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; The Tribune. Nassau, Saturday November 25,4916 l_ L. (ilLBKKT DUT'UCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFKICK: Corner Shirley 6. Chivrloii* Sta Sattau, N. P., Bahamas •PHONK 2fl0. P. O. B OX !<• PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Momlav. Weiliiesrloy and Friday— single copv furMUv. Bad Thursilay—nule copj Saturday—ringta o>|>v Weekly Monthly • %  • '-• Uuaitcih %  • s HalfYeatlv fearh 9SISI'AYAKI.K IN ABVAMCK IrWcctMiDg Rate*:—* pt """ •01 IH-.I insertion: tiiree ieice 1*1 line i.. %  vaoood niviii.iii ; BM |*nn) I'et hue (Of Mibtquei t insertion-. Advertisements mulef • %  'i %  iNOTICE—WktU Correspondent.r ArlicU* are signed with tkt writer's name 11 initial*, or with a pseudonym, w an vunk.,1 "Communicated;'the Edit* must o 1 necessarily be held to be in agr* men: With the warn therein expressed or ivilh the mode ojexpression In such instances, or in the camof"LttUnU the Editor," it only means that the matter ,n> ftnt oi view it considered >/ sufficient interest and impittance to warrant publicuti M. Zhc XiviDune SATURDAY. November 25th New developments in the art of war have revolutionised the theories of military science. The accepted principles Which governed former wars do nut obtain in modern trench warfare. Hence it is not surprising to find a great diversity of opinion among experts as to strategy. One school holds to the beleif that the right course to pursue is to seek out the enemies strongest point, and by concentrating al! available forces at that point to strive for a decisive victory. Such we nre told, is the view of General Foch, that great French soldier who is in command on the Somme front, and of Colonel Repington. whose articles to The Times have attracted so much attention. The other school holds that the true aim of strategy is to find out the enemy's weak point, and concentrate over whelming forces upon that. This we have seen exemplify ed over and over again in the German plan of campaign These tactics are being pursued in the operations against Roumania. At such a critical stage of the war, when his resources are taxed to the utmost, the enemy has delib erately chosen to weaken his forces'on the main front, in order to attempt the destruc • tion of Roumania. Up to the present, the end seems to have justified the means, but whither that state of affairs will continue time will de, cide. Already the effect of these tactics has been seen I in the reverses sustained by the Germans round Verdun. Let us hope that this time.i the Teutons will learn to their cost that these methods can be pushed too far. —:o: — We have seen a circular signed by a large number of the owners of small vessels to the effeot that "on and af ter the First of December" the freight rate on Sisal from the Out Islands to Nassau will be advanced totwoshillingsper hundred pounds. This increase, we are informed has been rendered necessary by the sharp rise in price of all the materials es sential to the running of the vessels. Such things as Hope, Paint, Hardware, and Provisions, have practically doubled in price since the commencement of the war. At that time Sisal was worth Six or Fight shillings per hundred pounds in Nad sau, and the freight rate was One Shilling per 100 lbs. Today Sis 1 fetches from twenty six to twenty eight shillings .Mid six pence, and the freight rate has not been altered. Under these circumstances it is surprising that the ad v.iii e was not made long ere now. Of course we shall be told that this is just another instance of the "wealthy ship owner" exploiting the poor grower, but that is hardly the way to look at it. There are hundreds of our men who depend on "Freight Hauling" for a livelihood. It is well known, also, that these men work the boats on shares. These men have, for the past few months, been working for next to nothing, because provisions and other necessities have advanced so greatly in price. Thus while the wicked owner of vessels, has been enriching himself by running his boats at a loss, these men, whose lives are hard enough in all conscience instead of profiting by the better prices ruling for the commodities which they ban die, have to be content with smaller sharings. EMIGRATION FIGURES FOR OCTOBER. Outwards Inwards Males Females 426 104 P l 20 Totals 530 81 Telegrams will be found on enclosed sheet. MAILS Foreign mails to be d< s patched via Miami, Fla, per "Prances K." will be made up and closed on Friday next, Dec. ist at 8 a.m. The Ward Line S.S. "Norden" sailed from New York on Friday midnight with 8200 bbls. cargo for Nassau. The War Warning published in our paper of yesterday was not quite correct, it should be as follows : War Warning German submarines are in the vicinity of the United States Coast. On and after November 28th all vessels may not enter or leave the harlour of Kingston Ja., between the hours of Sunset and Sunrise. All harbour lights will be extinguished. No incoming or outgoing vessels may enter the Southern Channel by day or night. CHILDREN OF THE EMPIREFUND for maimed and blinded Soldiers and Sailors. by ac We have been requested the Private Secretary to knowledge the following sums which have been received by His Excellency on account of the above Fund : Previously acknowledged £154 4 5 Schooner Corinthia toVictoria School per Mr. Wallace Thompson 10 00 Eight Mile Rock School, Grand Ha hama per Mr, \V. B. Cooper 5 1 £i&4, 9 6 From Saturday Nov. 18th. Sell. "Admiral" arrived from Miami, Fla. on Saturday evening the 181I1 with a cargo of Luui her, Shingles and 1'omato Cratus for Govemor'f Harbour. The sch. "Julia Elizabeth" ar rived from Miami, on Sunday morning the 191I1 with a cargo of Lumber and Shingle* and 5 passengers. Thi Sch. "Sarah K. Douglas" arrived from Miami, Fla. on Sunday morning the 19th with a cargo of Lumber, Tomato Carrieis and Paper and 5 pas seugers. The Ward Line S.S. "Esperan za" arrived from New York on Sunda\ afternoon the 19th—already reported. The tern sch. "Louise F" arrived from Sagua, Cuba on Wednesday Morning the aand in ballast. The Ward Line S.S. "Mon terey" arrived from Mexico and Havana on Friday afternoon the 24th on her way to New York. The following is a list of car go shipped per S.S. "Monterey" for New York on Friday the 24th. 182 bales sponges, 74 bales refuse sponges, 689 bales sisal, 115 bags cocoa nuts, 2410ns lig numvitae, 2250 cases canned pineapples, 3^3 boxes grapefruit, 82 crates tomatoes, 10 bales junk, 6 barrels shells, 1 case phono, records. estomtion of d). [Matthew's hureh. Notice The Committee of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce has decided to close the subscription, list of the "OUR DAY" Red Cross Fund on Saturday Dec. 23rd at noon and beg to urge all in te/ested in collecting & contributing to it to send in returns as early as possible. CHAS.' E. ALBURY, Chairman of Committee. Last Sunday the Lord Bishop of Nassau performed an interesting and extremely happy ceremony when he reopened S. Matthew's Church for Public Worship. Dedi cated various additions and alterations, and consecrated a Side Chapel in the Southern Transept. The work which has in ev ery respect been exceedingly well done has made a decid ed improvement in the inter estof our oldest Nassau Place of Worship. The Chancel has been enlarged by a stone platform built out into the church towards the west, and bounded by a low stone wall, at one corner of which has been built an admirable stone pulpit—the first of its kind we believe in the colony—a beautiful piece of work which is well worth a visit to S. Matthew's to see how much can be done by local work men in spite of many disad vantages under which they labour. Within this addition to the Chancel the Choir Stall — removed from the South Transeptare placed : whilst in place of the Sta I Is a simple but effective Side Chapel has been erected. The Altar has also been beautified by decorative work which has been beauti fully done