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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02840
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: 3/10/2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
sobekcm - UF00084249_02840
System ID: UF00084249:02840

Full Text








The


Tribune


HIGH 81F
LOW 66F

SPAMTLY
SUNNY


Volume: 103 No.91 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007 PRICE- 750














iNS host's girl: man charged


Accused

arraigned over

stabbing of

McKinney's

daughter
By NATARIO McKENZIE night after she was stabbed mul-
tiple times during a row in the
THE MAN charged with the Wilson Tract area around 6pm
stabbing death of the daughter on Sunday.
of a local talk show host was McKinney reportedly fought
arraigfied" in aN Naami -airgis-" rThierTeiim heii tensive Care
trate's court yesterday. Unit for several hours, having to
* Michael Simmons, 22, of Wil- undergo multiple surgeries
son Tract, was brought before before her death.
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez The accused was informed by
to face the murder charge. Magistrate Gomez that he was
The accused is represented not required to plead to the
by attorney Dwayne Hanna. murder charge and would be
Prosecutor was Sergeant Her- remanded to Her Majesty's Fox
bert Duncombe. Hill Prison.


Twenty-two year-old Micheal Simmons, a resident
of Wilson Tract, appeared in court yesterday for the
stabbing of 22 year-old Trevonne McKinney.
(Pic: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff)


Court dockets alleged Sim-
mons, on Monday, March 5,
2007, by means of unlawful
harm, caused the death of
Trevonne McKinney.
McKinney, 22, a mother and
the daughter of Immediate
Response talk show host Steve
McKinney, died at Princess
Margaret Hospital on Monday


The case was adjourned to
March 15 at 10am for a fixture
hearing and transferred to
Court Five, Bank Lane, before
Magistrate Marilyn Meers. Sim-
mons' attorney requested yes-
terday that, in the interim, his
client be allowed to undergo
psychological evaluation.


Car theft rings found

across Family Islands


By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
THE lucrative Andros car theft ring broken
up by police in January has been repeated on
other islands in the Bahamas, assistant commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson told The Tribune yes-
terday.
While not as large as the Andros operation,
the racket is under police scrutiny, he said.
Meanwhile, theft victims are being made to
wait with little chance of regaining ownership of
their vehicles.
Cassandra Davenport, of the Bahamian Forum,
expressed disbelief that her daughter Janine,


whose car was stolen as part of the Andros ring,
is left without a vehicle and may not get her car
back after the investigation has been complet-
ed.
The Attorney General's Office is reportedly
investigating who would, in fact, be the true "own-
er" of the cars, as once they have been stolen,
they are often sold and resold to other unsus-
pecting parties.
Despite this, the initial victims maintain they
should have their vehicles returned to them.
Ms Davenport said: "My daughter's car, and I
SEE page 8


Man

drowns

in boat

capsize
ONE man drowned and sev-
eral persons were seriously
injured when a boat capsized
off Marsh Harbour, Abaco, yes-
terday afternoon.
Details were still sketchy at
press time last night, but it was
reported that the injured vic-
tims were being flown to New
Providence for emergency treat-
ment.
According to reports, the
drowning victim was a Haitian
who could not swim.
The private vessel was appar-
ently travelling from either
Guana Cay or Scotland Cay to
Marsh Harbour when the acci-
dent occurred.
Pattie Toler, of BASRA at
Marsh Harbour, said the open
boat with outboard engine had
five men on board when it
turned over and sank.
Troy Albury of Guana Cay
fire and rescue was on the scene
within 20 minutes and dived
into the water to retrieve the
dead man. The others had been
picked up by a passing vessel.
The tragedy happened in
front of a church just off Dun-
das Town. BASRA received an
emergency call at 3pm and
stood down at 3.25pm.
Ms Toler said: "The response
from local boats was tremen-
dous."

Morton

workers

to take

strike

vote
By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter j
THE workers of Morton Salt
yesterday announced that they
will be taking a strike vote
despite the fact that negotia-
tions are moving forward.
The employees although
still hopeful that the dispute
over salary increases can bd
resolved through talks with
management have notified the
Ministry of Labour of their
intention to hold a strike vote,
union adviser Obie Ferguson
told The Tribune yesterday.
Mr Ferguson, legal adviser to
the Bahamas Industrial Manu-
facturers and Allied Workers
Union (BIMAWU), said the
workers are due to meet on
Monday to review statistical
SEE page 8


- .: ..... E .. .. "

/
/(


ii


#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION


SBAHAMAS EDITIraON
BAHAMAS EDITION


Mo, torist-hits the heights

















Utilities reassigned


from Roberts'


MINISTER of Works and
Immigration Bradley Roberts
is no longer responsible for the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company or the Water and
Sewerage Corporation, the
Cabinet office announced yes-
terday.
It said the utilities aspect of
Mr Roberts' portfolio will pass
to Dr Marcus Bethel.
' A release from Cabinet said
that the switch occurred conse-
quent upon the resignation of
Shane Gibson as minister of
immigration, labour and train-
ing on February 18.
Prime Minister Perry Christie
advised Governor General AD
Hanna that this new adjustment
to the Cabinet will occur with


BTC, Water & Sewerage to pass

to Dr Marcus Bethel's ministry


effect from February 19.
Following Mr Gibson's res-
ignation, the prime minister
advised the governor general
that the ministerial responsibil-
ity for immigration was to be
transferred to Bradley Roberts,
who became minister of works,
utilities and immigration.
Ministerial responsibly for
labour was transferred to Vin-
cent Peet, who is now minister
of labour and financial services.
Yesterday the Cabinet office
announced that the utilities
aspect of Mr Robert's portfo-


lio was to be transferred to Dr
Marcus Bethel who is now min-
ister of utilities and the envi-
ronment.
All other portfolio assign-
ments remain as before.
On Thursday during the com-
missioning of the $29 million
water facility on Baillou Hill
Road, the prime minister com-
mended Mr Roberts for all of
his efforts as minister of works.
The prime minister also said
that Mr Roberts will be demit-
ting office at the end of this
term officially ending specula-


care

tion as to whether or not he will
return to active politics.
Many political observes have
considered it a forgone conclu-
sion that Mr Robert's place as a
candidate for Bain and Grants
Town on the PLPs 2007 ticket
will be filled by Dr Bernard
Nottage.
Election paraphernalia fea-
turing Dr Nottage was circulat-
ed during that last PLP mass
rally in Pinewood.
He has also been seen cam-
paigning door to door in the
constituency.
Dr Bethel is also not expect-
ed to offer in the next general
election, having failed to secure
a seat for the House of Assem-
bly for his entire political career.


Bradley Roberts
(Tribune file photo)


Domestic violence 'cannot



be ignored', says minister


m m
FHouse sends 'clear

ou

d oly
esssage' to combat

omestic violence]


Minister of Social Services
and Community Development
Melanie Griffin told delegates
attending the second annual
National Congress of Trade
Union women's conference that
domestic violence is a problem
that "cannot be ignored".
Domestic violence, she said,
has a tremendous social, physi-
cal, psychological and econom-
ic impact on individuals and
families.
The delegates represented
various unions that fall under
the umbrella of the NCTU.
Thursday's conference, held
at the Bahamas Union of
Teachers Building, was staged
as part of ceremonies observ-
ing International Women's Day
and was hosted by the Wom-
en's Associationpf the NCTU.
Mrs Griffin said domestic vio-
lence, also referred to as family
violence or intimate partner vio-


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S MELANIE GRIFFIN


lence, for the most part occurs
behind closed doors and tran-
;cendridce. color, religion and'r
creed. -
"It know s no political, social
or economic bounds," Mrs Grif-
fin said. "It is not a one time,
isolated event, but rather a pat-
tern of behavior or a cycle that
has to be broken."
She said while Bahamian
women "have come a long way"
they cannot rest on our laurels
as there are "still many of our
sisters who are deeply rooted
in situations of domestic vio-
lence and they need our help."
"We are all touched in one
way or the other by domestic
violence and it requires the col-
lective efforts of all to address
the problem," Mrs Griffin
added.
She said the passage of the
Domestic Violence (Protection
Orders) Bill in the House of
Assembly on Wednesday will
not eliminate domestic violence,
but will serve as a major plank
in the fight against it, "and we
hope bring it to a reduced lev-
el."
"What we do know," she
said, "is that the legislation will
certainly bring relief to our
many citizens who are in rela-
tionships and/or living in.homes
where violence is a common
occurrence."
Mrs Griffin said the over-
whelming support for the leg-
islation by parliamentarians
from all sides of the political
divide sent "a clear message"
to perpetrators of domestic vio-
lence that the country is united
against them.
"I am satisfied that the pro-
visions of the Bill will go a long
way in raising the level of con-
sciousness of domestic violence
while providing greater protec-
tion for victims and promoting
and fostering the implementa-
tion of programmes for both
victims and perpetrators."





!NIGHT,[1 :




Fo te-soie


Parliamentarians on
Wednesday night sent a
"clear message" to perpetra-
tors of domestic violence that
their acts will no longer be
tolerated in the Bahamas,
sending the proposed Domes-
tic Violence Bill through the
House of Assembly and on to
the Senate unopposed.
The passage of the Bill took
place on the eve of celebra-
tions surrounding Interna-
tional Women's Day which is
observed globally on March
8.
Minister of Social Services
and Community Develop-
ment, Melanie Griffin, who
introduced the Bill for a Sec-
ond Reading on Wednesday
morning, said that the over-
whelming support for the leg-
iMalimin by parliamei arians
-from all side% of the politicat-
divide seut "'a cleat message"
to perpetrators of domestic
violence that "this country is
united against domestic vio-
lence."
"The vote was unanimous.
Everyone, government mem-
bers, the opposition, the cler-
gy, everyone is well aware of
the consequences of domestic
violence and this vote sends a
clear message to those per-
sons who are out there com-
mitting these acts, that their
behavior will not be tolerat-
ed," Mrs Griffin said.
"When you look at the sta-
tistics, 45 to 60 per cent of
reported homicides have been
attributed to domestic vio-
lence," she said, "those sta-
tistics are too glaring to be
overlooked."
Mrs Griffin said the quick
passage of the legislation by
House members was even
more significant based on the
"worldwide move" by legis-
lators and organizations to
stamp out domestic violence
within their communities.
She said the passage of the
Bill also coincides with the
discussions of the United
Nation's 51st Session of the
Commission on the Status of
Women.
The discussions, which
began last week, will end this
week under the theme:
"Elimination of all forms of
discrimination and violence
against the girl child."
The Bahamas is represent-
ed at the session by members
of staff of the Bahamas' per-
manent mission to the United
Nations.
Phedra Rahming, officer-
in-charge of the Bureau of
Women's Affairs and First
Assistant Secretary in the
Ministry of Social Services
and Dr Sandra Dean-Patter-
son, Health Social Services
co-ordinator in the Depart-
ment of Social Services, were
also present.
"It is very significant for us
at this time in the life of our
country to be making this
landmark legislation," Mrs
Griffin said. "I feel a sense of
accomplishment. Not for
myself, but for the team and
for persons in this country
who have been working
towards this type of legisla-
tion for a number of years.
Mrs Griffin said the Bill is
not gender-biased and is
designed to provide a level of
protection that is currently


non-existent for the many
persons who are victims of
domestic violence be they
male or female.
She said the legislation will
also provide intervention,
including counselling, for both
victims and perpetrators.
Mrs Griffin said the legisla-
tion will, for the first time,
provide a comprehensive def-
inition for domestic violence,
covering physical, sexual,
emotional or psychological
and financial abuse.
She added that physical and
sexual abuse "have long been
accepted" as forms of domes-
tic violence but that the new
Bill recognizes that there are
"other more subtle forms of
abuse that may not leave vis-
ible scars like physical and
sexual abuse."
The minister said another
'-shortcoming" of the previ-
ous legislation was that it did
not recognize persons
involved in relationships out-
side of marriage.
She said that while drafters
of the legislation accepted
that marriage is the ideal rela-
tionship between a man and a
woman who want to share an
intimate relationship they
could not ignore the fact that
a large number of persons are
involved in other types of
relationships.
The legislation also makes
provision for the granting of a
protection order by the Mag-
istrate's Court when a judge is
satisfied that a person has
engaged in or has threatened
to engage in conduct that is
considered to be domestic
violence or conduct that may
reasonably be regarded as
harassment of the spouse,
partner, child or other mem-
ber of the household.
As timing is a critical issue
when dealing with the need
for protection, the legislation
also provides for the court to
endeavor to hear an applica-
tion for a protection order
within two days after the date
of service of the application
or as soon as possible there-
after.
The minister said the pro-
tection order might include
provisions that restrain the
respondent from being near
the complainant.
"This includes going to the
person's workplace or school.
Where appropriate, a protec-
tion order might require the
respondent to leave the
premises and continue any
legal or other obligation rela-
tive to rent, mortgage, utili-
ties and the like," Mrs Griffin
said.
In addition to the victim,
an application for a protec-
tion order can be made by the
Commissioner of Police,
another member of the house,
a person other than the
spouse or partner acting as an
agent for the person, with the
leave of a court and a social
worker in the case of a child.
"Fear, intimidation and
dependency often cause vic-
tims not to follow through
with action which often
results in no consequences
being taken against the bat-
terer. This provision will
ensure that victims get the
protection they require," Mrs
Griffin said.


I I
'I

I





'I



.1











>1~




ii.


PAGE 2, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


THE TRIBUNE











SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007, PAGE 3


THE TRIBUNE


LOAS NW


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Construc-
tion work will begin on a
new $75,000 state-of-the-art
playground at Eight Mile
Rock on Monday, through
funding provided by the
Million Dollar Round Table
Foundation.
The 12,000 square foot
playground at the Sea
Grape Community Park will
be the largest of its kind in
the Bahamas. It also repre-
sents the largest and the fifth
one built by the MDRT
Foundation.
The project is expected to
be completed in five days by
volunteers, comprising of
both international and local
MDRT members and the
residents of EMR commu-
nity.
Anthony "Tiger" Long-
ley, a MDRT member, said
that local insurance compa-
nies, including Colinalmpe-
rial, British American, Fam-
ily Guardian, and CLICO,
have given their support as
volunteers.
He said volunteers will
begin work on Monday,
March 12, between 8am to
5pm each day until the pro-
ject is completed on Friday,
March 16, when an opening
ceremony will be held.
Prime Minister Perry
Christie is expected to speak
at the official dedication at
3pm on Friday.
The Million Dollar
Round Table, which was
founded in 1927 in Park
Ridge, Illinois, is an inter-
national, independent asso-
ciation of the world's best
life insurance and financial
services professionals.
The association currently
consists of more than 35,000
-members from 76 nations
and territories, representing
476 different companies,
The MDRT formed a
foundation in 1959 as a
means to give back to their
communities to help
improve the quality of life
of those in need. It has
donated in excess of $17 mil-
lion to more than 1,600 char-
ities around the world.
MDRT has seven mem-
bers in Freeport. Mr Long-
ley said a total of 25 volun-
teer MDRT members from
the Bahamas, United States,
Belgium, Sri Lanka, and
Trinidad and Tobago, are
expected to assist in building
the playground.
"Volunteers, who are
paying all of their expenses
for the trip, will dig holes,
and construct equipment to
create a safe and fun place
for children to play," he
said.
In addition to construct-
ing a newplayground, Mr
Longley said they will also
build a separate toddler play
area, erect new picnic tables,
and add attractive landscap-
ing.
He noted that improve-
ments will be made to the
existing basketball court and
bleachers.
He said the dedication
ceremony will be a big event
with a ribbon cutting,
marching bands, and
junkanoo by the Martin
Town Primary School
Junkanoo Group.


Share

your

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you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.


South Beach residents




seek candidate debate


Voters seeking

'substance' from



their MP in 2007


V OTHERS at
South Beach
want a public
debate between
their election
candidates in an effort to raise
the quality of their local MP.
They say they are tired of vot-
ing for a "party label" and want
someone of substance to repre-
sent their interests.
The call came yesterday from
teacher Charles Moxey, who
said he and his friends were fed
up with tit-for-tat mudslinging
between the major parties.
"I want substance this time
around," he told The Tribune,
"I registered to vote at the last
minute, but I still don't know
who to vote for. I want to hear
the candidates discuss the
issues."
So far, only the FNM has
named its candidate for South
Beach. He is Phenton Neymour,
a former member of the CDR.
The PLP is, meanwhile, still
undecided, though attorney


Fayne Thompson also an ex-
CDR member is being touted
as their likeliest candidate.
The PLP incumbent, Agatha
Marcelle, is not running this
time and was, in any event, dis-
missed as a "no show" MP by
Mr Moxey and his friends.
He said he and many voters
elsewhere were keen to see an
improvement in "quality and
style" among candidates. "We
want to see for ourselves what
they have to offer," he added.
Father Sebastian Campbell
of All Saints Church had agreed
to make his church hall avail-
able for the debate, said Mr
Moxey.
"We want this debate and we
want it soon," he added, "I
think it is time we as a democ-
racy started looking for people
of quality and character. We
can't depend on the parties
sending whomever they will."
Discontent over the quality
of candidates has mounted in
recent months as the govern-


Romauld Ferreira (left) and Gabriella Fraser laugh
it up during a broadcast of Bahamas @ Sunrise.
(Photo: Collin Galanos, the Counsellors Ltd.)


Presenter to


leave Bahamas


@ Sunrise show


After nearly five and a
half years, Gabriella Fraser
will soon get to sleep in a
little later on her weekday
mornings.
The co-host of the popu-
lar Bahamas @ Sunrise
morning show on ZNS TV
will be leaving the pro-
gramme at the end of
March.
Ms Fraser and Romauld
(Romi) Ferreira, have host-
ed the show since it pre-
miered in 2001. It airs live at
6.30am Mondays and Fri-
days.
Ms Fraser made an offi-
cial announcement about
her impending departure on
the March 5 broadcast of
the show.
"I know that many of you
have noticed that this co-
hosting chair has been kind
of a revolving chair of late;
we're seeing a number of
new faces sitting here. And
that's because I'm actually
in my final weeks here on
Bahamas @ Sunrise," said
Ms Fraser.
"In fact, to be exact, com-
ing up at the end of this
month, Friday, March 30,
will be my last show. So I
won't get to share my morn-
ings any more with Romi
after that."
"I don't know what to say
to that," replied Ferreira.


"It started out as a bright
Monday morning. Now I
feel sad. But I tell you what.
We're going to enjoy our-
selves as we give her a
grand farewell."
Joan Albury, the execu-
tive producer of Bahamas
@ Sunrise and president
and CEO of the Counsel-
lors Ltd, which produces
the programme, described
Ms Fraser as "naturally-gift-
ed" and "hard-working",
adding that it will be "hard
to imagine Bahamas @ Sun-
rise" without her.
She said Ms Fraser has
"raised the bar in Bahamian
broadcasting and in the
media industry."
The Counsellors Ltd had
known about Ms Fraser's
intention to leave the show
for some time now, and is
expected to announce a
new co-host for Bahamas
@ Sunrise in the next few
weeks.
Bahamas @ Sunrise pre-
miered on October 8, 2001.
It currently airs live on
Monday and Fridays at
6.30am, with rebroadcasts
on Wednesday at 8am and
Saturday at 9am on ZNS
TV13.
The show celebrated its
fifth anniversary in 2006,
and has aired more than
520 episodes.


ONLY ONE NAMED SO FAR Phenton Neymour, of the FNM,
is the only South Beach candidate to be publicly declared


ment has become embroiled in
a string of scandals.
The Cabinet Room brawl, the
Anna Nicole Smith affair and
'the travails of Sidney Stubbs
have all persuaded voters to
look for something more than
party placemen at the polls.
Mr Moxey said: "Those who
are sitting in parliament leave a
lot to be desired. We need to
look at the quality and back-
ground of candidates and what
they have to offer, not what the
party is saying."
Ms Marcelle, a motivational
speaker by profession, made lit-
tle impact during her five years
in the House of Assembly.
She was appointed parlia-
mentary secretary to the Min-
istry of Tourism, but was con-
sidered largely ineffectual. One
of her complaints was that insuf-
ficient use was made of back-
bench talent.
Mr Moxey and his group are
not the first to call for public
debates. Independent candidate
Clever Duncombe, the fathers'
rights champion who is chal-
lenging ex-minister Shane Gib-
son in Golden Gates, wants a
public face-off with both his
known opponents, MP Gibson
and FNM challenger Don Saun-
ders.
He said the time had come
for people to judge the quality
of candidates on offer instead
of voting strictly on party lines.


