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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02852
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 3/24/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02852
System ID: UF00084249:02852

Full Text










FLE[O'SH
FORUT .m lovln' .

HIGH 81F
LOW 68F

* SUNNY AND
A BREEZY


The


Tribune


Volume: 103 No.103


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007


PRICE 750





i. ..ey os


Teen is held





in connection





with stabbing





of his brother


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A YOUNG man was in police
custody yesterday in connection
with the stabbing of his older
brother an act which ultimately
led to his sibling's slow death and
the addition of his name to a
growing list of homicides.
The teenager from Mermaid
Boulevard, off Carmichael Road,
allegedly reached for what Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter
Evans described as "an object"
during an altercation with his 21-
year-old brother on Thursday. A
stabbing followed.
However, it was not until hours
later that his brother died in hos-
pital, becoming the country's 20th
murder victim for the year.
The 19-year-old is due to
appear in court next week in con-
nection with the attack.
ASP Evans said he was unable
to say what the argument had
been about.
The past two weeks have wit-
nessed much brutality in New
Providence, with four murders
and two "suspicious" deaths,
which may yet be re-classified.
The Mermaid Boulevard resi-
dent's death occurred on the
same day that 22-year-old Mak-
isha Brown, and a 17-year-old
boy, were charged with the mur-
der last Friday of Ms Brown's
one-year-old son.
The infant's death was one of
three murders committed over
that weekend.
Meanwhile, the death of a Fox

Woman claims
officers broke
down her door,
before realising
it was wrong
residence
A CONCERNED citizen is
lodging an official complaint
to the commissioner of police,
claiming that officers broke
down her door and entered
her home, only to discover
that they were in the wrong
residence.
The female resident in the
Centreville area stated that
around 2.55am on Thursday,
she was awakened by the
sound of footsteps in her yard.
Suddenly, she stated, voices
shouted: "This is the police,
open the door." The voices
then informed her that if she
SEE page nine


Hill man found burnt last Thurs-
day and US citizen Susan-Patri-
cia Freed on the previous Sun-
day, are both currently deemed
"suspicious", but may yet be clas-
sified as homicides at a later date.
According to ASP Evans,
Police Commissioner Paul Far-
quharson has responded to this


year's unusually high murder rate
by seeking to introduce addition-
al incentives to eradicate crime.
These should be launched
some time this week, he said.
"Police remain committed to
eliminating crime so that the
majority of people can feel safe
again," said Mr Evans.


Man c wSKM iIhsit

shotig eat


A 22-YEAR-OLD man
accused of a shooting death
which took place in the
Montell Heights area last
weekend was arraigned in
magistrate's court yesterday
charged with murder.
Tekoyo McKinney, of
Moore's Avenue, appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at Court Eight, Bank
Lane. He was not repre-
sented by an attorney.
Sergeant Alexander Ban-
nister appeared for the pros-
ecution.
It is alleged that on Sat-
urday, March 17, 2007,
McKinney, by means of
unlawful harm, intentional-


ly and unlawfully caused the
death of Tyronne Devcaux.
According to reports,
Deveaux was shot near
Ethel Street and Montell
Heights. When police
arrived at the scene they
reportedly found Deveaux
with a gunshot wound in his
abdomen. He was rushed to
hospital but died of his
injuries a short time later.
McKinney was not
required to plead to the
murder charge and was
remanded to Her Majesty's
Prison. The matter was
adjourned to April 3 and
transferred to Court Five,
Bank Lane.


I)\~ I ally l atrL




0 0E

com lint aains


* By TRIBUNE STAFF
A SEXUALLY related
complaint has been filed
against popular media per-
sonality Darold Miller, The
Tribune has learned.
Police confirmed yesterday
that they are investigating a
complaint filed by three
women at Central Detective
Unit headquarters at llpm
on Thursday.
It was further confirmed
that the complaint encom-
passed a time period of many
months.
According to reports, the
women were accompanied to
CDU on Thompson Boule-
vard by a prominent
Bahamian.
Police said yesterday that
they are now looking into the
various aspects of the com-
plaint and cannot comment
further on the issue at this
time.
Mr Miller known for his
boisterous style of reporting
- has for many years been
one of the country's most
prominent personalities on
the airwaves and on televi-
sion.
In his most recent profes-
sional history, Mr Miller
served as news director at
the radio station Love97
before taking up a similar
position at ZNS, where he


also hosted the successful
daily talk show 'Immediate
Response.'
Late last year, Mr Miller
announced that he was leav-
ing ZNS to join the new
radio station GEMS, where
he today is the chief operat-
ing officer and hosts a daily
morning talk show.
After parting ways with
ZNS Mr Miller declared that
he was now a free man, no
longer suppressed by gov-
ernment.


He conceded that during
his time at ZNS he was being
controlled by'thi govern-
ment-owned monopoly.
"I don't fear any politician.
I fear God that's it. If it
needs to be said, Darold
Miller will say it. Yes, I have
to admit, ZNS tied my hands
a little bit after the PLP
came to power but I'm free
now. And in our talk shows
and in our news you will see
and hear the difference," he
said at the time.


Second eviction Haitian shanty village

notice served on ff Joe Farrington
Howard K Stern Road 'even bigger fire
Howard K Stternhe Mud
hazard' than the Mud


* By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
A SECOND eviction notice has been
served upon Howard K Stern, the most
recent partner of the late Anna Nicole
Smith, as the man who claims to own the
Eastern Road home where Mr Stern is liv-
ing has moved again to push him out.
Godfrey 'Pro' Pinder, attorney for South
Carolina realtor G Ben Thompson, a for-
mer lover of Ms Smith who claims he
bought the house for her as a favour last
year, but on the basis that she would repay
him, told a US entertainment show Access
Hollywood that he filed a request for the
notice in the Magistrate's Court on
Wednesday.
The request states that Mr Stern has
been "trespassing" at the mansion since
Ms Smith's death on February 8.
"I served a summons asking the magis-
trate's court to give us an eviction notice
against Howard K Stern and to have him
pay rent and legal costs and damages, if
there are any damages in the place," Mr
Pinder told the show.
SEE page nine


BAHAMIANS living near the Haitian shanty
village off Joe Farrington Road say it is an even big-
ger fire hazard than the Mud in Abaco, which has
gone up in flames twice in two years.
This week's blaze in Marsh Harbour, which
destroyed an estimated 20 homes, has again alerted
neighbours to the dangers of the Nassau site.
"I don't know how long it takes for the govern-
ment to move these Haitians into apartments but it's
been a full year and a half since we were promised
action," a Bahamian resident said yesterday.
"I see Haitians walking down the street with cell-
phones to their heads, adorned in gold jewellery,
and I also see cars and trucks parked outside the
huts, so I think they can afford housing," she added.
"Garbage litters the entrance of the village, we
still smell burning day and night, sewage is still
contaminating our wells. Do you think this gov-
ernment will clean this up by election time?
"How long will they wait until there's an out-
break of cholera or they burn down an entire neigh-
bourhood?"
The neighbours' fury was sparked by this week's
Marsh Harbour inferno, when at least 20 shanty
homes were destroyed. Luckily, there were no
reported injuries.
Residents say the Joe Farrington Road.site is an
even bigger hazard because burning goes on day and
night.
SEE page nine


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A.'


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,;1 ~-









THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 2. SATURDAY. MARCH 24. 2007


0'CALNEWS


Gasline and diesel

prices increase
* By PAUJ. G TURNOUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE pefB line and diesel has increased throughout the
Bahamas is.e ministry of Consumer Affairs signed off on
mark-ups "Itltetl, Texaco, Esso, and FOCOL yesterday.
Esso lead free gasoline and diesel oil increased by 32 cents and
13 cents respectively. These changes bring the new prices up from
$3.74 to $4X llon for gasoline, and from $3.06 to $3.19 for
a gallon owi-iKil.
At FO( 3fesel oil increased by 17 cents from $3.03 to
$3.20 per gQh. Both these increases came into effect on March
16.
Sun Oil.(Shell) and Texaco prices will increase today from
$3.75 to $4.oft galon for lead free gasoline an increase of 25
cents. Diesefolhwill increase by 10 cents from $3.08 to $3.22 per
gallon.
Texaco lead free gasoline will increase by 38 cents from $3.70
to $4.08 per gallon. Texaco diesel oil will increase by 10 cents
from $3.04 to $3.14 per gallon.
The Ministry of Consumer Affairs encouraged motorists to
conserve fuel "as best as possible".


SShare your news


The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighborhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


Sears believes new Educational



Leadership Institute will help



create quality administrators


* By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
FREEPORT Minister of
Education Alfred Sears said
he believes that the launch of
the Educational Leadership
Institute will help create more
quality school administrators
"to turn around faj 'ng
schools."
Mr Sears was in
Bahama this week f e
launching of the second e
ership institute at the CIlege
of the Bahamas' northern
campus.
The institute developed
through a partnership
between the Ministry of Edu-
cation and the college will
give school administrators the
opportunity for further train-
ing and professional develop-
ment.
About 20 school adminis-
trators from throughout
Grand Bahama and Bimini
have now joined 40 of their
counterparts from other
islands including New Provi-
dence, who began the pro-
gramme in February.
There are 400 school admin-
istrators, including principals,
vice principals, senior masters
and mistresses, on Grand
Bahama.
Mr Sears said the ministry's
mission is to make leadership
training accessible to all serv-
ing and aspiring public and


"Although I am pleased to
acknowledge that we do have a
number of quality school
administrators who have perfected
their skills through experience,
trial and error and professional
development, I must also add that
our current practice of becoming a
school administrator by moving
through the ranks can no longer
provide the effective and successful
leadership, which is needed to
produce the quantity of quality
leaders required to turn around
failing schools."