by Mr. Chas. Eldon --the people's Warden. Whilst upon the Holy Table itself have been placed a magnificent Cross and pair of Candlesticks in turned wood covered with gold leaf. These are again local work and of exquisite design and proportion. In addition to these additions much humble but equally necessary work has been done. The roofs have been attended to, the pews stained and the entire church cleaned and renovat ed. An important architect ural addition has been a false round ceiling in the chancel which both adds to the ap pearance.and bring thech in eel into conformity with the rest of the church. The Ves try has been also newly ap pointed and fitted for the proper keeping of the various articles of worship and the church books, etc. The en tire work reflects great credit upon all concerned and is a distinct tribute to the com plete harmony, interest and loyalty shown toS. Matthews and each other by the Rector the Rev. A. E. Homer— and the Vestry. The pulpit reflects every credit upon the Rector and W. V. Eneas who had charge of the entire ma son's work whilst the Can dlesticks and Cross made by K. Smith, Joiner, W. Bay St., are a tribute to local powers. At the 11 a.m. Service the Rector in his Sermon con gratul; 1 ted the members on their efforts and happily al hided to his various prede cessors as contributing to such splendid results. At 4 p in. the Lord Bishop was met by the Rector and other clergy, the Church warden and Vestry, and after 1 receiving t'e salute of the S. Matthew's Scotus proceeded to the Chancel Steps wheie the KeCtOT and Warden and Vestry presented the petition for Consecration and Bless ing in quaint legal form The Bishop having signified his assent the new Pulpit and Choir were Blessed. Then— to the singing of the 23rd Psalm—a procession wended its way to the Side Chapel which was Blessed and Con secrated. The Bishop's Ser mon and Benediction closed the ceremony, In the evening the Rev. A. J. Brown, Rector of S. Agnes who was ordained S3 years ago in S. Matthew's preached to a packed congregation. S. Matthews or as it is often affectionately called "Eastern Church" is well worth a visit and is a standing tribute to local work consecrated to Cod's service in Nassau's oldest Church. ST. JOHNS CATHFDRAL. g Rev. G. A. Thompson, S. T. D., Minister. Inspiring services tomorrow. 9.30 a.m. Sunday School, H. W. Bradford, Supi. n a.m. Theme "Vision of Duty.'' 7.30 p m. Theme "The contradictions of life" Extra seats. Pleasant ushers. The public are cordially invited. THE GREAT ADVENT. A Sermon for the first Sunday in Advent. Uomans XIII, 12 Put on thi Armour oj light. We are thinking much of sol diers and of their defence and equipment. St, Paul, when he wrote these words to the Chris tian Chuich in Rome, had in, his mind the Roman Soldier, clad in the bright a r mour which was so necessary in those days of hand-to-hand fighting NoW the Church year, which begins with the season of Advent, speaks ol the Christian's armour as the first thing needful in be ginning the new life. I. WHY IS* IT CALLED TUB ARMOUR OF LIGHT ? First, because God is light and in Him is no darknessat all. Everything which enlightens the soul, such as goodness, faith and Christian hope, is God's gift. In the collect for this Sunday we pray that we may cast away the works of dark ness and that He will put upon us this Armour of Li ht. As we make preparation for the festi val of Our Lord's first Advent, which we celebiate at Christ mas, so the Church now turns our minds afiesh to His Second Coming and endeavours t<> get us ready for it by inviting us to come out of the gloom of sin into the light of God, in winch our own Christian armour can reflect the sunshine of a Father's love. Secondly, This armour is call ed The Armour oj Light because it, and the weapons which God gives us, are the only ones with which we can hope to drive back the hosts of darkness. This is what St. Paul means when he writes The weapons of our warfare are not carnal, (i.e. after the flesh). Many persons want to overcome evil but they think that education or cleverness can do it. But no earthly sword can beat the Evil One and his**i •gents. We need The sword of the Spirit God's weapons alone can win the fight, for only divine light can drive aua\ the daikness of sin. Thirdly, We must remember that we aie soldiers of a kingdom of Light. In the Holy Church, which is God's King jdoin. the light of the Gospel is always shining This is repre tented by the lights upon the Altar—Christ the Light of the world, in His two natures, per feet God and peifect Man. The Lhble calls the works of sin the deeds oj darkness, and our Lord Says tliat no man that doeth evil cometh to the tight. II. WHY SHOULD WE PUT ON THE ARMOUR OF LlOHT ? Because a still brighter light is to break upon the world in the Second Coming of Our Lord Jesus Christ. No event is men tioned more frequently in Holy Scripture. Our Lord spoke it plainly and said The Son of Mutt shall come in the glory of His Father with His Angels. In many of His parables he spoke of His return in great glory. When He was on His trial before the High Priest He stated clearly Hereafter shall ye sec the Son of Man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of Heaven. When He a cended up to Heaven, on that Holy Thursday forty days after Easter, the two men in white assured the upward gazing Apos



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%  £* %  The Tribune. Nassau, Saturday November 25,1918 %  To be had at all Grocers C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent lies and others Tkit same Jesus .. I: ek is I \ken uf r i u into kta\ in like man net as i ha\ t \een Him heaven, I he Apostle St. Paul l-'ils the Christians <>f Corinll that the) are u aiting for the ( %  ming of ilic I. : % %  !. and thou <•( I'll lippi that we the S i viour, and tiipe and fous appearing of the threat God and our S iviour Jesus Christ, It js that we may be fitted and prepared f'r that "Last Day" HIKI Our I. id's I lomins to judge the liv niu and the dead and to i<' < ive His pi op*le t> Himself, thai we are urged t<> put on tins Armour of light These are days when ever) Christian soldier must "do his bit". He must be n o gnii d as a soldier <>i Christ by Ins at titude and lo tic, just as the U<> man soldiers were known HI once by tin ir appearance. I hi le i> i ft real fight in progress, but u i are bound to win, for Chi isl and llis men cannot be beaten. Si .'a' rs of Christ ai ise A put your armour on Stio i %  ; in the strength which i iod supplies Through 11 is eternal Son." (Continued from 1st page) n portion admittedly beyond li ti i itorial limits of a vt DHim d the "Vinland," and this c | h lamt reft in,| io "InKl jousness with which the United States govs) nnient regaided the boveriurf of belligerem wai ships about American ports and coas 8 s "The official romp;.out sail the British ttOVi in m ill was aware thai l*e Unil I States BiiveniK it had al • • a n (tardi d t l,,. pi ,ci ii e ol %  Hig' rent rruis ers |llIr [ling He Ann lican c „ s! jn rinse proximitj to tin' | e) | itorial w .'HITS i if the United States and making the neigh bourli"'' I .i stHtin of tlieil observationas inconsistent with ,1,,. treatment to I"' i xpected from ihe naval veaaeli of a fruii'l'i' powei in tun ol war and had maintained h t Con lequ III menace of >uch pro ceedings io freedom ol Ameri* can commerce was vexations and uncourteous to thetinted States SHADOWING OBJECTIONABIE"We assume ibal the clew of the United States government ,s still that contained in their dispatch of the fourth of Oete IH r, 1870." Vicount (irev quoted tins to the efiect the Unit, d StatesgOV '•run 11 nt would regard as auunfriendly act the hovering of of belligerent \ easels n< ai the \in"inan coast in the track of 'ommercfl to American ports A i tli intent to int rc< pt enemy merchantmen and continued ; "In reply to these v'ari us re quests, pn\ate and sem official and official, from the Unitxl States government we asked to !)