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Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123
e-mail: rhon da.rolle(pepsibahamas.com


- ~ ~~ I


I


nOIIILYy LO IIMuI LISI











THE TRIBUNE -


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


EITOIUET TOTH 'EDSITOR


The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEONE. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DLfPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama
TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager (242) 502-2352
Circulation Departm '! (242) 502-2387 "
Nassau Fax: (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348


Bush to visit Latin neighbourhood


PRESIDENT BUSH came to
office six years ago pledging a "fun-
damental commitment" to Latin
America.
Whether because events elsewhere
distracted him or because he was
incapable of concentrating on more
than one or two foreign challenges at
a time, Bush has failed to keep that
promise.
As he hops from Brazil to Uruguay
to Colombia to Guatemala and final-
ly to Mexico on his current Latin
America tour, he is certain to hear
well-founded complaints about the
consequences of his inattention to
the southern hemisphere.
Administration spokesmen have
been denying that the president's trip
is meant to counter the influence of
the oil-rich Venezuelan President,
Hugo Chavez.
But Bush's hosts know he was moti-
vated to visit them in large part
because of the Chavez effect.
After six years of not-so-benign
neglect, Bush is visiting five coun-
tries outside the Chavez orbit with
the presumption that a trickle of US
aid and expressions of support may
suffice as an answer to the financial
aid Chavez has been lavishing on
select neighbours and to his impas-
sioning anti-imperialist rhetoric.
If Bush hopes for even modest suc-
cess, he will have to alter his past
approach to Latin America.
Instead of harping on a militarized
war on drugs or free-trade agree-
ments that seem only to exacerbate
poverty and disparities of wealth,
Bush ought to heed the particular
local needs of the countries he visits.
In Brazil, his first stop, he is likely
to be told it is hypocritical of the


The Tennis Department requires the services of a Tennis
Court Maintenance
Among other duties the successful applicant will be
expected to:
* Maintain daily, 12 Fast Dry Tennis Courts and
surrounding areas. This includes sweeping lines,
watering courts as necessary, and rolling courts.
* Make certain there are always water, ice and ips on
the courts.
* Empty trash bins around the courts, fitness center and
tennis shop. Clean benches, chairs and tables daily
and also check for wasps nests.
* Add court material as necessary and directed by
supervisor.
* The successful applicant must be highly motivated, in
good physical shape, flexible and with a willingness
to serve.
It would be helpful if the person has reliable transportation
as well.
Interested persons should fax resumes to:
The Director, Human Resources
Lyford Cay Members Club
Lyford Cay
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: #362-6245


United States to maintain a tariff of
54 cents per gallon on imported
ethanol. Brazil has had great success
in converting its sugarcane crops into
fuel for vehicles.
Brazilian sugar-based ethanol is
considerably cheaper to produce than
US corn-based ethanol, and so the
US tariff on imported ethanol
amounts to a protectionist barrier
for US corn producers exactly the
sort of device American proponents
of free trade commonly preach
against.
Bush will be taking a step in the
ght direction if he volunteers to
pash for lifting the ethanol tariff,
which otherwise will not expire until
2009.
He should also back an ethanol
agreement that includes cooperation
in US and Brazilian research pro-
jects aimed at improving techniques
for deriving ethanol from cellulose
material, such as common plants.
If Bush wants to respond to Mexi-
co's central concerns, he will take to
heart complaints he is sure to hear
from President Felipe Calderon
about Bush's failure to keep a
promise to legalize undocumented
Mexicans working in the United
States.
And Bush will also have to recog-
nize that the United States cannot
be considered a good neighbour of
Mexico. if it builds a 700-mile wall
along the border.
In Mexico, as elsewhere in Latin
rnerica, the best way for Bush to
..(gin rolling back the Chavez tide is
by undoing some of the damage done
during the past six years of neglect.
This article is from the Boston
Ulobe 2007)


'Who is the1




Art Gallery:



really for?'

a~y .i


EDITOR,
The Tribune.
As I have been associated
with several Bahamian artists
in various disciplines and con-
tinue to be so in some cases, let
me say that the following is
entirely my own perception and
personal point of view; I speak
for no-one except myself.
The focus of this letter, the
comments and the questions,
are directed towards The
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, its Curator and rep-
resentatives. My questions are
fundamental. My understand-
ing of the functions of the
NAGB are to showcase
Bahamian artistic talent (of
which there is a mighty
amount), support and empower
the artists and show the public,
our society, that art in all its
aspects needs to be neither
daunting nor elitist; in other
words encourage everyone to
understand the role and real
value that culture plays in every
society.
This being so, as recently
reflected in a newspaper article
by Miss James the Curator and
by Antonius Roberts and John
Cox on Love 97 on the forth-
coming Gallery Tour, March
16th-18, it begets the following
question.
By what process and by
whom was the decision made
as to which artists and galleries
should be included in this tour?
I do not know of any kind of
open invitation that went out
to all recognized or emerging
artists who might be interested.
This, in turn, begets this com-
ment. The word "inclusive" has
been bandied around, indeed
emphasised, by all three per-
sons in their media contribu-
tions and promotions for this
"new" thrust of expanding the
art experience both for the


artists involved and for the com-
munity, yet it still appears to
me that the more accurate word
might be "exclusive"; with per-
haps a couple of exceptions the
artists are the customary cho-
sen few.
I called the NAGB person-
ally to inquire whether a newly-
opened gallery by an estab-
lished artist could be included
on the tour and was given an
unequivocal no that it was too
late. Perhaps it was but as a pro-
fessional event planner, I have a
little difficulty with that answer
and with the espoused philoso-
phy of inclusiveness.
Be that as it may, it illumi-
nated another point for me. In
the grand scheme of things I am
nobody not a wealthy patron
nor major collector but I am
everybody am I not?
As a 'nobody' I have been
able to call Curators in London,
Toronto, Germany and other
places and speak or meet direct-
ly with them. Without going
into details it would have been
nice, it would have been com-
mon courtesy to a donating
member (me) not to say very
good public relations had the
NAGB Curator felt inclined to
do the same.
My last question is who is
this Gallery really for? What
is its mandate surely not a pri-
vate playground for the selected
elite? If it is to be world-class
and for 'everyman' and 'user
friendly', a place to learn sub-'
liminally as well as literally, I
suggest the following: change
the hours to suit the public not
the staff i.e. have it open-
beyond 4.30 pm so that people


could browse after work; open it
on a Sunday so that it could:,
become a family affair; offer.
special Sunday events from time.
to time; consider putting in a,
small caf6 or restaurant that
could be a draw to business per-
sons on a lunch hour or other,-
times; place some seating in the4.
garden to encourage visitors to,
sit and read, or meet a friend,
so that it becomes familiar and.c
a natural place to gravitate to;
make a concerted effort to court.
international corporate groups,,
who are always looking for an,
event to do off-site from a hotel,,,
such as spouse tours or lunches;
promote using the grounds for,
other special events the space,
is more than adequate for a tent-,
for receptions, weddings and,,
expositions.
Last but not least, it is a.
beautiful, gracious building with,,
a history lovingly restored
although not so well main--
tained, so please, please can,,
someone tell me why the
entrance to an edifice purport-3
ing to be the sacred home of,.
Bahamian culture, do we have:
to enter it through a parking.
lot. There is a perfectly lovely
main entrance with driving,
access all round the building to ,
the parking lot and it would be.,
far more appropriate and
impressive, obviously, to enter ,
that way particularly as a pedes-
trian. I know of no museum or
art gallery in any major cities
or countries that I have been to
where one enters through a.,
parking lot and what basically
amounts to a side entrance. So,
disrespectful of a grand old lady,
of a building and for its con-
tents and a very inauspicious.
introduction to an aesthetic
experience.
Victoria Braham Same
Nassau,
March 1, 2007.


We must all play fair in elections


EDITOR, The Tribune.
JUST remember you persons,
through unions and otherwise,
just prior to elections, attempt-
ing to force moneys out of gov-
ernment, implying that they pay
or get voted out of office, that
your methods are immoral.
Equally immoral is or would
be government, to give in to
these pressures at this time to
attempt to secure re-election.
Allow me to point out; the
money you are attempting to
manipulate out of government
is not PLP money it's yours
and mine.


viIlIgglo
COCKTAIL & WINE BAR
&


seek experienced


V Pizza Cooks Straight Shifts
V Line Cooks
V Pantry Cook
V Buspersons


Must be culinary minded and able to work
to high levels of sanitation with a great work
ethic and must be able to pay
"ATTENTION TO DETAIL"

References Essential

Please present resume in person at
Villaggio 10am 2pm, Mon-Fri.



ATTN GENRAL ANAER


Being my money and your
money, it's not to be manipu-
lated out underhandedly or paid
out to buy out or buy off who
would oppose a party political-
ly.
This is too clear and the pain
of such trickery or treachery by
unions or by government, too
much to bear. Such pernicious
games twist and thwart a









LARGE SHIPMENT

IN ST

COME CHED


NEWSHI

ARRIVING


For Easy F

Bank And


On Prei

Check Oi

Before I


Bahamas Bi


Ca


democracy, our people gener-
ally as well as every individual
Bahamian citizen.
In a democracy, the people ,
rule and I am one of them. On,%
behalf of everyone, I demand
fair play instead of fowl.
OBEDIAH MICHAEL
SMITH
Nassau, February, 2007.


I






r OF USED CARS

OCK

CKUS OUT ,

PMENTS

MONTHLY


financing

Insurance

mises

ur Price

buying


us & Truck


Ill


322 17221


v









SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007, PAGE 5


THE TRIBUNE


LOA NW


OIn brief

US holds

its first

detainee

hearings

By BEN FOX
Associated Press Writer
SAN JUAN, Puerto
Rico (AP) The U.S.
began a series of secret
hearings Friday to deter-
mine whether 14 alleged
terrorist leaders at its prison
in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
should be declared "enemy
combatants" who can be
held indefinitely and pros-
ecuted by US military tri-
bunals.
No details were released
and a military spokesman,
Navy Cmdr. Chito Peppier,
declined to identify
detainees who appeared
before the panel of three
officers.
Edited transcripts of the
hearings at the U.S. Navy
base in southeast Cuba will
be released later, Peppier
said.
The 14 detainees, includ-
ing an alleged mastermind
of the Sept. 11, 2001,
attacks, were moved in Sep-
tember from a secret CIA
prison network to the
prison at Guantanamo Bay,
where the U.S. holds about
385 men on suspicion of
links to al-Qaida or the Tal-
iban.
Some are expected to
boycott the proceedings
and their hearings will be
held in absentia, Peppier
said.
The military held 558
combatant status review tri-
bunals between July 2004
and March 2005 and the
panels concluded that all
but 38 detainees were "ene-
my combatants" who
should be held.
Those 38 were eventually
released from Guan-
tanamo.
The military allowed the
media to cover previous
hearings but this time has
adopted more stringent
rules, barring anyone with-
out a special security clear-
ance. The 14 detainees
include Khalid Sheikh
Mohammed, a suspected
mastermind of the Sept. 11
attacks who was captured
in Pakistan in March 2003,
and other alleged al-Qaida
figures.





SATURDAY
MARCH 10TH
12:30 Bullwinke & Friends
1:00 Fun Farm
2:00 Bahamas Government
Depart-mental Softball
Association Games
6:00 In This Corner
6:30 Sports Lifestyle
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Native Show
8:00 55 Degrees North
9:00 Movie: "Lady Monster"
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Hustle
12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

SUNDAY
MARCH 11TH
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM
8:00 In His Image: Change
Ministries International
8:30 The Bible Study Hour
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
11:00 St. Barnabas Anglican
Church
1:00 Gillette World Sports
1:30 Live Up
2:00 This Week In The Bahamas
2:30 Transforming Moments
Agape Full Gospel Baptist
Church
3:00 Taking Dominion
3:30 Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International
5:00 Walking In Victory


6:00 Apostolic Hour
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Practical Princples: Kemp
Road Ministries
8:00 Higher Ground: Calvary
Deliverance Church
8:30 Ecclesia Gospel
9:00 BTC Thanksgiving Service
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 New Dimension
12:m/n Community Pg. 1540AM


NOE:ZS-V13rsevs.h


Motorist survives


driving


By DENISE MNIAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT A motorist in
the Berry Islands miraculously
escaped unhurt after his vehi-
cle went over a bridge and
crashed into a large boulder,
according to a senior police offi-
cial on Grand Bahama.
Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming reported that Roland
Oliver, 35, of Bullocks Harbour,
was driving his 2000 Oldsmo-
bile east along a bridge around
1.15am on Thursday when the


The construction industry in
New Providence and several
Family Islands is "healthy"
according to Bradley Roberts.
He said figures show a
"whopping increase" in
approved building permits in
2006 over the previous year.
In a communication to the
House of Assembly on Wednes-
day, March 7, 2006, Roberts
said there have been significant
increases in building permit
fees, approved housing units
and building inspections.
He pointed to the following:
The value on approved
building permits in New Provi-
dence for 2006 totalled
$661,056,818 a 44 per cent
over the previous
year
Building permit fees for
New Providence also showed
significant increases from
$762,217 in 2005 to $1,131,873 in
2006, a 48 per cent increase
There was a marginal
increase of 1.8 per cent in the
total number of housing units
approved in 2006 (2,847 units)
Mr Roberts emphasised that
building inspections performed
by the
Building Control Division
"showed much activity as a
result of a burgeoning econo-
my."


accident dOccurred.
He explained that the cause-
way connects Bullocks Harbour
with Great Harbour Cay.
Oliver told police that he was
travelling at about 40mph when
the vehicle suddenly slid out of
control and went over the
bridge on the southern side and
crashed head on into a large
boulder which was the only
thing standing between the car
and a plunge into the sea.
According to reports, Oliver
was on his way home after
attending a party on Cocoa Cay.


"Firstly, there was a 19 per
cent increase in the number of
buildings completed in 2006
totalling a value of $203,181,628.
"Secondly, a review of the
records revealed that the num-
ber of construction starts for the
year 2006 were up by some 27
per cent over the previous year
requiring building inspectors to
carry out some 1,261 inspec-
tions. The value of these struc-
tures totalled some
$201,957,286, representing a 33
per cent increase over the pre-
vious year's value.
"Thirdly, the Buildings Con-
trol Division's records also
showed that there were some
1,865 housing units completed
during the year 2006 and the
Housing Units starts in 2006
totalled 1,638, indicating a six
per cent increase over the pre-
vious year."
Mr Roberts told parliamen-
tarians that about a year ago,
he discovered that the building
statistics that were being pub- .
lished by the government for::'
many years only covered coha',
struction in New Providence." '
The minister said he has since
directed that statistics be com-
piled on construction for the
entire Bahamas, by island.
Mr Roberts emphasised that
the "robust construction activi-


off bridge


Berry Islander's vehicle crashes

into boulder, which stopped

him going into the sea


Although the vehicle was badly
damaged, he escaped unhurt.
In Grand Bahama, three
young men trapped in a car
wreck are also lucky to be alive
after being extricated with the
Jaws of Life following a serious
traffic accident on the Warren J


ty" is not limited to New Provi-
dence. "Our statistics also show
an increase in construction in
the Family Islands."
He presented statistics on
three Family Islands -
Eleuthera, Abaco, Exuma and
Grand Bahama.
In Eleuthera there has been
a 10.3 per cent increase over the
previous year in building per-
mits to the tune of
$43,040,512.
In Exuma the value of
building permit approvals were
over $48,261,283
In Abaco, approved build-
ing permit values were as high
as $111,401,166.
"Finally on building permit
statistics," said Mr Roberts,
"contrary to the dismal reports
of the downturn of the economy
we continue to get from detrac-
tors, the island of Grand
Bahama is not dead. Statistics
have shown that in Freeport
during the year 2006, there was
,a 73 per cent increase in
approved building permits con-
struction value over the previ-
ous year botalling $186,165,000.
"Additionally for the same
period there were 345 con-
struction starts with a construc-
tion value of $55,543,685, three
quarters of which were for res-
idential development."


Candidate in call



for national lottery


BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT Michael
Edwards, independent candi-
date for Marco City, believes
that the country should consid-
er the benefits of a national lot-
tery as a means to provide fund-,
ing for various national public
programmes.
Mr Edwards pointed out that
most developed countries have
lotteries, the earnings of which
are used to help defray the costs
of education, healthcare and
sports programmes.
"What better way to help the
children of those persons on the
lower rungs of the socio-eco-
nomic ladder. Through such
help we can ignite their dreams
and inspire them to greatness,"
he said.
Mr Edwards was speaking on
Tuesday at his campaign office
on Poinciana Drive, where he
officially announced his inten-
tions to run as an independent
candidate in the general elec-
tions.
Even though Mr Edwards is
running as an independent, he
insists that he is still a member
of the FNM and "will remain
unwavering and committed to
the original philosophy and
ideals of the late Sir ('ecil Wal-
lace-Whitfield and Sir Kendal
Isaacs."
"I will continue to be a'n
advocate of good governance
and an activist and warrior for
the enlistment of the down trod-
den, the aged and less fortunate
in our coinmunity. and in par-
ticular our youth: to press for
economic opportunities for all


FR3INI LWNSRVC


Bahamians that want and
should have more of the eco-
nomic pie of this blessed nation
that we call Bahamas," he said.
Mr Edwards stated that many
Bahamians have expressed their
disappointment wiUt both polit-
ical parties and are crying out
for an alternative.
He stated that Bahamians are
entitled to affordable adequate
healthcare, properly funded
educational institutions, and a
strong Bahamianisation policy.
"We must rid our country of
the blight of illegal migration
that threatens our existence,
people and culture. We must
properly develop a proper


youth programme to ensure
that the youth of our nation are
developing properly academ-
ically, socially, and morally- so
as to secure their future and
productivity for nation build-
ing, lest we would cease to exist
as a people," he said.
Mr Edwards also called on
the media to mindful of its
"sacred responsibility". He said:
"It is vitally important that the
voices of the masses be heard,
and their expressions and opin-
ions, barring legal repercus-
sions, ought to be printed and
not subject to editorial censor-
ship."


Levarity Highway on Thursday.
The men Kevin Moss, 22,
of Hanna Hill and passengers
Jarvares Moss, 19, and Chris-
ten Bartlette, 17, of Bartlette
Hill, Eight Mile Rock are in
hospital in stable condition.
Supt Rahming said the acci-


dent occurred around 8.40pm
on Thursday. He reported that
Kevin Moss was driving a bur-
gundy coloured 1994 Chevy
Camaro west along the highway
when he lost control of the vehi-
cle, which skidded across the
eastbound lane and crashed into
a utility pole.
Mr Rahming said it took fire-
fighters 30 minutes to extricate
the occupants from the vehicle,
which was wrapped around the
pole. They were taken by ambu-
lance to Rand Memorial Hos-
pital.


PALMDALE
326-5556
9am-6pm
Monday-gaturday
-:4-*<


TOWN CENTRE MALL
356-3205
10am-7pm Monday-Thursday
10am-8pm Friday-gaturday


CLOTHING


ALE










''to


Don't


mi q


it!


* MINISTER BRADLEY ROBERTS


ID)IEAITH ANNOUNCEMENT
I I I


ROBERT ROY ALBURY aged 68 of George Town
Exuma died on Sunday March 3, 2007.

lie is survived by his wife, \Vernell Albury; 4 Sons, Robert,
George, Brian and Isaac Albury; 3 Daughters: Kim ('arey,
Evelyn Glynatsis and Tiasia Albury; 3 Brothers, Albert
Albury of Marsh Harbour Abaco, Bcrchnal Albury of Freeport,
Grand Bahama and Arlington Albury; 1 Sister, Adcnia Roberts;
Numerous grandchildren, nieces and nephews and a host of
other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announce at a later date.


I I I .. -


I


IBu'i'*ldi"n sector 'healt y9.
9










PAGE SAURDAY MARH 10,2007THE TIBUN


57n .aps One o..., .p


The rise of Sir Sidney


THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH
Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
= P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
aani Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
-mu CHURCH SERVICES
SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2007
THIRD SUNDAY IN LENT
E E AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC.
D ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
7:00AM No Service
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
7:00PM Pastor Martin Loyley
GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen's College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC
ST. MICHAEL'S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue
8:00AM Connections Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC
TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
S4 11 :00AM Mr. Henry Knowles
7:00PM Dr. Patrick Roberts


t
* t.
!- "--























ri,





Ii

i


|


@rant's Eton uWesl p Aletljobtint Ottrb
iBailou Hill Rd & Clsral Gtreet) PO Box CB-13046
The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)
SUNDAY MARCH 11TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/ Sis. Marilyn Tinker
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezal Anderson
7:00 p.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Board of Children, Youth & Young Adults

"Csingo.lrlllleslu iIf.ponlHi H.B!BBHBcafr ( e


.s'-1;


Sunday School: 10am
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm


This week, In Days Gone By
looks back at Sir Sidney Poitier.
Sidney Poitier was born in
Cat Island where his parents a
Bahamian father of Haitian
descent and a Bahamian moth-
er were farmers.
He spent his first years on Cat
Island, but during his early
teenage years travelled to Nas-
sau with his family.
As he got older, Sidney dis-
played an increasing inclination
toward juvenile delinquency. At
the age of 16 his parents
shipped him off to Miami to live
with his older brother.
After a stint in the theater,
Sidney had his first breakout
role as a member of an incorri-
gible high school class in the
1955 film Blackboard Jungle.
He was the first male black
actor to be nominated for a
competitive Academy Award
(for The Defiant Ones, 1958),
and also the first to win the
Academy Award for Best Actor
(for Lilies of the Field in 1963).
Sir Sidney is a Knight Com-
mander of the Order of the
British Empire. While this enti-
tles him to use the title "Sir",
he chooses not to do so.


CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL
CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS Tel: 325-2921
SUNDAY, MARCH 11TH, 2007

11:30 am. Speaker: Elder Brentford Isaacs
NO EVENING SERVICE

( Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a m.
Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
Sisters' Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)


,BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
S SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL


FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC
Pastor:H. Mills


"Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are"
Pastor: H. Mills Phone: 393-0563 Box N-3622


He has served as a non-resi-
dent Bahamian ambassador to
Japan (since April 1997), and
as ambassador to UNESCO. In
these diplomatic roles, the
Bahamian Ministry of Foreign
Affairs refers to him as "His
Excellency Sir Sidney Poitier".
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP
LEFT:
February 20, 1968 Sidney
Poitier with Anne Bancroft,
who presented him with his
Oscar.
August 1, 1975 Sidney Pot-
tier receiving the insignia for
his honorary knighthood from
Governor General Sir Milo
Butler in a brief ceremony at
Government House along with
the late Sir Lynden Pindling.
November 23, 1971 Sidney
Poitier chats with the press
about his film "-Buck and the
Preacher" which will had its


world premiere in the Bahamas,
the funds of which went to aid
the Jordan / Prince Williams'
building fund.
OPPOSITE PAGE: CLOCK-
WISE FROM TOP LEFT
May 31, 1974 Sidney Poitier
at his Winton Heights home dis-
cussing the Nassau premier of
his movie Uptown Saturday
Night.
January 27 1972 Sidney
Poitier presents the authentic
western gun used by him in
Buck and the Preacher to Lady
Thurlow. Mr Poitier generously
donated the gun along with two
antique silver cases along with
other items in aid of an auction
at Government House.
June 17, 1974 At the world
premiere of Uptown Saturday
Night the late Sir Milo Butler,
Bahamian actor Calvin Lock-
hart and Sydney Poitier.


It'


Time to


Get

Connected
i )~,.





Come! Join us this Sunday as we

Connect To God Throuqh Prayer






SUNDAY SERVICES
S -) Worship Service ... 8.30 am.
Sunday School for all ages.. 9,45 a.m.
,. 'i: Education ................ 9.45 a m.
. . .......... .. 11 a .m .
Spanislh Seovice ................. 2.00 p.m
Evening .', Service ........ 6.30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Selective ":- T. : .1 i!
Parges : Club) 4- 6 yis.
: :,, : r.,. (- rls :l,.A) 4-16.vIS,

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
;,;!h ',iu s'i Mveeltiing
RADIO MINISTRY
sundays at 83 a.m. 1I TEVPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE
Assembly Of God

Colin Aene t thTerae enreill


RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL' on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles
'METHODIST MOMENTS' on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Mr. Henry Knowles
The "Red Ribbon Ministries" Committee of the Bahamas Conference of The
Methodist Church will sponsoring a Public Lecture on AIDS at Epworth Hall
at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 14, 2007. Nurse Rosamae Bain from the
AIDS Secretariat will be the Guest Speaker.
Curry Memorial Methodist Church will be holding their Annual Good Friday
Luncheon on Friday, April 6,2007 on the Church Ground, Zion Boulevard from
1:00 3:00 p m. Donation: $10.00


LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future


Worship Time: 11am & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Timc: 6:30prm

Place: The Madeira Shopping
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday lmorniiig on i
JoY 101.9 at 8:30a.n lRev. Dr. Franklin ]kiow/'

fiLL IRE WELCOME TO flIfElD
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs


-- --


*******************t********************


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


I


1 4












SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007, PAGE. 7


THE TRIBUNE


LOCAL NEWS.


t!..'