Minister of Education Alfred Sears


private school administrators
in the Bahamas.
He stressed that school
administrators must be effec-
tive leaders as Bahamian soci-
ety is struggling to keep up,
understand and adapt to glob-
al changes in order to meet
local needs.
"Although I am pleased to
acknowledge that we do have
a number of quality school
administrators who have per-
fected their skills through
experience, trial and error and
professional development, '
must also add that our current
practice of becoming a school
administrator by moving
through the ranks can no


longer provide the effective
and successful leadership,
which is needed to produce
the quantity of quality lead-
ers required to turn around
failing schools," he said.
Mr Sears said the Depart-
ment of Education, Science
and Technology formed an
advisory committee to devel-
op a programme for adminis-
trators and sought the help of
the College of the Bahamas
in meeting the required
accreditation standards.
The college formulated an
eight module curriculum that
provides practical, inter-active,
hands-on training that seeks
to promote reflection, critical


thinking, creativity and excel-
lence.
On completion of the pro-
gramme, Mr Sears said, par-
ticipants will be presented
with an Educational Leader-
ship Diploma.
He noted that the ministry is
considering making the diplo-
ma, which is to be attained
over a five year period,
mandatory for promotion to
or within the administrative
career path.
Mr Sears urged administra-
tors from independent schools
to also seize the opportunity
for improved professional
development.


* II: ' 1 II I "" "* l':li' .'I
.."4 *" ,. -- --. ..

-- 1








E-TEC BANK & TRUST LIMITED

S Invites applicationsfor the position of

TRUST MANAGER

Responsibilities will include (but are not limited to):

Creating fiduciary structures that will service the needs of
clients
. Marketing trust products
+ Ensuring that all fiduciary structures'are administered at a
high professional standard and in accordance with Policies
& Procedures of Deltec and the laws of The Bahamas
: Maintaining current knowledge of all issues (law and tax)
affecting fiduciary structures
Supervising the Company Department

The successful candidate should have the following:

> STEP Diploma
> 10 years trust experience
(minimum 5 years in a supervisory capacity)
> Excellent written, oral and presentation skills

Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Interested persons may submit resumes as follows:

Human Resources Manager
': Deltec Bank & Trust Limited
P. O. Box N.3229
Nassau, Bahamas


Resumes may also be faxed c/o 362-4623
anh@deltecbank.com


or emailed to


ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE
CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED


* Offer good until April 13th, 2007 for Auto Show Applicants Only


-I


I







SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOA INEWS


Jamaican police
seek evidence,
witnesses in
cricket coach's
mysterious death
* KINGSTON, Jamaica

WITH no suspect in cus-
tody, an investigation into
the slaying of Pakistan's
national cricket coach
turned toward his players
and the public at large Fri-
day as suggestions of match-
fixing and corruption
emerged to darken the
sport's image, according to
Associated Press.
Authorities planned to
seek DNA samples from the
22-man Pakistan squad to
help eliminate potential sus-
pects in the death of Bob
Woolmer, 58, who was
found strangled to death in
his hotel room on Sunday, a
day after his team's surprise
loss to the Ireland team in
the Cricket World Cup.
Police also studied sur-
veillance cameras in and
around Kingston's Pegasus
Hotel for leads in a case that
has prompted shock and
grief throughout the cricket
world.
"With that many people
in the hotel it's no doubt
that somebody saw some-
thing," said Deputy Police
Commissioner Mark
Shields, a former Scotland
Yard detective hired by
Jamaica in 2005 to help the
Caribbean nation get its spi-
raling crime rate under con-
trol.
The March 13-April 28
Cricket World Cup, which is
taking place across the -
Caribbean, is continuing
despite Woolmer's death.
Police told reporters that
there was no sign of forced
entry in the coach's hotel
room, suggesting he may
have known his attacker.
Access was restricted on the
12th floor, where the team
was staying, to those with
the proper key card or hotel
staff.
Still, Shields said the Pak-
istan team, which had
already supplied finger-
prints to investigators,
would be allowed to leave
the country as scheduled on
Saturday. The team flew to
Montego Bay, on the north-
western coast, on Thursday
after giving statements to
police.
"We have some theories
of what may have hap-
pened, but it's too early to
go public with them,"
Shields said on Jamaican
radio.
Separately, the Interna-
tional Cricket Council was
having its anti-corruption
unit investigate if match fix-
ing had a role in Woolmer's
death, ICC Chief Executive
Malcolm Speed said. .
"Our people from the
anti-corruption and security
unit will cooperate with the
Jamaica police, they're
working with them already,"
Speed told Britain's Sky
TV. "If there is a link we
want to know about it and
we will deal with it."
Earlier, Speed told
reporters that cricket
authorities had been suc-
cessful in cleaning up the
sport.
"Our anti-corruption unit
has made great progress in
the last few years, and we
have had corruption under
control in an environment
where there is huge betting
on cricket," he said.
Woolmer was South
Africa's coach in the 1990s
when the team's captain,
Hansie Cronje, admitted
taking money to fix matches
and was banned for life.
Woolmer was never impli-
cated.
Former Pakistan fast
bowler Sarfraz Nawaz has
claimed that Woolmer, a
former player for England,
was killed because he was
writing a book that would
expose illegal gambling.
Pakistan team spokesman
Pervez Jamil Mir told
reporters that Woolmer was
upset that proofs of his


book had gone missing.
"Bob told me the proofs
had been misplaced and he
was very disturbed." Mir
said. "I don't know what
was in the book but that was
his only copy at the time."
Cricket generates tremen-
dous passion in Britain and
its former colonies. Protest-
ers in several Indian cities
burned effigies of their
national cricket players
and destroyed portions of
one player's half-built
home after the team was: '
beaten Sunday by
Bangladesh.


BDM C:


* By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE Bahamas Democratic Movement
has called on the government to "do the
right thing" and compel those responsible
for the Sea Hauler/United Star collision
to make good on promises that were
made to the victims.
The government has been criticised on
a number of occasions for failing to take
action in the matter especially after an
independent commission named the gov-
ernment itself as one of the parties
responsible for the disaster.
The BDM said that the Ministry of
Social Services promised to assist Mr
Cecil Hart, a victim of the accident, but
that promised has not been fulfilled.
On Monday, Mr Hart told the media
that he was about to be kicked out of his
home because he has been unable to
work due to his disability from the acci-
dent.
After the accident in 2003, Mr Hart
remained in a coma for almost two years
and since that time has suffered from a
leg injury.
In December 2006, the survivors of the
Sea Hauler/United Star tragedy tried to
get the media's attention by blocking
House of Assembly members as they
entered the lower chamber.
The survivors, who also staged a
demonstration at Potters Cay Dock, said
they had fallen on hard times and had
still not received financial assistance from
the government despite promises made
to them three years before.
The group crossed the path of Minister
of Agriculture and Marine Resources,
Leslie Miller who told them that the Port


* By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter
GLOBAL unions have pro-
duced a a new cancer preven-
tion guide, which reveals that
over 600,000 deaths a year -
one death every 52 seconds -
are caused by occupational
cancer, making up almost one-
third of all work-related deaths.
The guide launches the first
ever international zero occu-
pational cancer campaign,
involving 11 global trade union
organizations together repre-
senting over 300 million mem-
bers in more than 150 coun-
tries.
A World Health Organisa-
tion (WHO) study concluded
that 20 to 30 per cent of men
and 5 to 20 per cent of women
in the working-age population
could have been exposed to
occupational lung cancer risks
during their working lives.
Anita Normark, general sec-
retary of the Building Work-
ers International, highlights the
problem: "Bad, and often ille-
gal, working conditions cause
ill health that mean disaster for
hundreds of thousands of fam-
ilies every year. The social
invisibility of the impact of
working conditions on our
health creates a vicious circle
where diseases are not recog-
nised as occupational, so they
are not recorded and notified,
therefore they are not proper-
ly treated or compensated and,
worst of all, they are not pre-
vented.
"Health and safety is top pri-
ority for unions in the building
and timber trades, where peo-
ple are exposed to a wide range
of nasty, cancer causing sub-
stances."
The zero cancer coalition
includes the International
Trade Union Confederation
(ITUC), Building Workers'
International (BWI), Educa-
tion International (EI), Inter-
national Federation of Chemi-
cal, Energy, Mine and General
Workers' Union (ICEM),
International Federation of
Journalists (IFJ), International
Textile, Garment and Leather
Workers' Federation
(ITGLWF), International
Transport Workers' Federation
(ITF), International Union of
Food, Agricultural, Hotel,
restaurant, Catering, Tobacco
and Allied Workers' Associa-
tions (IUF), Public Services
International (PSI), UNI Glob-
al Union (UNI) and the Inter-
national Metalworkers' Feder-


alls on govt to 'do the right





over victims of sea tragedy


"We find it's a shame and a disgrace
that the government of the Bahamas
could be so callous, uncaring, cold and
disingenuous or outright deceitful in its
affairs with its citizens who are in the
most need."