> %  informed on whal ground tiie claim was made tii.it belligar ent operations which were legi timate in one part of the high se is were illegitimate in another, admitting thai the British slops were not accused of ex ling their sti icl legal right '. under international law ami that the compl nuts made by the United States government were not based on any actual legalit), but on irritation winch the coatinued 1 iresence ol belli gereni vi ssels in 1 lose proximit) • I foiled Stales ports naturally cau •• d io a nutral country. "l,onl Ben sford asks what we d ii AS a matter of fact, though we had contended that accord iny to the sti icl principle of international law British warships tvere entitled to operate freel) anywhere outside ol territorial water, nd the United States had not based their request to to us on international law, but on the giound of courtesy and friendliness, and die annoyance n would cause if vessels wen lose to then coast, insti actions -. n -mi by tin' admiralty tu British \essrN of war at that lime, with a view lo meeting as fai as possible the views ol the United Stall s goi ernment, and it was impressed upon them dial no ai is should be commit' 1 A which would be liable to mince essary irritation. "That, I believe, isa fan sum1 v of wdiat has 1 assed be veer, the United States govern nen 1 and ourselves and of what we 1 w of theii views, It amounts to this : That the United States government did re qu -t us very emp iat cally not to patrol neat their coast; and hat instriit tions W< re sent to i'.ntisli ships of wai. Yital Point Unknown "When we Come to what haS passed with regard to GermarJ ubmariues we do not know. and I cannot answer the ques 1 ion as lo what the ttilud 1 if the United States ai .upwa • toward the German submarines on the Spot. We know that lhey saved life. They rescued ihe crews after the ships were sunk and did everything tl could" to prevent loss of life afterward. "The questions asked mi What did they do before anv Vessel was Sunk, and is it true that ,a German submarine re |UeSted United Stales vessels of war to cle.u out of the way in order thai the operation of sink Ing the defenci less merchant ship should be facilitated and did the I iti I States vessels of war, in f i< t, comply with that request and so facilitate the sinking 1 f vssels. "On that we know nothing more than what has appealed in the press. We have no means >f finding out what actuallv oc curred unless some of the refugees from the vessel itself are able to give an account of Ihe natter. But 1 assume that the only people who can give an account of it are the officers of the German submarine and the officers of the United States na vy who were present on the scene, and thai is a matter which I assume the United States gov ernment will inquire into or has j inquired into, and either is, or will be, in lull possession in re gard to the facts We have not any means ourselves of stating what the actual facts were. I will sum up the situation by saving this : The whole matter Seems to be in a state o| suspense so far as we are concerned Ii is evidently the case that a Ger man submarine visited a United States pun and subsequently sink British and neutral vessels %  iff the American coast. We do not know what precautions .Yen taken to prevent the submarine from obtaining supplies or information from the newspapers or otherwise as to the movement of merchant ships off the coast. Nor do we know whether American ships of war facilitated the operations of the submarine by getting out of the way as r< pu t fully to the United St..tes government their view wnh regard lo the danger of permitting submarines of (he war powers to visit ports ol the neutral powers. That was done befoss tins part irulai I lei man submarine arrived. The nplv of the United Mates govern men! was not favourable to the views of Ihe Allies mi th.it point but it is possible there may be further discussion on the gener al question. "Therefore, when I say that we do not propose to make official representation until we know the full facts and the view of the United Slates govern ment, that applies only to the spe< ml procei dings of the < !ei man submniue, which w? un demand are now 11 •• subject on tin special consider 1 tion ol the United States g'lVfmniriit, who are tin mselves ascei ta ling the full facts of the case and vv ill, I suppose, in due course let it be known to the world what view tin v lake. "We shall then be able to d cide whether it is ne 1 ary for us to make any official reprr sen tat ion on the subject, and, if so, whal the nature of this offi cial r e i entation si all 1 Lord Beresford expressed Ihe hope that the situation would not be allowed to remain as it was, as it would lead to irrita tion. "We do not want political questions raised between these two great countries," he said, „but they are certain to be rais ed unless some definite conclu sion is reached or some commu ideation made between the two governments which will clear up the question. —"The Clarion," Belize, I londuras. NOTICE. O N and after Dec. 1st,' 1916, the !• HEIGHT on SISAL con veyed by my vessels from the Out Islands, to Nassau N.P. will be advanced to Two Shillings per 100 lbs. Till further notice. (Signed) WAI.TKR K. MOORE. To DEAF PEOPLE "FRENCH ORLENE" absolutely cures den mess and noises in the head, no matter how severe or longstanding the case may be. Hundreds of persons whose cases were supposed to be incurable have been permanently cured by this new remedy. I his wonderful preparation goes direct to the actual scat of the trouble, and one Box is ample toe}]'actually cure any ordinary case. MRS. HOW 16, ol /' rttand Crescent, says "1 ba "Orlene" bai pletaly cored ma afn-r twelve jrssut' Log." Miss RANCIS, ot Bradford Strett, Birmingham, -..iv> "Yournewrema for nearly 26 years. Ii is indc I ;i tplendid preparation, and she wiihea me to convey to you her luinllell thanks. UBS. WILDE 1 says: —"I .nu delighted, I triad the new 'Orlene* f. >r the bead-a cd almoat at one, and the he has returned enabling me tn hear or:, 1 iv..' %  1 %  %  1 • MR. JOHN MA.YNARD, of Hose St., il\ IMS lieen tinnu sins of curing my, Gfatt •. I J %  "After spending nearmother's deafness aftai being a suferesi ly fifty pounds 00 various so called •Vuti's" il is wonderful t find mys If completely cured at such a 11 rust. The'Orlene'is indeed a splen did remedy." &r Every sufferer should try this new remedy, for there is nothing better at any price. PRICE 4/6 per Box, post free, with full directions. Address:—'ORLENE,' Co., io, South View, Watling Street, Dartford, Kent, England. Please mention this paper. %  iiifiiiiauwii* niiiiiiMliitiiMnMiiiui(iiiiitnifnii„Miiininii,iiMi TAILORING A. J. KEMP -TAILOR— And Artistic Cutter Graduate ol ihe Jno. J. Mitchell's School of Garment Cutting M w v RK iroceedings Is prepared to give the I-it.-: rial and the bi 11 n 1 iafactino to the id public REPAIRING. CLKAN1NG nnd PR.ESSING carefully attended 10. TAILORING I YOUR PATRONAGE appreciated. will lie No. 572 [Last Bay Street NASSAU BAHAMAS. U"*l THE ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT of the GIRAFFE is remarkable, but the abnormal development of the demand for BVNUOHT SOAP is still more remarkable. It is not known how many people have ever seen a Giraffe, but it is known that there are millions and millions of carctul housewives all over the world using ., Sunlight SoapVi These housewives no longer dread the advent of Wfl 1, with SUNLIGHT SOAP as tb< 1 ally, they are assured dt a quick I all dirt and uncleanlincso. SuUi .1 >HT SOAP saves your clothes. T.tY IT N XT IN YOUR W ASK ? % %  • ft 11 w &M Shingles. UST received from Jacksonville5 l9"Besl Cjp No bettei grade than Muse on the Via at 18s .5 ; iea our ,! Primea>" Cypreaa at 32$. per 1000. Tins grade same guaranti 1 .is l he Bests Anv defective shingles can be returm .1 r\lsocheapef grade in it April6th. 1916 C. C SAUNDKRS.



