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tion'ally well armed nor panicularly fit. but her remarkable me is her radius of action. Where she' might have carried foiir guns s!ie lias only two ; her torpedo tubes number onlv four, and her surface speed of i 8 knots represents the medium between 14 knot boats finished beiore the war and those of 20 knots which have been employed around these islands. This intciesting development of the range of action of submarines, which, though confidently expected, has been hastened considerably under the stren of war, is one of the features of the sea warfare, from the naval and engineering standpoints. When hostilities were declared it was thought t< bo as much as the U boats could do to reach the shores of these islands. One recalls the sensa tion expeiienced by the public when it was found that I! 9 had been able to travel as far south as the I look of Holland and tor peilo the 1 three "Cressys." In December, 1914, Gia..d Admi von Tirpitz, in the historic interview in which he f< re shadowed a submarine 'blockade," said : — The successes achieved (by Ilia submarines) do not justify the conclusion that large ships are played out. It is still a question whether submarines could have behaved so splendidly in other waters. In this war we have learnt a great deal. VVe belh ved that they could scarcely remain loi fler than three days from their base, as after that time tiieir c rews would be exhausted. VVe soon discovered that the larger types of these boats cm hi go round Kn^Iand and remain out for as much as 14 days at a time. Two months later the fust U ll reached the waters of the Irish Channel, and two months later still they were busy off the south coast of Ireland. In May, 1915. helped by supplies en route, the first of them had reached the Dardanelles. The following September saw a regular campaign mst merchant shipping instituted in Mediterranean wa t' is, which became specially virulent in December, 1915. an 1 April, 1916. Simultaneous lv the boats, as things became t 0 hot for them in the Medi terranean, began to operate in the Atlantic. The extentsion of t'u ir depredations to the Ameri can coast could not rone, there fore, as a surprise.— -The Tiims. MiamiEXCU RSIO N=Key_West Motor Vessel "PANAMA Sails from Nassau to Key West DECEMBER 21st Stopping on way to MIAMI Round Trip: Nassau-Miami $12. Nassau-Key West lo* Tickets for return good only for 10 days. Nassau, N.P., Dec. 12, 1916. All Particulars, OFFICE "FRANCES I'." East Bay street. A nnouncemeni Mr. Oscar E. Johnson TAILOR and CLOTHIER QEGS to inform his many Customers [hat he has just returned %  from New York where lie became a graduate oi the Mitchell 'lolle^e of America^ was swarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the several branches of railoring. Modern ''. c< hmque and Cutting being his specialty. 1 his testimonial from such a high quartet will serve as ;i Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill and in his well known three P's viz : Price, Push, Punciuaiity Patronage Solicited. OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St. (and No. 10 George St.) 3 "The Clothes of a Perfect Day" Ladies Silk Waists Ladies Silk Sweaters Ladies Overcoats Above is a Job Lot Selling Cheap WM. HILTON, 40 BAY ST. Phone 201. For Exchange. R I'.NTl'.I) property in Mount I 11)011, III. ;i!ul Florid;!, f"r pro| city in New Providence. / ~ ~ "~~ "~ W hat have von ? ply "I JOHN IIKXRY Cutttbei land St



PAGE 1

HH i Vvilllvis oiti.lic ma ivirnrc In vei btk m&wntrl Boii> bound to luesr to the Dojmat of no Master. ^ No 18 VOL. XIV N&isnu N.P.. Bnha.mii*. TI1VR.SUAY December 14 1916 •:' Development of the Submarine. WAR TIME CHANGES RANGE AND SPEED (By our Naval Correspondent) T III 7 return of U 53 to Ger many, and the reported arrival in America of the Deutscli land on her second trip an the Atlantic, are events of great interest, but of no new signifiranee, in the enemy's submarine operations. Both were expected, and both were rather overdue. It will be noticed that Commander Rose (00k nearly a week longer to come home than to make the outward passage, which suggests a cautious voy and possibl) a delib< rat< ty in order to gain the bene fit of the dark nights whicl ; vailed towards the end of las! k. He w ill certainly be ere I 1 by bis compati iota with the accomplishment ol a delicate and difficult piece of work in bringing the IJ 53 through the Allied cordon OI cruisers and patrol boats, but hi a Bubma fine manned with a picked crew the task is not so bard as it might seem. Anyway, one swal low doc not make a summer. The late captain of the IMowe had a double SUCl ess at the be ginning of this year iii running the blockade both out and home, but he has had DO imitators, although, as the destruction of the '.1. if showed) there have PHI attempts in this direction. The new feature about I' 1'cruise is that we have the dati s of its beginning and en I, and the exploit tf%jf' u 8 I|M •* steam* ers off t" santui k< t lightship on October 8 appears in a somewhat different light when it is :, that the submarine had to make a six weeks' voyage to do it. Add other two or three weeks in which the boat must remain at her base for refit and repair and to rest her crew, and it will be realized how impossible is the hope of sustaining a submarine blockade "f the American const, espei ially when it is reui' in! ( K ,1 that no otlx 1 b will have the benefit of the element of surprise with which U 53 was favoured. The problem'pres* nted by a submarine campaign on the le of t'.e Atlantic s. era rather to i> I and legal than naval. I he methods of accounting for the submarines which I1.1 ve prot in home waters and in the \ledi 11 may not be adapted to localiin s in (lose proximity to iheeo.isi of tinUnited Stati B At the same time, it can hardly be expected that the Allied Powers will stand idly looking on if merchant ships continue to tinlc iii the "trade lanes ap pioximate to American waters." AN INSTRUCTIVE CONTRAST. It is instructive to compare the particulars, said to be ot 1, 11I, which have been tele graphed from America concern nig the dimensions, &C, of the U 53 with those of tiie British "K" class submarines, the latest in commission when the war e nut. The respective de tails aie as follows : — TIIE CHAMOIS >!y the most sure-rooted of all anil is famed tor its remarks GHT SOAP is the : urc friend 1 e :ful IK usewi ; it k ivtr the w 1 with •. %  : < h il dift tr in t' I I'. 1 id only on the .' 1 ui SOAP is 1 of the 'E" Boats. U 53. 4 ! Two 310 i.75 if) knots One 4in. One gin. Three 2,400 18 knots 14 knots Torpedo tul Guns ... Peri scoi es II.i\ oil ;mes Speed (surface) Speed ('submerged) 10 knots Submerged radius — 5,000 knots There is shown here the pro gross in constructson made in two years. Not that the devel opment indicated in the German figures COmei as any surprise. It was not only anticipated by, but plainly evident to, our nav al authorities, whose reply can not yet be disclosed. On more than one occasion I haverelerr ed in these columns to the entry into service, actual or pending, of improved German submarines the designs for which had been prepared some months before the war began. Boats of from 1,700 to 3.000 tonsdis., cairy in

