD. 35mm film can be positive
(slides) or colour negatives. Digital images must be of high quality (2700 x 2100 pixels or larger). Digital images showing any signs of photo manipulation,
resolution enhancement or compression will be rejected. To ensure the best colour reproduction, digital images should be supplied in RAW, TIFFor high quality JPEG
and in the original colour format the camera uses (LAB or RGB). All entries must be supplied with prints which will be used in the judging process.
(Note: prints submitted without 35mm slides or negatives or CD's will not be eligible). The photographer's name and photo subject should
be written on the reverse of the print.
6 Judging of entries will be based on beauty, interest, composition, colour, originality and quality of photograph. Preference will be given to fauna photographed in its
natural state, rather than in captivity. The photographs selected will appear in Family Guardian's 2008 calendar. The decision of the judges will be final.
7 All entries are submitted at the owner's risk. It is the company's intention to return all entries in their original condition. However, Family Guardian
will assume no liability for any loss, damage or deterioration.
8 A gift certificate valued at $400 will be presented for each of the photographs selected. More than one entry from a single photographer may be selected.
Photographic credits will be given in the calendar The number of entries per photographer is limited to a maximum of 5 photos.
9 The winning photographs, along with all publication and reproduction rights attached thereto, become the property of Family Guardian and the company
reserves the right to use such in the future.
10 Employees of Family Guardian, its affiliated companies or family members are not eligible.
11 Previous, pubtiiSneo princlu are not eligible.

>PIO bTim a igg 2008 CALENDAR PHOTO CONTEST ENTRY FORM



SI A ...... ...... .............. ...UMBER OF PHOTOS ENTERE................................... ax...........mum of 5)


I agree that in the event that one or more of my entered photographs is selected as awinnefinte2006 Famly
Guardian Calendar Photo Contest it wl become the property of Family Guardian insurance Co. Ltd., and
B Lassign to Family Guardian all rights pertaining to its use in any way whatsoever I also confirm that the
STELphotos entered in thi....... contest were taken ....................n The Bahamas by the undersigned and have not been.............................................




Guard an CalendarP Photo Contest, Family Guardian
I agCorporate Centre, Village & Eastern Road photographs is selecUARD IA
Roundabout, Nassau, Bahamas INSURANCE
ENTRY DEADLINE: MAY 31, 2007 C O M P A N Y

SALES OFFICES' NASS/. ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


1'


Housing replies to



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EVERY MONTH I


GETS YOU SI


CLOSER TO


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tourist numbers unlikely


to reach five million mark


Police investigate


body in vehicle


SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007, PAGE 11-;


THIE TRIBUNE


It.


%W-.FW-.











THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


By STEVEN R. HURST
Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD (AP) Sui-
cide bombers and militiamen
fought back ferociously in the
seventh week of the Baghdad
security crackdown, killing at
least 508 people in the past six
days, but the government
vowed Friday it would win the
race against terrorism and
despair.
As the deadly week drew to
an end on the Muslim day of
rest and prayer, radical cleric
Muqtada al-Sadr blamed the
United States for the violence
and called for a huge anti-
American demonstration April
9, the fourth anniversary of the
fall of Baghdad.
Marketplaces in Baghdad,
Tal Afar and Khalis stood in
ruins. Clean up crews shoveled
broken glass and debris into
wheelbarrows in bloodstained
streets. Bomb victims in wood-
en coffins were hoisted atop
cars and vans for the trip south
for burial in the Shiite holy city
of Najaf.
In a sign of how deeply offi-
cials were shaken by the car-
nage, a top aide to Prime Min-
ister Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki, Sami al-Askari, pledged
that the government would not
relent in efforts to curb vio-
lence.
"There is a race between the
government and the terrorists
who are trying to make people
reach the level of despair," al-
Askari said. "But the govern-
ment is doing its best to defeat
terrorists and it definitely will
not be affected by these bomb-
ings."
The new U.S. commander in
Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus,
issued a statement blaming al-
Qaida in Iraq for the week's
first major suicide attack, a twin
truck bombing that killed 80
people and wounded 185 at
markets in Tal Afar in the far
northwest of the country.
He said al-Qaida's leaders
"once again displayed their
total disregard for human life,
carrying out barbaric actions
against innocent Iraqi citizens
in an effort to re-ignite sectari-
an violence and to undermine
recent Iraqi and coalition suc-
cesses in improving security in
Baghdad."


"There is a
race between
the govern-
ment and the
terrorists who
are trying to
make people
reach the level
of despair."


The Pentagon ratcheted up
its rhetoric against Iraq's Sunni
Arab insurgents as well, con-
demning the recent use of chlo-
rine gas as a weapon. It called
that the first use of a poison gas
against Iraqis since Saddam
Hussein ordered mustard gas
attacks on ethnic Kurds in
northern Iraq nearly 20 years
ago.
Maj. Gen. Michael Barbero, a
deputy operations director on
the Joint Staff, said he was not
implying the insurgents were
following Saddam's pursuit of
weapons of mass destruction.
But his comments recalled a key
U.S. argument for invading Iraq
- Saddam's history of using
chemical weapons against his
own people.
Insurgents in their Anbar
province stronghold have car-
ried out or unsuccessfully
launched at least eight attacks
using toxic chlorine gas since
Jan. 28, when 16 people were
killed in Ramadi, the provincial
capital. Al-Qaida-linked insur-
gents were believed to have
turned to the weapon to strike
terror among fellow Sunnis who
have sided with U.S. forces.
While President Bush, the
American military and U.S.