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.V"





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OIn brief


Pakistan

removes

top judge

By MUNIR AHMAD
Associated Press Writer

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan
(AP) Pakistan's president
has removed the Islamic
nation's chief justice for "misuse
of authority," a minister and
state media reported Friday.
Iftikhar Mohammed
Chaudhry, chief judge of the
Supreme Court since 2005, had
enjoyed a reputation for taking
a tough line against misdeeds
and human rights abuses.
Opposition groups, lawyers
and former judges expressed
surprise over the dismissal,
which underlined the power of
the executive dominated by
*' President Gen. Pervez Mushar-
raf over the judiciary.
A hard-line opposition leader
in the National Assembly, Hafiz
Hussain Ahmed, condemned
Chaudhry's removal and urged
the opposition parties to back
the fired justice "to protect the
judiciary from a dictator
(Musharraf)."
Speculation about reasons for
Chaudhry's fall ranged from
reports that he had misused his
influence to secure official
employment for his son, to
recent court rulings that had
challenged the government's
authority.
Information Minister
Mohammed Ali Durrani said
Musharraf removed Chaudhry
for "misuse of authority" but
gave no further details.
The president has submitted
a case against Chaudhry to the
Supreme Judicial Council, state-
run Associated Press of Pak-
istan news agency reported.
Musharraf had received
"numerous complaints and seri-
ous allegations for misconduct,
misuse of authority and actions
prejudicial to the dignity of
office of the chief justice of Pak-
istan," and Chaudhry had been
unable to give a satisfactory
explanation, APP said. The
report did not detail the acci!
stations against the judge.


I tHE BAHAMAS, TIR'kS AND ( \Ml OS ISLANDS
C-ONFERENCE
OF THE MIEllI)ODIS I (tiR(tIIIN TIll
CARIBBEAN VND 111IE \FRICIS \ '
I.'EGLISF M1EI HOlMST E DANS I \ C \R \II k H
ET IF.S IIERIQUES I
NASSAU CIRCUIT OF ('HII(II'l -
P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telepho'ie: 32' 64 U: l'a."
328-2784; rhodesmethll hatlelneiit.hs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF
GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY
THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL
HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND
(Father John Wesley)
"Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist
witness for Christ in'The Bahamas"
THE FOURTH LORD'S DAY BEFORE T1HE
RESURRECTION, THIRD IN LENT, MARCH 11, 2007
COLLECT:
Almighty God, whose most dear Son went not up to joy
but first he suffered pain; and entered not up into glory
before he was crucified: mercifully grant that we, walking
in the way of the cross, may find it none other than the
way of life and peace; through Jesus Christ your Son our
Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in unity oflihe Holy
Spirit, one God, now and for ever.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts
RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)
7:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly (Holy
Communion)
10:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Denierilte
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demecrille
6:30 p.m. Prayer Band Conccrl
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST (111 R(11 (Rose
Street, Fox Hill)
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arlhur Cliase
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CIIHURCI (Shirley Plahiza)
11:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R Ncilly
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METIHODIS I
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (I loly ('omilunnion)
METHODIST CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHIEPIHERI)
8:00 a.m. Worship at Rhodes Memo CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALI)ERS(GA TI ) luwlo Strec 5:30 p.m. Friday Children's ( lub
9:00 a.m. Sunday Circuit Pr,~,'er (;roup
METHODIST MISSION CEN] RE (Quackoo S) -TIihri
Shop and other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST (O1 1 Fi E 1 (28 C(ratonird
St., Oakes Field) Reception to PrimarN

PEACE AND JUSTICE ('AMP \lIGN 2007: All
Methodists of the Confereince are urged to pray and to flst
for Justice to prevail in tlh Mlethodist Cases. Ihe fl:i:
begins weekly after the e ening meal on I hlursd an il
ends at noon on Friday. This we procl aim uonsw.ervingiwly:
"My God and My Right."

RADIO PROGRAMS
"Vision" On the Lord's Day. ZNS I at 9 p.m.: "(ireat I l imns
of Inspiration" On the iL r,, < Dnv R, i dio S 10 at 5:30 p.m.:
"Family Vibes" ZNS 1 ,,i; '
Glor-v"7NS 1 Tuesday "' I ..


IT's A TIME of JOY AND JUBILATION!

IT'S A GRAND TIME OF PRAISE AND CELEBRATION!


ANNUAL NATIONAL

"-'CONVENTION


..as.i'JL :,l -ar r F .V





March 11-18, 2007 East Street Tabernacle

THEME:

Power Possessed People
ACTS 1:8


GUEST SPEAKERS:

BISHOP RANDALL E. HOWARD
Geneinl Overseer (Worldwide)
BISHOP DR. BRICE H. THOMPSON
Geneivil Pie liy!tr (Canibberi & Ailfntir Ocear Islands)
BISHOP DAVID H. BRYAN
Global Outreach Director
BISHOP CLAYTON N. MARTIN
Mutio0nal Oveisecr (Jalnll ui (uyihi,, I' il, Giuyini .Y
F iinh L'ijioni)

MINISTER MORALS L. CASSELL
Regioniil Yolth Dilecdor (Norlier'i 1.1 A PFqeri, \ lt rmuiln)
ii., ir[i,i in anointed sonilg iin perl.rmini .vi1l lbe ihe
(oin lnlion Choir and Praise leam ht liabLmri,dle (oncerl
Choir, lhe Bahamas Public Ollir, Chahoir and olher (huroh
Choirs, along with the Bahamnu Bi Bnd lie ioulh Blu,'.
Bund, the Junior Bruss Band, andI Ihi (r,,.,id, I BrU:s Bond

LOG ON TO: www. FOR LIVE WEBCAST EVENING SE


Monday, March 12th, 2007
National Overseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming will deliver his
Annual Address LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS
Sunday, March 18th, 2007
Annual Baptismal Procession will leave the Tabernacle for the
Western Espianride followed by the live ZNS Radio and TV 13 evening
, broadcast Service.
Final Message on Convention Theme:
Power Possessed People
will be delivered by
National verieer
,i,ph.p ir [lhrniel B Pahm ng
.S-4


- e" a he 1
*' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,, i.--"a ^ "r.J I 1 .L' B 'f


:^. -


L__.


I I


- I


On3m


li a












THE TRIBUNE


PAGE 8 SATURDAYMARCH 10, 2007


Further talks with


union are planned

FROM page one

information provided by Morton Salt executives.
These company statistics, Mr Ferguson said, will help the union
evaluate its requests and assist workers in deciding what step to
take next.
Following this meeting, he said, the union is scheduled to sit
down to further talks with Morton Salt on Wednesday.
Mr Ferguson said the strike vote does not automatically mean
workers will engage in industrial action, but will show how many
employees would be willing to strike.
Last month, more than 100 Morton Salt workers walked off the
job in Inagua in protest at a proposed reduction in their work
schedule.
MQ'ton Salt managing director Glen Bannister said the pro-
pose2reduction was due to a low production of salt at the compa-
ny. '
T14 unionised workers are asking for five to six per cent basic
salatX raises for the years 2007 to 2009.
Inagua's largest employer, however, is offering its workers a
salary increase of 3.75 per cent for those years, in addition to a 40-
hour week productivity bonus, which roughly equates to another
two er cent.
M erguson yesterday did not wish to speculate on the outcome
of n&'xt week's discussions between the two parties, stating that he
pretwrred not to pre-empt negotiations.
"It I say that if the talks don't go well, there will be a strike, that
is not the best approach to take in trying to resolve the matter," he
,,aid:
The main objective at the moment, Mr Ferguson said, was to find
a resolution to the long-standing dispute, with concerns 60 per
ceAritf Inagua's workforce.
'im'ere is the possibility that the matter will be resolved. There
seeniBto be some willingness to bring the matter to an end. Obvi-
ouslyVve would prefer, as a union, to go that route (of talks)," he
said.


By BRIAN MURPHY
Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD (AP) -- Wash-
ington is sending a veteran Mid-
dle East hand. Tehran's envoy is
a British-educated diplomat
considered one of Iran's top
analysts of the West.
Combine that with a flexible
agenda and a matchmaking
Iraqi host -- and the interna-
tional gathering Saturday to
help steer Iraq's future also
appears as a prime opportunity
for some icebreaking overtures
between Iran and the United
States.
But any outreach no mat-
ter how limited would be
shadowed by deep suspicions
and grievances from both sides
in their odd-couple roles: old
foes yet also Iraq's two most
influential allies.
"D)on't expect any miracles,"
said Hamid Reza Jalaipour. a
professor of political affairs at
Tehran University.
In fact, expectations have
been kept very modest before
the conference' which
includes delegates from Iraq's
six neighbors, the five perma-
nent U.N. Security Council
members and several Arab rep-
resentatives.
In Washington, the U.S. chief
delegate, David Satterfield, said
"we are not going to turn and
walk away" if approached by
Iran or Syria to discuss Iraq.
But Satterfield, the top State
Department adviser on Iraq,
added Thursday that the United
States plans to use the meeting
to reinforce its accusations
against both nations.
They include U.S. claims that


Syria allows foreign jihadists
and Sunni insurgents to cross
its border into Iraq, and that
weapon shipments from Iran
reach Shiite militias. Both
nations deny the allegations.
Iran's chief envoy. Abbas
Araghchi, left Tehran without
directly mentioning the United
States, but said Iran "hopes to
take more steps" to support the
U.S.-backed government -
which is led by a Shiite prime
minister with close ties to Shiite
heavyweight Iran.
Iran, however,' has strongly
denounced the U.S. military
presence. The complaints grew
more pointed in December
after American forces detained
two Iranian security agents at
the compound of a major Shiite
political bloc in Baghdad.
Six other Iranians were
arrested Jan. 11 at an Iranian
liaison office in northern Iraq.
The U.S. military said they were
members of Iran's elite Revo-
lutionary Guard a charge
Tehran rejects.
The showdown over Iran's
nuclear program also lurks
behind any attempt to ease the
nearly 28-year diplomatic freeze
with Washington.
"But both Iran and the Unit-
ed States realize they are stuck
together on Iraq," said Alireza
Nourizadeh, chief researcher at
the London-based Center for
Arab-Iranian Studies. "So per-
haps they see this meeting as a
way to open some doors for
bilateral talks."
For Iran, opening more direct
contacts with Washington could
help promote their shared inter-
ests in Iraq, including trying to
stamp out Sunni-led insurgents.


NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MANOUSKA ALCEE OF
RATTLE SNAKE LANE, FOX HILL, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
atwenty-.eight days from the 10th dav'idHflarch, 2007 to the
Y' Mihlster'respohsibfe fo? Nationality aridIttizenship;. P O.Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









Computer skills must include Microsoft Excel and Microsoft
Word
Excellent oral and written communicational skills
Ability to work on own initiative
Interpersonal skills
Ability to work with cash
Must be able to implement and maintain company standards
and procedures
Applicants must be between the ages of 18 21





ShreySret(hrc teetPaa


BISI DErIn Yi C
C G A k-*
Pricing Information As Of: '
Fridyv'9 Mamih 2007
BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES VISIT WWW.BISXBAHAMAS COM FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION
BISX ALL SI-IARE INDEX CLOSE 1.768.54 / CHG 02.43 /%CHG 00.14 / YTD 92.35 / YTD % 05 51
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Securit y Previous Close Today's Close Crarge Ea1i, .1. EPS $ C0,. .i PE ,-'1e3
1.85 0.54 Abaco Markets 0.75 0.75 0.00 -0.282 0.000 N/M 0.00%
12.05 10.40 Bahamas Property Fund 11.25 11.25 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7 3.56%
8.50 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.50 8.50 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.7 3.06%
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.85 0.85 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.2 2.35%
2.01 1.26 Bahamas Waste 2.00 2.00 0.00 0.199 0.060 10.1 3.00%
1.44 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.26 1.26 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.4 3.97%
10.30 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.03 10.03 0.00 0.715 0.240 14.0 2.39%
2.20 1.64 Colina Holdings 2.10 2.10 0.00 0.078 0.040 26.9 1.90%
14,00 9.38 Commonwealth Bank 13.85 14.00 0.15 1.000 0.998 0.680 14.0 4.86%
6.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.09 5.08 -0.01 0.134 0.045 37.9 0.88%
2.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.46 2.46 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3 0.00%
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.94 5.94 0.00 0.552 0 240 10.8 4.04%
12-30 10.70 Finco 12.30 12.30 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.65%
1460 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 000 0.921 0.500 15.9 3.42%
16,1 10.00 Focol 16.71 16.71 0.00 1.644 0.510 10.2 3.05%
.1 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50 050 0.00 6,000 -0.434 0.000 N/M 0.00%
10.-0 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00 0.532 0.100 13.6 1.38%
9 1B 8.52 J. S Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4 6 19%
10.00 1000 Prenrer Real Estate 10 00 1000 0.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 7.95%
i Fidelity Over-The-Counter Secunlies
I II 5 L-: 1" -LOA. S n-d B, 3 5. ___ -: i ____ I 5:1 a 'Last '.'*.: 1 n ,1.-:. i EP i C... i, tP P E- -. ''
11 J,3 12 25 Bannama 1.uc-.eri"ark t 1.j ,) 1i ,., 1 .1 t' 1 -- __ 1 i i 1%-
10.'14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 10.00 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%
0. 54 0.20 RND Holdings 0.45 0.55 0.20 0.021 0.000 26.2 0 00%
i Colina Osver-The-Counter Securhties
43.00 28 00 ABDAB 41.00 43.00 41 00 2.220 0 000 194 0.00%
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
u 60 u 35 F-.'C, 4 on3....3 ,r J(. 0.55 0.45 -0.070 0.000 N/M 0.00%
BISX Listead Multial Funeis
.2M-.H-i .. .L.,.. Fur.. IJa.. 5" YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1 3, 1 2 1 : ,'_ .i,,i,-,.i r.t.-.,I-,e r.1.ar el Funa. 1 -' *1-
3.0669 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund 3 0569-"
2.6254 2.3312 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.625419"
1.2246 1.1592 Colina Bond Fund 1.224635*...
11 3945 10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.3945.".
i .. .* .&..;: :-:;. FINDEX: CLOSE 782.64 I YTD 05 46' 2006 3-1 47"%
e, '.. RE. .NC".E 19 C., = l ..:.'...... r. ,- -,,-T TE- rI .- C .. .i .. . ,,y lu- ll) price NAV KE
52wk-.-Hi Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bid S Buying price of Colin1 and FIdolily
52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ Selilng price of Colina and fidelity 2 Marc 2007
Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price Last traded over-lhe-counter price
Today's Close Current day's weighted price for dally volume Weekly Vol trading volume of the prior week 8 February 2007
Change Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ A.company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol. Number of total shares traded today NAV Net Asset Value 31 January 2007
DIV $ Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months NIM Not Meaningful
P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index January 1. 1994 = 100 .. 28 February 2007
..... 8 F bru.,ry 2007
.M i-, -, r-r[.TV,, 242.356-.77 1I / F',1' MfOPF A~'~^ e '---r*** .CTOI CALL '* "' '03


U.S. officials, meanwhile, need
the support of Iranian-allied
political groups in Iraq to keep
a lid on Shiite militias.
On a trip to Brazil on Friday,
President Bush said the mes-
sage to Syria and Iran won't
change at the Baghdad confer-
ence.
"We expect you to help this
young democracy," Bush said.
"We will defend ourselves and
the people in Iraq from
weapons being shipped in that
cause harm; that we will pro-
tect ourselves and help the Iraqi
people protect themselves
against those who would mur-
der the innocent to achieve
political objectives." There
have been other chances in the
past for one-one-one dialogue,
but rarely with such promise.
In September, the United
States joined Iran and Syria in
talks on Iraq although Wash-
ington ruled out direct talks
with Iran in advance. This time,
however, there is an open invi-
tation to Iran.
And both sides have dis-
patched well-suited diplomats.
Satterfield has served in posts
in Saudi Arabia, Tunisia,
Lebanon and Syria, as well as
Washington positions including


Victim's


the National Security Council
staff. Araghchi did postgraduate
studies in England and served
as ambassador to Finland. He's
regarded as one of Iran's lead-
ing diplomatic strategists on
relations with the West.
The host, Iraqi Foreign Min-
ister Hoshyar Zebari, juggles
close ties with Iran and the
United States and has left
ample room for closed-door dis-
cussions and possible bilateral
exchanges. Washington broke
ties with Iran after militants
stormed the U.S. Embassy in
the wake of the 1979 Islamic
Revolution.
The one-day session in Bagh-
dad also carries little pressure
on the delegates. It's designed
only to pave the way for a high-
level gathering possibly in April.
Zalmay Khalilzad, the U.S.
ambassador to Iraq, said he
would not necessarily object to
meeting with the Iranians. "But,
the first point to make to them
is that they need to stop arms,
Iranian arms, coming across the
border," he told ABC's "Good
Morning America."
The meeting also is the first
time in nearly two years that
Washington is willing to discuss
security issues with Iran.

concern


over cars return


FROM page one

guess a few others, had been sold in Andros. And the buyers had
paid what would be considered fair market value for the car.
"So the car really at this stage belongs to these buyers, and she
needs to go to the insurance company and get reimbursed by them.
"She was asked a strange question, which was: 'Was the car
sold directly by the thief or was it sold by a second party?' Mean-
ing the second party who got the car from the thief would have legit-
imised the situation and then, when they sold it to another party,
that person couldn't possibly have known the car was stolen.
"So the car belongs to them and she needs to go to the insurance
company and get reimbursed by them. The problem is'the car is a
12-year-old car, a 1995 Honda. And she only had third party cov-
erage, and they don't give you fire and theft unless you have been
a long-time customer and had this car insured since it was first
bought and you reduced the coverage.
"So she is left with a bank loan, no car, and the idea that the car
now belongs to the thief? It makes no sense to me. I say, look, if I
buy a stolen watch, it doesn't matter if I pay fair market value for
it, they will haul me before the courts for receiving stolen goods. So
how does it become legitimate because it is a car?" she asked.
Ms Davenport is one among many who have been inconve-
nienced by the racket. Many victims have asked police to list the
descriptions of cars they have confiscated to re-acquaint owners with
their stolen property.



FOR SALE


II M I'1 A I io' l

$20,000.00
14,000 miles, 1 1/2 cabs
AC, CD player, excellent condition.

Tel: 327-8026 Cell: 359-8100




ESTATE SALE


of


PROSPECT


RIDGE


Furniture, Antiques, Appliances,

Collectibles, Books, Piano, etc. etc.


Friday, 9th March

Saturday 10th March

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
No Early Birds Please

Directions: From Goodman's Bay roundabout
go south through golf course, first house
on right (west) at top of the hill


LOCALNW


LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

, International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
sectionn 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
tNo. 45 of 2000), PACIFIC MARINE CHINA LTD. is in
dissolution. PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT SERVICES
IBAHAMAS) LTD, is the Liquidator and can be contacted at
blalborough & Queen Streets, P.O. Box N-10429, Nassau,
rahamas. Al 1 persons having claims against the above-named
aumpany are required to send their names, addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before the
Ist day of April, 2007.




Liquidator
s>


/"%- L U


I


Bg meeting open
*0










SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007, PAGE 9


THE TRIBUNE


Literature





conference





prompts yet





more debate


By ALISON LOWE
and BRENT DEAN
THE second day of the West
Indian Literature Conference
rolled on yesterday at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas with yet
more diverse and thought-pro-
voking presentations and
debates.
The well-received event has
played host to novelists, poets,
academics, students, and com-
binations of all of these, pro-
viding what many attendees
agree, has been fertile ground
for the sharing of ideas. The day
started off with a round table
discussion involving Bahamian
writers Christian Campbell,
Patricia Glinton-Meicholas and
Angelique Nixon.
"It was really interesting to
hear the Bahamian writers talk
about audience, the issues of
publication and getting people
to read in the region," said one
visitor to the conference, Dr
Raphael Dalleo, from Florida
Atlantis University.
The mid-afternoon session
saw presentations ranging from
the topic of to what extent spec-
ulative fiction for example,
science fiction can challenge
traditional notions of desire, to
an exploration of the role of the
supernatural in Caribbean pop-
ular culture, specifically reggae
and calypso music.
Dr Andrea Shaw from Nova
Southeastern University pre-
sented a paper on the "Articu-
lations of the Supernatural in
Caribbean Popular culture."
She focused on the use of the
supernatural in Caribbean
music as symbolic of wider
socio-economic struggles in
society.
Dr Shaw used musical inter-
ludes of Bob Marley's Duppy
Conqueror and Peter Tosh's


Vampire, among others, as
examples of this theme. The
"old vampire" who does not
wish to see "youths prosper" in
Tosh's song, can be said to rep-
resent the oppressive social
apparatus that keeps the under-
privileged from true liberty.
Whereas, in Marley's Duppy
Conqueror the narrator speaks
of being held from his spiritual
journey by forces that "Jah" has
given him power to overcome.
Her lecture also focused on
the demonisation of animist
religious traditions by colonial
and post-colonial societies.
Voodoo and Obeah have come
to be regarded as subversive
cultural forces. Historically,
these religious practices were
instrumental in mobilizing slave
communities in revolt against
the colonial order, Dr Shaw
pointed out.
Dr Michael Bucknor from the
UWE Mona presented a paper
entitled: "Horizons of Desire:
Imagining alternative words in
speculative fiction." He dis-
cussed works by several authors
working in the genre of specu-
lative fiction, and in which ways
they can be seen to be "shift-
ing known and given under-
standings of sexuality." Sexual
politics are very controversial
in the region, as mainstream
Caribbean culture can be
regarded as homophobic. Dr
Bucknor's lecture spoke to the
growing number of pan-
Caribbean voices that are chal-
lenging normative views of sex-
uality.
Dr Jennifer Rahim from the
University of the West Indies,
St Augustine gave a very per-
sonal lecture "On Learning the
Art of Shedding Skin." Dr
Rahim spoke of sexual abuse
as a child and related the expe-
rience to the colonial experi-


ence of the Caribbean.
She pointed out that despite
prevalence of romanticised
notions of the Caribbean home,
it is very often the case that the
reality of "home" in a
Caribbean context is charac-
terised by conflict and violence.
There was praise all round
for the level of papers present-
ed at the conference, with one
of the organizers of a previous
West Indian Literature Confer-
ence in Trinidad, Dr Jean
Antoine Dunne, describing the
academic contributions as of an
"exceptionally high" standard.
Many of the international
attendants of the conference
expressed their delight that the
event is being held in the
Bahamas, as it presents them
the opportunity to learn about
Bahamian literature and cul-
ture. Kathryn Morris, a teacher
from Florida commented on the
climate of the event.
She said: "It's a looser
dynamic, discussions go as long
as they're productive, people
get together in comers or under
some shade, have really mean-
ingful conversations and do the
kind of networking that in the
US seems so, sort of corporate."
An English graduate student
from the US, studying African
American literature, said: "I'm
learning a lot. The panelists are
amasing scholars and writers
from all over the Caribbean.
I'm from the States and so it's
been a nice experience for me
to be able to participate."
The conference concludes
tomorrow with discussions on
topics such as, Jamaican politi-
cal ideology, the Caribbean
influence on the Salem Witch
trials and Bahamian academic
Christian Campbell will present
his paper, "Dis we Tings, Folk,
Romance, Nation".