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The Tribune, assau, Saturday November 25,1916 N O T I C E This is to inform the public that in future B. V. D. UNDERWEAR will be sold in the Bahamas by the undersigned ONLY Wm. HILTON, 260 Bay Street. T. S. HILTON, The Park Store. Nov. 18, 1916 ~4 A nnouncemenl Mr. Oscar E. Johnson TAILOR and CLOTHIER B EGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned from New York where he became a graduate of the Mitchell Zollege of America& was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting eing his specialty. This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill and in his well known three P's viz : Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited. OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St. (and No. io George St.) To Pay 21s. For 100 lbs. RICE —Is Equivalent TOPS Od. £ for 224 lbs. BUT 47s. Bicycles for Sale, Hire and Repaired. Don't grope in the dark—turn night into day. Large stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs. W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St. FOR SALE. A SET of Encyclopedia Britannica—29Volumes. New—never been used. For information, Apply to TRIBUNE Office. FOR RENT T HAT desirable Cottage, corner Marl borough St. and Nassau Court. Possession can be had 1st December. For further particulars, Apply J. W. DAVIS, 6-io Marlborough St. Our IOO lb. Bags Is Superior Rice. SEE FOR YOURSELF At The New York House Shingles. J USr received from Jacksonville 5 x iq"Best Cypress at 1 per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—5 3' "Primes" Cypress at 3JS. per 1000. This grade carriei same guarantee as theBests." Any defective shingles can be returned. Alsocheaper grade in stock April6th. 1916 C. C SAUNDERS. 8s carries our NOTICE. O N and after Dec. 1st,! 1916, the FREIGHT on SISAL con veyed by my vessels from the Out Islands^ to Nassau N. P. will be advanced to Two Shillings per 100 lbs. Till further notice. (Signed) WALTER K. MOORE. NOTICE T HIS is to inform my Patrons and the Public, that I have opened my Public Black Smith Shop; and am now ready to do anything in the line fo Gene ral repair or new work Horseshoeing a specialty. All work done Mechanicallv P. A. HUYLER I 4



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The True Safeguard of Baby's Health ^JMenburgs'FbDds T HE milk of a healthy mother con fe is a degree of immunity to infection to the young infant. Many mothers, however, though willing, cannot nurse their babies for various reasons. In such cases the greatestoare should be taken in selecting a proper substitute. Ordinary cow's milk cannot be regarded as a safe food for infants; it is acid, contains indigestible curd, and is almost invariably contaminated with harmful germs. By using the "Allenburys" Foods, which are freo from all dangerous organisms, and effectually replaco human milk, security for baby is ensured and vigorous growth and health are promoted. Tho "Allenburys" Foods are largely used and recommended by the Medical and Nursing Professions; they have stood the test of timo and have become a household necessity all over tho world. The 'Allenburys' Infant Dietary Mothtr and Child. Baby b'i mmlhl. FtJJram tnrin n Ita'AllrnHnyi' Fotii ^ *> W2 &>\ MILK FOOD No. I. Prom Birtb to 3 months MILK FOOD No. 2. From 3 to 6 month* MALTED FOOD No. 3 From 6 month, upwards. The 'Allenburys' Foods ire made under special processes by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand. Wrllrlorlrer haok'lnlitiit Feeding nnr unofficial despatches which would indicate that the perilous position of the Roumanians had be* n ameliorated. Pttrogtad reports that the Roumanians are still in retreat from the Jiul Valley towards Qrajova hut this report probably anted the announcement of tlie capture of the Crajova railway junction by the forces ol the Central Powers. A retieat on Crajova would surely throw the Roumanians into the hands of their enemy to the north east. In the All Valley, and in the Rothcuthurm Pass sector more ground has been taken from the Roumanians by the Teutons, while in the region around Campalun|| the Roumanians in 1 strong offensive have been held by the stiffness of the front of the invaders. Late repoi is from Berlin concern ing the fighting were to the effect that northeast ol Monxstii attacks by the Allies hid failed. Paris had previously announced that the Gei mans and Bulgarians were offering strong resistance a'ong their new line running bom Snegova tluee miles north of Monastic to Hill 1051, 13 miles northeast of the town, while a Serbian official statement credited the Serbians and their allies with the caplme of the village of Paralevoand Dobrimor, northeast ol Monastir, On 1 he extreme western flank of the Macedonian theatre between Lakes Presba and Ochrisa the belligerenl forces have come into contact, P.iris reports the capture by Entente troops of the town ol Las kovets on the west bank of Lake Presba. The Turks have launched a heavy attack against Sultan.ibad, Persia, but were repulsed with he,ivy losses by 'he Russians, according to Petrograd advices. B\ order of the Entente commander the Minisiersof the Central Powers with their staff have left Greece. Paris: —Energetic resistance is being offered by lie Germans and Bulgarians on the Macedonia front north of Monastir, the war office announces. 1 he advance of the Allies was delayed by heavy tug 500 more prisoners were taken, Berlin:—The capture by the ,,,,,„ forces ol the height neat Para lova 10 miles northeast of Vonasti r ,.] announced olficially.Berween Lake Presba and Lake Ocbl and on the Mou istir PJains the vanguad of the Allies forces came within reach of our forces east of Para lova. We captured a height .Hid maintained it againststl Fit racks The invasion of Routn continues um h •" ian attacks have beonchecked ground was gainedon the Rothenthurm Pass road and in the Alt Valley. On the western front M| weather has greately interfered with the f'gbting activity. South of I.abassee Canal patiols of Anhall InfantrV Regiment No93.and Magdeburg Pioneer BattaliooNo. 4 entered British trenches and after destroying that defensive bn; back more lhan a 1 prisoners 11 one maceine gun. — :o:251 h November, iqi6. Via Jamaica. London:—We bombarded the enemy lines near Ranstrt east of Aogres and north ol Labassee Canal. An unsuccessful attack by a German column upon a small British position in German East Africa resulted in the Germans being driven off With heavy losses. Saloniki:— Serbian headquao ten announce that our troops successfully followed up their attack on the whole front taking the village of Budamirtsa and surrounding heights. Severe losses were inflicted on the ene my and 186 Germans arid 300 llulgaiians were captured. Paris:—There has been inter mittent artillery action along the whole front. The British successfully mid ed Kjupri on the Struma front, Via Key West. Berlin.—The war office an nouncea that army groups 01 Von Mackensen have crossed tl ic Danube in several places, v.or man forces in Wallachia have reached the Alt River. Bucharest:-Roumanian lor ces have assumed the offenssjjB in Dobrudja and have advance along the entire front captuun^ several towns 15 miles north ot theTchernavoda-Constanza rail road. j+\ London:-The virtual? n quest of Wallachia by Teuton ~ forces is announced by Bei ' Orsova and TernuSeverin on the Danube have been captured by Austro-German troops.