BDM press statement


Authority should not be blamed for the
accident as some in the group had sug-
gested.
Meanwhile, Minister of National Secu-
rity Cynthia Pratt and Minister of Trans-
port Glenys Hanna-Martin said they
would re-examine the matter to see what
could be done to assist the victims.
Accompanied by his three young chil-
dren and fiance, Mr Hart told the media:
"The government accepts part of the
responsibility for the Sea Hauler acci-
dent and promised to treat this like a
national disaster with swift justice and a
quick closure. But so far, people are still
suffering everyday."
In an official press statement the BDM
said: "We find it's a shame and a disgrace
that the government of the Bahamas
could be so callous, uncaring, cold and
disingenuous or outright deceitful in its
affairs with its citizens who are in the


most need.
"The role of the government is to pro-
tect the interest of its citizens in general,
but in this case they have been found to
have played a role in putting Mr Hart
and his young children in this precarious
position."
"Poor Bahamians are sick and tired of
empty promises made by our leaders,"
BDM leader Cassius Stuart
added.
The Sea Hauler and United Star col-
lided in the early hours of the morning on
August 2, 2003. Four passengers were
killed and 25 others were injured in the
accident.
MINISTER of National Security
Cynthia Pratt (pictured right) and
Minister of Transport Glenys Hanna-
Martin said they would re-examine
the matter.


* BDM leader Cassius Stuart


The MWlE..-t.Marathoin .
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

PRIDE NEW 1 33 WN I 1018 :25
SHOOTER NEW 1:0 3:35 N/A 4 8 20 1045
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJATURTLE NEW 125 3;45 6I2W 8A3 10: 3
THE LAST MIMZY NEW 1:10 3380 N/ 15 8:25. 1035
THE HILLS HAVE EYES2 NEW 1:25 3:25 WA 8:35 10:4
THINK I LOVEY WIFE C 120 3:5 IA 820 8:30 1045
PREMONITION C 1:15 3:28 A 615 185 10
300 C 1:05 5s A 8S 2 18Z 5
WILD HOGS T 1l MS a5 6e I 8 :5
DADDrS LlTLmE GIRLS T 1: 3:3 685
BRIOGETO TAiMMTHIA A 1:16 M4 81a


PRIDE HEW 15 3:50 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:45
SHOOTER NEW 1:15 3:45 N/A 6:18 8:20 10:40
THE LAST MIMZ W 1:00 3:30 N1/A 6:01 8:30 10:25
THHILLA1:10 3:40 N/A 6 '2 8:35 10:30
I THINK I LOVEMY WIFE C 2 3:35 N/A 6:15 8:40 1025
0 C 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:0 8:20 10:40


ation (IMF).
Occupational Cancer/Zero
Cancer: a union guide to pre-
vention, published yesterday,
provides information about
workplace cancer risks and
advice on practical steps work-
ers and unions can take to
make workplaces safer and is
being distributed with action


guidelines to unions worldwide.
The guide is published in
English on the IMF website at
www.imfmetal.org/cancer.
The Tribune contacted a few
of the local unions to ascertain
whether their members were
aware of the guide, but calls
were not returned up to press
time.


In commemoration of the 200th Anniversary of the
Abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade Act
25th March 1807 25th MAarch 2007
Presents



.LEST WE FORGET
SI- I IL 1 R 1 I 'P 1 0 V R S L A V L R 'Y


Thls n cling c\luhbiitn t 'i created hb the Schomburg Center and UNESCO and is featured
at the (.' 1lllL., NIi.,.i 10 in Iunl!g l n bicentenunal year to mark the abolition of the transadanuc
-I.1l II.njd

T'hs tratelintg exl.hiiin is unique in that at focuses less on enslaved .fricans as victims
and more on tIh wa'a in 1 'l which the1 reshaped their destinies and place in history through
the creation of distincIt culture . .


'600,000 deaths




each year' caused by




occupational cancer


I


.~sl












PG4,ATRAMARCH 24,2007THETOTEEDITT1RIBUNE


The Tribune Limited
SNULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

'SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

'EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


White House vs. Congress discord


WASHINGTON- The current con-
frontation between the White House and
the newly aggressive Congress is a contest to
see which branch is best at bullying.
In the case of the mysterious firings of
eight Bush-appointed U.S. attorneys, there
are few hard facts about cause and moti-
vation and lots of spin about administra-
tive purity.
Strictly a "personnel matter," Attorney
General Alberto Gonzales insisted. Yet the
administration's confused explanations and
Justice Department e-mails have reinforced
the suspicion on Capitol Hill that improper
interference with law enforcement was
afoot.
Presidential press secretary Tony Snow
claims that the White House is being gen-
erous to let selected members of Congress
"interview" key presidential advisers impli-
cated in the plot behind closed doors,
answering only pre-screened questions, no
transcript and nothing uttered under oath.
No reporters worth their salt would go
for such a stacked deck. And Congress is
not getting suckered by it either. Subponeas
demanding that key advisers appear before
Congress have been approved, although not
yet issued.
What lawmakers want is "testimony," the
standard form of information-gathering
under oath in a public forum. What the
White House is offering is some kind of
off-the-record chat. There's a big legal dif-
ferene;, as any dictionary can tell you. It's
all albu4Prcing people to talk who have a
profes~lohal-and personal interest in con-
cealinm the truth.
BusT pbologists contend that it is illegal to
lie to'Congress at any time so that the oath
does' "tal0y matter. Baloney.
witi thtle specific promise not to lie, it
is pr4e~~HfHimnpossible to prove whether a
witne~ s i~os fused or deliberately distorting
the truth. Even then, it is hard to prove -
remember-the conflicting versions of who
said w tko whom during the perjury trial
of V tu,!t dent Cheney's former chief of
staff,Il ewis "Scooter" Libby? The guilty
verdir' a~'e-down to which witnesses the
jury 7lt were most credible.
ThidOlfnistration has not been forth-
comig 'Edcias rendered several versions of
the fig.*o there is little assurance that
officials dould be more candid in some
secret closed door session.
What the administration did doesn't make
any sense, except for scary political rea-
sons. Although the official version is that
the prosecutors were not performing their
duties well, a USA Today survey shows that


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court records list three of the ousted lawyers
among the top 10 for prosecutions and con-
victions among the nation's 93 U.S. attor-
neys. A fourth was among the top third.
President Bush defended his refusal to
allow his aides to testify under oath. The
chief executive must protect their ability to
speak freely without fear of retribution, the
president said.
Yet Bush has also insisted that he was
not involved in the decision nor the discus-
sions Snow said Bush "had no recollec-
tion of the firings ever being raised with
him."
So under the limited scope of constitu-
tionally protected executive privilege, the
public interest is a big factor here.
The White House has also been aggres-
sive in claiming to have released all perti-
nent e-mails and messages to Congress in a
big document dump. They were all internal
Justice e-mails; none from the White House
were included.
And no messages between Justice and
the White House were included from mid-
November to December 7, when the firing
decision was announced. That would be the
period when the president signed off on the
deed, if indeed he was consulted.
The administration is momentarily stand-
ing behind Gonzales, but reports abound
that the White House is searching for a
replacement. His credibility is so strained
that such a move seems inevitable, despite
the president's tough stance against letting
other aides testify.
Gonzales is the exception. The president
has specifically instructed him to march into
the congressional lion's den again soon to
defend his previous statements.
It is significant that congressional Repub-
licans are not rushing to Gonzales' side.
"The best defence you can give is it was
poorly handled," Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-
S.C, said.
One good development from this mess,
however, is that Congress reacted by mov-
ing rapidly to eliminate a provision recent-
ly added to the Patriot Act that allows the
Justice Department to appoint permanent
new U.S. attorneys after a vacancy without
Senate confirmation.
That sneaky presidential power grab slid
into the law while everyone was distracted
by arguments over the war on terror. But
it's important, and it leads to a larger ques-
tion: what else is the president trying to
hide?
(* This article is by Marianne Means of
Hearst Newspapers 2007)


EDITOR, The Tribune.
JUST this in response to
Pierre Dupuch's logic sug-
gesting that Hubert Ingra-
ham's return to head the
FNM indicates a lack of
integrity.
Were a man to promise to
give me two blows and he
gave me three, I'd be as mad
as hell. Were a man to
promise to give me two hun-
dred dollars and he gave me
three, I'd not hold it against
him. I'd be overjoyed.
Hubert Ingraham's return
to lead the FNM, it seems, is
troublesome to those who
oppose him. It certainly is not
a problem for those who
believe in him for those
who wish him to lead them -
who think they can rely upon
him to lead them to victory.
His being able to lead, it
seems, has not been exhaust-
ed. His returning to lead vio-
lates no law no officially
established policy. His sug-
gestion that he'd serve two
terms was his personal whim
and did not involve law or
policy.
What if the captain of a
ship we're on in this case,
the ship of state decided to
take us to Acklins but not to
bring us back? What if he
decided to drink Guinness
and eat boil fish until he
burped goat pepper once he
got us to Acklins? What if on
the way back with one less
experienced at the helm, the
ship began to sink? Were he
to be persuaded to take the
helm again to save the day -
to save us all, would he be
lacking in integrity or full of
magnanimity?
What of Perry Christie's
deciding figuratively, to
return to his vomit? Now I
find that reprehensible.
What we're confronting, to
my mind, in both cases, is
individual whim and will
when what matters'ultimate-
ly is what is divinely ordained
- what is God's will. The Per-
ry Christie who, to the minds
of many, despicably returned,
even figuratively, to his vom-
it, is certainly not the gentle-
man certainly not the giant
who has led out Bahamas
especially since recovering
from his frightening illness.
We see someone no less than
anointed to lead while he has.
Many of us in careers:
policing, teaching, etc. decide
initially to serve for a time
and then move on only to
decide later to prolong that
service. Would such persons
have robbed us or rewarded
us? Should they be consid-