Bush vs Chavez




in fight for Latin




America's soul


By BILL CORMIER
Associated Press Writer
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
(AP) It's in-your-face diplo-
macy as Presidents Bush and
Hugo Chavez carry out dueling
tours in South America. The
more the American leader talks
compassion, the more his
Venezuelan antagonist
responds with taunts like
"gringo go home" and "if he
says yes, we say, no."
Bush said Friday in Brazil
that "we care about our neigh-
borhood a lot." But he hasn't
gone this far south of the U.S.
border for quite some time,
allowing Chavez to establish a
dominant presence in a region
where many people have long
felt either neglected or inter-
fered with by Washington.
And Chavez is refusing to
cede any ground. While Bush
moved on to Uruguay's capital
Friday night, staying inside a
high-security bubble that keeps
protesters at a safe distance,
Chavez relished the opportuni-
ty to fill a Buenos Aires soccer
stadium with leftist supporters
after getting another public dis-
play of affection from his
Argentine ally, President Nestor
Kirchner.
In the Bush vs. Chavez
debate, these ideological adver-
saries vie for regional influence.
On the right, Bush says Wash-
ington is firmly committed to
democracy and the poverty-
fighting benefits it inspires. On
the left, Chavez says the United
States is determined to keep the
region subservient to its own
selfish needs.
Some Latin Americans would
rather they both stay home.


Latinobarometro, a respected
and independent pollster based
in Chile, found 39 percent of
Latin Americans had a nega-
tive opinion of Bush, the same
as Chavez. The survey of 20,234
people in 18 Latin American
countries from Oct. 3 to Nov. 5
had a margin of error of 3 per-
centage points.
Brazilian President Luiz Ina-
cio Lula da Silva seemed to take
care to avoid favoring either
side as he and Bush faced the
media Friday. While Bush cele-
brated an ethanol partnership
with his new "biofuels buddy,"
Silva said more carefully that
Brazil-U.S. relations will
strengthen "to the extent that
we respect each other."
Chavez also moved to
upstage Bush on the environ-
mental front, signing deals with
Kirchner to promote the use of
cleaner natural gas as Brazilian
environmentalists claimed that
Bush's ethanol plan could
increase Amazon deforestation.
While Chavez publicly calls
Bush the "Devil" and the "King
of Lies," Bush has sought to
ignore him, and studiously
avoids mentioning Chavez by
name.
Yet Bush is not ducking from
the fight. Just before the trip,
Bush apparently- tried to take
on the mantle of Chavez's
revered independence hero,
telling an audience of Hispanic
businessmen that Simon Boli-
var "is often compared to
George Washington Jorge
(George) W."
Chavez labeled Bush's appar-
ent reference to himself as a
crude slap to the dignity of the
Venezuelan people.
Chavez, a pal of Cuban com-


munist Fidel Castro, has spent
years crisscrossing Latin Amer-
ica to slap backs, sign agree-
ments and drop hefty govern-
ment checks drawn from
Venezuela's vast oil wealth.
And he's only ratcheted that up
during the Bush trip.
When Bush promised to send
a military ship to regional ports
to treat 85,000 poor Latin
Americans, Chavez could point
out that 30,000 Cuban doctors,
bankrolled in part by
Venezuela, are not only treating
but living among Latin Ameri-
ca's poor.
And when Bush promised
more than $1 million for Boli-
vian flood victims, Chavez
quickly upped the ante to $15
million.
Also, in a region where
democracies have only recently
vanquished military dictator-
ships supported by previous
U.S. governments, Chavez tries
to capitalize on the common
perceptions that U.S. has dark-
er intentions than friendship
and trade.
During Bush's six hour stop
in Colombia, for instance, he'll
get a glimpse of a U.S. Embassy
scholarship program for belea-
guered minority descendants of
African slaves. But human
rights groups have launched the
allegation that the United States
did little to stop Colombian
paramilitaries from forcing
thousands of these Afro-Colom-
bians to flee their homes.
All told, Bush aides say U.S.
foreign assistance to Latin
America totals about $1.6 bil-
lion annually. But Chavez has
pledged at least $5.4 billion to
18 Latin American and
Caribbean countries since 2005.
1


Your look at what's going on in your community


Chinese acrobats arrive einNassau


Members of the Shandong Acrobatic Troupe
pose with Chinese and Bahamian cultural stake-
holders, upon their arrival at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport yesterday. The
Bahamas is the first stop on the award-winning
troupe's Friendship Tour and they will hold
three performances at the Kendal G L Isaacs
Gymnasium. On Saturday they will perform
for charitable organizations. On Sunday at 4pm
the general public is invited to attend. There will
be a third command performance and recep-
tion. Tickets are on sale at the gymnasium. Pic-
tured seated, from left,


are project manager of the China Arts and
Entertainment Group Mr Tan Ziqiang, First
Secretary of the Embassy of the People's
Republic of China in tThe Bahamas Mr Chen
Jingshen, Special Project Officer in the
Bahamas Cultural Affairs Division Dr Ann
Higgins, Deputy Director of the Cultural
Department of the
Shandong Province Mr Li Hua Wen and,
Director of the Sldoag Acrobatic Troupe
Mr Gui Zhongshan.
(BIS photo: Eric Rose)


Credit Suisse (Bahamas) Limited ]

is presently considering applications for a

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AND HEAD OF .
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Main tasks:
* Ensuring accurate and timely delivery of monthly results and analysis
for Private Banking legal entity CS (Bahamas) Ltd. and other Private
Banking entities managed via service level agreement;
* Preparation of required statutory accounts/reports and their presentation
to management;
* Overseeing all HO, Group and Regulatory reporting to specific reporting
deadlines for all legal entities within scope;
* Ensuring that all Balance Sheet accounts are substantiated & reconciled;
* Ensuring timely and accurate Management Information System (MIS) ,
reporting to monitor Assets under Management (AUM), Net New Assets
(NNA) & Client Profitability (TOI);
* Ensure that accounting treatment for new products are implemented in
a controlled manner and execute implementation review with IT,
Operations and Accounting;
* Identify potential risks and suggest improvements regarding controls,
systems in use and business management;
* Ensuring compliance with SOX requirements for entities within scope;
* Chairman of Bahamas Finance Committee;
* Responsible for preparing and monitoring budgets and expenses for
legal entity, overseeing payables and receivables;
* Managing Financial Accounting department (staff) of legal entity;
* Managing relationship with Auditors & Regulators
* Providing overall leadership, direction & control to the finance function
in the Bahamas

Requirements:
* Prior experience as senior manager in similar capacity;
* Strong Product Control or Financial Accounting background required;
* Good working knowledge of US GAAP;
* Good understanding of Private Banking Business; ideally demonstrated
by prior work experience;
* Technical product knowledge of structured products would be a plus;
* MBA / MS (Finance), CPA, CA or equivalent;
* Effective communicator and hands-on and proactive approach;
* Strong analytical and organisational skills and good sense of control;
* Demonstrated management / leadership skills;
* Good IT skills would be an asset

Experience:
* 10 years of hands-on accounting work experience;
* 3-5 years of senior management experience

Personal Qualities:
* Excellent administrative, organizational, leadership and communication
skills
* A commitment to service excellence
* Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
* Ability to work in a team environment

Benefits provided include:
* Competitive salary and performance bonus
* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance

ONLY APPLICANTS MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS WILL BE
CONTACTED. NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

Applications should be submitted:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 19th, 2007
III I ^ II II


--`- II


I


LOCALNEWS













PAGE 1 SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


b


BC figure





ept away'





Atlantis'





w feature


s' Today Show's Al
carried away at
w Aquaventure -
e water rapids, of
oyed an unforget-
ence on the excit-
de during a live
om Atlantis' new
rscape on Monday,
cast was seen by
'iewers across the
S.
ut the televised
r, known for his
d easy going style
, told viewers and


his co-host that "it is better in
the Bahamas," while being
pampered at the resort.
Seconds later, he informed
his audience about the bitter
cold weather they could look
forward to experiencing in the
United States.
The broadcast also included
interviews with Atlantis' Mark
Gsellman, senior vice president
of marine and waterpark oper-
ations who pointed out that it,
took a little over two and a half
years of planning and construc-
tion to complete the water-
scape.
Thai Kerzner, son of Vanessa


and the late Howard 'Butch'
Kerzner, former chief executive
officer of Kerzner International,
was featured in a tube gliding
through The Surge, one of three
inner tube slides which uses
"master-blaster" technology to
effectively create roller coast-
ers from jets of water that pro-
pel riders up and down at a fast
pace.
Later on Roker enjoyed an
exciting encounter with
Atlantis' dolphins, which saw
him hanging on to the dorsal
fins of two dolphins at Atlantis'
Dolphin Cay as Teri Corbett,
vice president of marine mam-


NBC News' Today Al Roker (at left) is pictured with Atlantis' executive chef Romero Dorsette on NBC News' Today
Show during a live broadcast at Atlantis, Paradise Island.
(Photo: Eric Hall Kerzner International)


mal operations, looked on as he
swam.
And if that was not enough to
incite jealousy among his peers
and viewers, Roker concluded


his eventful Atlantis experience
with the delightful flavors of
savory Bahamian cuisine pre-
pared by Atlantis' executive
chef Romero Dorsette.


The menu included conch sal-
ad, conch fritters, crack'conch,
peas n' rice, peas soup, guava
duff, benny cake, just to name a
few.


hospital, through the Dr Meyer Rassin Foundation, has offered financial assistance to
ts seeking healthcare studies.
n 1999 in honour of the late Dr Meyer Rassin, the foundation offers funding to students
he stipulated requirements.
icants would have had to achieve a grade point average of 3.0 or higher and have been
an accredited college or university.
dation invited the public to share in its commitment by helping those in need for years


Antoine Brown


I


I 3 9,3


Th
an
in
wit
be


incumbent will have overall responsibility for the efficient operation
maintenance of equipment and machinery, with a keen focus on detail
eping with international standards. He/she will also be customer oriented
a track record of mastery in mechanical areas. Specifically he/she will
quired to:


> Ensure the effective and efficient performance of the maintenance
function for the following assets:
Building and the environment
Packaging lines and blow molding operations
Utilities supplies: Electrical distribution, high and low pressure
air, refrigeration and RO water systems

> Manage the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative
maintenance program
> Diagnose equipment malfunction and remove, install or effect repairs
as necessary
> Evaluate the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,
compile reports and effectively use performance data
> Maintain technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements

Ide candidate would have strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering
exl rience, demonstrate a proficiency to trouble shoot and repair common
ele rical problems and have the ability to work independently.


Pie 'e send resume to:


Human Resources Manager
P.O. BOX N-3207
DA 16436
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Bahamian gains top



post at St Lucia hotel


IF you ever thought that big
dreams don't pay off, meet
Antoine Brown he has a suc-
cess story that even he some-
times can't believe.
Brown has been promoted to
the position of hotel manager
at Sandals Regency Golf Resort
and Spa at La Toc in St Lucia,
an accomplishment that his pre-
vious general manager, Stephen
Ziadie said is a testament to
Antoine's strong desire for
excellence and commitment to
everything he undertakes.
"Antoine epitomises every-
thing that Sandals holds dear in
the delivery of customer service
to our guests," Mr Ziadie said.
"Since joining Royal Bahami-
an more than nine years ago,
Antoine has proven that there
are many opportunities that are
available not only on the prop-
erty but also within the Sandals
chain. His achievements over
the years demonstrate that hard
work, total commitment and
total job knowledge some of
our sacred fundamentals will
be rewarded."
In 1997, Brown joined San-
dals Royal Bahamian as restau-
rant manager; three years later
he was promoted to assistant
food and beverage manager. In
July to August 2003 Brown
served as acting food and bev-
erage manager at Sandals
Grande St Lucian Spa and


Beach Resort in St Lucia and
in September he travelled to
Beaches Turks and Caicos
Resort and Spa in Turks and
Caicos to assist with the food
and beverage aspect of the
Ultra Awards, Sandals premier
awards for tour operators.
In October of that year, he
was returned to Sandals Grande
St Lucian before being trans-
ferred to Sandals Halcyon
Beach Resort in Castries, St
Lucia as food and beverage
manager in December 2003.
In June 2005 Brown was
again promoted, this time to the
role of executive assistant man-
ager, second only to the gener-
al manager, a feat he described
as something he never dreamt
of.
"Sandals continues to provide
challenges that help me to fur-
ther my knowledge in the ever
changing environment of the
hospitality industry. I have been
successful with Sandals due to
the support available to me such
as Stephen Ziadie; Lorenzo
Barigelli, former food and bev-
erage director at Royal Bahanii-
an: Lennox Dupal, general
manager of Sandals Halcyon;
and fellow Bahamian Kapil
Sharma who now serves as
hotel manager at Sandals Negril
in Negril, Jamaica and Durie
Smith, restaurant manager at
Royal Bahamian, just to name a


few."
Brown said that in spite of his
success, he never hesitates to
call on his colleagues to assist
him with any challenges he may
be faced with: "I am of the
assumption that two heads are
better than one."
Since his promotion, Brown
recently returned from a brief
stint in Antigua where he assist-
ed in the opening of the Grand
Pineapple Beach Resort, serv-
ing as acting general manager.
What's next for Brown? "The
next step for me is general man-
ager of my own property, which
I am working towards and
hopefully will accomplish very
soon.
-Once you believe in your-
self and focus on the goals that
you have set, you should have
no problem in achieving what-
ever it is you set your mind on.
My family has been very sup-
portive of me and encouraged
me to do well and continue
striving for the top."
A former graduate of C C
Sweeting Senior High School,
Brown has served 26 years in
the hospitality industry.
He is a certified food and
beverage executive with the
American Hotel and Lodging
Association and holds a certi-
fication in event and hospitality
management from George
Washington University.


NBC Ne
Roker gL
Atlantis' i
by the wh
course.
Roker e
table expe
ing river
broadcast
63-acre wa
March 5.
The bro
millions o
United Sta
Through
event, Ro
humorous
of report


a *


Doctor
two stud
Create
who mee
The ap
accepted
The fo
to come.


4.


THE TRIBUNE


r


*








SATURDAY, MARCH 1, ,-uu/, r-MuLi-


THE TRIBUNE


Guides make a difference


UNDER the theme, Making
a Difference for a Better World.
the Baharnmas Girl Guides Asso-
ciation recently hosted its
Annual Guide Week Activities.
The activities were centred
around World Thinking Day, a
day set aside to think about the
meaning of Guiding and Scout-
ing, and about Guides and
Scouts around the World. The
week commenced with a
Church Service at St Gregory's
Anglican Church, Carmichael
Road. The message was deliv-
ered by Deacon Berkley Smith.
Prior to the service, guides
along with their leaders paraded
from Bahamas Faith Ministries
to the church.


The Highlight of the week
was the World Thinking Day
Ceremony, held on February 22
on Government House
Grounds. On this day, the
Bahamas Girl Guide Associa-
tion joined their 10 million sister
guides in recognizing the
founder of the Association and
the impact of this organisation
in their various communities.
Celebrating with the Associa-
tion were members of the
Bahamas Scouts Association,
founded by Lord Baden Powell.
Sunflowers (5 -6 years) and
Brownies (7-10 years) took part
in Revels held on St Joseph and
Holy Cross Church Grounds.
The Revels gave these girls an


opportunity 10o sec iox\\ the\ can
improve their worli tlotiuigh
fun pr1esentalionsl itil 'a.iiii
The Guides (I(1-14 'di'i) a;tl
Rangers (14-IS ve;its) enlo()L'Id a
camp fire at ( ;lil I le atI ltldq r-
ters. The final \e !It of| l w \\CLck
was a Fi-n andl Sporls l)ay 0or
all which was held atl ( (iihsoin
Senior Hlilgh Schtol field.
Marathon Estatcs.
The BIahamas (iril G(iihides
Association tlih.nks the iniiN
friends of guiding \\ho support
.them throughout Ihe year, and
those parents 'i ho ensure that
our girls and ymouiti' 'lomen
realise their greatest t epot iniial
in a safe, educaltonal nit. lcr-
taining environment.


-- - ."** "*:",: . F,y ----------




i


-* ''*


4$ Ms~~


Bahamas Agricultural & Industrial

Corporation (BAIC)



Handicraft "STRAW"

Training Program


Venue: Albury Sayle Primary School, Nassau
Street (next door to Bamboo Chicken
Shack)

Date: March 121h 23rd, 2007

Time: 6:00pim to 10pm


APPLICATION FORM

N am I e:

A dd res s:

Settlement:


Cellular:_ Fax:


Telephone:

P.O. Box:


Emiail:


Administrative Cost: $100.00


contactt Persons:


Te'liephone #:


Ms Sl"ahu ('ollic or Mrs Antoinette Bain
l;l);amnts Agricultural & Industrial corporation (BAIC)
Il ii l- ),i I Srect, Nassau, Bahamas

242-322-3740/3 or Fax: 242-322-2123 or 242-328-6542


~t4


...I,_-_


I ~ ~~~ II P l=


- a~-~ I-~v~yZ C I


~ati:


,


.~










PAGE 2, SAURDA, MARH 10,2007THE TIBUN


Government bolsters


protection laws


THE Government has moved
to strengthen child protection
laws under the Child Protection
Act, 2007, Social Services and
Community Development Min-
ister Melanie Griffin said on
Monday night..
Addressing a group of stu-
dents at the Eugene Dupuch
Law School, at the lecture the-
atre at the College of the
Bahamas, Mrs Griffin said that
the act is intended to strengthen
child protection laws, particu-
larly as the cases of sexual and
emotion abuse continue unabat-
ed.
She said that the act has
implications for the various
agencies of the government,
"and so we are diligently work-
ing to bring the act into force,
and we expect that very soon."
"While the act is not a
panacea, I am satisfied that it
is a tremendous improvement
on what was in place before,"
Mrs Griffin added.
She noted that social condi-


tions have changed since the
Children and Young Person
Act in 1947.
"Our efforts on behalf of the
care and protection of children
needed to be brought into the
21st century," she said.
The major issues dealt with
by the act are as follows:
Parental responsibility
The concept of significant
harm to children
Expanding the definition of
cruelty to a child
Supervision orders, emer-
gency protection orders, care
orders and exclusion orders
Supervision orders are meant
to assist parents or guardians
who cannot control children's
behaviour. Care orders are
appropriate where children are
likely to suffer harm. Exclusion
orders are used where it is nec-
essary to exclude, for instance,
abusers from homes to protect
children.
' It also recognizes the need to
provide children with the infor-


mation and skills they need to
protect themselves from all
forms of abuse.
The act imposes a duty on
persons who have the charge,
care or custody of children to
use their best efforts to protect
them from discrimination, abuse
and neglect and to ensure that
they attend school.
It also provides that after the
death of the mother, the father
of a child born out of wedlock
can only appoint a guardian of
the child if he has been granted
custody of the,child.
Such fathers can only be
granted custody of the child if a
court is satisfied that it is in the
best interest of the child.
The act also provides that a
police officer, social service offi-
cer or any authorised person
who has reasonable grounds to
believe that a child is suffering,
or is likely to suffer, can take
the child and place that child
under emergency protection for
a maximum of 48 hours.


A


Your look at what's going on in your community


THE Royal Bahamas Defence Force was presented with a small token of appreciation by the Nurs-
ing Association of the Bahamas this week, in recognition of contributions to charity over the past year.
During a brief ceremony in the officers' dining mess at the Coral Harbour Base, Commodore Clif-
ford Scavella was presented with a plaque by president of the Nursing Association Prescola Rolle.
A nursing officer at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Nurse Rolle made the presentation on
behalf of the Caribbean Nurses Organisation.
During the past year, members of the Defence Force were instrumental in performing charitable
work for the Nursing Association.
Commodore Scavella expressed his gratitude on behalf of the men and women of the force, and
pledged to continue working with the association.


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


THE TRIBUNE


7u rewar











* MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


SECTIONi I




Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@lO.jainz.com MIAMI HERALD SPORTS


Big Red


machines coast


to track and field victorP


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
THERE WERE no huge celebra-
tions, no victory lap for the St.
Augustine's College Big Red
Machines yesterday.
It just seemed as if SAC's domi-
nance of the Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary Schools'
Track and Field Championships has
become such a routine that the only
thing they look for is how many
points they win by.
Yesterday was another of those
low key celebrations for the Big Red
Machines as they rolled out of the
Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Field Stadium with a 326-point mar-
gin over the Queen's College
Comets.
After three days of competition
that saw a number of schools take
some of the spotlight, SAC accumu-
lated a total of 1,209.50 points for
their 19th straight victory.


Queen's College, who once again
mounted the biggest challenge, had
to settle for second with 883 as the
point margin increased over each
day.
The St. Anne's Bluewaves
emerged as the surprise team in the
championships as they came in third
with 509.50. St. John's Giants slipped
to fourth with 487.50 and the Nas-
sau Christian Academy Suns moved
into fifth with 360.50.
SAC's coach William 'Knuckle-
head' Johnson said it was just anoth-
er day at the track as they did what
they expected..
"They came out and performed
well. Our seniors wanted to go out in
a blaze of glory and I think they pret-
ty much did that," he stated.
"We knew that QC was going to
be strong, but we couldn't just worry
about QC. We made sure that we
took care of our business. Our ban-
tams coming in also looked strong, so
the future looks bright for us."
Johnson had nothing but praise for


his supporting cast, inclusive of for-
mer student Tito Moss, who worked
with the distance runners; Benedict
Dorsett with the sprinters; Anastacia
Moultrie with the jumpers; John
Todd with the throws and Munnings
with the hurdlers.
After 19 years, Johnson said he
doesn't envision that the feat would
ever be duplicated.
"In the early days we had St.
John's, who were right there in the
fight, then we had Prince Will, who
came along for years, followed by
Faith Temple and now we have QC,"
Johnson reflected.
"This is what helps to motivate us.
We know that we can't just come out
here and lay down and play dead.
So we work hard and come ready to
compete."
With a historic 20-year victory in
the horizon next year, Johnson said
they have the team that will be back
to defend their title.
"But we know we have to work
even harder, but the kids are up to


the challenge," he proclaimed. "So
we will try our best not to become
complacent."
The challenge for the Big Red
Machines will actually come next
month when they compete in the
Bahamas Association of Indepen-
dent Secondary Schools' National
Track and Field Championships.
"We don't know what will happen
yet. That's the same day as our fair
and some of the athletes have
BJCSE," Johnson stated. "But -we
have the team to go out there and
perform very well.
"Based on what they've done in
this meet, we feel that we should be
able to do very well."
SAC, who only lost the title once
in the nationals to St. John's, will
have a stiff challenge from the CR
Walker Knights in the senior divi-
sion and the CH Reeves Raptors in
the juniors.
The Nationals, which bring togeth-
er all of the schools in the country,
will be held from April 26-28.