PAGE 1

etrognd:—The Russians in ^obrudja pushing south have reached Lake Tashaul ia miles north of Constanza and have crossed theCartal Hiver. Siloniki:—TheSt-rbwuismade further inroads on < ierman-Bul garian lines nerlheastof Monas *; r Within the bend of the Cerna River the Germans were forced to flee. London:—The British hospi tal ship Braemer Castle, 6200 t^ns, enroute from Saloniki to Maria with wounded, was tor pedoed in the Aegean Sea ac cording to report from Ailii-ns. There was no loss of lile. 'Vtrograd:—Alexander Ire P"ff. Rusaian Minister of Kail ways, has been appointed pr mier. The retiring piemier Slur rner, has be*>n appointed Grand Chamberlain of the Imperial Court. Milan: —A newspaper says that British naval forces recent ly captured a large German sub marine and landed two officers and 13 sailors of the crew at an Italian port. London:—The British steam er Krnaston has been sunk. Crew saved. Juarez,Mexico:—Villa renew ed attacks on Chihuahua again today but was repulsed. One general two colonels and 100 men of Carranza forces were killed. 400 of Villa's forces were left dead on the field. Villa personally directed the fighting from a nearby hill. Atlantic City:—A protocol providing for the withdrawal of American troops in Mexico and for patrol of the border was signed by the American-Mexican joint commission. American troops will be withdrawn 14 days after the protocol is finally approved unless the border i endangered by bandits Kach country will patrol its own side of the border. The United States reserves the right to pur sue into Mexico any marauding force. The Nassau Bargain House. Xmas Goods T HE Largest display of and finest Toys, Fireworks, Doll's etc. ever seen in this City. Personally selected by the proprietor while in America. We are exhibiting same at our 3 stores in Market and Bay Sts. The tipper floor of the Department Store in Hay St. will be opened up on Saturday 25th irist. from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m., and the Public, are respectfully invited to! come and see one of the larg• est varieties of Toys ever seen in this city. Toy* from 3d! each to 30s. We have also been opening up Gents* Palm Beach Suits at £1. also Boys' and Youth's Palm Beach Suits at 12s and 14s. Boys, Wht. Duck Pants, Gents Overcoats, Black Alpaca Coats, Boys' Suits at 2s. to 4s. Ladies' White Chin cliilla Coats, Gents' fast HI line quality and fitting Tweed Suits sold in N. Y. at •35. our price $15. Another Big Stock of Furniture. Chi na, Muslin Underwear &C, You can buv almost anything at A. F. MOO UK'S 3 stores. A. F. MOORE. Xmas 1916. The Branch Tailoring Dept. 60 Marborou^h St. Opposite Hotel Colonial. EXPERIENCE bought is C give me a chance at a suit and Cutter. lost, then for you. Tailor nothing T. S. N'ABI.IK. JOHN BUTLER Office: 367 Bay St., East I Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Real .Estate Agent ne 245 %  EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods -AGENT NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich NOTICE *OF REMOVAL K EMOVED from 404 Ba\ Street City, to Georg< Street No. 11. All work dont witKj^ieatness and despatch, PS licrc-tofore. Patronagi solicited. JOS. H. S. BOWEN, Tailor. New Bicycle Tyres For Sale We put them on for you free of charge. New American Bicycles for sale. Moderate Prices. BRICK JOHNSON 42 King Street, Nassau. Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, 1.1 M I TE D. Authorized Capita £5,000 •— LOW RATES FOR WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and at is factory Adjustments of Claims. HOME OFPICB:— 264 Bay Street, Nassau. Phone 214 Private School A RK vou going to be a stai or a 'tick ? Why not try Thompson's Private School ? Terms reasonable. Apply to TRIBUNI Office. Chas. E. East Bay St. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spir its



PAGE 1

t' "News FOP Everybody" %  ; Svillivm ivildli in* |urar in verb* mnuietrl BaiiiK bound loiwenr to the Dogmive of no Master, Vol XIII. No. 524 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. NOVEMBER. 25. 1916 1917 Announcement "Reo Six"" 7 passenger Touring £J50 "Reo Four" 5 passenger Touring 205 Price. THREE CENTS ie Reo specui ] NOTE. In July closing year 1916 I mad.offer of £"246 on I lie Reo Six, 7 passenger Touring Car as I had done the previous yeai on the Reo Four, 5 passenger Touring, but no one 11 d confuse these special offers Which are transient, with regular pri( 1 Yours, J. P. SIMMS, Reo Agent J. C. Coakley's Flake Tobacco. This l'oba< co made express ly for J. C. CoakleyLong leaf, Fine flavor and UOma, K ps hard and firm. Made to catch the trade "I those who know what good tobacco is and have got tired of some < >f t he old brands that have gone had. Give it a tl ial and you will enjoy smoking like you used to. Prices OJd. per flake—3 dozen flakes at od. per Hake. Satisfaction guaranteed 01 money refunded. LONDON, Oct. 17.-The British government will DO! make any official representation to the Umted States coocerning the Geunau submarine U 53 pend an announcement of its attitude by the American government, 'or patrolling its waters or in regard to coming to port and pro curing information from news papers. We do not know whether it is true American war. ships got out 'if the submarine's wav. That is a matter for the d V iscount Grey, Secretary of American government only, and h Just a hint -"The Ulies" id. Cigars are the best evi r, and still at the front and good to the end. J. C. COAKLEY, 304 Hay St Mate lor foreign affairs, in the House of Lords today. In reply to a question >n cerning the attitude of the United Slates toward British patrols Viscount Grej said the United States admitted British si ips were not exceeding their legal rights under international law, but the American government complained of their presence, on the ground of the irritation which the continued present 1 of belligerent warships off the coast of the United Mates naturally cau ed in a neutral coun try. He declared the United States had requested Great Britain emphatically not to patrol "if its coast and said that instructions were sent to the British ships there to avoid causing any unnecessary irnta tion and to comply as far as l>"ssible with the American request. "With regard to the U 53," the foreign secretary continued, "we do not know what steps were taken by the United States th it government is I inquiries. We as will announce its York harbour. We bad an un official communication later on deprecating the same thing and saying that in the past such hovering of foreign vessels in the vicinity of the great ports of the United Mates had forced that government, owing to the public feeling aroused, to take a very Strong line, and that if the practice continued it might be construed into an act of un friendliness requiring some ac tion on the part of the United States government. "There was later on an official complaint, on the sixteenth of December, 1914 (1915) founded I on the shadowing by a British' warship for some distance along the American coast, though from (Continued on 3rd page) DRINK WELCH'S Grape Juice PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. i Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. At BLACK'S 222 Bay St. And The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colohial u > %  assume making full smile also it attitude in due course. Pending that WC do not propose to make any official representation on the subject of the submarine." Tinquestion concerning the German submarine raid in Am erican waters as raised by Baron Charles Beresford, former commander of the British Home Fleet ; Earl Grey, foimer gov ernor general of Canada, and others. Baron Beresford asked whether British cruisers were removed from American waters owing to American objections, and, if so, \\ hat steps the government proposed for the pro tec lion ol British vessels. He criticised the submarine replyas at least curt and said the American ideas of neutrality wencurious. Karl Grey wanted an assur anee the report was untrue that American commanders of des troyers had accented to the re qui st HI t lie German submarine c< immander to clear out the way and give him room to blow up ships. GREY REVIEWS SITUATION The foreign secretary said in replj