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ENVERLY MANACE
PIERRE OF WILSON TRACT, P.O. BOX N-8889, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day
of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N' 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that ELSIE MASSILLON OF
FIRETRAIL ROAD, P.O. BOX SB-51996, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows
any reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of the
facts within twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MARCH,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that RENOLD VILLE, NASSAU
STREET, P.O. BOX N-3331, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17TH day of MARCH, 2007 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.


ered patriotic or unpatriotic?
On Immediate Response
with Ace Newbold on
Wednesday, March 7, 2007,
Pierre Dupuch, reasoning,
stated, "...therefore in law, it
is a contract." Mr Ingraham's
words though were never
embraced by law, entertained
by law were never entered
into law. His idea is yet to be
considered officially has yet
to be enshrined in law as is a
similar rule in the United
States' constitution.
His return seems to be a
problem for those whom he
opposes for those who
oppose him for his adver-
saries for whom he might
defeat. His opponents seem
to fear his formidable oppo-
sitional force. For those
whom he'd lead courageous-
ly into battle and possibly into
victory, they are grateful to
him, thankful that he capitu-
lated. A lack of integrity
seems to be the cry of his
opponents, not at all the cry
of those who welcome him.
Those who seem not to
want him back, want Tommy
Turnquest, whom they've
defeated once and imagine
they can effortlessly overrun
again. Tommy's moment, it
seems, has not yet come. Is
the PLP giving over leader-
ship to the next generation of
politician? Is Perry Christie
stepping down to let Fred


Mitchell head the party?
I view it as unfair to put
Tommy Turnquest in the ring
with Perry Christie a middle
weight up against a heavy
weight. I am neither PLP nor
FNM but with Hubert Ingra-
ham in the ring with Perry
Christie experience-wise
and otherwise we have fair-
play heavyweight against
heavyweight. Though I am
not a big boxing fan, I'd more
readily pay money to go to
sit at ringside to see such a
match such a fight.
The suggestion that Hubert
Ingraham lacks integrity, for
the reason stated, is baseless
and is not an issue.
In conclusion, Pierre
Dupuch's debate of this issue
is not entirely logical and is
not objective, though he sug-
gests it is. One can hear clear-
ly that something subjective -
something personal colours
his reasoning. I find it mis-
leading, his suggestion that
Ingraham's integrity is at the
heart of the matter at the
heart of his argument.
As nice as he is, his logic is
flawed and insults the think-
ing person's intelligence and
the nation's.
It is in defense of reason
and intelligence that I have
here raised my pen, not in
defense of either party or
either leader.


OBEDIAH MICHAEL
SMITH
Nassau,
March 7, 2007.


Unearthing of



resting places


EDITOR, The Tribune.
I AM obliged to comment on the vexing, unapologetic and
uncaring manner in which the remains of several of the inhab-
itants of Rolletown have been unearthed and their resting
places given to aliens. Their families would no longer be able to
spend quiet and meditative moments at their gravesides.
The community is shocked, perplexed and saddened as well
as other descendants of Rolletown, who are relatives of those
deceased persons, at this indiscretion and cavalier attitude,
which was shown in this situation.
While there may have been some compelling circumstances,
there was a requirement out of simple courtesy and respect, one
would think, for some consultation with the chairman of the
commonage or if not an elder person in the community, which
could have avoided this horrific desecration of those graves.
How many of us would want our parents' and grandparents'
graves to be disturbed under the same circumstances? God
forbid that it were my grandparents' resting place, that is locat-
ed in the same cemetery.
I hope that the families affected would find some redress in the
matter, and could only hope that this situation does not recur.

A DESCENDENT
OF ROLLETOWN
Rolletown,
March 22, 2007.




FOR SALE
p i v 6 SA. p -. .


Hubert Ingraham's



return seems to be



problem for those



who oppose him


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Tel: 327-8028 Cell: 358-3160


. THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007













I I~LOCALNEWS I~


0 In brief


Three-year

sentence

for drug

possession

A MAN has been sen-
tenced to a three-year
prison term after being con-
victed of possession of near-
ly $700,000 worth of mari-
juana.
Alvin Anton Storr of Bai-
ley Town Bimini, was sen-
tenced to jail on Thursday
by Magistrate Carolita
Bethel.
The charges alleged that
on Wednesday October 13,
2004 while at Bimini and
being concerned with oth-
ers, Storr was found in pos-
session of a quantity of mar-
ijuana which he intended to
supply to another.
He was reportedly found
in possession of nine bales
containing 686 pounds of
marijuana with a street val-
ue of $686,000.
Storr was first arraigned
in Magistrate's Court on
October 15 2004.
At that time, he pleaded
not guilty. He was subse-
quently granted bail in the
sum of $100,000 with two
sureties.
His trial began on March
14, 2006 before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel. Magistrate
Bethel handed down her
sentence on Thursday.


Meeting

for writers

THE monthly meeting
of the Commonwealth
Writers of the Bahamas
(TCWB) will be held on
Tuesday, March 27 begin-
ning at 7pm at the
National Centre for the
Performing Arts.
All interested persons
are invited to attend.
The guest speaker will
be Ms Willamae Johnson,
director of libraries and
instructional media ser-
vices at the College of the
Bahamas.












SATURDAY
MARCH 24TH
12:30 Bullwinke & Friends
1:00 King Leonardo
1:30 The Fun Farm
2:30 The 411
3:00 Matinee: "The Cat From
Outer Space"
4:30 Sports Desk
5:00 Cricket World
5:30 Gillette World Sports
6:00 In This Corner
6:30 Sports Lifestyle
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Native Show
8:00 Hail Ma' Bahamas
8:30 Island Jams
9:00 Movie: "The Cartier Affair"
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Hustle
12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM


SUNDAY
MARCH 25TH
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 In His Image: Change
Ministries International
8:30 Let's Talk Church
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Differenr 3
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
11:00 BTC Thanksgiving Service
Freeport, G.B.
1:00 Taking Dominion
1:30 Calvary Deliverance
2:00 Ernest Angley Ministries
3:00 Bahamas Spelling Bee


Champiosnhip
6:00 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
6:30 The Bible Study Hour
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Practical Principles
8:00 Living Abundantly
9:00 Movie: "Passion's Way"
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 New Dimension
12:m/n Community Pg. 1540AM

NOE -.-V1 esre h
rih*o aelstmnt
program hanes


Senior officers are challenged to





enforce discipline 'across the board'


NEWLY promoted senior police officers
were warned not to mix friendship with the
execution of their duties.
Commissioner of Police Paul Farquharson
challenged the officers to enforce discipline
"across the board" adding that he finds it
"disconcerting" when members of the public
complain about the bad behaviour of officers.
"Members of the public will want to know
that you are performing your jobs in compli-
ance with the Constitution and all of the laws
of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas," he
said.
Addressing the promotion exercises for 221
law enforcement and civilian employees of
the force at the newly constructed Police Con-
vention Centre on Thursday, Mr Farquhar-
son added that he finds it equally unsettling
when it is proven that some of the supervi-
sors under his command are not doing their
jobs effectively.
"In this business, the people's affairs are
the real business that you ought to be about.
Never mind those that criticise you when per-
forming your duties. As commissioner, I along
with senior officers will support you fully when
you do your jobs effectively and efficiently."
Mr Farquharson told the officers he expects
them to lead by example and set the highest
standards for themselves and their subordi-
nates.
"If you fail, then the Royal Bahamas Police
Force has failed," he said. "By the same token,
if you succeed, then we all will succeed."
Commissioner Farquharson warned that
their elevation is not a reward for what they
have accomplished in the past.
Instead, he said, they are to use those pro-
motions as a catapult to look to the future
"with enthusiasm and courage" and as an
opportunity to serve the Bahamas with loyal-
ty, creativity, personal integrity and a keen
sense of their roles in the overall development
of the country.


* COMMISSIONER of Police
Paul Farquharson


"Drugs, violent crimes, including murder,
rape and robberies, recklessness on the
nation's roadways and the exploitation of our
children, are all plaguing this beautiful country.
It is with this focus in mind that I challenge you
to be the best senior officers that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force has ever seen," Mr Far-
quharson said.