HERE'S the final results of thE
Bahamas Association of Independen
Secondary Schools Sports' annua.
Track and Field Championships tha.
wrapped up yesterday at the Thoma,
A. Robinson Track and Field Stadium.


M OVERALL DIVISION
St. Augustine's College ......1,209.50
Queen's College ....................883
St. A nne's .............................. 509.50
St. John's College.................487.50
Nassau Christian Academy...360.50
Temple Christian Academy.......322
Jordan Prince William.................311
St. Andrew's.......................... 258.50
Kingsway Academy ............95.50
Aquinas College .....................90.50
Charles W. Saunders...................85
Faith Temple Academy...........32.50
Westminster College...................30


Sprinters at





the double





on final day


* TEMPLE Christian Suns' Warren Fraser clocked the best times in both the intermediate boys 100
and 200 metres at the BAISS Track and Field Championships. Above, Fraser is shown winning the 200
yesterday in 22.20 seconds. SAC's Marcus Thompson, next to Fraser, was second in 22.34 and Devon
Creary got third in 22.42. SAC, however, emerged as the champions for the 19th straight year with
1,209.50 points, compared to Queen's College's 883 for second.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)


* TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
WHAT do Aalyah Harris,
Printassia Johnson, Sparkyl
Cash, Sheniqua Ferguson,
Harold Carter and Warren
Fraser all have in common?
They all emerged as double
sprint champions in the 100 and
200 metres in their respective
divisions yesterday as the
Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools'
Track and Field Championships
came to a close.
The only athlete who didn't
post the double was Nassau
Christian Academy's Shawn
Lockhart, who claimed the title
as the fastest senior boy in the
BAISS.
Lockhart missed the double
as he was beaten by his team-
mate Karlton Rolle, who won
the 200 in 22.62. Lockhart ran
22.65 for second and CW Sauun-
ders' Brandon Miller was third
in 22.71.
"I tried to get out hard,
knowing that I had a strong
runner behind me and a cou-
ple of strong runners ahead of
me," said Rolle. "The first 50. I
decided to go out, relax on the
second 50 and come back hard
on the last 100."
Running as smooth as silk,
Jordan Prince William Falcons'
Sheniqua Ferguson left no
doubt in anybody's mind that
she was the "real deal."
Conming off the curve well
ahead of the rest of the field,
Ferguson blazed down the
straight away to take the senior
girls' 200 in 23.99.
In the 100 ltlhe much antici-
pated showdown with St.
Augustine's College's Cache
Armbrister didn't materialise,
but it did in the 200 if only
for the first 50.
As Ferguson powered from
behind, Armbihrister pulled up


and had to withdraw from the
race on the curve.
SAC's Tia Rolle, second in
the 100, got another second in
the 200 in 25.25. Queen's Col-
lege Leeza Glinton was third
in 27.03.
"I think it was a good per-
formance. I'm sure I could run
faster, but this is my third race
for the year, so I just wanted
to take it easy," said Ferguson,
who along with Armbrister is
heading to Auburn University.
As for Armbrister, Ferguson
said she heard when she
screamed, so she knew some-
thing was wrong.

Fastest
Temple Christian's Warren
Fraser, in the 100, posted the
fastest time of the day in the in
the intermediate boys' 200.
He clocked 22.20 to pull off
the 200 ahead of SAC's Mar-
cus Thompson (22.34) and
Devon Creary (22.42).
"I was trying to get out as
fast as I could coming off the
curve and extend it as I came
clown the track," Fraser stated.
"I sort of got tired at the end,
but it was okay."
On his double victory, Fraser
said "it would have feel better if
my knees were not hurting."
Queen's College Sparkyl
Cash added to her sprint dou-
ble crown when she easily blew
away the field in the interme-
diate girls' 200, winning in
24.79. SAC's Valonce Robin-
son was second in 25.57 and
Nassau Christian Academy's
Javonya Wilson got third in
25.77.
"All 1 had to do was pray to
God that I got out strong and
bring it home strong," she said.
"I haven't ran the 200 all year,
so I just wanted to come out
here and do my best."
Cash was a triple winner, tak-


ing the long jump as well.
Harold Carter of SAC got his
sprint double when he clocked
23.66 to snatch the junior boys'
200 crown. Temple Christian's
Devaugh Fraser was second in
23.90 and Shaquille Burrows
was third in 24.14.
"The race good. I was able
to get out the blocks, run the
curve hard and push my hardest
to win this race," he lamented.
"It feels good to get a first in
the 100 and 200."
Queen's College Printassia
Johnson was clearly the cream
of the crop in the junior girls
division. She turned in a fan-
tastic performance in winning
the 200 in 24.81 for her sprint
double, breaking the old record
of 25.51 that was set by SAC's
Kellie Rolle.
Jordan Prince William's
Teshon Adderley was second
in 27.05 and Kingsway Acade-
my's Randi Hilton got third in
27.92.
"It was good. I just went for
the time. I wanted to set a new
record for the juniors. I exe-
cuted." she said. "I know I did-
n't have any competition, so I
went for the time."
Johnson not only won the
100. but she also added the long
jump title to her ledger.
Aalyah Rolle, winner of the
bantam girls' 100 and long
jump, took the 200 in 28.16.
Her nearest rival was Willecai
Hart of Queen's College in
29.01. St. Anne's Rikki Barry
was third in 29.03.
"It went good. It was pretty
hard of the turn, but it was
good," Harris said. "The com-
petition was good, but I tried
my best."
In the bantam boys' 200,
C('harles W. Saunders' Leonard
McPhee won in 26.26. Temple
Christian's Maverick Bowleg
was second in 27.14 and
SAC's Keric Rolle got third in
27.73.


I ~-----e ~-CB--.UI---.-.Q;~II .-CIIIIIIIIIBPIYLIIPI~


9.











PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, MA


110, 2007


TRIBUNE SPORTS


Rec





st

TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
DWAYNE Ferguson inked his na
the record books twice to highlight e
other than the sprints at the Bahamas
ciation of Independent Secondary Sc
Sports' Track and Field Championsh
After lowering the meet record i
1,500 metres, the Nassau Christian A
my's senior boy came back yesterd
the Thomas A. Robinson Track and
Stadium and ran a fantastic time o
minute and 53.84 to erase the 800 m,
well.
"I decided to get out because the r
they had wasn't a fast time," said Ferg
who surpassed his previous time of 2:(
"I just decided to get out in the first
relax and come back at the 150 ai
again.
"When I got to the 400 mark, I sa
guy came close to me, so I just decid
go out a lot faster than I did so that
win."
Ferguson, a 17-year-old 12th grade
4:13 the day before to post the 1,500 re
On the field, St. Augustine's G
Brown popped a leap of 14.58 metr
take the senior boys"triple jump, addii
title to his long jump.
Brown, the Carifta defending chan
in the triple jump, was expected to r
the 200 final, but he opted to concern
on his speciality in the triple jump, \
was being ran at the same time.
"I didn't jump as well as I want
jump because I was taking part in a 1
events," Brown stressed.
Also on the field, Nassau Christian
emy's Eunae Wright took the senior
triple jump with a leap of 10.65 to
her own record of 10.55.
Back on the track, Queen's College
neth Wallace-Whitfield ran 1:56.71 ii
senior boys' 800 to replace the old ma
2:02.40 by Michael Bethel.
"Today, I wasn't feeling so well. '
went into it and focused my mind o
said Wallace-Field, who also won the,
the day before.
SAC's Nathan Arnette ran 53.71 t(
the senior boys' 400 hurdles, replacing
old mark of 54.37 that was left behii
Andretti Bain.
And Justin Miller of SAC picked u
N JORDAN Prince William
posted her sprint double by winning
in a time. of 23.99 seconds at the BA


d-breaking Ferguson





s for the Crusaders

victory in the senior boys' 5,000 in 17:58.87
to shatter the old record of 18:42.11 that
was set by Lawrence Darville. .
"SAC just needed the points, so I was '4
1 willing to cooperate," said Miller, about
s his decision to run the gruelling race. "I
was afraid that Keno (Perigord) was com-
s ing, so I just pushed it.".
SAC's Krystal Bodie clocked 1:01.79 to
win the senior girls' 400 hurdles record of
1:02.52 that was set by her team-mate "-la
t Michelle Cumberbatch. Cumberbatch got -,
i second in the race in 1:04.23.
Bodie also posted a record in the 100
s hurdles as they won over Cumberbatch on
day one of the meet.
1 SAC also had a clean sweep in the girls
800 as Dawnique Maycock took the ban-
tam in 2:47.56; Desirae Sands got the junior
, in 2:42.16; Deshana Burnside claimed the
intermediate in 2:24.99 and Hughnique
Rolle was the senior winner in 2:27.08.
Joining Ferguson and Wallace-Whitfield
in the boys races were SAC's Shervin
1 Hilton in the bantam in 1:38.46 and SAC's
Earl Rahming in the junior in 2:21.92.
N NASSAU Christian Academy Cru- ..
I saders' Dwayne Ferguson leads the pack '
w in the senior boys' 1,500 metres at the .
BAISS meet. Ferguson came back yester-
day and won the 800. He lowered the
record in both events.
1 (Photo: Felipe Major)


SM'FASTEST MAN' TITLE
THE title of the 'fastest man in the
Bahamas Association of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools Sports' Track and Field
Championships' in yesterday's edition of "
The Tribune was referring to the athlete .
that won the senior boys event in the 100 .
metres. u.
The Tribune acknowledges that Temple
Christian Suns' Warren Fraser had the
fastest time of the day in 10.74 seconds and
St. Augustine's College Marcus Thomp-
son ran 10.88 for second.
Both times were faster that Nassau Chris-
tian Academy Suns' Shawn Lockhart, who
ran 10.89 to win the senior boys division.
The title, however, was referring to who .. '
was the fastest in the senior boys, which
was the highlight of the event.
)ns' Sheniqua Ferguson
senior girls' 200 metres -
neet. She also came out
h the victory in the 100.No
(Photo: Tim Clarke) i '


' p


5~


SA7


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41., g




.',It,,W^ ...' ^Sfl ,if
,t,


Ap.


SAC'S Gerard Brown gets ready t
to victory in the senior boys' triple ju
umph in the long jump at the BAISS



Leading 3apanese
Visit our 'rno
Internet -Shr
3Japanese &


Kan-de (Nagoya) Tr i
Tel : +81-52-351-9943 WW
Fax: +81-52-351-9944 e-mail:


p, skip and jump his way
sterday to add to his tri-
k and Field Meet.
(Photo: Felipe Major)


Exporter
_ rnprehensive
iorn for
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::-----



















SPORTS


Dhe Mliami licratO


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


INTERNATIONAL EDITION


IN MY OPINION
DAVID J. NEAL
dneall Miami Herald.com


COLLEGE BASKETBALL I NCAA TOURNAMENT



Grab a pen: Bracketmania is back


You can color

ACC tourney

Carolina Blue
TAMPA, Fla. On Friday after-
noon, Death came to the 2007
ACC tournament's Florida
phase, which lasted one day longer
than its Duke phase.
Oh, sure, they'll still play the
remaining three games. But it really
goes back to being a North Carolina
tournament now.
There is nobody left for the Tar
Heels to truly despise. There is no
scorching hot con-
K tender, such as Mary-
land, to slap down.
There is not even a
team they can feel
good about outnum-
bering in the stands
GAME and overwhelming on
STORIES: 9B the court, the way
they did Florida State
on Friday and probably would have
done against Miami today.
The Tar Heels will probably have
to settle for just winning the tourney.
"Everybody always acts like I
pooh-pooh the ACC tournament
because there is that thought process:
You play people for nine weeks -
why do you have to play them all
again in three days?" North Carolina
coach Roy Williams said. "But it's
what it is. Since we're here, I want to
win this sucker."
SAME OLD RESULT
For Florida State, the end came
with the suddenness of Bambi Meets
Godzilla. They were noodling around,
trying to get to halftime in good shape
when... STOMP. Game over.
For Miami, the end came with the
augmented cruelty of Carrie.
The ACC's biggest losers (by
record) had won by just being there
Friday. They had charmed the crowd,
done a similar stomp on Boston Col-
lege that North Carolina had done on
FSU and were all but crowned the
tournament Cinderellas. Then the
young men from New England rained
buckets of big shots on the Hurricanes
and left them a heartbroken mess.
FSU never recovered from North
Carolina running off 14 unanswered
points in 3:30 spanning the first and
second halves, but Miami watched
Boston college refuse to die after the
Hurricanes blew out 11 points in 2:19
that spanned the halves.
The game didn't slip away from
Miami as much as it seeped away. The
Canes still had an eight-point lead
with 3:58 left. BC no more showed a
sense of urgency than it would have
for a summer scrimmage. It was as if
BC knew Miami was 12-19 for a reason
- and, eventually, Miami would
reveal that reason to all.
SOMETHING TO BUILD ON
"That's the way they play. They
just stay poised through all situa-
tions," said Miami forward Jimmy
Graham, who committed a charge and
missed short jumpers on consecutive
possessions as the Hurricanes' 62-54
lead dissipated. "That's something we
can learn for next year, learn how to'
stay poised like they do. It didn't mat-
ter what kind of run we went on -
they were right there."
Graham personifies the Hurri-
canes, a physical, diligent bunch that
neither gets nor gives cheap baskets.
They know how to foul hard without
being dirty.
In overtime, when Graham fouled
out, fans stood and applauded the raw
effort in his 12 points, five rebounds
and two charges taken. It wasn't an
ovation, but it was acknowledgement.
Speaking of acknowledgement,
Florida State got a kind one from Wil-
liams when he was asked if FSU was
worthy of the NCAA Tournament.
"There's no question in my mind,"
Williams said. "They did not lose to a
team that's not in the top 50 in RPI.
"I have a hard time believing
they're not one of the top 65 teams in
the country," Williams said. "It would
be a shame for people to not see [FSU
star] Al Thornton in the NCAA Tour-
nament."
Maybe the Selection Gods will
notice that Florida State beat Florida
and Maryland. Maybe they will notice
that five ofFSU's losses came while
guard Toney Douglas was out with a
broken shooting hand, and that Doug-
las has returned to the lineup. Or
maybe they will notice that his shoot-
ing hand still hasn't returned.
FSU will find out Sunday, hours
after North Carolina winds up what is
becoming its own private party.


BY TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
It's time to start filling out
NCAA Tournament brackets and
tossing a few dollars into the pot.
The office pool party to end all
office pool parties is back.
On Sunday, the NCAA will fill
out the 65-team field that will lead
to the promised land of the Final
Four, in Atlanta. By Monday morn-
ing, millions of college basketball
fans will have brackets in their
e-mails or fax machines, and office
copiers everywhere will be spitting
out even more of them.
It's bigger business than Las
Vegas, and it's a bargain, too -
usually $5, $10 or $20 a person.
Bettors will stay up overnight to
get a seat to watch the action in the
Vegas sports books, and $80 mil-
lion to $90 million is expected to


be bet legally on the games in
Nevada. By one FBI estimate a few
years ago, the office pools are
worth $2.5 billion.
The NCAA doesn't much like it,
and some bosses fret that employ-
ees won't get their work done
because they are watching games
or checking scores on websites.
But it has become an annual rite of
spring enjoyed equally by Wall
Street tycoons and the people who
park their cars.
"It takes away the winter gloom
and puts it into a spring fever," said
Fred Kirsch, office m manager at the
Furniture and Appliancemart in
Wausau, Wis., where 65 people
already have signed up, at $20
apiece. "It takes away from the
everyday work environment, too.
"This is something that livens
it up. We are waiting impatiently


for the brackets to form."
There are stories of far-more-
expensive pots getting up to
$100,000, but, for the most part, the
pools are a low-budget, low-
pressure way to keep the interest
up for people who have never
heard of Winthrop or Wright State.
A survey by career publisher
Vault Inc. found that 27 percent of
employees participate in March
Madness pools, and that a third of
them take at least 30 minutes at
work to fill out their brackets.
"The bosses don't care as long
as the work gets done," said Andy
Carver, who runs a $10-per-person
pool for 20-30 employees at the
trucking company where he works
in Cicero, N.Y. "With the com-
puter, it really only takes a few
minutes, so it's not like I'm cheat-
ing them out of time."


With high-speed Internet access
common in many offices, the urge
to keep tabs on favorite teams is
becoming more difficult to resist.
CBS is doubling its Internet band-
width this year so that 300,000
people can watch video streams of
NCAA Tournament games at any
given time, with a target audience
that is generally assumed to be
office workers.
The network is even offering a
"Boss" button, which can be hit if
viewers see office supervisors
coming. The button silences the
audio and causes a fake spread-
sheet to pop up.
Businesses are fighting back
with technology such as that
offered by Websense Inc. to
block access on company comput-
ers to sites workers that use to
watch games or follow scores.


COLLEGE BASKETBALL I BIG TEN TOURNAMENT


es charge


Freshman center

comes on strong

against. Michigan


BY RICK GANO
Associated Press
CHICAGO Greg Oden took a half to get
acclimated. Once he settled in, he became the
offense force No. 1 Ohio State needed as the
Buckeyes reeled off their 15th victory in a row.
"This is my first go-around in these type of
tournaments, so I just feed off the guys that have
been there before," Oden, Ohio State's prize
freshman, said Friday after his
second-half performance pow-
ered a 72-62 victory over Michi-
gan in the Big Ten quarterfinals.
Oden scored 15 of his 22 points
in the second half as the Buck-
eyes fought off the Wolverines,
who had a 47-25 rebounding edge
but still couldn't stop Ohio
State's 7-foot center.
"I was just trying to do some-
thing for us to win. I was just trying to go at the
other team and fire my team up," Oden said. "It
was just to be more aggressive, take what the
defense was giving us. They weren't doubling,
so I had to go to work."
Oden, who hasn't decided if his freshman
season will be his only one with the Buckeyes
before heading to the NBA, scored 11 of his
points in the final 8:27 after the Wolverines had
pulled within four points.
Oden was 8-for-12 from the field and 6-for-10
from the free-throw line, and he also contrib-
uted eight rebounds and four blocks.
Ohio State (28-3) hasn't lost since a defeat
Jan. 9 at Wisconsin. The Buckeyes, who kept
themselves on tracks the No. I overall seed in
the NCAA Tournament, will play Purdue today
r in the Big Ten semifinals.
Ohio State posted its third victory in as many
3 attempts this season against Michigan (21-12),
which is hoping to make the NCAA Tourna-
ment for the first time since 1998.
BRIAN KERSEY/AP Ron Lewis added 16 points and Mike Conley
CENTER STAGE: Greg Oden of Ohio State shoots over Michigan defender Courtney Smith Jr. had 13 for the Buckeyes. Lester Abram scored
on his way to scoring 22 points Friday. The Buckeyes advanced to play Purdue today. 13 and Jerret Smith had 12 for the Wolverines.


GOLF I PODS CHAMPIONSHIP


Late birdie gives Leaney the second-round lead


BY DOUG FWERGUSON
Associated Press
PALM HARBOR, Fla. On a
golf course where Stephen Leaney
said there were no easy holes, he
had a simple explanation for how
he wound up atop the leaderboard
Friday at the PODS Championship.
"I've probably holed more putts
than anyone," Leaney said.
Staring into a bright sun that
toyed vyith his depth perception,
Leaney watched a 40-foot birdie
putt on the last hole tumble in for a
birdie and a 4-under 67, giving him
a one-shot lead over Heath Slocum
on an Innisbrook course that won't
let anyone get too far ahead.
Defending champion K.J. Choi
and Chris DiMarco were among
those another shot behind, but the


true measure of this tournament
was found farther down the leader-
board. Only 37 players remained
under par, and 27 of them were
within four shots of the lead.
Brad Faxon was only four shots
behind until he struggled down the
stretch and made the cut on the
number. Even so, he and the others
in last place were only eight shots
behind Leaney.
"When you shoot under par on
this golf course, you've got to feel
pretty good," said Slocum, who felt
great after finishing with a 69.
Putting is imperative at any
tournament, but it has been key for
Leaney. He couldn't remember the
last time he made more than a few
putts longer than 10 feet, but he
shouldn't have a problem now. The


CHRIS O'MEARA/AP
AUSSIE RULES: Stephen Leaney.

shortest of his six birdie putts was
12 feet. The 40-footer on the 18th
hole gave him the lead, and he even
picked up what he called a miracle
birdie along the way.
Leaney had 250 yards for his


third shot on the par-5 fifth. He hit
it into the rough, then chipped in.
"This golf course just wears you
out," said Leaney, a 37-year-old
Australian. He was at 6-under 136.
Course officials were concerned
when the tournament moved from
late October to early March, caus-
ing a drastic change in the grass.
Instead of the dry, crispy condi-
tions in the fairway and prevalent
Bermuda rough, the rye grass used
in Florida over the winter to keep a
green look to the course has made
it play longer, and at times softer.
Some thought the course might
be playing a little easier.
"Just look at the board,"
DiMarco said after finishing with
his second consecutive 69.
MORE GOLF


Oden ta


Y_


~__~


__


- I I I, = '=bll I I II I I



















INTERNATIONAL EDITION SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007 I 4B


PRO BASKETBALL I HOCKEY


PRO BASKETBALL


Shaq powers surging Heat


From Miami Herald Wire Services
MIAMI Shaquille O'Neal made his
first seven shots and scored a season-high
32 points, Jason Williams added 20 points
and the surging Miami Heat beat the Min-
nesota Timberwolves 105-91 on Friday
night.
O'Neal finished 13-of-16 from the field
and added nine rebounds. Williams shot
9-for-13 and Eddie Jones had 15 points and
11 rebounds for the Heat, who shot 58 per-
cent to win their fifth in a row overall, Uth
in a row at home and move within 21/2
games of Washington for the Southeast
Division lead.
Kevin Garnett had 23 points and 11
rebounds and Ricky Davis added 21 points
for Minnesota, which lost for the seventh
time in nine games.

ROCKETS 112, NETS 91
HOUSTON Tracy McGrady scored
34 points and Yao Ming had 24 points and
13 rebounds in his first home game since
returning from a leg injury, leading the
Rockets to the victory.
McGrady topped 30 points for the 18th
time this season and also had five assists
and four rebounds.
Yao, who missed 32 games with a bro-
ken tibia, was 6-of-11 from the field and
went 12-of-13 from the free-throw line,
despite playing with tape around the mid-
dle and ring fingers on his shooting hand.
Yao dislocated his middle finger late in
Wednesday's 111-80 victory at Boston.

HAWKS 106, GRIZZLIES 105
ATLANTA Josh Smith scored 20
points, including the go-ahead, three-
point play with 11.5 seconds left, to help
hand the Grizzlies their sixth consecutive
loss.
The Grizzlies took a 105-103 lead on a
basket by Damon Stoudamire with 28 sec-
onds left after trailing by 17 points early in
the second quarter.
It was Atlanta's second consecutive
victory after losing six in a row. Memphis
has lost nine of 10 and has the worst
record in the NBA at 15-48, including the
poorest mark on the road,'falling to 4-28.
Mike Miller led the Grizzlies with 29
points, 22 in the second half.