expressed cautious optimism
about the crackdown on vio-
lence that began Feb. 14 in
Baghdad, Anbar province and
regions surrounding the capi-
tal, the ease with which sus-
pected al-Qaida suicide
bombers have continued strik-
ing Shiite targets must be deeply
disconcerting.
Only about a third of the
additional 30,000 soldiers and
Marines that Bush pledged for
the security drive are in the
country, with the full deploy-
ment not expected until June.
Al-Sadr's statement was his
first since March 16, when he
urged supporters to resist U.S.
forces through peaceful means.
U.S. and Iraqi officials say al-
Sadr remains in Iran, sitting out
the security crackdown, but
aides have told The Associat-
ed Press he has returned to
Najaf.
His latest declaration was
read to worshippers during Fri-
day prayers at a mosque in
Kufa, a twin-city to Najaf where
al-Sadr frequently led the ritual,
and in Baghdad's Sadr City Shi-
ite enclave.
"I renew my call for the occu-
pier to leave our land," he said
in the statement, a copy of
which was obtained by AP.
"The departure of the occupier
will mean stability for Iraq, vic-
tory for Islam and peace and
defeat for terrorism and infi-
dels."
AI-Sadr, whose Mahdi Army
militiamen fought American
troops in 2004 but have gener-
ally cooperated with the cur-
rent U.S.-Iraqi security push in
Baghdad, blamed the presence
of U.S. forces in Iraq for the ris-
ing violence, lack of services
and sectarian bloodshed.
"You, oppressed people of
Iraq, let the entire world hear
your voice that you reject occu-
pation, destruction and terror-
ism," he said in calling for the
April 9 demonstration.
The U.S. military said one
soldier was killed and a second
wounded Thursday during a
patrol in southern Baghdad,
raising to at least 3,245 the num-
ber of American military per-
sonnel who have died since the
war began in 2003, according to
an AP count.
Iraqi police said 26 people
were slain or found dead
nationwide Friday, a huge drop
from the 181 killed Thursday,
most in suicide attacks on mar-
kets in Khalis, 50 miles north
of Baghdad, and the Shaab
neighborhood in the capital's
north.
A key representative of Iraq's
most revered Shiite cleric,
whose word is law with many
members of the majority sect,
may have condemned to defeat
a key piece of reconciliation leg-
islation proposed by the Shiite
prime minister a measure
insisted on by his U.S. backers.
Criticizing a draft law that
would allow many members of
Saddam's former Baath Party
to regain their government jobs
or begin drawing pensions,
Sheik Abdul Mahdi Al-Kar-
balai warned "valiant brothers
in parliament must be cautious
and alert" when taking up the
measure.
. He said the proposal "could
give criminal individuals from
the security agencies of the for-
mer regime a loophole that
allows them to return to impor-
tant jobs."
Al-Karbalai's Friday sermons
at the Imam Hussein mosque
in Karbala reflect the thinking
of Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sis-
tani, the country's most revered
Shiite cleric.
The Bush administration has
set out four benchmarks for al-
Maliki's government. One is
passage of the de-Baathifica-
tion law as a way to reconcile
with Sunni insurgents.
Aides say al-Maliki has been
warned by U.S. officials they
will withdraw support for his
shaky government if that pro-
posal and three others one
on fair distribution of oil rev-
enues, one setting a date for
regional elections and several
constitutional amendments -
aren't passed in parliament by
June 30. All four would benefit
the Sunni minority that ruled
over the oppressed Shiite
majority for decades.
Washington denies linking
support for al-Maliki with those
measures, but has declared it is
using them to measure his com-
mitment to curbing violence


Voyage of Discovery


Parents came out to support their children at the Science Fair.
(Photo: Felipe Major/Tribune Staff)


Somali rebels intensify



fight with Ethiopians


By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
Yuusuf Maxamund contributed reporting from Mogadishui
c.2007 New York Times News Service
NAIROBI. Kenya Missile-toting Somal rebels plucked an
Ethiopian helicopter gunship out of the sky on Friday. apparently
killing the crew and sending a fireball of a signal that they arc as
determined and dangerous as ever.
Residents said bands of insurgents then svcpt into the streets of
Mogadishu. Somalia's capital, and fired rocket-propelled grenades
at Ethiopian troops, who invaded Somalia in December as part of
a plan to back up the country's seak transitional government.
That plan seems to running into serious difficulties.
Somali hospital officials said the intense urban combat. which
began last week. had claimed dozens of li .s. he international
Committee of the Red ( ross called it 'M;,;ishuio w'.orst lifhtine


It sho wed no signs of letting up Friday. Frenzied mobs dragged
the bodies of Ethiopian soldiers through the streets as hundreds of
soung insurgents massed in the center of town.
We are warriors." Abdullahi Hassan Mumin, 25, said as he
stood in a crowded intersection with a rocket launcher on his
shoulder.
T"hc defiance. the shot-down helicopter, the explosive street
fighting and the mutilated bodies are a grim replay of the last for-
eign intervention in Somalia in the early 1990s.
TFhat mission ended in failure after Somali militiamen in
Mogadishu downed two American helicopters on Oct. 3, 1993,
and killed 18 American soldiers in a single battle, the infamous
"Black Hawk Down" episode. American troops and U.N. peace-
keepers pulled out, and Somalia has remained in a state of nearly
perpetual chaos ever since.
The only time Mogadishu was peaceful was last year, during
the briet rein of an Islamist movement that controlled much of the


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 2007


THE TRIBUN


GoveCrnment



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