Historian: 19th century



Bahamian society became



more 'africanised' by




liberated Africans' arrival


* By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

EARLY Bahamian society
became more "Africanised"
through the arrival of liberat-
ed Africans in the 19th cen-
tury, historian Gail Saunders
said yesterday.
Dr Saunders made the
remark while appearing on a
local radio show with Dr
Thaddius McDonald of the
College of the Bahamas.
She said that one of the
ways in which liberated
Africans influenced Bahamian
society was by organising
themselves into friendly soci-
eties and "asues";
In her book, Slavery In the
Bahamas, Dr Saunders wrote:
"The arrival of liberated
Africans had a profound effect
on the growth of the popula-
tion of the Bahamas between
1808 and 1840 ... Most of the
displaced Africans were con-
demned at Nassau at the
Court of Vice Admiralty and
between 1811 and 1832 over
1,400 Africans had been put
ashore under the protection
of the crown.
"On being landed in the
Bahamas they were placed in
the hands of the Chief Cus-
toms Officer, whose duty it
was to bind them to suitable
masters or mistresses, in order
for them to learn a trade or
handicraft, for periods not
exceeding 14 years ... In the
1830s, there were at least eight
free black villages or settle-
ments outside the town of
Nassau.
"They were: Grants Town
and Bain Town just south of
the city, Carmichael and Ade-
laide in the southwest,
Delancey Town just west of
Nassau, Gambier in the west
and Creek Village (New
Guinea and Fox Hill) in the
east...
"Fox Hill was named after
Samuel Fox who arrived in
New Providence in the 1820s


and purchased property in the
eastern district of New Provi-
dence. Fox Hill comprised a
series of villages, for example,
Congo Town, Nango Town,
Joshua Town and Burnside
Town.
"Congo and Joshua Town
were probably settled by
slaves or freed men who had
been born in Africa. Congo
and Nango Town probably
took their names from the
tribes that lived there."
Yesterday, Dr Saunders
said: "Many of the slaves who
came to the Bahamas with the


loyalists were creoles, that is
they were born in the Ameri-
cas, so there memories of
Africa were distant, whereas
the liberated Africans were
somewhat able to re-create
their lives in the Bahamas as it
was in Africa."
On March 31, 2007 one of
communities that was settled
by the Liberated Africans,
Fox Hill, will commemorate
African Heritage Day, observ-
ing the 200th anniversary of
the abolition of the transat-
lantic slave trade in the old
British Empire.


With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands and
the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial services
group offering a comprehensive range of insurance services, domestic
and international banking, estate planning, pension services and corporate
finance as well as other financial products and services. Fidelity is now
inviting applications for a:

Director Corporate Banking

Reporting directly to the President, the successful candidate will have the
following minimum requirements:-
Bachelor Degree in Business, Banking or Finance
An MBA qualification would be an asset
5 years experience in international credit markets
10 years commercial credit expenence at a managerial level
Comprehensive understanding of structured financing solutions
Strong financial and business analysis skills
Exceptional written and oral communication skills
Proven record ofdelivery ofpresentations
The successful applicant will pnmarily be responsible for the develop-
ment of Fidelity's corporate finance business in The Bahamas and across
the Caribbean and will be expected to travel on a frequent basis.
An attractive compensation package, including a comprehensive range of
employee benefits is offered.


Director Corporate Banking
Director of Human Resources
P.O. BoxN-4853
Nassau, Bahamas
Tel (242) 356 7764
Fax (242) 326 3000
Ema il care rs c ('fidc litybahaiis s.co ii


FIVE of 17 trained dolphins rescued during
Hurricane Katrina and taken to Atlantis are preg-
nant.
A sixth dolphin gave birth to a stillborn calf earlier
this week, Kerzner International said in a statement.
The dolphins were from a Mississippi marine park
that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.
Some of the animals were swept out to the Gulf of
Mexico following the storm. After being rescued, the
dolphins were moved to the resort early last year.
The mammals had lived at Marine Life Oceanarium
in Gulfport, Mississippi, doing jumps another tricks
for tourists, before it was severely damaged by Katri-
na.
The five pregnant dolphins two first-time moms
and three experienced mothers are doing well,
according to Teri Corbett, Kerzner Int'ernational's
vice president of marine mammal operations.
Officials said the dolphin that gave birth to a still-
born calf did not appear to experience complications
during her pregnancy. .
The rescued dolphins live along with fquf'9utRers in
seven interconnected pools comprising ,ap. i-acre
lagoon at the resort.












i !I I I I, 1





S I I 6 i








Te Porches @ Cora Harbor111


SUNDAY SERVICES
Morning .'. .rir,,p Service .......
Sunday School for all ages ..
Adult Education ................
Worship Service ...............
Spanish Service ...................
Evening Worship Service ........


8.30 a.m.
9.45 a.m.
9.45 a.m.
11.00 a.m.
2.00 p.m --
6.30 p.mr .' ,


WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.


Se'ective Bible Teoching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club) 4-16 yrs.
Missionehtes (Girls Club) 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting


* .


RADIO MINISTRY
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. ZNS 1 TEMPLE TIME


Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007, PAUL b


THE TRIBUNE


OPPORTUNITIES FORT~I


I












PAGESAURDAYMARH24,2007TCLEWSHETIBUN


In Days Gone By:


the Sha


f ran in the Bahamas

4 f Iran in the Bahamas


The compromise was e\treme-
Iy unpopular ith the resolution-
arN movement. which h had not for-
gotten the LUnted States \ears
ofi support lor the Shah s rule.
and demanded his return to Iran
to stand trial.
This resulted in the kldnappmg
of a number of American diplo-
mats. nulhtdr personnel and intel-
ligence officers in %hat became
kno\ n as the Iran hostage crisis.
Once the Shah s course ol
treatment had finished, the
Americjn government, eager to
a old further contro\ers\. pressed
the former monarch to leaIe the
country\
He left the United States on
December 15. 19" and lined for
a short time in the Isla Coniado-
ra in Panama Finall\ he went
back to Egppi where he died on
Jul\ 2'. I .SI, jged nil Egpptian
President Sad.at ga\e the Shah j
state funeral

JUNE 15. 1979 Part of
the Shah of Iran's 10-ieek
hideawa. on Paradise Island.


THIS week, In Days Gone By
looks at the 10 weeks that
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the
Sha of Iran, spent of his exile in
the Bahamas.
Brought to power by a CIA-
led coup that ousted the popular
nationalist leader Dr Mohammad
Mossadegh, the Shah's policies
led to economic growth during
the 1960s and 1970s but at the
same time, opposition to his auto-
cratic, pro-Western and increas-
ingly brutal rule grew.
Although he supported some
progressive causes, for example
women's rights, he was seen as
increasingly anti-democratic. In
1975, he abolished the multi-par-
ty system so that he could rule
through a one-party state under
the Rastakhiz (Resurrection) Par-
ty. He created the infamous secret
police force, SAVAK, with the
help of the CIA and Mossad,
which assassinated dissidents, ran
a secret prison, used extensive
torture and kept the CIA
informed.
As tensions rose alarmingly in
early 1979, the Shah agreed to
leave Iran -'only to find that he
was unpopular in much of the
world.
Ironically, this was especially
so in many western countries,
which had originally backed his
rule.
He travelled' from country to
country seeking what he hoped
would be a temporary residence.
First he went to Egypt, and
received a warm welcome from
president Anwar el-Sadat. He lat-
er lived in Morocco, the
Bahamas, and Mexico.
But his non-Hodgkin's lym-
phoma began to grow worse, and
required immediate and sophisti-
cated treatment.
Reluctantly, on October 22,
1979 US president Jimmy Carter
allowed the Shah to make a brief
stopover in the United States to
undergo medical treatment.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MARCH 25TH, 2007

11:30 a,m. Speaker: Elder Elliott Neilly
::;:,0:p.m. U.M.D. Prayer Rally
: Blue Hill Gospel Chapel
S iaCgitash::45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Meeting: 10:00 am. (2nd Thursday of each month)


THE BAONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
1.df. Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
kSS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
>PiMC^^T :393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
m- Q'PHCH SERVICES
--I"AIy, MARCH 25, 2007
IUilNDAY IN LENT
AI AE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
,, ;,. Rev. Mark Carey/HC

,P Since Charles Drive
B .WAM Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC.,
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
6:00AM Regional Seminar-St. Michael's
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Mr. Sidney Pinder
6:00PM Regional Seminar-St. Michael's
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC
S 6:00PM Regional Seminar
S TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
6:00PM Regional Seminar-St. Michael's
RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your HQst: Rev. Charles A. Sweeting
III*****t**** **********************************
On Sunday)r larch 25, The Nassau Region is scheduled to hold a Seminar
sponsored by the Division of Doctrine and Polity dealing with what we believe
and the Methodist "method". Whenever Methodism is still being faithful to its
roots, there is much that is being accomplished for theKingdom of God. The
seminar is scheduled for 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at St. Michael's Methodist Church
on Sunday, March 25th. The scheduled topics are: Pastoral Care: Liturgy:
Doctrine, Order and Governance and The Constitution.


e p RIfetbobist Chjurclj
SChapel StraWl) P.O Box CB-13048
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY MARCH 25TH, 2007
7:00 am. Bro. Emest Miller/Rev. Carla Culmer
11:00 am. Rev. Caria Culmer/Sis Mathilda Woodside
6:00 p.m. St. Michael's Methodist Church

"C sting orcar s uo Hm frHecrsfous(1Ptr57


APRIL 2,1979- The
Shah leaves the each after a
brief s-wim with members of
his family on Paradise
Island. The Shah and his
family were under light secu-
ril).


APRIL 4, 1979 -
The Sha of Iran's children
enjoying themselves at a
beach at Paradise Island.