CELTICS 118, SONICS 103
BOSTON Al Jefferson had 31 points
and 16 rebounds, Paul Pierce added 21
points, and the Celtics rallied for the vic-
tory over the SuperSonics.


EASTERN CONFERENCE


SOUTHEAST
Washington
Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Charlotte
ATLANTIC
Toronto
New Jersey
New York
Philadelphia
Boston
CENTRAL
Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Indiana
Milwaukee


Pct. GB
.567
.525 2'2
.460 61/2
.381 111/2
.355 13


Home
24-8
20-10
19-13
12-18
13-16
Home
21-9
17-15
17-14
16-15
8-22
Home
19-12
23-8
24-8
18-12
14-13


Pct. GB
.627 -
.590 2
.563 3/2
.483 82
.371 15Y2


WESTERN CONFERENCE


SOUTHWEST W
x-Dallas 51
San Antonio 44
Houston 38
New Orleans 28
Memphis 15
NORTHWEST W
Utah 42
Denver 29
Minnesota 27
Portland 25
Seattle 25
PACIFIC W
Phoenix 48
L.A. Lakers 33
L.A. Clippers 29
Sacramento 28
Golden State 28
x-clinched playoff spot


Friday's results
Mia. 105, Min. 91
Phi. 108, LAL 92
Atl. 106, Mem. 105
Buos. 118, Sea. 103
J. PAT CARTER/AP Hou. 112, NJ 91
Pho. 104, NO 103
LOOK OUT BELOW: Heat center Shaquille O'Neal knocks Timberwolves center Det. at Den., late
Mark Blount out of the way during a drive to the basket. O'Neal poured in LAC. at G.S., late
a season-high 32 points and added nine rebounds in Friday night's victory.


Rajon Rondo, starting in place of the
injured Delonte West, scored 20 points
and Gerald Green had 19 for the Celtics.
West sat out with a mild concussion he
sustained in Wednesday's 111-80 loss to
Houston.

76ERS 108, LAKERS 92
PHILADELPHIA Andre Iguodala
scored 31 points and the 76ers spoiled the
return of Kobe Bryant with their sixth
consecutive victory.
Andre Miller scored 23 points, Kyle
Korver had 18 and the Sixers scored 16
consecutive points in a 20-3 run to cap a
perfect homestand (6-0) and win their
seventh in a row at home in front of their
first sellout crowd of the season.
The Sixers are making a late playoff
push, one reason team president Billy


King said before the game that coach
Maurice Cheeks would return next sea-
son.

ELSEWHERE
SuperSonics: The club suspended
forward Danny Fortson for two games
without pay for conduct detrimental to
the team. The suspension covers Friday
night's game at Boston and Sunday's
game at Toronto.
Pistons: The club recalled guard
Will Blalock from Sioux Falls of the NBA
Development League.

LATE THURSDAY
Spurs 100, Kings 93: Manu Ginob-
ili scored 31 points, including five 3-point-
ers, to lead visiting San Antonio to its 11th
consecutive victory.


.492 12
.443 15
.410 17
.403 17'2.
Pct. GB
.774
.524 15iVz
.483 18
.459 19'/2
.444 20'/2


L10
10-0
10-0
5-5
4-6
1-9
L10
8-2
4-6
3-7
4-6
5-5
L10
9-1
3-7
4-6
6-4
4-6.


Home
30-3
20-8
21-10
19-12
11-20
Home
24-7
16-16
18-13
14-17
18-13
Home
25-6
20-10
21-11
18-13
21-10


Away
10-18
12-19
10-21
12-21
9-24
Away
12-20
11-19
11-20
8-23
10-21
Away
18-10
13-17
12-20
11-19
9-26



Away
21-6
24-10
17-14
9-22
4-28
Away
18-12
13-14
9-21
11-19
7-24
Away
23-8
13-20
8-20
10-20
7-25


Conf
22-14
18-16
17-21
13-24
14-21
Conf
22-14
21-16
17-21
14-20
11-24
Conf
26-12
21-16
25-13
20-14
11-26



Conf
32-6
27-11
20-18
16-22
9-29
Conf
24-12
13-22
16-22
15-21
12-23
Conf
23-10
19-14
16-20
14-22
15-19


RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Tonight's games Thursday's results
Min. at Atl., 7 Chi. 100, Orl. 76
N.Y. at Was., 7 S.A. 100, Sac. 93
Phi. at Ind., 7
Mem. at Cha., 7
N.J. at S.A., 8
Cle. at Mil., 8:30
N.O. at Utah, 9


Through Thursday


SCORING
G FG FT PTS AVG
Anthony, Den. 43 485 304 1298 30.2
Bryant, LAL 57 546 475 1665 29.2
Wade, Mia. 46 445 413 1324 28.8
Arenas. Wash. 60 540 479 1724 28.7
Iverson, Den. 43 407 353 1210 28.1
James, Clev. 59 588 362 1614 27.4
Redd, Mil. 42 377 288 1136 27.0
Allen, Sea. 50 465 252 1332 26.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 59 518 402 1495 25.3
Carter, N.J. 61 542 342 1538 25.2
ASSISTS
G AST AVG
Nash, Phoe. 55 643 11.7
Williams, Utah 59 538 9.1
Kidd, N.J. 59 529 9.0
Paul, NOk. 44 388 8.8'
Davis, G.S. 45 386 8.6
Miller, Phil. 59 480 8.1
Wade, Mia. 46 362 7.9
Ford, Tor. 55 419 7.6
Billups, Det. 51 385 7.5
Felton, Char. 59 424 7.2


REBOUNDING
G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Garnett, Minn. 59 152 597 749 12.7
Chandler, NOk. 59 260 485 745 12.6
Howard, Orl. 63 218 542 760 12.1
Okafor. Char. 56 228 429 657 11.7
Camby, Den. 50 115 467 582 11.6
Boozer, Utah 53 164 451 615 11.6
Jefferson, Bos. 53 190 402 592 11.2
Lee, N.Y. 55 191 398 589 10.7
Duncan, S.A. 62 171 490 661 10.7
Wallace, Chi. 61 236 397 633 10.4
FIELD GOALS
FG FGA PCT
Chandler, NOk. 226 363 .623
Biedrins, G.S. 281 462 .608
Lee, N.Y. ,, 237 391 .606
Howard, Orl. 410 684 .599
Stoudemire, Phoe, 447 764 .585
Curry, N.Y. 439 752 .584
Boozer, Utah 461 813 .567
Patterson, Mil. 354 643 .551
Bogut, Mil. 327 595 .550
Okafor, Char. 345 637 .542


I NHL STANDrINGS


EASTERN CONFERENCE


DIV
5-5-1
8-1-0
8-0-2
2-2-1
-1-4

DIV
5-1-1
7-1-2
0-2-1
1-0-3
4-2-5

DIV
9-1-2
9-0-2
3-2-2
0-0-4
2-0-1


SOUTHEAST W L O0. SLPTS Gf GA HOME AWAY
Atlanta 36 23 7 3 82 213 213 18-10-4-2 18-13-3-1 15-'
Tampa Bay 38 27 3 1 80 218 214 18-14-1-0 20-13-2-1 16-1
Carolina 34 28 3 4 75 202 209 17-13-1-3 17-15-2-1 15-1
Florida 28 27 6 7 69 198 215 19-10-3-1 9-17-3-6 8-1;
Washington 24 32 2 10 60 199 242 14-15-1-6 10-17-1-4 8-12
ATLANTIC W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
New Jersey 41 19 1 7 90 183 165 22-8-0-5 19-11-1-2 20-!
Pittsburgh 36 21 4 6 82 229 211 19-9-2-3 17-12-2-3 17-:
N.Y. Islanders 33 24 5 5 76 199 188 18-11-4-1 15-13-1-4 12-1(
N.Y. Rangers 33 27 3 4 73 194 186 15-14-3-2 18-13-0-2 11-11
Philadelphia 18 38 5 6 47 179 254 6-19-3-4 12-19-2-2 5-1,
NORTHEAST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY


3 93 253
4 84 235
6 73 212
5 72 199
3 69 191


23-8-1-2
22-11-1-2
13-15-2-3
19-12-0-3
17-15-1-2


21-9-1-1
17-12-1-2
19-12-1-3
14-18-1-2
15-15-1-1


16-!
17-9
10-1:
11-11
13-1;


WESTERN CONFERENCE


SLPTS GF
4 96 240
4 95 215
5 68 176
5 61 168
7 59 165


HOME
24-5-2-2
25-3-2-3
17-16-2-1
15-16-1-3
14-16-1-3


AWAY
21-13-0-2
18-13-3-1
12-12-3-4
12-18-1-2
11-17-1-4


DIV
19-5-1-1
16-4-2-1
11-13-2-2
7-13-0-4
11-15-1-0

DIV
14-11-0-1
12-6-1-4
14-7-1-2
11-10-1-0
9-15-1-0

OIV
18-6-1-2
18-7-0-0
-13-0-1
7-14-2-1
8-14-0-3


EST W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY
er 40 22 2 3 85 182 168 22-9-1-1 18-13-1-2
a 37 24 1 6 81 192 171 22-6-1-3 15-18-0-3
36 22 4 5 81 218 182 27-6-0-1 9-16-4-4
34 29 2 3 73 223 213 18-14-1-2 16-15-1-1
n 30 31 3 3 66 175 197 18-15-1-1 12-16-2-2

W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY


7 91 215
4 83 176
2 82 200
1 57 177
6 56 189


22-5-2-5
21-10-0-2
18-12-0-2
14-15-2-0
13-14-4-4


18-12-2-2
18-13-1-2
22-13-0-0
13-22-0-1
9-20-3-1


Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES


Friday's results
Dallas 3, Columbus 0 ,
Carolina 3, Washington 0
Detroit 3, Los Angeles 2, OT
Minnesota 5, Buffalo 1
Edmonton at Anaheim, late
Vancouver at SJ., late


Thursday's results
Florida 2, Philadelphia 1
Minnesota 2, Boston 1
Atlanta 6, Montreal 2
Ottawa 5, Toronto 1
New Jersey 4, Pittsburgh 3, SO
Rangers 2, Islanders 1
St. Louis 5, Dallas 3
Nashville 6, Calgary 3
Vancouver 4, Phoenix 2


Tonight's games
Boston at Phil., 1
Rangers at Pitt., 1
NJ. at Buffalo, 7
Ottawa at Toronto, 7
Wash. at Islanders, 7
Atlanta at Florida, 7:30
Montreal at St. Louis, 8
Columbus at Nashville, 8
Chicago at Phoenix, 9
Tampa at Calgary, 10


Through Thursday


SCORING
Player,teamr GP G A Pts
Crosby, Pit 64 27 72 99
Lecavalier, TB 69 45 46 91
SL Louis,TB 69 39 52 91
Heatley, Ott 68 41 46 87
Hossa,AU 69 39 48 87
Savard, Bos 67 21 63 84
Thornton, SJ 67 16 68 84
Ovechkin, Was 67 38 42 80
Briere,Buf 65 27 52 79
Selanne, Ana 68 39 39 78


GA AVG
93 2.04
33 2.10
141 2.15
104 2.21
60 2.23
117 2.30
142 2.34
80 2.36
85 2.37
147 2.43


GOALIES
Player, team GP MIN
Hasek, Det 46 2729
Smith. Dal 18 942
Brodeur, NJ 65 3942
Gigu,Ana 49 2821
Backstrom, Min 30 1612
Turco, Dal 55 3056
Luongo, Van 62 3642
Nabokov, SJ 37 2030
Mason, Nas 37 2156
Kiprusoff, Cal 61 3631


HOCKEY




Hurricanes blank Capitals


From Miami Herald Wire Services
WASHINGTON Carolina goalie
Cam Ward recorded his second career
regular-season shutout both against
Washington and Justin Williams,
Niclas Wallin and Andrew Ladd scored,
leading the Hurricanes past the Capitals
3-0 on Friday night.
Ward made 25 saves for the defending
Stanley Cup champions, who entered the
day in a three-way tie for the eighth and
final Eastern Conference playoff berth
with the idle Toronto Maple Leafs and
New York Rangers.
The Capitals have lost six consecutive
games and 11 of 12. The Hurricanes had
lost three of their previous four games,
scoring only six goals in that span. The
offense was a bit better although Wal-
lin's goal was an empty-netter with 29.9
seconds left but credit goes to Ward
and his defense for holding Alex Ovech-
kin and Co. in check.
Ovechkin and Alexander Semin, the
Capitals' top two scorers, were limited to
a combined eight shots.
And Carolina's penalty-killing unit
continued its recent form. The Hurri-
canes came in having killed off 27-of-28
penalties over the previous eight games.
Washington went 0-for-5 on the power
play.
Ward had two shutouts during the
playoffs en route to being the MVP of the
Hurricanes' run to the title.

RED WINGS 3, KINGS 2 (OT)
DETROIT Mikael Samuelsson's
goal 3:26 into overtime completed a
comeback and gave the Red Wings the
victory.
It was Samuelsson's first game back
after being out since late January with a
broken bone in his foot.
Pavel Datsyuk had a goal and an assist,
and Brett Lebda also scored for Detroit.
Dominik Hasek, who returned after miss-
ing three games with tightness in his
thigh, made 24 saves.
Raitis Ivanans and Brian Willsie scored
for Los Angeles, and Sean Burke stopped
51 shots.

STARS 3, BLUE JACKETS 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio Sergei Zubov,
Niklas Hagman and Mike Ribeiro scored
goals, and Marty Turco posted his 29th
career shutout to lead the Stars.
It was the 15th time Columbus has been
shut out this season, extending a club
record.


TRY, TRY AGAIN: Hurricanes goalie Cam Ward scoops up the puck during his
second career regular-season shutout. Ward made 25 saves in the victory.


Turco, who has been sharing time in
goal for the Stars lately, had 30 saves in
picking up his fifth shutout of the season.
The Blue Jackets had won their past
three games and Dallas had lost four in a
row.
Zubov also had an assist and Philippe
Boucher had two assists for the Stars, who
improved to 18-3-2 against Columbus.

WILD 5, SABRES 1
BUFFALO, N.Y. Third-string rookie
goalie Josh Harding made 35 saves, and
Dominic Moore scored twice to lift the
Wild.
Pavol Demitra, Keith Carney and Todd
White also scored for the Wild, who have
gone 12-3-2 in their past 17 road games.
Michael Ryan scored for the Sabres,
who lost for the second consecutive time
at home. Buffalo, the league's 'top-scoring
team, has scored just six goals over the
past three games.

SIMON GETS SUSPENDED
UNIONDALE, N.Y. New York
Islanders enforcer Chris Simon was sus-
pended indefinitely Friday by the NHL,
one day after his vicious, two-handed
stick swing to the face of New York Rang-
ers forward Ryan Hollweg. Simon, who


was given a match penalty Thursday
night for deliberate attempt to injure, was
summoned to a league hearing set for
today in New York.
Hollweg took a few stitches in the chin,
but was not seriously hurt. Simon likely
will be feeling the sting of his actions for
quite some time.
The length of the banishment won't be
determined until the hearing with league
disciplinarian Colin Campbell.
The suspension could be as long as
those given to Todd Bertuzzi and Marty
McSorley following their violent infrac-
tions that also gave a black eye to hockey.
The Islanders have 15 regular-season
games left, and might be without Simon
for those and the playoffs should the team
qualify.
"It hurts, no question," forward Mike
Sillinger said. "His presence on the ice,
his toughness in the locker room. Obvi-
ously there is nothing we can do about
that. What's done is done and we move
forward."

LATE THURSDAY
Canucks 4, Coyotes 2: Jeff Cowan
scored his sixth goal in four games and
Markus Naslund also scored to lead visit-
ing Vancouver.


Buffalo
Ottawa
Toronto
Montreal
Boston


CENTRAL
Nashville
Detroit
St Louis
Columbus
Chicago


NORTH
Vancouve
Minnesot
Calgary
Colorado
Edmonton

PACIFIC
Anaheim
Dallas
San Jose
Phoenix
Los Ange


les


THE MIAMI HERALD I MiamiHerald.com


------


--


------~


- I I I

















THE MIAMI HERALD I MiamiHerald.com INTERNATIONAL EDITION SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007 115B,

COLLEGE BASKETBALL



ACC QUARTERFINALS



North Carolina flogs FSU; BC wins in OT


From Miami Herald Wire Services
TAMPA, Fla. An Atlantic
Coast Conference title is about
the only thing missing from
Roy Williams' resume as a
head coach, and he says it
would be really sweet to win
one this weekend.
"Everybody always acts like
I pooh-pooh the ACC tourna-
ment because there is that
thought process: You play
people for nine weeks why
do have to play them all again
in three days? But it is what it
is," Williams said Friday after
his eighth-ranked Tar Heels
beat Florida State 73-58 in the
conference quarterfinals.
"Since we're here, I want to
win this sucker," Williams
said. "There's no question in
my mind I'd like to win it. I
would like the Carolina Blue
people to have more bragging
rights than anybody else."
Wayne Ellington scored 18
points and Ty Lawson had 14,
and the Tar Heels' depth and
balanced attack were simply
too much for the Seminoles'
one-man show, Al Thornton.
FSU never led, and Thorn-
ton the ACC's leading
scorer and the runner-up for
conference Player of the Year
- scored 12 points before
fouling out with more than 6
minutes left to play.
"I really didn't get in an
offensive rhythm, but I had
some great looks," Thornton


BALL CONTROL: North Carolina forward Tyler Hansbrough
wearing a protective mask after his nose was bt oken
Sunday, takes a rebound away from Ralph Mimns of FSU


said. "The ball just wasn't
going in for me."
North Carolina (26-6), hop-
ing to win its first ACC tour-
nament title since 1998,
advanced to play Boston Col-
lege today, reversing a trend of
upsets in the tourney. The
higher-seeded team lost every
game in the first round.
Williams led the Tar Heels
to a national title two years
ago after losing in the ACC
tournament. Duke, which has
dominated the league's signa-
ture event since Carolina last
won it, lost on Thursday.
"It would be great because
I've never won an ACC tour-
nament since I've been here,


even being on a team that wonr
a national championship,"
North Carolina senior
Reyshawn Terry said. "So it's
very important to me and my
team and my coaches. It's very
big for us."
The Tar Heels, the No. I
seed after tying Virginia for
the league's best regular-
season record, pulled a waxy
during an 18-2 run that bdilt
their lead to 48-28 early in the
second half. The closest FSU
(20-12) got was 12 points.
Brandan Wright scored 11
points and Terry had 10 for
North Carolina, which had lost
two of three games entering
the tournament, raising ques-


SEC QUARTERFINALS




Mississippi State




catches Kentucky,




wins in overtime


From Miami Herald Wire Services
ATLANTA Kentucky was set to
advance in the Southeastern Confer-
ence tournament on Friday .after-
noon. The Wildcats merely needed
Jodie Meeks to sink one more free
throw, and the freshman had not
missed from the line all day.
Then the improbable happened.
Kentucky was called for a lane
violation before Meeks attempted the
clinching free throw. Jamont Gordon
raced down to hit a tying 3-pointer at
the buzzer, and Mississippi State
went on to an 84-82 overtime victory
in the SEC quarterfinals.
It was another disappointment for
the Wildcats (21-11) in a season that
has failed to meet expectations. The
stunning loss is sure to turn up the
heat on coach Tubby Smith, espe-
cially when he took blame for the
unusual call.
Meeks swished the first of two
free throws to put the Wildcats ahead
76-73 with 5.1 seconds left to play in
regulation. ABut he never got to
shoot the second one.
Smith instructed Sheray Thomas
to drop back on defense, and Thomas
started to comply. But he jumped
away from the lane a split-second
after the official had flipped the ball
to Meeks.
"We wanted to get somebody off
the lane," said Smith, already under
fire for a fourth-place finish in the
SEC East. "I didn't see the official
pass the ball. It was probably my fault
to tell him to move off the line."
Mississippi State coach Rick
Stansbury stormed onto the court to
protest, but the officials already had
picked up the violation. They cut off
Stansbury near midcourt, wiped out
Meeks' second free throw and
awarded possession to the Bulldogs
(18-12).
"It definitely shocked me,"
Thomas said. "I've never seen any-
thing like that before."
Stansbury said he willing to risk a
technical foul to make sure the offi-
cials had spotted the mistake.
"It was a very obvious lane viola-
tion," said Stansbury, who was so
hoarse after the victory that he could
barely speak.
Gordon, who scored 26 points,
took the inbounds pass and raced up
the court, slipping away from a Ken-
tucky defender with a cross-over
dribble and launching a shot from at
least 2 feet behind the e-point arc.
The ball hit nothing but net as the
buzzer went off, forcing overtime.
The officials took a quick look at
the replay, but there was no doubt
that Gordon's shot was good.