to I.oul Beiesford's ques tion : "The best thing I can <]o is to read a summary of what actual ly passed between the United States government and His Majesty's government on this subject srnce the war began and what we understood the view of the United States government to be." Viscount Grey then read the following statement: On the fourteenth of Septem ber, 1914, the British Ambas sador .it Washington telegraphed! that the United States au thorities had intercepted wireless communications from H.M. ''Suffolk" at New York asking for supplies and newspapers, and and be inform* d us that the Un ited States government conlidered that this would be making use of United States tern torj as a base for supplies and information as to shipping movements through the newspapers. "The proceeding was, as far as 1 am aware, not repeated and no official protest was received so far as I have been able to discover in the foreign office. "On the fifth of October, 1914, we had a private communication respecting the pre sener of British ships near New European Agency. I NDENTS promptly execut ed at lowest cash prices for all kinds of British and Con'tinentnl goods, including r h 1 gi 11i. ini\. Boots, Shoes and Leather, Chaotic ill and Druggists' Sundries, China, Karthenw.tre ami Glassware, Cycles, M ton an 1 \ —111 s, D i\. Millinery and Piece Goods, Kaiu-y Goods and Perfun Hardware, Machinery and Metals, Jewellery, Plate and Wati Photographic and 0| tical Goods Provisions and Oilmen's Stores, c ti\, etc. ( --liii'v i n :' I'.r. I 1 J p,c. v Discount1 Sfecinl Quotationt M Dimand, ;.. , ids. Const u AtWILLIAM WILSON A SONS i Established i"o ij 25 Abchurch Lane, London, E.C. Cable Address LONRE AINANDOUN, Pretty Flower Siand. Wonderful Tftlilf. If not perfectly aalMartnrv, returned at rai M will he promptly refunded Including AI.1.|. 9.-<|2.20j Hostage e*Ira. Welcitf JHI< krd 6 tits. Send POSTCAKU for Catalogue • 1 Hller Pint*. It ry, Fountain 1 ollel A rile lea, 1 „i . tc. It will only cost \oii n P Piiiv .ai. I ma>] \'< > 01 We tfimrantew the aafa delivery of all our rfoods '1 11 in UnWar. hhould anjuooai ,. 1 hem I Klil 1 Ol %  II tROE Write our Hank for lleferenoe. Rttiikara: [.otidon < nv and Midland Hank. Lid 14, Corn H\ n .1. Ittiafc I, toff. PFAR<1 I TH l" \Jw'llnri.Cut1ere, rr,rtAi3 L.IU. \ \Mf. / K nd Slhersmlthi. V. BRISTOL RRIDOK. BRISTOL, Ing. T Keeping Guard HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these preserving the balam e t cade. SHOE i-i STORE is on guard, and in spite ol the advanng price of leather, and the increase in U}e wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. Tins week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 210 cases containing 6656 pans of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan V&V KNOW ys With these reinO'ii i'ai nts he Rig Four will be able to keep the effemy High I'rh cs'off its terrtforv and Customer*; may rely on*, pysi'liasing at the old pd£r>s in spite of Tariff rumours ancrTising quotations in 'he Mar kets abroad. G. T, KKOWL.IIS, Prop. Big4, B iv "it. (Sponge Exchange).


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02754
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, November 25, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02754

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Full Text
t'
"News Fop Everybody"
;
Svillivm ivildli in* |urar in verb* mnuietrl
BaiiiK bound loiwenr to the Dogmive of no Master,
Vol XIII. No. 524
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. NOVEMBER. 25. 1916
1917
Announcement
"Reo Six""
7 passenger Touring J50
"Reo Four"
5 passenger Touring 205
Price. THREE CENTS
ie Reo
specui ]
NOTE.
In July closing
year 1916 I mad.-
offer of "246 on I lie Reo Six,
7 passenger Touring Car as I
had done the previous yeai
on the Reo Four, 5 passenger
Touring, but no one 11 d
confuse these special offers
Which are transient, with
regular pri( 1
Yours,
J. P. SIMMS,
Reo Agent
J. C. Coakley's
Flake Tobacco.
This l'oba< co made express
ly for J. C. Coakley-
Long leaf, Fine flavor and
UOma, K ps hard and firm.
Made to catch the trade "I
those who know what good
tobacco is and have got tired
of some < >f t he old brands that
have gone had.
Give it a tl ial and you will
enjoy smoking like you used
to.
Prices OJd. per flake3
dozen flakes at od. per Hake.
Satisfaction guaranteed 01
money refunded.
LONDON, Oct. 17.-The Bri-
tish government will do! make
any official representation to the
Umted States coocerning the
Geunau submarine U 53 pend
an announcement of its attitude
by the American government,
'or patrolling its waters or in re-
gard to coming to port and pro
curing information from news
papers. We do not know whe-
ther it is true American war.
ships got out 'if the submarine's
wav. That is a matter for the
d V iscount Grey, Secretary of American government only, and
h Just a hint -"The Ulies"
id. Cigars are the best evi r,
and still at the front and good
to the end.
J. C. COAKLEY,
304 Hay St
Mate lor foreign affairs, in the
House of Lords today.
In reply to a question >n
cerning the attitude of the Unit-
ed Slates toward British patrols
Viscount Grej said the United
States admitted British si ips
were not exceeding their legal
rights under international law,
but the American government
complained of their presence, on
the ground of the irritation
which the continued present 1
of belligerent warships off the
coast of the United Mates na-
turally cau ed in a neutral coun
try. He declared the United
States had requested Great Bri-
tain emphatically not to patrol
"if its coast and said that
instructions were sent to the
British ships there to avoid
causing any unnecessary irnta
tion and to comply as far as
l>"ssible with the American re-
quest.
"With regard to the U 53,"
the foreign secretary continued,
"we do not know what steps
were taken by the United States
th it government is
I inquiries. We as
will announce its York harbour. We bad an un
official communication later on
deprecating the same thing and
saying that in the past such
hovering of foreign vessels in
the vicinity of the great ports
of the United Mates had forced
that government, owing to the
public feeling aroused, to take
a very Strong line, and that if
the practice continued it might
be construed into an act of un
friendliness requiring some ac
tion on the part of the United
States government.
"There was later on an official
complaint, on the sixteenth of
December, 1914 (1915) founded I
on the shadowing by a British'
warship for some distance along
the American coast, though from
(Continued on 3rd page)
DRINK
WELCH'S
Grape
Juice
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
i Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.
At BLACK'S
222 Bay St.
And The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colohial
u > assume
making full
smile also it
attitude in due course. Pending
that WC do not propose to make
any official representation on
the subject of the submarine."
Tin- question concerning the
German submarine raid in Am
erican waters as raised by Baron
Charles Beresford, former com-
mander of the British Home
Fleet ; Earl Grey, foimer gov
ernor general of Canada, and
others. Baron Beresford asked
whether British cruisers were
removed from American waters
owing to American objections,
and, if so, \\ hat steps the gov-
ernment proposed for the pro
tec lion ol British vessels. He
criticised the submarine reply-
as at least curt and said the
American ideas of neutrality
wen- curious.
Karl Grey wanted an assur
anee the report was untrue that
American commanders of des
troyers had accented to the re
qui st hi t lie German submarine
c< immander to clear out the way
and give him room to blow up
ships.
Grey Reviews
Situation
The foreign secretary said in
replj to I.oul Beiesford's ques
tion :
"The best thing I can <]o is to
read a summary of what actual
ly passed between the United
States government and His
Majesty's government on this
subject srnce the war began and
what we understood the view
of the United States government
to be."
Viscount Grey then read the
following statement:
On the fourteenth of Septem
ber, 1914, the British Ambas
sador .it Washington telegraph-
ed! that the United States au
thorities had intercepted wire-
less communications from H.M.