.10
. :, .: .. 7, T"" .?
:: **-*


if


BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
S SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Pastor:H. Mills
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2 Pastor:H. Mills
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
S Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future


Worship Time: 11am & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45amn

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on
Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.n Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles


iLL fRE WUELCOmE TO UflEilD
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs









Worship Time: llain & 7nn
Prayer Time: 10.j15n to 10:45.jn
Church School during nforship Service

Special Events
Lenten Tea March 31st (a 4-6pi..
Palm Sunday April Ist (a la. i
Holy Week Serice April 4th 'a :30p.m.
S Maundy Thursday April 5 (i ":3p. ,m.
Good Friday Service April 6 ("' lla.m.
Easter Sunday April 8 (a I11a.m.


place: Tw7inm Jleigh~s
off Prince Charles I )ire

Minister: Rev, Henley Perry
P.O.Box SS-5631
Telephone number: 324-2538 Telefax number: 324-2587
COME TO WORSHIP, LE 1E "TO SER IVE


STHE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS +
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS
L'EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE
e. PA- ET LES AMERIQUES t- .
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rlodesmethod@batelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in The Bahamas"
THE SECOND LORD'S DAY BEFORE THE
RESURRECTION, FIFTH IN LENT, MARCH 25, 2007
COLLECT:
Gracious Father, you gave up your Son out of love for the
world: lead us to ponder the mysteries of his passion, that we
may know eternal peace through the shedding of our Saviour's
blood, Jesus Christ our Lord.
WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
11:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
6:30 p.m. Rhodes Memorial Choirs
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street,
Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Sis. Cecile Gardiner
6:00 p.m. Rev. Stacia Williams-Christmas
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia Williams-Christmas (Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
6:30 p.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD
8:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demceritte
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Friday Children's Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
MONASTERY PARK FELLOWSHIP
5:15 p.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly after
the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday.
This we proclaim unswervingly: "My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; "Great Hymns
of Inspiration" On the Lord's Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
"Family Vibes" ZNS Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. "To God be the
Glory" ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.


THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007


~8%8~,
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My dolphin encounter and



Happy Trails horseback riding
0 hr*


See Monday's Tribune for


'vel

tOP __ Sill


The Coastal Awareness Committee





spreads message through banners


Awn weCoastal

SAwareness


~4 -


THE Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee of the Bahamas, a group
of stakeholders from the private
and public sectors with an interest
in promoting sustainable devel-
opment, has begun its national ini-
tiative by placing banners through-
out Nassau and the Family Islands.
The large, colourful banners
each contain messages of conser-
vation and depict scenes of the
country's coastal environment and
animals that make the coastal
region their home.
"The messages conveyed on the
posters require each person to
think about trash and the prob-
lems it creates for our environ-
ment." said Angela Cleare of the
Ministry of Tourism, chairperson
of the Coastal Awareness Banner
Committee. "These posters have
been sponsored by companies
throughout our country that sup-
port conservation and are a great
way to educate people as they go
about their business or are stopped
in traffic."
There are five main threats that
affect coastlines. The committee
will focus on trash as a theme for


this year's campaign, as it is one of
the biggest problems threatening
Bahamian coasts.
"We all know that trash is hav-
ing a negative effect on our coun-
try, impacting our social and eco-
nomic well-being." said Earlston
McPhee director of sustainable
development for the Ministry of
Tourism and chairman of the
Coastal Awareness Committee.
"The exit surveys handed in by
our tourists indicate that trash is
one of their biggest complaints
when visiting our country. Our
goal is to educate the public and to
offer real solutions to people that
collectively will help us as a devel-
oping country and as a major
tourist destination."
The committee will be hosting a
clean-up of Nassau Harbour on
April 28 as one of their main activ-
ities during the month of April,
which is Coastal Awareness
Month in the Bahamas.
Working together with the Port
Authority and businesses in the
immediate vicinity, areas in the
harbour determined to be envi-
ronmentally unsafe for the coast


COLOURFUL banners depicting beautiful coastal scenes
and wildlife in the Bahamas ask the public to think about pre-
serving the coast and to stop littering. Sponsored by the Coastal
Awareness Committee and other local businesses, the banners
are displayed throughout Nassau and several Family Islands as
part of Coastal Awareness Month which begins in April.


will be targeted and cleaned.
During Coastal Awareness
Month the committee will also
host, in collaboration with its
strategic partners both in the pub-
lic and private sectors, a number of
activities, including: an education-
al marine exhibition at the
Marathon Mall that will run from
Monday, April 23 through Friday
the 27; and a national school sci-
ence competition.
Field trips to Dolphin Encoun-
ters and Dive Stuart Cove have
been arranged to provide students
with an opportunity to learn about
protecting the coasts and enjoy-
ing the marine wonders of the
Bahamas.
There will also be beach clean-
ups, a national T-Shirt Day on Fri-
day, April 20 and a National


church service.
As this is a national initiative,
beach clean-ups and other Coastal
Awareness activities are planned
for the islands of Abaco, Andros,
Bimini, Eleuthera, Exuma and San
Salvador.
"All beneficiaries of the tourism
industry must take an interest and
active role in conserving the
resources of this vital industry, par-
ticularly in growing Small Island
Developing States (SIDS) like the
Bahamas," adds Mr Mchee.."As
we depend on the tourism industry
for approximately 75 cents, of each
dollar in earned foreign exchange,
the economic sustainability of the
Bahamas hinges on our ability to
maintain the natural beauty of
these islands that attract millions
to our shores."


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S '... .. . .; . ..
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.. 3


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that PHONISE JEAN GREEN 64A
POLARIS DRIVE, CARAVEL BEACH, P.O.BOX F-60488,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any
person who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH
day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007, PAGE 7


THE TRIBUNE


~;





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Toys Egg Colouring Kits
*Stuffed Bunnies Reading Books
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S Basket Fixings Yard Decorations
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,,, b, ,Ai UHUAY, MARCH 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


The Tribune's & Kelly's


EASTER
Coloring Contest





































1 Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives of The Tribune and Kelly's are not eligible to enter.
? Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or an older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY.
j Enter as many times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 5 pm on Friday March 30, 2007. Winners will be contacted April 3 and winners
S published Thursday, April 5, 2007.
P 4 There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age group.
1 5 All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.

Child's Name: Parent/Guardian Signature
| Address: Tel: (hm) (cell) Age:
. - .. .. "------


F












THE TRIBUNE


SATURDAY, MACH 24, 2007, PAGE 9


Shanty town

FROM page one
Two years ago, they alleged
Haitians were even burning
human bodies there a claim
denied by parliamentary secre-
tary Ron Pinder, who carried
out a personal investigation.
Acrid smoke pollutes the
entire neighbourhood, accord-
ing to residents who have to
keep their windows closed at
night whatever the weather. "It
is intolerable," one reported.
Another maintained that
bodies either humans or ani-
mals were still being burnt
there.
"I know the smell of burn-
ing flesh very well," said a res-
ident, "When I was a boy in the
Family Islands carcases of ani-
mals were being burnt all the
time."
In Abaco, residents are
increasingly concerned about
both The Mud and its neigh-
bouring Pigeon Pea settlement
because there have now been
three serious fires in the last
few years.
The last time volunteer fire-
men were called out, an esti-
mated 70 homes went up in
smoke.
With electric wires dangling
between buildings, and open
stoves used for cooking, the set-
tlements are seen as potential
flashpoints for a major inferno.
For years, the government
has been promising dispersal of
the inhabitants into low-cost
sub-divisions, but Abaconians
say nothing significant has been
done so far.
Meanwhile, despite official
warnings, the immigrants con-
tinue to build on the sites.
Director of Environmental
Health Ron Pinder was
unavailable for comment yes-
terday. He was said to be off
the island.


FROM page one


did not open the door, they
would break it down.
The noise startled the
woman, whose son was also
wakened by the loud threats.
The officers continued to
shout at the house stating that
they were looking for Rudy,
and that they had a tip that
there were firearms and drugs
in the house.
The woman told the police
that no-one by the name of
Rudy lived there. She and her
son were alone.
Suddenly, officers broke
down her door and entered
her home without showing
any official form of identifi-
cation, according to the
woman.
"None of the officers iden-
tified themselves. I saw no
badges on any of the so-called
policemen. They trampled
through my bedroom and
house searching for some-
thing," the complaint stated.
The resident told The Tri-
bune that after they had rum-
bled through the home for a
period of time, she could hear
another policeman order the
more than ten officers who
had entered the house to
stand down, as they were in
the wrong home.
The police eventually
showed the woman a warrant.
However, she said she was
shaking, and so traumatised,
that she was unable to fully
comprehend the document.
The officers then left with-
out informing the woman how
the door would be repaired.
Instead, her son had to do his
best to ensure that the door
could be propped shut for the
night.
In a state of panic, the


Woman claims officers broke down her door


woman then called the emer-
gency hotline to complain.
The senior officer she spoke
to told her to lodge a com-
plaint to the commissioner.
At that moment, a com-
manding officer returned,
identified himself, apologised
and informed her that the
door would be fixed by noon
on Thursday. That did not
occur. Instead, the door was
repaired yesterday.
The woman still would like
a written apology from the
officer in charge of the opera-
tion. And she questions how
the police expect innocent cit-
izens to trust them when
errors such as this occur.
The complaint stated: "I
thought that policemen had
procedures on how to carry
out a search. To me, anyone
could have signed the warrant
and one of the officers was so
bold and mean. I wondered if
it was his home being wrongly
searched, how he would feel?
I was so scared, I thought I
was going to faint. My son had
to hold me up. I couldn't
sleep the rest of the morning -
I just read my Bible.
"How do you (the police)
expect for the public to assist
the police in matters of crimi-
nal actions when they do not
follow procedures them-
selves?"
The woman said if police
had shown her some form of
identification before they
barged in, and reasonably
spoke with her, she would
have opened the door.
"I understand that you want
to catch the bad guys, but you
can't be trigger-happy for pro-
motion and hurting the inno-
cent people kicking down


doors and abusing the person
who believes in the police
department," her complaint
further stated.
The woman told The Tri-


FROM page oe


bune that she was concerned
that police may not be per-
forming the necessary intelli-
gence work before they barge
into private homes, which sub-


ects law-abidiag citizens to
arausment.
Police pri. liaison officer
Walter Eva ws unavailable
for coaUent W p to press time.