"Coach called a great play," said
Gordon, who was 9-of-16 from the
field and grabbed 11 rebounds. "He
told me to line up on the opposite
side of the ball so I could get on my
left side and curl into it.
"Oh, man, giving my team a
chance, it was a great feeling to me."
Gordon fell onto his back as the
shot went through, then got up and
thumped his chest toward the Ken-
tucky bench.
The Bulldogs, who were the top-
seeded team from the weak SEC
West but might need to win the tour-
nament to receive an NCAA invita-
tion, got another huge break in the
final minute of overtime when Meeks
missed an open layup after slipping
loose under the basket.
Mississippi State took off the other
way, passing ahead to Barry Stewart
on the fast break. He went up strong,
rolling in the shot for an 83-82 lead
despite being fouled by Randolph
Morris with 24.7 seconds to go.
Stewart missed the free throw,
giving Kentucky another chance to
escape with the victory. But Joe
Crawford's driving shot was blocked
by Richard Delk. Stewart grabbed the
rebound and was fouled with 3.7 sec-
onds left to play.
Stewart made one free throw, and
the Wildcats quickly called time after
getting the ball to midcourt. Again,
the Mississippi State defense came
up big. Stewart slapped away the
inbounds pass to Crawford, and Gor-
don grabbed the ball in the corner
and held on until the horn went off.
Only then did Gordon hurl the ball
toward the roof of the Georgia Dome.
The Bulldogs advanced to today's
semifinals game against Arkansas.
Morris had a huge game for Ken-
tucky, with 29 points and 15
rebounds. Crawford had 20 points,
and Meeks, who was 5-of-5 at the foul
line, added 14.
"My intent coming into the game
was to play physical and get their
post player in foul trouble," Morris
said.
He did just that. Mississippi State
center Charles Rhodes fouled out in
the opening seconds of overtime
after scoring 15 points.
Kentucky overcame a 14-point def-
icit in the final 11ll/ minutes of the
second half but couldn't complete the
comeback. Even so, the Wildcats are
still expected to receive an invitation
to the NCAA Tournament.
Of course, it might take a while to
get over this loss.
"Jodie probably would have made
that shot," Smith said, pondering the
free throw that never happened.


tions about whether the Tar
Heels had done enough to
ensure themselves a No. 1 seed
in the NCAA Tournament.
Tar Heels forward Tyler
Hansbrough, whose nose was
broken when he was elbowed
during the closing seconds of
North Carolina's victory over
Duke on Sunday, wore a pro-
tective mask and scored six
points on 3-for-7 shooting
before fouling out for the first
time this season.
Boston College 74,
Miami 71 (OT): Tyrese Rice
scored a career-high 32 points,
including a key 3-pointer near
the end of regulation and two
huge free throws in overtime
and the Eagles survived a big
scare from the Hurricanes'.
Rice carried Boston College
for much of the game and
picked up the slack for leading
scorer and ACC Player of the
Year Jared Dudley, who fin-
ished with 12 points.
Dudley was quiet most of
the game but stepped up in
overtime, hitting a jumper and
then converting a three-point
play that put fourth-seeded
Boston College (20-10) ahead
72-71 with 1:51 remaining.
The 12th-seeded Hurri-
canes (12-20) had several shots
to regain the lead, but none of
them fell. Anthony Harris
missed a 3-point attempt, and
Jack McClinton's baseline
scoop shot hit the side of the


backboard. Miami was then
forced to foul, and Rice made
both free throws to make it a
three-point game with 3.1 sec-
onds left to play.
The Hurricanes had one
final chance,: but Harris
couldn't get a 3-pointer off
before the final buzzer.
North Carolina State
79, Virginia 71: Gavin Grant
scored nine of his 20 points in
the final 2 minutes and the
Wolfpack rallied from a 14-
point halftime deficit to pull
off its second consecutive
upset in the tournament.
A night after ending Duke's
reign as tourney champions,
10th-seeded North Carolina
State (17-14) rode Grant and
Brandon Costner into the
semifinals by shooting 74 per.
cent and outscoring the sec-
ond-seeded Cavaliers 53-31 in
the second half.
Costner finished with 23
after delivering a career-high
30 in his team's 85-80 overtime
victory over seventh seeded
Duke. Virginia (20-10) was the
No. 2 seed after tying North
Carolina for the league's best
regular-season record.
Grant began the Wolfpack's
comeback with a layup in the
opening minute of the second
half. He made a 3-pointer to
finish a 31-12 run that turned
their double-digit deficit into a
57-52 lead, then took over after
an offensive foul on Mamadi


E'AL


STALKING THE WILDCATS: Mississippi State defenders Jamont Gord
left, and Jarvis Vat nado harass Ramel Bradley of Kentucky und
basket Fi iday. The Bulldogs defeated the Wildcats 84-82 in ovw


Arkansas 72, Vanderbilt 71:
Gary Ervin sank a jump shot with 11
seconds left, sending the Razorbacks
to the SEC semifinals for the first
time since 2001.
The win gave Ark-nsas back-to-
back 20-win seasons, improved the
Razorl'acks' NCAA tournament
hopes and possibly provided job
security for coach Stan Heath.
Ervin, who twice set personal
scoring highs last week while being
named Southeastern Conference
player of the week, scored only six
points but made the biggest basket of
the game with his jumper.
After Ervin gave At kansas the
lead, Shan Foster missed a 3-pointer
for Vanderbilt.
After the final buzzer sounded,
Ervin was at the holttonl of i; pile
Arkansas players near press row.
I'liht s big lne!,'" Eivin veIled as
he rose to his feet.
Michael Washington led Arkansas
(20-12) with 18 points. Patrick Bever-
ley added 17.
Derrick Byars led van d-irbilt
(20-111 with 15 points. iositer had 13
and Dan Cage had 12.
Vandeibiih reach'ld 20 victories in
backl-to-back seasons f'o1 ill first
time since 1998-09.
With Arkansas leading 70-69, a
miss by Beverley gave Vanderbilt
possession with 45 seconds left.
Byars ii'sr.d a -poinil shot. 4lunnylly
Weems rehoiunded tor Ark;insas but
turned the ball over, giving the Com-
modores an-other chance with 30 sec-
onds left.
This time, Ross Nelter.scored an
easy layup otn (he inhounds pass from
Alex Gordon, giving Vanderbilt a
71-70 lead with 23 seconds left. Gor-


don faked his inbounds pas:
left before finding Nelter op
the basket.
Arkansas officials already
paring a $900,000 contract
for Heath if the Razorbacks
receive an NCAA bid, The
Press Register reported
Heath's contract runs through
According to the paper, A
would decline an invitation
NIT and immediately laur
search for a new coach.
Mississippi 80, Lou
State 60: LSU's Big Bal
knocked out of the SEC tour
Ly Mississippi's Big Barn.
Bam Doyne scored 26 poil
Ole Miss (20-11) built a 20-poi
halt lead over cold-shooting
ana Slite and never looked b;
Glen "Big Bahy" Dlavis p(
l.SU past 'I ennessee with ?<(
and 15 rebounds in the first
Thursday night, but Davis a
Tigers couldn't match that
against Ole Miss.
Davis ( () 728')) had oi
points on l-for-8 shooting
couIntecCed with their own biF
players Dwayne Curtis (6
280 pounds) and Kenny W
(0-8, 240).
LSIJ (17-15) is left to await
ble NIT bid, a bitter postseasi
ity one year after playing
N(CA A's Final Four.
Doyne, a senior guard, f
two points shy of his career h
also led the Rebels with
rebounds. Williams had 12
and Eniel Polynice added 11.
Tasmiine Mitchell led LS
15 points, and Darnell Lazare
Ole Miss will play Florida


Diane denied Virginia a basket
that would have made it 68-all
with 1:55 remaining.
Grant's layup gave N.C.
State some breathing room,
and then he made a long
3-pointer to make it 73-66. He
scored his team's next four
points from the foul line
before Costner sank two free
throws to put the finishing
touch on the victory.
Sean Singletary led Virginia
with 23 points, but he had only
seven in the second half. J.R.
Reynolds added 11 points.
Virginia Tech 71,
Wake Forest 52: A.D. Vas-
sallo scored 22 points, Deron
Washington added 13 all in
the second half and the
Hokies won big.
Virginia Tech (21-10) used
a fast-paced tempo to take
advantage of Wake's short
turnaround after a double-
overtime victory against Geor-
gia Tech that ended well past
midnight Thursday.
The Demon Deacons (15-16)
tired in the second half, com-
ing up short on jump shots,
committing silly turnovers
and failing to get back on
defense.
Vassallo and Washington
benefited most. Vassallo had 11
points in each half, and Wash-
ington scored nine points in a
19-5 second-half spurt that put
the Hokies ahead by double
digits for good.


NO. 6 FLORIDA 74,
GEORGIA 57


Gators


humble


23Bulldogs


BY PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
ATLANTA After a sluggish
finish to the regular season, the
Florida Gators started the postsea-
son as if they are fully capable of
winning another national title.
No. 6 Florida scored the first
17 points of the game, built a 25-
point lead before halftime and
romped to a 74-57 victory over
Georgia in the quarterfinals of the
Southeastern Conference tourna-
ment on Friday night.
Taurean Green scored 19 points
to lead the Gators (27-5), but this
was a devastating group effort by a
team that looked vulnerable when
it closed February by losing three
of four games.
Florida opened March by beat-
i r; i ing Kentucky, and the Gators are
hoping a third SEC tournament
on, title in a row will lock up a top
er the seed in the NCAA Tournament.
ertime. Georgia (18-13), which has not
been to the NCAAs since 2002,
s to his was looking to bolster its creden-
en near tials with an upset of the Gators.
The Bulldogs didn't come close,
are pre- and now they can hope for only
buyout and NIT invitation.
do not Florida showed off its imposing
Mobile depth and versatility before the
Friday. game was 4 minutes old.
i 2011. Joakim Noah started the
rkansas onslaught with a short jumper. Al
to the Horford then got loose on the
nch its inside for an easy hoop. Green
swiped the ball away from the
Aisiana Bulldogs and went in for a layup.
hy was Corey Brewer drew a foul and hit
iaml'nt both free throws. Green came up
with another steal and fed it to
nts, and Noah, who converted a 3-point
nt first- play. Finally, Lee Humphrey
Louisi- swished a 3-pointer for a 14-0 lead.
a k. That made Florida 5-for-5 all
'wered five starters had scored, and Geor-
points gia was still stuck on zero.
round In fact, when the Gators got to
and the 15-0 on Chris Richard's free throw
luccpss with 15:53 left in the half, they
could have gone the rest of the
nlly six period without scoring and still
as the been ahead at the break.
g inside As-it was, Florida was up 35-14
loot-8, by halftime. Georgia missed its
illiams first 13 shots and needed a late
surge to reach 7-for-37 from the
a possi- field, heading to the locker room
on real- after shooting a dismal 19 percent.
in the The Georgia guards were espe-
cially woeful: Sundiata Gaines was
finished 2-of-13 from the field, and Levi
igh and Stukes went 1-foi-10.
eight The Bulldogs didn't have a
points, player in double figures until Billy
Humphrey hit a pair of free
U with throws with 2:50 remaining.
had 13. Takais Brown was the Bulldogs'
today. top scorer, with 12 points.


I I -- -- -- -L -

















PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007


TRIBUNE SPORTS


I COMICS PAGEI *1


Dennis


)( Calvin&


Preparation for the Unexpected


South dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
*643
VAJ 105
*AQ83
.+104
WEST EAST
4J972 *KQ5
Y 96 VKQ742
*K104 *J9752
4.J963 4-
SOUTH
*A 108
V8 3
*6
+AKQ 8752
The bidding:
South West North East
1 4 Pass 1 V Pass
2 4 Pass 2 Pass
3 NT
Opening lead two of spades.
A fine declarer is always on the
lookout for an unlikely lie of the
cards when he plays a contract that
appears to be a cinch. It is easy
enough to do well when suits break
normally; the trick is to do well when
suits break abnormally.
Here is a typical example. South
was in three notrump, and West led a
spade. Declarer ducked twice and
took the third round with the ace. He
then played the ace of clubs, on


which-East showed out, and the hand
collapsed.
What had appeared a moment
before to be a shoo-in for 10 tricks -
seven clubs and three aces -
changed drastically when East failed
to follow to the first club. South
struggled a while, but eventually
went down two.
Had South taken the proper pre-
cautions to guard against a 4-0 club
break, however, he could not have
failed to make the contract. As soon
as dummy came down, he should
have realized that only a 4-0 club
division could defeat him, and his
sole concern should have been to
guard against that possibility.
There was a simple way to do
this. After both opponents followed
to the third spade, proving that the
opposing spades were divided 4-3,
he should have led a low club from
his hand. The worst that could hap-
pen then would be that the defense
would take three spades and a club to
hold him to three notrump.
It is true that in most hands this
precautionary measure would have
cost South an overtrick or two -
since the clubs were much more
likely to be divided 3-1 or 2-2 but
this minor investment to assure mak-
ing a vulnerable game was well
worth the price.


AR


0^


E


N


G




M


Al




0


The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)


I .. HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
Sand there must be at least one
nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET
I ***'""* **Good 18 very good 27; excellent
36 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.


CRYPTIC PUZZLE 2 3 17
nI


ACROSS
1 Where planet Earh finally becrne
boaggy(5)
6 Joins me by a et arrangemen(5)
9 LondonMheartbi(7)
10 Keyinan(5)
11 Very lean and gh-hearted
reliew (5)
12 It'sdear the novloe Is In
drM(5)
13 Pobibtlymeicdponkt?(7)
15 SoldcIUtyin
mannywmy(3)
17 There~lhroIlpolryin
some pice (4)
18 Adamnor u ledl(6)
19 Shout abou the i"nleader
Inagh t(5)
20 Hawagofaltng,
petap (6)
22 There mo precede
here, yougrat (4)
24 Haenmhenceto thdie nlmt(3)
25 LoelInhtegerden?(7)
26 There'snoepartdng due
for th (5)
27 Excmatfthecelrtalite(ofa
number) (5)
28 The Mile bar atthe nd
oftheie (5)
29 An educator wlth dan (7)
30 Coid asound jodey win
thiscup?(5)
31 Pale, as when dmicn? (5)


DOWN
2 To Idll thus brings
unwowndoanee(6)
3 1TN route, to part of Scoland, may
be rce(6)
4 Atheianmae? (3)
5 Where the home can
dop running? (5)
6 Wondeui wayto make a lcaln (7)
7 Dash from Ireland (4)
.8 A bk or the troop leader and m,
pelhas(6)
12 The dhplan' hom again (5)
13 Suchdchargecanbe
very damain (5)
14 In theOdymsey, enanlmeI lout
of t drde (5)
15 Conputer devIce hatelephoric
connection (5)
16 PoWeiy*ewerWWW7 (5)
1 Onecauseoltheups anddownmin
savoring (5)
19 t en e and morngpurposee(7)
21 How to wa thngmty, being
beezy? (6)
22 Incricket, 100 oveicded forhen t
mins?(6)
23 Fgure n a te s deed, ayou
choose (6)
25 LUk he p dichhellengsyl(5)
26 Locaioto somd a bleoacted
about? (4)
28 GreenorMIue,buLticoLdd be'25
Down (3)


Yestrdsys ayptic solution ltrday'sasy -touom
A JS: 3, (me) Glae 8, Sodom 10, Trry 11, Mumn 12, ACR5: 3, Speed 8, Mer 10, Louse 11, Men 12, CabIn
Proo-f 13, PW ld 15, Peos 18, Era 19, Cde 21, 13, Appesi 15, Cow 18, Via 19, Ptre 21, Rampart 22,
F-RE4gIt 22. Had 23, Sma(-p) 24, PkudW 26, Frv-ly Loot23, Fid 24, Reined26, Eroded29, Sun 31, re
29, KId 31, Fls 32,T-E41 le34, Sain To.E 36,Rd 32, Deals34, Fired 35, Lolt36, Tnd 37,Tenl 38,
37, Debar3, Sleep Ram
DOWN: 1, COMC2, Bonmbers 4, Lardn5, Stopl 6, Salr DOWN:1,Temps 2, Wine v 4, Peas 5, Ek 6, Donor 7,
7, Dr..-ol9, Due 12, P.@1"y 14, Amr 1, Scad 17, Seems Amel9, Rep 12, Clapped14, Alm 16,Vad 17, Ready 19,
19, Ctilckn 20, Ch40 21, Fl.H 23, SeDOled 24, Puael Pnimd 20, FlM 21, Rolor 23, Femae 24. Relide 25,
25, IKn 27, lle 26, Dsls 30,Clmn 32. Time 33, Bob NuI27, Rlid 28, Dder30, Aler 32, Der33, lon


ACROSS
1 Fel (S)
6 Dot(5)
9 Pause (7)
10 Viper (5)
11 Proecile (5)
12 SneMaked (S)
13 Flemboyance(7)
15 Coch (3)
17 Dash (4)
18 Stop(6)
19 Jaeln(5)
20 Counting
frame (6)
22 Genuine (4)
24 Zero (3)
25 Earn (/)
26 Stories (5)
27 VItal organ (5)
28 Inrxan dish (5)
29 Mistake (7)
30 Japnese port (5)
31 Brmlteescap (5)


DOWN
2 Trial (6)
3 Greek Islander (6)
4 Pronoun (3)
5 Surplus (5)
6 Stationerytem (7)
7 Saucy (4)
8 Flower (6)
12 Fellow(5)
13 Type of nut (5)
14 Of birth (5)
15 Motorcycist (5)
16 Ftshion (5)
18 Appoiniments (5)
19 Indonesian Island (7)
21 Musde (6)
22 Continue(6)
23 Opposed (6)
25 Pos pone(5)
26 Long joumey (4)
28 Young animal


4
+C 4 -



Cd
a a
us ,a'o0E




0.
z ~ nO 04


ne


meter

S.m. '
poetry that is


SATURDAY,
MARCH
ARIES March 21/April 20 .
There's no use trying to knock down
a brick wall with just your hands,
Aries, you're going to need a little; i.
help with that important obstacle. -
Cancer lends a helping hand.
TAURUS April 21/May 21 '1
You've got.a spring in your step,
Taurus, and it could be due to that
new relationship which is blossom- -
ing. Expect some good fortune to
arrive in your wallet as well.
GEMINI May 22/June 21
Spent another all-nighter worrying
about work issues? Don't let your job
take up more than its necessary share
of your day. This is an unhealthy way ,
to live so make a change soon.
CANCER June 22/July 22 -.: :
You have plenty of plans and ambi-
tions, yet few resources to make the
dreams a reality. It's best-if you ,
start seeking assistance in influen- .
tial places. Consult Scorpio for
some expertise.
LEO July 23/August 23
A visit to the doctor has you upset, but
there's no need to-be, Leo. You are
making a mountain out of a molehill.
Do some Internet research and ask
around -you'll get find some clarity.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Sometimes it seems like life is just
passing you by, right Virgo? It's
fine time you stop watching the '
train scoot by and climb aboard.
Cancer takes the ride, too.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A new business venture has you see-
ing green profits that is, Libra. Yet,
all is not what it seems, so don't rush
into anything just yet. Concentrate on
some research before investing.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
As usual, in your quest'to be "the
best" you've taken on more than you r
can handle, Scorpio. You may just
have to give in to defeat for once.
Forget about extra work on Monday.
SAGrITARIUS-Nov23/Dec21 '
You've taken a gamble on that
attractive stranger and now you're
ready to see if this person is the one.
If you don't find a connection by
Thursday, it might be best to throw
this one back and keep fishing. -
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Someone close to you is giving you
bad vibes this week, Capricorn. Trust
your intuition but don't make any rash
moves. Ask Virgo for a second opinion.
Make time for fun on Wednesday.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 ,
After a bit of consideration, you've .
decided to play "the wanderer" for a
while. An extended vacation or just a '
time for reflection seems best. Make
this a solo trip to really reap the benefits.
PISCES Feb'19/March 20 I
If your pockets seem empty, Pisces, it
could be that you haven't been as
thrifty as you hoped. Perhaps birthday
riches will come your way next week
when you wish on your candles.


I CHESb e -onaoBao-


Vishy Anand v Francisco Vallejo
Pons, Monaco blindfold 2004.
Blindfold chess used to mean
the expert sitting with his back
to the board, mentally
visualising moves announced by
his opponents. World blindfold
records dimaxed in a
grandmaster taking on 45
games simultaneously in an
exhibition lasting the best part
of a day. Nowadays blindfold
chess has become high tech in
the annual Monaco invitational
and its large prize fund. The
GMs si at a computer screen
showing only an empty
chessboard and the opponent's
latest move, and must visualise
the rest. When the event started
a decade ago there were
numerous elementary blunders,
but the cash incentives have


6 1



3 &


b c d a f X h


worked wonders and now most
games are high class. Here India's
world number two is White, with a
forced win. How did It end?


LEONARD GARDEN


- I


Chess solution 8313: N4f5+Bxf52 Nxf5+ Kh8 3
Qxh7+! Kxh7 4 Rhl+ Bh4 5 Rxh4 mate.
Mensa quiz Breathtaking.
One possible word ladder solution is: FOU, foil,
toil, toll, till, tile, VILE


C





4


_





w


I --















TRIBUNE SPORTS


SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007, PAGE 7B


SATURDAYY EVENING
-STRA VNN


MARCH 10, 2007


SUNDAY EVENING


MARCH 11, 2007


I 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30
S(:00) American Soundtrack: Doo Wop's Best on TheLovin' Spoonful Wth John R Orblson Friends: A Black
S WPBTPBS Full-length performances from "Doo Wop 50, Sebastan: A Lovin' Look Back t and White Night n (CC)
"Doo Wop 51" and "Rock, Rhythm & Doo Wop." (CC)
College Basket. CSI NY "Fare Game' A fantasy Shark "Dr. Feelbad" Sebastian sus- 48 Hours Mystery "Dangerous Re-
SWFOR ball: Pac- Fi- game leads to murder. (CC) pets a heart surgeon of killing his union" A classmate targets former
nal missing wife. t (CC) cheerleaders. (N) n (CC)
(:00) Access * THE ITALIAN JOB (2003, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton. A thief and
S WTVJ Hollyood (N) his crew plan to steal back their gold. f (CC)
(CC)
SDeco Drive Cops An officer Cops Suspects America's Most Wanted: America News (CC)
S WSVN Weekend fins a 5year-old resist arrest. f Fights Back (N) t (CC)
in traffic. (N) (PA) (CC)
Wheel of For- * THE SIXTH SENSE (1999, Suspense) (PA) Bruce Willis, Haley Joel Osment, Toni Collette. A child psy-
I9 WPLG tune "Family chologist counsels a boy who can see dead people. ft (CC) (DVS)
Week" (CC)