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02770
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, December 14, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02770

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Full Text
HH
i
Vvilllvis oiti.lic ma ivirnrc In vei btk m&wntrl
Boii> bound to luesr to the Dojmat of no Master.
^
No 18
VOL. XIV
N&isnu N.P.. Bnha.mii*. TI1VR.SUAY December 14 1916
:'
Development of the Submarine.
WAR TIME CHANGES
RANGE AND SPEED
(By our Naval Correspondent)
TIII7. return of U 53 to Ger
many, and the reported ar-
rival in America of the Deutscli
land on her second trip an
the Atlantic, are events of great
interest, but of no new signifi-
ranee, in the enemy's submarine
operations. Both were expected,
and both were rather overdue.
It will be noticed that Com-
mander Rose (00k nearly a week
longer to come home than to
make the outward passage,
which suggests a cautious voy
, and possibl) a delib< rat<
ty in order to gain the bene
fit of the dark nights whicl ;
vailed towards the end of las!
. k. He w ill certainly be ere I
1 by bis compati iota with the
accomplishment ol a delicate
and difficult piece of work in
bringing the IJ 53 through the
Allied cordon OI cruisers and
patrol boats, but hi a Bubma
fine manned with a picked crew
the task is not so bard as it
might seem. Anyway, one swal
low doc not make a summer.
The late captain of the IMowe
had a double SUCl ess at the be
ginning of this year iii running
the blockade both out and home,
but he has had DO imitators, al-
though, as the destruction of the
' '.1. if showed) there have phi
attempts in this direction.
The new feature about I' 1'-
cruise is that we have the dati s
of its beginning and en I, and the
exploit tf%jf'u8 i|m' * steam*
ers off t" santui k< t lightship
on October 8 appears in a some-
what different light when it is
:, that the submarine had to
make a six weeks' voyage to do
it. Add other two or three weeks
in which the boat must remain
at her base for refit and repair
and to rest her crew, and it will
be realized how impossible is
the hope of sustaining a subma-
rine blockade "f the American
const, espei ially when it is re-
ui' in! ( k ,1 that no otlx 1 b
will have the benefit of the ele-
ment of surprise with which U
53 was favoured.
The problem'- pres* nted by a
submarine campaign on the
le of t'.e Atlantic s. era
rather to i> I and legal
than naval. I he methods of ac-
counting for the submarines
which I1.1 ve prot in
home waters and in the \ledi
11 may not be adapted
to localiin s in (lose proximity
to iheeo.isi of tin- United Stati b
At the same time, it can hardly
be expected that the Allied
Powers will stand idly looking
on if merchant ships continue to
tinlc iii the "trade lanes ap
pioximate to American waters."
An Instructive
Contrast.
It is instructive to compare
the particulars, said to be ot
1, 11I, which have been tele
graphed from America concern
nig the dimensions, &C, of the
U 53 with those of tiie British
"K" class submarines, the latest
in commission when the war
e nut. The respective de
tails aie as follows :
TIIE CHAMOIS
>!y the most sure-rooted of all anil
is famed tor its remarks
GHT SOAP
is the : urc friend 1
e :ful Ik usewi ; it k
ivtr the w
1 !
with . '. :< h il dift
tr in t'
I .
I'. 1 id only on the
.'
1 ui Soap is
1 of the
'E" Boats. U 53.
4 !
Two 310
i.75
if) knots
One 4in.
One gin.
Three
2,400
18 knots
14 knots
Torpedo
tul
Guns ...
Peri scoi es
II.i\ oil
;mes
Speed
(surface)
Speed
('submerged) 10 knots
Submerged
radius 5,000 knots
There is shown here the pro
gross in constructson made in
two years. Not that the devel
opment indicated in the German
figures COmei as any surprise.
It was not only anticipated by,
but plainly evident to, our nav
al authorities, whose reply can
not yet be disclosed. On more
than one occasion I haverelerr
ed in these columns to the entry
into service, actual or pending,
of improved German submarines
the designs for which had been
prepared some months before
the war began. Boats of from
1,700 to 3.000 tonsdis., cairy in four 4in. or 6in. guns, with en
giius of 4,000 horsepower and
a speed on the surface of if1
knots, had been planned, .
thee was admittedly no me
chanical difficulty ,n construct
ing boats of this size. Indeed,
vessels of even larger types, with
6,000 b.p., were in sight.
Fewer Guns And Greater
Speed.
The experience of the war
would seem to indicate an in
teristing modification of tin
designs. The demand for g
has been reduced, as in most
any rate, of the boats of whi
we have had information
more than two weapons w<
carried. On the other hand, t
speed has gone up- Vessels 1
ao knots made their ap| -
at quite an early slai;e of
submarine blockade. '1 lie U 53,
so far as her speed and an
ment are concerned, reprcs-
a compromise between th de-
signs of 1914 and most of the
(1 rman boats completed during
the war. She is neither ex<
continued on fourth page
I'