''Suffolk" at New York asking
for supplies and newspapers, and
and be inform* d us that the Un
ited States government con-
lidered that this would be mak-
ing use of United States tern
torj as a base for supplies and
information as to shipping
movements through the news-
papers.
"The proceeding was, as far
as 1 am aware, not repeated
and no official protest was re-
ceived so far as I have been
able to discover in the foreign
office.
"On the fifth of October,
1914, we had a private com-
munication respecting the pre
sener of British ships near New
European Agency.
INDENTS promptly execut
ed at lowest cash prices for
all kinds of British and Con-
'tinentnl goods, including
r h 1 gi 11i. ini\.
Boots, Shoes and Leather,
Chaotic ill and Druggists' Sundries,
China, Karthenw.tre ami Glassware,
Cycles, M ton an 1 \ 111 s,
D i\. Millinery and Piece Goods,
Kaiu-y Goods and Perfun
Hardware, Machinery and Metals,
Jewellery, Plate and Wati
Photographic and 0| tical Goods
Provisions and Oilmen's Stores,
c ti\, etc.
( --liii'v i n :' I'.r. I 1 J p,c.
v Discount- 1
Sfecinl Quotationt m Dimand,
;.. ids.
Const u At-
William Wilson a Sons
i Established i"o ij
25 Abchurch Lane, London, E.C.
Cable Address LONRE AINANDOUN,
Pretty
Flower
Siand.
Wonderful Tftlilf. If not perfectly aalMartnrv,
returned at rai m
will he promptly refunded Including AI.1.| enn lie returned at our expense Mid v Uf money
d IneludUu ALL iK*st-
I vve pnlil oul. Height 12,
lnches>....................9.-<|2.20j
Hostage e*Ira. Welcitf jhi< krd 6 tits.
Send POSTCAKU for Catalogue 1 Hller Pint*.
It ry, Fountain
1 ollel A rile lea, 1 i tc. It
will only cost \oii n P Piiiv .ai. I ma>] \'< > 01
We tfimrantew the aafa delivery of
all our rfoods '1 11 in Un- War. hhould anjuooai
,. 1 hem
I Klil 1 Ol II tROE Write our Hank
for lleferenoe. Rttiikara: [.otidon < nv and Mid-
land Hank. Lid 14, Corn H\ n .1. Ittiafc I, toff.
PFAR<1 I TH l" \Jw'llnri.Cut1ere,
rr,rtAi3 L.IU. \ \Mf. /Knd Slhersmlthi.
V. BRISTOL RRIDOK. BRISTOL, Ing.
T
Keeping Guard
HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these
preserving the balam e t cade.
SHOE i-i STORE
is on guard, and in spite ol the advanng price of leather,
and the increase in U}e wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
Tins week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
210 cases containing 6656 pans of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
V&V
KNOW
ys

With these reinO'ii i'ai nts he Rig Four will be
able to keep the effemy High I'rhcs'off its terrtforv and
Customer*; may rely on*, pysi'liasing at the old pdr>s in
spite of Tariff rumours ancrTising quotations in 'he Mar
kets abroad. *
G. T, KKOWL.IIS, Prop. Big- 4,
B iv "it. (Sponge Exchange).


;
The Tribune. Nassau, Saturday November 25,4916
l_
L. (ilLBKKT DUT'UCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFKICK:
Corner Shirley 6. Chivrloii* Sta
Sattau, N. P., Bahamas
PHONK 2fl0. P. O. BOX !<
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Momlav. Weiliiesrloy and Friday
single copv .....
furMUv. Bad Thursilaynule copj
Saturdayringta o>|>v
Weekly ............
Monthly ......... '-
Uuaitcih........ *s*
HalfYeatlv.........
fearh ........
9S-
IS-
I'AYAKI.K IN ABVAMCK_____
IrWcctMiDg Rate*:* pt """
01 IH-.I insertion: tiiree ieice 1*1 line
i.. vaoood niviii.iii ; BM......|*nn) I'et
hue (Of Mibtquei t insertion-.
Advertisements mulef ' 'i ' i-
NOTICEWktU Correspondent.- r
ArlicU* are signed with tkt writer's name
11 initial*, or with a pseudonym, w an
vunk.,1 "Communicated;'the Edit* must
o 1 necessarily be held to be in agr* men:
With the warn therein expressed or ivilh the
mode ojexpression In such instances, or in
the camof"LttUnU the Editor," it
only means that the matter ,n> ftnt oi view
it considered >/ sufficient interest and im-
pittance to warrant publicuti m.
Zhc XiviDune
SATURDAY. November 25th
New developments in the
art of war have revolutionis-
ed the theories of military
science. The accepted prin-
ciples Which governed former
wars do nut obtain in modern
trench warfare. Hence it is
not surprising to find a great
diversity of opinion among
experts as to strategy. One
school holds to the beleif that
the right course to pursue is
to seek out the enemies
strongest point, and by con-
centrating al! available
forces at that point
to strive for a decisive victory.
Such we nre told, is the view
of General Foch, that great
French soldier who is in
command on the Somme
front, and of Colonel Rep-
ington. whose articles to The
Times have attracted so much
attention.
The other school holds that
the true aim of strategy is to
find out the enemy's weak
point, and concentrate over
whelming forces upon that.
This we have seen exemplify
ed over and over again in
the German plan of campaign
These tactics are being pur-
sued in the operations against
Roumania. At such a criti-
cal stage of the war, when
his resources are taxed to the
utmost, the enemy has delib
erately chosen to weaken his
forces'on the main front, in
order to attempt the destruc
tion of Roumania. Up to the
present, the end seems to
have justified the means, but
whither that state of affairs
will continue time will de,
cide. Already the effect of
these tactics has been seen I
in the reverses sustained by
the Germans round Verdun.
Let us hope that this time.i
the Teutons will learn to
their cost that these methods
can be pushed too far.
:o:
We have seen a circular
signed by a large number of
the owners of small vessels
to the effeot that "on and af
ter the First of December"
the freight rate on Sisal from
the Out Islands to Nassau
will be advanced totwoshil-
lingsper hundred pounds.
This increase, we are in-
formed has been rendered
necessary by the sharp rise in
price of all the materials es
sential to the running of the
vessels. Such things as Hope,
Paint, Hardware, and Pro-
visions, have practically
doubled in price since the
commencement of the war.
At that time Sisal was
worth Six or Fight shillings
per hundred pounds in Nad
sau, and the freight rate was
One Shilling per 100 lbs. To-
day Sis 1 fetches from twenty
six to twenty eight shillings
.Mid six pence, and the freight
rate has not been altered.
Under these circumstances
it is surprising that the ad
v.iii e was not made long ere
now. Of course we shall be
told that this is just another
instance of the "wealthy ship
owner" exploiting the poor
grower, but that is hardly the
way to look at it. There are
hundreds of our men who de-
pend on "Freight Hauling"
for a livelihood. It is well
known, also, that these men
work the boats on shares.
These men have, for the past
few months, been working
for next to nothing, because
provisions and other neces-
sities have advanced so great-
ly in price. Thus while the
wicked owner of vessels, has
been enriching himself by
running his boats at a loss,
these men, whose lives are
hard enough in all conscience
instead of profiting by the
better prices ruling for the
commodities which they ban
die, have to be content with
smaller sharings.
EMIGRATION FIGURES
FOR OCTOBER.
Outwards Inwards
Males
Females
426
104
Pl
20
Totals 530
81
Telegrams will be
found on enclosed
sheet.