Second eviction notice


This is the second attempt .'
on behalf of Mr Thompson to
rid the house of its occupants.
Last November, Mr Pinder
served a writ on Anna Nicole
ordering her to vacate the
premises.
However, she ignored the
appeal and remained, despite
utilities being switched off on
the instructions of Mr Thomp-
son on more than one occa-
sion.
Mr Thompson has previ-
ously stated that, despite
alleged promises made to the
contrary, Anna Nicole failed
to sign a document agreeing
to execute the mortgage for
the home, and as such had no
rights to remain. She respond-
ed by asserting that 'she *HOWA]
believed the house was a gift. (
Mr Pinder attempted to
serve Stern with the notice on Wednesday,
but was forced to leave it at the gate block-
ing the entrance to the driveway.
Mr Stern had been living at the home
with Ms Smith since summer fast year,
when she was granted permanent residen-
cy in the country under circumstances
which have since become the topic of heat-
ed political debate.
Since her death in February, the home
has continued to be under the spotlight
because of a custody battle over Ms Smith's
six-month-old daughter, Dannielynn, who is
said to be being cared for there.
In January, Mr Pinder told The Tribune


I
RI
4/F


that the -ome was on the
market. Originally pur-
chased for $9o00,QOp,Mr Pin-
Sder claimd tbhat .it. is now
valued at neat $10 million.
However, a Nassau realtor
said he felt that, despite the
Salue added by the home's
Sm dentril positioning the
S "Anna Nicole Saga", he
S felt tbisw as an. over-esti-
mate.
1 t, is ot yet clear how a
potential eviction will affect
moves, reportedly being
made by Ml Stern to seek
Speiuanenit residence in the

The eviction notice comes
days before Broward County
medical amsiner Dr Joshua
) K STERN Perper is set to reveal the
FILE Photo) cagae 61f Anna Nicole
Smith's i(dden death, which
Florida authorities have deemed "suspi-
cious.''
The announcement set for Monday -
was delayed after authorities looked into
new evidence relating ltothe incident.
And it seems none of those involved
with Ms Smith, even after her death, can
escape controversy. Smitli's mother Virgie
Arthur has been su oiiQ d to court for
allegedly refusing to pay her legal bills,
according to EilertaiHlhent Onllne.
Attorney Jamal Davis, from law firm
Halsbury Chanibers, helped her obtain an
order to ensure Daanielyan was not
removed from the Bahabmas.


PROSPECTUS
THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2026 AND 2027
ISSUE OF BS50.000. 000.00


Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and authorized by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 21st June, 2006.
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th March, 2007 and
will close at 3:00pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007.
If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$50,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.
The date of this Prospectus is 15th March. 2007
The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling BS50,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in'a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2026 and the latest in 2027. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the isue
price are given below:-


Rate Of Interest
9/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2d26
5/16% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2027


Amount
BS
25,000,000.00
25.000.000.00
50.000.000.00


Issue
Price
BS
100.00
100.00


The Stock shall be repaid on 28th March, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.
INTEREST
The Stock will bear interest from 28th March, 2007, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the
percent per annum over.the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the
Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 28th September, 2007 and thereafter on 28th March and 28th September in every year
until the Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND
The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS
Issue of Stock The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th
March, 2007 and will close at 3:00 pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence
at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007. All
envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled "Application For Bahamas
Government Registered Stocks".


Units


The Stock will be in units ofBS100.00.


Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.
Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:
I. Bank of The Bahamas International
2. First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited
3. Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited
4. Commonwealth Bank Limited
5. Royal Bank Of Canada
6. Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited
7. Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)
8. Citibank, N.A.
PUBLIC DEBT
Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at December 31, 2006 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,880,739,000.*
GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE
The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.
FY2005/2006p** FY2005/2006p** FY2006/2007p**
BS B$ BS
Approved Budget Approved Budget


Revehue


Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt)
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)


1,221,454,000

1,149,582,000



123,454,000


1,132,774,300

1,145,691,000



132,901,000


1,338,971,000

1,269,560,000



162,356,000


** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at
December 31, 2006 totalled BS499,067,000.


F omaFFIIL Lussn.
DAPMCAlTON a........
ALLOUME No.
DAT Es: '-.'_ ~


Thc Reirm
co The Ciral BnBk of The Bahamas
P.O. Bo N-4868
Na-U.a INa


I/Wehereby apply for the following amsounmtorfBhmamr:Mini.

bint"b81.64 ".ft M ,.h ,
h. b~isamlw Le le


9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate


BJhmas Rueitld Stock i02: -:' .-',m
BahumM RegisteredStoe2k 27 S


and dertak to accept any less amount which may be allowed to ne/u.


iVWe ael BS


min pynis tr r SM ,i f,.


h ehventof the full amountof Stoclsi)applied fr abi ltea BL
me/u, Ie request that the sum refundable to me/us be applied for the Aloik 31set :
.


~
n
sc
86
86
88


Bahamas Regisered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock
Bahamas Registered Stock


as.


PAYMENTS CAN UE MADE VIA RTGS SYSTEM THROUGH AlL COMMERCIAL BMIKis
EXCEPT FINOO, BY BANK DRAFTS PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANiKOq i lBAAMAS
ANDB CAS. ,





Ordiy Signau.re- *

Nane in Full (BCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Misn md tidls If.)



Addre (CrpomaliU lc. ouM give Registerd Addresses)


P.O. aBu


2. (Where Itweer msrea.in apply as elm auberlmlera, the mbadlileunsI aUa u d0
belveb heelow.)
Ordinary Signatures

Namns in Fun







T qe busby VN__ .. ... ,. .., o.
Ite hery requet aeM anal imeret to be p to:


^*^----------------------------------- --*- ..


AccM Nbmb


i '5


LOCAL NEWSI


'


TH GOVERNMlNT OF THE COMMONWAL-Tl air fimi A*AFA
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOC 26H2 ANDI ,


''


I -, I I _


''










THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007


LOCAL. ....


GN480

MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTAND CONSUMER AFFAI
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971
CHAPTER 339
THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS, 2002



The puic is advised atprices asshown in the S r LAD FREE 87

libe sold by FOCOL wll become effective on Friday,2 March 2007.

SCHEDULE



MAXlMUM WHOLESALE MAXIMUM
SELLING PRICv ER U.S RETAIL
GALLON SELLING PRICE
PlACE ARTICLE PER U.S
MAXIMUM MAXIMUM GALLON
SUPPLIES DIS'BUTORS'
PBMCE PRICE $
__ $
PART B
FREEPORT INCLUDING SEA FREIGHT

FREEPORTOIL
COMPANY
LIMITED LEAD FREE (87) 3.41 3.41 3.85










S ARRISON THOMPSON
PERMANENT SECRETARY


AFTER a three month
nationwide search for the best
and brightest primary school
students in the Bahamas, it has
been announced that 103 stu-
dents were nominated to rep-
resent their respective schools in
the 11 annual Bahamas Primary
School Student of the Year
Award competition.
These students will be repre-
senting Abaco, Acklins,
Andros, Berry Island, Bimini,
Eleuthera, Exuma, Grand
Bahama, Inagua, Long Island,
Mayaguana and New Provi-
dence.
In November 2006, the foun-
dation presented each primary
school in New Providence,
Grand Bahama and the Family
Islands with an application
package to nominate one stu-
dent deserving of national
recognition. More than 100 pri-


To.meet the challenge of operating our growing business, we wish to recruit a:


Client Relationship Manager

Main responsibilities Develop his existing client base
Assist with the administration and operations of the Bank
Ideal profile Proven track record in selling financial services, confirmed by the existence of a portfolio of clients
Strong marketing, communication andl sales skills
Ability to generate high levels of income
University degree
Dynamic and proactive personality
What we offer The opportunity to play an active role in the success of an innovative bank
The chance to work within a dynamic and motivated team
An attractive remuneration package which provides incentives based on results
Competitive welfare benefits


Please send your resume and reference to: betsy.morris@syzbank.com
SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. I Tel: (+1 242) 327 66 33
Bayside Executive Park I P.O. Box N -1089 I Nassau, Bahamas www.syzbank.com


m


mary schools accepted the
opportunity.
Ricardo Deveaux, president
and chief executive officer of
the Bahamas Primary School
Student of the Year Founda-
tion, said: "Each year, a select
group of students are nominat-
ed to accept one of the most
prestigious national recognition
for primary school students in
this country.
"This awards programme,
which is the premier pro-
gramme for primary students,
is an excellent opportunity to
recognize those students who
have demonstrated excellent
academic achievement, leader-
ship ability, campus and com-
munity involvement and good
citizenship."
The competition, which was
established in 1997, is sponsored
by the Bahamas Primary School
Student of the Year Founda-
tion in partnership with the Nas-
sau, Bahamas Pan-Hellenic
Council.
The programme was estab-
lished because it was felt that
major emphasis was being
placed on the achievements of
high school students, however
little was being done to salute


our younger achievers.
The 2007 nominees will vie
for the title of National Primary
School Student of the Year,
with one overall winner to be
announced on Saturday, May
19 at a ceremony.
The Student of the Year win-
ner will receive a $10,000 schol-
arship donated by Grand
Bahama businessman Basil
Neymour.
The other winners will share
over $50,000 in scholarships and
prizes.
An independent panel of dis-
tinguished judges headed by Dr
Davidson Hepburn, former
ambassador United Nations,
will review the applications and
determine the overall winner
and finalists.,
Since the inception of the
awards programme, over 600
students have been recognized
and over $120,000 in scholar-
ships and prizes has been pre-
sented.
The awards ceremony is open
to the public and will be held
on Saturday, May 19 at 6pm at
the Bahamas Faith Ministries
Diplomatic Centre on
Carmichael Road.


NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES JEAN-BAPTISTE OF
PRISON LANE, P.O. BOX N-7423, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 17TH day of MARCH, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.











LARGE SHIPMENT OF USED CARS

IN STOCK

COME CHECK US OUT


NEW SHIPMENTS

ARRIVING MONTHLY


For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance,


On Premises

Check Our Price

Before buying


Bahamas Bus & Truck



Call:


* ABOVE: 2006 Student of the Year Awards Finalists

N RIGHT: George Zonicle 2006 Bahamas Primarn
School Student of the Year


Primary school


students to


be honoured


Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 23 March 2007
S. .. "*" .A.IA.COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
': M ... ~%C. %cHo oo.0o f YTD 102.37 / YTD '% o0.11
52k..-H 52wk-Low Securil y PIOre ous Close Today's Close Change Dal,, *.*ol EPS .. .:- ,.1..
1.85 0.54 Abaco Markets 0.812 0 82 0 00 -0 -6- :.. I A .1f
12.05 10.70 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25 11.25 0.00 500 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.56%
8.60 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.60 8.60 0.00 800 0.737 0.260 11.7 3.02%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.2 2.35%
2.19 1.26 Bahamas Waste 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.199 0.060 10.6 2.86%
1.49 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.30 1.30 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.6 3.85%
10.33 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.33 10.35 0.02 1.000 0.915 0.240 11.3 2 32%
2.20 1.67 Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9 1.90%
14.15 9.38 Commonwealth Bank 14.15 14.15 0.00 0.998 0.680 14 0 4.86%
6.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 4.80 5.03 0.23 0.118 0.045 401 7 0.94%
2.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.295 0.000 8 3 0.00%
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 300 0.552 0.240 10.8 4.04%
12.45 10.70 Finco 12.45 12.45 0.00 500 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.58%
14.70 10.90 FlrstCaribbean 14.61 14.61 0.00 1,000 0.921 0.500 16.0 3.40%
17.06 10.40 Focol 17.06 17.06 0.00 1.644 0.510 10.4 2.99%
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.532 0.100 13.6 1.38%
9.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4 6.19%
10.00 10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 10.00 0.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 7.95%
52K-HI 52*k-Lovw Symool Bid $ Ask S L ast Pre p,. eS, .,1 EP I _- *
14 30 12 25 Bahamas Supermarkets 14 60 156 oO 1 -60I 1 1' 1 -1%
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0.54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 0.00%
ICA811tif ;.- securIties
4300 28.00 ABDAB .41 '1 C.. 4 -L' 0 1 ..- ".. 19.4 0.00%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
-.,",.,." S.-.... 2 SX Itd Mutual Funds
52.W-..HI 52K-1LOW Funo Name NA NTD': L.-I 1 1 .1.:.r.i.., 1C. i Yield %
1.3312 1.1273 Colina Money Market Fund 1.331194"
3.0988 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3.0988"*
2.6254 2.3312 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.625419**
1.2338 1.1592 Colina Bond Fund 1.233813**"
11.3945 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.3945*""*
S..- FNDEX: CLOSE 789.18 / YTD 06.34% ; 2006 34 47%.
l'.' I.L e ir : : = I i..X T T r.::, .. .. i NAV KI1Y
52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ Buying price of Cohina and Fidelity
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selling price of Collna and fidelity I M i.l '20117
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price Lost traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. Trading volume of the piior week BF lftr Change Change In closing price from day to day EPS S A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 31 January 2007
DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M Not Meaningful
PIE Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1, 1994 = 100 "" 28 Feobruary 200/
S- February 2007
r .. 14 5L6-77. ll, FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CALL t242) 394-2503


~ rC


3221722


~ *
rt)
r
1 i










THE TRIBUNE


Iit-
SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007, PAGE IT
*a e


* t -
*:;d


-, ft-


t~bij i3,i3riS.

* r l *..n -


GOOD FOR THE BAHAMAS.



BETTER FOR BAHAMIANS.










9










J '.
S' .) ",>'


'\3 ,rC* .J
'- 4* I

9 9' .4 $
r*^ "^*-


S A lu.r:;y ;:-sort, the likes of which the

world tas n-.ver seen. In less hin four ye.-n.s, dahaf Mar
wilt L. .s. 3,C00('C r.om-rn, acres of .-niing as well as prr i-:
enter-;.'r: r and sh i ''ig .wes.


Wher. you rlrd.rn big, you '.-,' do it al r,-. That's why
we expec to ;m a)i: over ':;5 jro-!., fj'ron :truc
to cust rnm er *,Or.;i- : r:E r:. .. 0: e IT :,:. thj;- i: fn 3 .i roCn
to the; 7r00 contuctir.! jo ..ilrie y c'-r::.i ad riJ ho

over 100 contr.acis awarded r~- '':-ial! :n:tr:ictors,, some
exc.e'd:r n 'i,.3i 5 IIir;. A .h! : tw: ri'. dos


following comjletin, Baha Mar is expected to ben,-fit
the nation's Gross Domestic Product to the tune of
nearly $15 billion.


Set to become one of the mon significant partnerships

in the hospitality industry, this worldwide exposure to

ttle beauty of The Bahamas can only serve to grow the

tourism industry exponentially and continue to provide

more jobs and economic growth.
:..'.: .- . ".: ..*

SHARE THE, BAHAMAS WITH THE. W
HARE TIHE BENEFITS WITH TH. -


. '.,'.,'


=I
,i;.::!:~~1~_2X~sL~~BPC;j~ll;t~Clt~X;~





:: ;:~:















Fire ravages stall



on Potter's Cay


* IN THIS photo provided by Warner Bros. Pictures, Captain (Vincent Regan), Leonidas (Gerard Butler) and the Spartans stand ready to halt the advance of the Persian army in the action drama 300.
S(AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures)


Historical epic


300 is a


triumph of imagination


* By JASON DONALD
300
Starring: Gerard Butler,
Vincent Regan
EVER since Gladiator
breathed life into the swords
and sandals epic, several
attempts have been made to
match the Oscar-winner's
success. All of them have
fallen short.
Now that may be about to
change. 300 has stormed
onto our screens and, while
it may be as epic in its silli-
ness as it is in scale, there's
no denying its sheer enter-
tainment value.
Loosely based (very loose-
ly to my knowledge
deformed giants and goat-
headed folk don't actually
exist) on the ancient battle
of Thermopylae in which
300 Spartans held off the
huge Persian army, 300
focuses primarily Spartan
King Leonidas (Butler)
Leonidas is the noblest
king you can possibly imag-
inc an-1 backed by his noble
aii,, .., noble wife (who
stays at home during the
fighting to make sure


things stay noble in Sparta),
he slices and chops his way
through a spectacular battle
against the odds.
This particular retelling of
the story originally appeared
as a graphic novel by Frank
Miller of Sin City fame, and
the film has no shame in dis-
playing its comic book ori-
gins.
There is little ambiguity
in the conflict (the Persians
are characterized as evil
waves of faceless oppo-
nents), the 300 Spartans are
blandly heroic (imagine the
hawk men from that 80s
Flash Gordon movie only
even more one-dimensional
S. .and wingless) and the
politics simple (fighting for
freedom, etc.).
So if you're looking for
complexity, or indeed a his-
tory lesson, you've come to
the wrong place: 300 is all
about the action.
Drenched in rich, com-
puter generated effects, the


sheer scale of the battle
scenes really does take the
breath away.
Director Zach Snyder isn't
satisfied with mere sword
play here he throws in ele-
phants, mutants, bomb
wielding ninja-esque war-
riors and more.
Each time the film slowed
down for a breather I found
myself thinking that there
couldn't be anything left in
the tank, but 300 always has
another trick up it's sleeve.
As the leading man, Ger-
ard Butler is sure to see his
star rise after this although
I suspect his performance
may owe a nod to Sean Con-
nery's Greek warrior from
The Time Bandits and Sny-
der, who made a big impres-
sion with his Dawn of the
Dead remake, gives another
indication of his talents.
So while 300 may be his-
torically inaccurate, or an
irresponsible glorification of
war, it is still a triumph of
imagination and visual sto-
rytelling.
Love it or hate it, you cer-
tainly won't be able to com-
plain you didn't get your
money's worth.


THE Bahamas International Film Festi-
val continues its Monthly Film Series this Sat-
urday with the showing of Johnny Slade's Great-
est Hits at the Hard Rock Cafe at 7.30pm.
Sure to delight fans of The Sopranos, the film
is a playful parody of the gangster genre.
John Flore plays Johnny Slade, a truly awful
nightclub singer, who gets a job singing at a
new club as long as he includes a different
song written by his new boss every night.
Slade reluctantly agrees, until he learns there
may be more to the lyrics of his special tunes
than meets the eye.


The film revels in it's light-hearted atmos-
phere, and contains a steady stream of sharp
one-liners.
Slade is a likable protagonist and you can't
help raise a smile at his ridiculous stage perfor-
mances. *
Great fun, and yet another change of pace for
the Monthly Film Series, following documentary
Eleutheran Adventure and last month's drama
Half Nelson.
Johnny Slade's Greatest Hits
Hard Rock Cafe
Saturday, March 24, 7.30pm


I
I
I


i


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 24, 2007


THE TRIBUNE