tion'ally well armed nor panic-
ularly fit. but her remarkable
me is her radius of action.
Where she' might have carried
foiir guns s!ie lias only two ; her
torpedo tubes number onlv four,
and her surface speed of i 8 knots
represents the medium between
14 knot boats finished beiore
the war and those of 20 knots
which have been employed
around these islands.
This intciesting development
of the range of action of sub-
marines, which, though confi-
dently expected, has been has-
tened considerably under the
stren of war, is one of the fea-
tures of the sea warfare, from
the naval and engineering
standpoints. When hostilities
were declared it was thought t<
bo as much as the U boats could
do to reach the shores of these
islands. One recalls the sensa
tion expeiienced by the public
when it was found that I! 9 had
been able to travel as far south
as the I look of Holland and tor
peilo the1 three "Cressys." In
December, 1914, Gia..d Admi
von Tirpitz, in the historic
interview in which he f< re
shadowed a submarine 'block-
ade," said :
The successes achieved (by Ilia
submarines) do not justify the
conclusion that large ships are
played out. It is still a question
whether submarines could have
behaved so splendidly in other
waters. In this war we have
learnt a great deal. VVe belh ved
that they could scarcely remain
loi fler than three days from
their base, as after that time
tiieircrews would be exhausted.
VVe soon discovered that the
larger types of these boats cm hi
go round Kn^Iand and remain
out for as much as 14 days at a
time.
Two months later the fust U
ll reached the waters of the
Irish Channel, and two months
later still they were busy off the
south coast of Ireland. In May,
1915. helped by supplies en route,
the first of them had reached the
Dardanelles. The following Sep-
tember saw a regular campaign
mst merchant shipping in-
stituted in Mediterranean wa
t' is, which became specially
virulent in December, 1915.
an 1 April, 1916. Simultaneous
lv the boats, as things became
t 0 hot for them in the Medi
terranean, began to operate in
the Atlantic. The extentsion of
t'u ir depredations to the Ameri
can coast could not rone, there
fore, as a surprise.-The Tiims.
Miami- EXCU RSIO N=Key_West
Motor Vessel "PANAMA *
Sails from Nassau to Key West
DECEMBER 21st
Stopping on way to MIAMI
Round Trip: Nassau-Miami $12.
Nassau-Key West lo*
Tickets for return good only for 10 days.
Nassau, N.P., Dec. 12, 1916.
All Particulars, OFFICE "FRANCES I'."
East Bay street.
A nnouncemeni
Mr. Oscar E. Johnson
TAILOR and CLOTHIER
QEGS to inform his many Customers [hat he has just returned
* from New York where lie became a graduate oi the Mitchell
'lolle^e of America^ was swarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the
several branches of railoring. Modern ''. c< hmque and Cutting
being his specialty.
1 his testimonial from such a high quartet will serve as ;i
Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill
and in his well known three P's viz :
Price, Push, Punciuaiity. Patronage Solicited.
OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St.
(and No. 10 George St.)
3 "The Clothes of a Perfect Day"
Ladies Silk Waists
Ladies Silk Sweaters
Ladies Overcoats
Above is a Job Lot Selling Cheap
WM. HILTON, 40 BAY ST.
Phone 201.
For Exchange.
RI'.NTl'.I) property in Mount
I 11)011, III. ;i!ul Florid;!,
f"r pro| city in New Provi-
dence. / ~ ~ "~~ "~ -
W hat have von ?
ply "I
JOHN IIKXRY
Cutttbei land St


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