Sell This Housel Flip This House Trademark Proper- Flip This House (CC) TheFirst 48 A woman is stabbed in
A&E Cathedral City, ties (CC) the street; an elderly man is shot in-
Calif. side a clinic. (CC)
(:10) Renais- (:10) The Doha Debates BBC News Turkey's Hopes BBC News This Week Cor-
BBCI sance (Latenight). and Fears (Latenight). respondents.
BET C Hill (CC) College Hill ) ll (CC) The Wayans Girlfriends"Toe Girlfriends Girl Gfriends Pity Girlfriends
BET Bros. (CC) Sucking"(CC) (CC) the Fool" (CC)
00)NHL HockeyOttawa Senators at Toronto Maple Leafs. From Air Canada Centre in NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning
CBC oronto. (Live) (CC) at Calgary Flames. (CC)
B (:00) Tim Deal or No Deal Contestants get a The Suze Orman Show "Women Tim Russert
S Russert chance to win money. r (CC) and Money Special Event" (N)
(:00) This Week CNN: Special Investigations Unit Larry King Live CNN Saturday Night
S at War College ballplayers' bus crashes.
Scrubs "My Last * NATIONAL LAMPOON'S VAN WILDER (2002, Comedy) Ryan Carlos Mencia: No Strings At-
COM Chance" f (CC) Reynolds, Tara Reid, Tim Matheson. An underachieving collegian needs tached The comic shares his take
money to stay in school. (CC) on American diversity. (CC)
T Forensic Files Forensic Files Forensic Files BodyofEvl- Bodyof Evi- Body of Evi- Body of Evi-
COURT "In Her Bones" "Concrete Alibi" Letter errfect dence dence dencedence
The Suite Life of Kim Possible American Drag- GET A CLUE (2002 Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Bug (35) Phil of the
DISN Zack &Cody Kim works with on: Jake Long Hall, Brenda Song. Students sleuth the disappearance Future First day
Game show. \ the Tweebs. n (CC) of their English teacher. (CC) of school. (CC)
S This Old House DIY tothe Res- DIYto the Res- Wood Works Wood Works Wood Works Freeform Furni-
DIY Exterior finish, cue cue ture
In Focus (Ger- Journal: Popxport Journal: with Euromaxx The Journal Im Focus
_DW man). Wirtschaftsbi. ___Business
:00) E! News Jessica, Ashlee and the Simpson Family: The El True Hollywood Saturday Night Live Salma Hayek;
E Weekend Story Joe Simpson drives his daughters' success. ft (CC) Christina Aguilera. (CC)
College Basket- College GameDay (Live) (CC) College Basketball Big East Toumament Final -- Teams TBA. From
ESPN ball Madison Square Garden in New York. (Live) (CC)
ESPNI :45)Beach Soc- 2006 World Series of Poker Main 2006 World Series of Poker Main ATP Tennis Pacific Life Open --
SPNI cer__event, from Las Vegas. (CC) event, from Las Vegas. (CC) Early Round. (Live) (CC)
EWTN Daily Mass: Our A Little About Don Orlone The So- Bookmark The Holy Rosary Fr. John Corapi
EWTN Lady city of Divine Providence. I
FIT TV Blaine's Low All Star Workouts Step workout. Total Body Sculpt With Gilad Mar- Caribbean Work- Namaste Yoga
IT TV Carb Kitchen C\ (CC) tial arts. f (CC) out Sugar Hill.
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report Geraldo at Large (Live) A (CC) The 1/2 Hour The 1/2 Hour The Line-Up
FOX-NC ____News Hour News Hour_
NHL Hockey Atlanta Thrashers at Florida Panthers. From the BankAtlantic Center in Sun- Poker Learn The FSN Final
FSNFL rise, Fla. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) From the Pros Score (Live)
O6:30) PGA Golf Champions Tour -- Toshiba Classic -- Golf Central Primetime (Live) LPGA Golf MasterCard Classic --
GOLF second Round. From ewport Beach, Calif. Second Round. From Mexico.
GSN (:00) Greed (CC) Chain Reaction Chain Reaction Chain Reaction Chain Reaction Chain Reaction I've Got a Secret
SN (c)(CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)
G Tech Star Trek: Next Star Trek: The Next Generation Cops f (CC) Cops Home inva- Cops "Coast to Cops "Coast to
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HALL quette, Marta Dubois, Matt Lutz. An attorney and a de- Matt Lutz. Premiere. An attorney's client stands accused of murdering her
tective investigate a stabbing death. (CC) lover. (CC)
H T Design Rivals Makeover Wish Small Space, Designer Superstar Challenge How Not to Decorate Val and Tom-
SHGTV "Family Flow" A redesign of a Big Style "Chair Flare" The contestants rans- my's bungalow was once the envy-'
SKitchen. (CC) teacher's room. form outdoor chairs. fI (CC) of the neighbourhood. (CC)
:00) Old Time Gaither Homecoming Hour Specials Christian Artist l-Gospel
INSP Gospel Hour Talent Search
* SELENA (1997, Biography) Jennifer Lopez, Edward James 01- Accordingto Everybody Everybody
KTLA mos, Jon Seda. Mexican-Amencan singer skyrockets to fame. Jim "The Closet Loves Raymond Loves Raymond
n (CC) n (CC) n (CC)
STRANDED (2006, Suspense) Erica Durance. Female LONG LOST SON (2006, Drama) Gabrielle Anwar, Craig Sheffer. A
LIFE friends start to disappear on a Caribbean island. (CC) woman believes she sees her dead son in a vacation video. (CC)
MSNBC MSNBC Re- Secrets to Tell One of a preacher's MSNBC Investigates Kentucky The Confessions of a Serial Killer
MSNBC (p : N two wives disappears. State Prison. Profiling Jeffrey Dahmer.
NICK SpongeBob Ned's Declassi- The Naked Drake & Josh Mr. Meaty (N) t Full House n Growing Pains
NIC SquarePants f tied School Brothers Band f (CC) (CC) n
T Grease: You're Prison Break (CC) W-FIVE Investigation into the mur- News f (CC) NTV Entertain-
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SPEED Tradin' Paint KONI Challenge Series Daytona. From Daytona Beach, Fla. (Taped) MonsterJam From Sam Boyd Sta-
E Odium in Las Vegas.
00) The Coral In Touch (CC) Hour of Power (CC) Billy Graham Classic Crusades
TBN idge Hour (CC)
S* ROAD TRIP * HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE AMERICAN PIE PRESENTS: BAND CAMP (2005,
STBS 2000, Comedy) (2004) John Cho, Kal Penn. Stoned roommates search Comedy) Tad Hilgenbrinck, Arielle Kebbel. A lewd teen
.. (CC) for hamburgers in New Jersey. (CC) causes mischief at a camp for musicians. (CC)
00) Fl That Moving U "Strong-Willedd and Moving Up Singes Nights and Moving Up Wedding Surprse and
TLC House range Stressed ut Supermoms" Memory Monster Fights" omen; first house. Budget Demise" In Louisiana. (CC)
____ County. lane. (N) (N)
-*** THE *t** MEN IN BLACK (1997, Comedy) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith, *** THE BOURNE SUPREMA-
TNT FIFTH ELEMENT Linda Fiorentino. Secret agents monitor extraterrestrial activity on Earth. CY (2004, Suspense) Matt Damon,
(1997) (CC) Fran Potente.(CC
STAN LEE PRESENTS: MOSAIC Bobobo-bo Bo- Naruto (N) One Piece "Extra Mar (N) The Prince of
TOON (2007) Voice of Anna Paquin. Bobo (N) Innings" (N) _Tennis (N)
V5 Sur unair de fte L'Envers du d- Village en vue
.iTV5 cor
TWC Climate Code- Weather: PM Edition (CC) Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
(:00) Casos de Sbado Gigante
-UNIV Familia: Edici6n
Especial
**x THE FAST Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
USA AND THE FURI- "Scavenger" f (CC) A 12-year-old is hospitalized with "Weak" n (CC)
OUS (2001) pregnancy complications. f
VH1 Surreal Life I Love New York "Momma Said I Love New York Ex-girlfriends dish. Dice: Undisput- Dice: Undisput-
Fame Games Knock You Out" f ft ed tn ed n
VS. :00) College Basketball Mountain West Tournament Bull Riding PBR Cabela's Classic. From Kansas City, Mo. (Taped)
V Final -- Teams TBA. From Las Vegas. (Live)
(:00) Circle of ***ri BASIC INSTINCT (1992, Suspense) Michael Douglas, Sharon WGN News at Nine f (CC)
WGN Care: Living Stone, George Dzundza. An erotic writer lures a detective who hunts an
with Diabetes ice-pick killer. n (CC)
Everybody American Idol Rewind "CBS 8 to American Idol Rewind "CBS 10 to CW11 News at Ten Thome. (CC)
WPIX Loves Raymond 7" f (CC) 8" f (CC)
n (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) *** x BASIC INSTINCT (1992, Suspense) Michael Douglas, Sharon Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (CC)
WSB K (CC)Stone, George Dzundza. An erotic writer lures a detective who hunts an tune "Family
ice-pick killer. Week" (CC)

(6:30) *** LIFE SUPPORT (2007, Drama) Queen Latifah, Anna Russell Sim- Boxing Ray Austin vs. Wladimir KI-
HBO-E RED EYE (2005) Deavere Smith. Premiere. An HIV-positive woman mons Presents itschko. f (CC)
ft 'PG-13' (CC) works for an AIDS outreach group. ft (CC) Def Poetry (CC)
(6:00) *** Deadwood "A Constant Throb" The Sopranos "Johnny Cakes" A The Sopranos 'The Ride" Christo-
H BO-P NED KELLY Hearst's henchmen target Alma. f real estate offer tempts Tony. t pher makes an announcement. ft
(2003) 'R' (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)
(6:30) ** THE ** DOCTOR DOLITTLE (1998, Comedy) Eddie Mur- *** RED EYE (2005, Suspense) Rachel McAdams,
HBO-W TRANSPORTER phy, Ossie Davis, Oliver Platt. A 20th-century doctor Cillian Murphy. A plane passenger involves his seat-
2 (CC) can talk with animals, n 'PG-13' (CC mate in a deadly olot. n 'PG-13' (CC)


(6:45) * WALK THE LINE (2005, Biography) ** JUST LIKE HEAVEN (2005, Romance-Comedy) (45) The Making
HBO-S Joaquin Phoenix. The story of music legends Johnny Reese Witherspoon. An architect falls for the spirit of a Of: Just Like
and June Carter Cash. 'PG-13' (CC) comatose woman. 'PG-13' (CC) Heaven fn
6:15) ** RUN- (:15) **i HARD TARGET (1993, Drama)Jean-ClaudeVanDamme, ** THE SENTINEL (2006, Sus-
MAX-E GING SCARED Lance Henriksen, Arnold Vosloo. A merchant sailor battles a vicious group pense Michael Douglas. Premiere.
(2006) 'R' (CC) of man-hunters. ft 'R' (CC) (I 'PC-13' (CC)
t6:50) * xCONSTANTINE (2005, Fantasy) Keanu *A I STILL KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER (:45) PASSION
MOM AX Reeves. A man who sees demons hels a police- (1998, Horror) Jennifer Love Hewitt. A killer in a slicker COVE 7: FOR-
woman probe her sister's death., 'R' (CC) once again terrorizes a young woman. 'R' BIDDEN FRUIT
(6:30) * THE ** THE PINK PANTHER (2006, Comedy) Steve (:35) ** INTO THE BLUE (2005, Adventure) Paul
S HOW HONEYMOON- Martin. iTV Premiere. A bumbling Frenchman probes Walker, Jessica Alba. iTV Premiere. Four divers cross
ERS (2005) (CC) the theft of a priceless gem. 'PG paths with drug smugglers. 'PG-13'
7s-z-Fnl -4 _J. n tUADW RCInrtv / IM )isAceon)riere.- osD---- YI 111 HMEnr T RUr7-ITOI r


TMC


7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30

(:45) They Came for Good: A History of Jews in the South of Brooklyn (CC) Elvis Lives: The
WPBT Unted States "Taking Root: 1820-1880" (CC)25th Anniver-
sary Concert
(:00) 60 Minutes The Amazing Race: All-Stars Con- Cold Case "Shuffle, Ball Change" A Without a Trace "Deep Water" The
0 WFOR (N) n (CC) fusion at theDetour allows a team missing teenager's body turns up in team searches for a missing U.S.
to overtake its rival. (N) a rash senator.(N) t, (CC)
S(V00) Dateline Grease: You're the One That I Deal or No Deal (iTV) A Texas The Apprentice: Los Angeles The
S WTVJ (N) n (CC) Want The remaining Sandys and woman and a general each play for candidates put on a halftime show
Dannys perform in duets. (N) n $1 million. (N) (I (CC) at a soccer match. (N) (CC)
NASCAR Rac- The Simpsons The Winner Glen Family Gu Pe- The Winner (N) News (CC)
* WSVN ing: Nextel Cup Grampa moves in spends time with ter hes BI Clin- n (CC)
with Selma. Alison. ton. (N) (CC)
(:00) America's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Desperate Housewives Susan de- (:01 Brothers & Sisters A disturb-
S WPLG funniest Home A single mother lost both her house lares her love for lan; Bree must ing better that may alter Justin's fu-
Videos (N) (CC) and her son in 2005. (N) confront Orson's past. (CC) ture shakes him. (CC)

00)TheFirst The Sopranos "Do Not Resuscitate (:09) The Sopranos "Toodle... o" Deceased mob (:17) The Sopra-
A&E 8 (CC) Tony tries to fix a labor dispute at a boss Jackie prile's ex-convict brother looks for action. nos Tony travels
construction company. T (CC) to Italy.
Extra Time BBC News Dateline London BBC News Spirit of Yacht- BBC News Have Your Say
BBCI (Latenight). (Latenight). ing (Latenight).
The Wayans The Jamie Foxx The Jamie Foxx The Jamle Foxx The Jamie Foxx College Hill (CC) College Hill (CC)
BET Bros. (CC) Show n (CC) Show n (CC) Show n (CC) Show ()CC)I
CBC (6:30) Curling Tim Hortons Brier -- Final. From Copps Coliseum in Hamilton. (Live) (CC) CBC News: Sunday Night (CC)
V| Wall Street Jour- High Net Worth Chris Matthpws The Business of Innovation (N) Business Nation Generic medica-
CNBP nal Reportl tions.
N:00) CNN Live CNN: Special Investigations Unit Larry King LWe CNN Sunday Night
CNN Sunday (CC) College ballplayers' bus crashes.
** FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982) The Sarah Sil- The Sarah Sil- The Sarah Sil- The Sarah Sil-
COM Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh. California teenagers verman Program verman Program verman Program verman Program
enjoy malls, sex and rock'n' rol. CC) ((CC) (CC) CC) (CC)
COURT Cops"Virginia Cops (Cop so(CC) Cps "Coast to Cops n (CC) Cops A (CC) Video Justice Video Justice
COURT Beach" A(CC) Coast" n (CC)__
The Suite Life of * THE PARENT TRAP (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan, Dennis Quaid, Natasha Naturally, Sadie
DISN Zack & Cody n Richardson. Reunited twin girls try to get their parents back together.'PG' (CC) Drama class puts
(CC) on a play.
This Old House DIY to the Res- Wasted Spaces Flooring Wall to Wall Special (N) 10 Things You Tricked Out
DIY (CC) cue Must Know
DW Euromaxx Journal: The In Focus (Ger- Journal: mit Re- Kultur.21 Journal: with Euromaxx
DW Week man). porter .Reporters
S(:00) E! News Forbes 20 Richest Women in En- The Girls Next The Girls Next The Girls Next Paradise City
Weekend (N) tertainmentDoorDoor Door (N) (N)
ESPN (:00) ESPNU Bracketology (Live) (CC) NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers. From Staples
ESPN enter in Los Angeles. (Live) t" (CC)
ESPNI Beach Soccer: Dutch Soccer Teams TBA. SportsCenter -International Edi-
ESPNI World Cup ton (Live)
EWTN Father Father Corapi and the Catechism G.K. Chesterton The Holy Rosary Lenten Parish Mission
GEWN Groeschel of the Catholic Church Ii ______Tg
FIT TV Ultimate Athlete: Art of the Athlete "Greg Louganis" Insider Trainin "Pitching With Bar- The Gym Thrown Into the Spot-
FIT Limit Greg Louganis. ,f (CC) ry Zito" Barry ito. (CC) light" Amber has her first client.
FOX-NC (:00) Fox Report Geraldo at Large (Live) n (CC) Hannity's Te /2 Hour The 1/2 Hour
.N.-. _________ ', PHour News Hour
MLB Bloopers: Poker Superstars Invitational PRIDE n'ut Around the
FSNFL The Funny Side Tournament From Las Vegas. ockouts Track
G F (6:30) PGA Golf Champions Tour Toshiba Classic -- Golf Central metthe (Live) LPGA Golf MasterCard Classic -
GOLF final Round. From Newport Beach, Calif. Final Round. From Mexico.
S:00) Twenty Greatest Game Show Moments Lingo (CC) Lingo (CC) Dog Eat Dog 1r (CC)
GSN Oene n (CC)
G4T ch Arrested Devel- Star Trek: The Next Generation Star Trek: The Next Generation The Man Show The Man Show
G4Tech opment (CC) "Half a Life" n (CC) 'The Host" A (CC) "Sperm Bank" (CC)
*'~ DIAGNOSIS OF MURDER (1992, Mystery) Dick * PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE ALL-STAR ASSASSIN
HALL Van Dyke, Cynthia Gibb. A doctor tries to clear his pa- (1989, Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, Shar Belafonte. A hockey
tient of murder charges. (CC) player is accused of murdering a sports mogul. (CC)
(:00) Million Dol- The Big Flip Buy Me "Pat & House Hunters Jun kHi w olmes on Homes 'Completely In-
HGTV lar Listing "Holly- Guys buy their fi- Ray" (CC) Stacy buys her i(G : complete" Second story addition
wood" (CC) nal house. A first home. .: "' over the garage. (CC)
INSP It's a New Day In Touch (CC) The King Is Calvari' l Jack Van Impe Manna-Fest (CC)
IN__SP_ __t"_Coming (CC) Church Presents (CC)
**'s AN- All of Us Track- Girlfriends Maya The Game The Everybody Pussycat Dolls Present: The
KTLA TITRUST (2001) ing down Robert's challenges Joan. Trey Wiggs Hates Chris ft Search for the Next Doll Eighteen
Ryan Phillippe. father. n n Episode n (CC) (CC) contestants audition. ,f (CC
A FAMILY LOST (2007, Drama) Cynthia Gibb, Daniel Blood Ties (Series Premiere) A former police officer witnesses a bizarre
LIFE Roebuck. Premiere. Danger follows a woman and her murder (N) (CC)
daughter after a plane crash. (CC)
MSNBC :00 A Shot in Countdown to Doomsday The scenarios threatening Earth's next mass Meet the Press (CC)
SNB the Dark extinction and how they can be averted.
Just Jordan "Get Zoe 101 (N) Name That Nom- Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of Fresh Prince of
NICK a Job" (N) (CC)Inee (N) t Bel-Air Bel-Air Bel-Ar Bel-Air
T :00) Brothers & Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Deal or No Deal (iTV) (N) ,, (CC) The Apprentice: Los Angles
NTV Sisters (CC) "Tiplon-Smith Family" (N) n "Bend It Like Donald" (N) CC)
SPEED (:00) SPEED Re- NASCAR Victory Lane (N) Wind Tunnel With Dave Despaln SPEED Report
port (N) (Live)
Jack Hayford Joel Osteen Taking Authority Believer's Voice Changing Your Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN (CC) (CC) (CC) of Victory (CC) World(CC)
HAROLD & KU- THE SCHOOL OF ROCK (2003. Comedy) Jack Black, Joan Cusack, Mike White. An HAROLD & KU-
TBS MAR GO TO unemployed guitarist poses as a teacher. (CC) MAR GO TO
WHITE CASTLE WHITE CASTLE
(:00)Shalom in Twins, Twins & More Twins A fami- We Have 15 Children The Povey My Husband's Three Wives A man
TLC the Home "The ly is far from normal (CC) family in the United Kingdom has 15 plans to add to his family by taking
Weidmans' children (N) a third wife. (CC)
t** THE t* MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE 2 (2000, Action) Tom Cruise, Dougray Scott, Thandie New- MISSION:
TNT BOURNE SU- ton. Ethan Hunt must retrieve a deadly virus from enemy hands. (CC) IMPOSSIBLE 2
PREMACY (CC) (2000)
TO * JAMES AND THE GIANT EEd, Edd n Eddy Class of 3000 Grim Adven- Futurama n Family Guy n
TOON PEACH (1996, Fantasy) tures (CC) (CC)
TV5 Questions pour Vivement dimanche Le Voile r6v6lateur D. (SC)
TV5__ un champion ____ __
TWC Storm Stories Weather: PM Edition (CC) Epic Conditions It Could Happen Weather: Evening Edition (CC)
TWC (CC) L __ ____(N) Tomorrow
:UNI 0 La Hora Bailando por la Boda de Mis Sueeios Concursantes compiten para ganar una boda.
UN IV Pico Beto el Boti-
cario.
t* TRAINING DAY (2001, * THE BOURNE IDENTITY (2002, Suspense) Matt Damon, Franka Potente, Chris
USA Crime Drama) Denzel Washington, Cooper. An amnesiac agent is marked for death after a botched hit. (CC)
Ethan Hawke. (CC)
VH (:00) I Love New Surreal Life Fame Games "Dial M ISurreal Life Fame Games "Peep- Dice: Undisput- The Agency
VH1 York ft for Mommy" Telethon. ft ing Toms" Paparazzi,. ed f, Canadian model.
VS. World Combat Bull Riding PBR Cabela's Classic. From Kansas City, Mo. (Taped) Fearless
V League_____
Funniest Pets & American Idol Rewind "CBS lOto Ultimate Blackjack Tour Hollywood WGN News at (:40) Instant Re-
WGN People n (CC) 8" n (CC) Dave. (CC) Nine (CC) play (CC)
Pussycat Dolls 7th Heaven "A Pain in the Neck" America's Next Top Model The CW11 News at Ten Thome. (CC)
WPIX Present: Search Eric pulls Sam and David out of models learn the art of walking the
for Next Doll school. n (CC) runway n (CC)
(:00) CSI: Miami CSI: Miami A high-school senior is Stone Undercover "Cash Call" (N) Red Sox This Red Sox Stories
WSB K Under the Influ- found dead after a spontaneous (CC) Week
ence" (CC) gathering of students. (CC)

(5:30) **i Rome "Death Mask" Servilia drives Rome "A Necessary Fiction" Octa- Entourage Entourage Vince
H BO-E RETURN OF Atia to distraction. n (CC) vian proclaims a new era in Rome. "Crash and Bum" raises his price.
THE JEDI'PG' (N) ft (CC) ft (CC) n (CC)
(:00) Real Time ** SOMETHING NEW 2006. Romance-Comedy) (45) ** DREAMER: INSPIRED BY A TRUE STO-
H BO-P With Bill Maher Sanaa Lathan. A black woman develops a budding ro- RY2005) Kurt Russell. A horse trainer and his daugh-
Roseanne Barr. mance with a white man. t 'PG-13' (CC) ter nurse an injured filly. f 'PG' (CC)


6:30) (:15) The Making * RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983, Science Fiction) Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie
H BO-W ONSTER-IN- Of: Monster-in- Fisher. Luke Skywalker and his comrades face a final confrontation. ft 'PG' (CC)
LAW (2005) f Law t_
(:5) *' PRIME (2005, Romance-Comedy) MeryT LONGFORD (2006, Docudrama) Jim Broadbent, (:45) The Making
H B O-S Streep. A recently divorced woman dates the son of Samantha Morton, Andy Serkis, A British earl advo- Of: The Island
her therapist. ft 'PG-13' (CC) cases rehabilitating a child murderer. n (CC) f (CC)
6:15) * A (7:50) * JARHEAD (2005. War) Jake Gyllenhaal, Peter Sarsgaard, ** MAJOR PAYNE (1995) Damon
MAX-E HISTORY OF VI- Jamie Foxx. Marines band together dunng the Gulf War. f 'R' (CC) Wayans. A gung-ho Marine com-
OLENCE 'R' mands young recruits. (CC)
(:15) * THE SENTINEL (2006, Suspense) Michael ***, THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1994, Drama) Tim Robbins,
MOMAX Douglas. Premiere. A Secret Service agent becomes a Morgan Freeman, Bob Gunton. Innocent man goes to a Maine prison for
murder suspect. f 'PG-13' (CC) life in 1947. 'R'(CC)


SHOW


TMC


(6:00) *', THE * AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH (2006, Docu- Update, Former (:15) The L Word "Little Boy Blue'
ONGEST YARD mentary) iTV Premiere. Al Gore campaigns to raise Vice Presldent (IV Angus tries to apologize. (N)
(2005) awareness of the dangers of global warming 'PG' Al Gore ft(CC)
CONFESSIONS * *,, CRASH (2004, Drama) Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Matt Dil- *'A PITCH BLACK (2000, Sci-
OF AN AMERI- lon. Racial tensions collide among Los Angeles residents. n 'R' (CC) ence Fiction) Radha Mitchell, Vin
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