MAILS
Foreign mails to be d< s
patched via Miami, Fla,
per "Prances K." will be
made up and closed on Fri-
day next, Dec. ist at 8 a.m.
The Ward Line S.S. "Nor-
den" sailed from New York
on Friday midnight with
8200 bbls. cargo for Nassau.
The War Warning published
in our paper of yesterday was
not quite correct, it should be
as follows :
War Warning
German submarines are in the
vicinity of the United States Coast.
On and after November 28th all
vessels may not enter or leave the
harlour of Kingston Ja., between
the hours of Sunset and Sunrise.
All harbour lights will be extin-
guished. No incoming or outgoing
vessels may enter the Southern
Channel by day or night.
CHILDREN OF THE EMPIREFUND
for maimed and blinded
Soldiers and Sailors.
by
ac
We have been requested
the Private Secretary to
knowledge the following sums
which have been received by
His Excellency on account of
the above Fund :
Previously acknow-
ledged 154 4 5
Schooner Corinthia
toVictoria School
per Mr. Wallace
Thompson 10 00
Eight Mile Rock
School, Grand Ha
hama per Mr, \V.
B. Cooper 5 1
i&4, 9 6
From Saturday Nov. 18th.
Sell. "Admiral" arrived from
Miami, Fla. on Saturday evening
the 181I1 with a cargo of Luui
her, Shingles and 1'omato Cratus
for Govemor'f Harbour.
The sch. "Julia Elizabeth" ar
rived from Miami, on Sunday
morning the 191I1 with a cargo
of Lumber and Shingle* and 5
passengers.
Thi Sch. "Sarah K. Douglas"
arrived from Miami, Fla. on
Sunday morning the 19th with
a cargo of Lumber, Tomato
Carrieis and Paper and 5 pas
seugers.
The Ward Line S.S. "Esperan
za" arrived from New York on
Sunda\ afternoon the 19thal-
ready reported.
The tern sch. "Louise F" ar-
rived from Sagua, Cuba on
Wednesday Morning the aand
in ballast.
The Ward Line S.S. "Mon
terey" arrived from Mexico and
Havana on Friday afternoon
the 24th on her way to New
York.
The following is a list of car
go shipped per S.S. "Monterey"
for New York on Friday the
24th.
182 bales sponges, 74 bales
refuse sponges, 689 bales sisal,
115 bags cocoa nuts, 2410ns lig
numvitae, 2250 cases canned
pineapples, 3^3 boxes grapefruit,
82 crates tomatoes, 10 bales
junk, 6 barrels shells, 1 case
phono, records.
estomtion of
d). [Matthew's
hureh.
Notice
The Committee of the Ba-
hamas Chamber of Com-
merce has decided to close
the subscription, list of the
"OUR DAY" Red Cross Fund
on Saturday Dec. 23rd at
noon and beg to urge all in
te/ested in collecting & con-
tributing to it to send in re-
turns as early as possible.
CHAS.' E. ALBURY,
Chairman of Committee.
Last Sunday the Lord Bish-
op of Nassau performed an
interesting and extremely
happy ceremony when he re-
opened S. Matthew's Church
for Public Worship. Dedi
cated various additions and
alterations, and consecrated
a Side Chapel in the Southern
Transept.
The work which has in ev
ery respect been exceedingly
well done has made a decid
ed improvement in the inter
estof our oldest Nassau Place
of Worship. The Chancel
has been enlarged by a stone
platform built out into the
church towards the west, and
bounded by a low stone wall,
at one corner of which has
been built an admirable stone
pulpitthe first of its kind
we believe in the colonya
beautiful piece of work which
is well worth a visit to S.
Matthew's to see how much
can be done by local work
men in spite of many disad
vantages under which they
labour. Within this addition
to the Chancel the Choir Stall
removed from the South
Transept- are placed : whilst
in place of the Sta I Is a simple
but effective Side Chapel has
been erected.
The Altar has also been
beautified by decorative
work which has been beauti
fully done by Mr. Chas. Eldon
--the people's Warden.
Whilst upon the Holy Table
itself have been placed a
magnificent Cross and pair
of Candlesticks in turned
wood covered with gold leaf.
These are again local work
and of exquisite design and
proportion. In addition to
these additions much humble
but equally necessary work
has been done. The roofs
have been attended to, the
pews stained and the entire
church cleaned and renovat
ed. An important architect
ural addition has been a false
round ceiling in the chancel
which both adds to the ap
pearance.and bring thech in
eel into conformity with the
rest of the church. The Ves
try has been also newly ap
pointed and fitted for the
proper keeping of the various
articles of worship and the
church books, etc. The en
tire work reflects great credit
upon all concerned and is a
distinct tribute to the com
plete harmony, interest and
loyalty shown toS. Matthews
and each other by the Rector
- the Rev. A. E. Homer
and the Vestry. The pulpit
reflects every credit upon the
Rector and W. V. Eneas who
had charge of the entire ma
son's work whilst the Can
dlesticks and Cross made by
K. Smith, Joiner, W. Bay St.,
are a tribute to local powers.
At the 11 a.m. Service the
Rector in his Sermon con
gratul; 1 ted the members on
their efforts and happily al
hided to his various prede
cessors as contributing to
such splendid results.
At 4 p in. the Lord Bishop
was met by the Rector and
other clergy, the Church
warden and Vestry, and after1
receiving t'e salute of the S.
Matthew's Scotus proceeded
to the Chancel Steps wheie
the KeCtOT and Warden and
Vestry presented the petition
for Consecration and Bless
ing in quaint legal form The
Bishop having signified his
assent the new Pulpit and
Choir were Blessed. Then
to the singing of the 23rd
Psalma procession wended
its way to the Side Chapel
which was Blessed and Con
secrated. The Bishop's Ser
mon and Benediction closed
the ceremony,
In the evening the Rev. A.
J. Brown, Rector of S. Agnes
who was ordained S3 years
ago in S. Matthew's preached
to a packed congregation.
S. Matthews or as it is often
affectionately called "Eastern
Church" is well worth a visit
and is a standing tribute to
local work consecrated to
Cod's service in Nassau's
oldest Church.
ST. JOHNS CATHFDRAL. g
Rev. G. A. Thompson, S. T. D.,
Minister. Inspiring services tomor-
row. 9.30 a.m. Sunday School, H.
W. Bradford, Supi. n a.m. Theme
"Vision of Duty.'' 7.30 p m.
Theme "The contradictions of life"
Extra seats. Pleasant ushers.
The public are cordially invited.
The Great Advent.
A Sermon for the first Sunday
in Advent.
Uomans XIII, 12 Put on thi
Armour oj light.
We are thinking much of sol
diers and of their defence and
equipment. St, Paul, when he
wrote these words to the Chris
tian Chuich in Rome, had in,
his mind the Roman Soldier,
clad in the bright armour which
was so necessary in those days
of hand-to-hand fighting NoW
the Church year, which begins
with the season of Advent,
speaks ol the Christian's armour
as the first thing needful in be
ginning the new life.
i. why is* it called tub
Armour of Light ?
First, because God is light
and in Him is no darknessat all.
Everything which enlightens
the soul, such as goodness, faith
and Christian hope, is God's
gift. In the collect for this
Sunday we pray that we may
cast away the works of dark
ness and that He will put upon
us this Armour of Li ht. As we
make preparation for the festi
val of Our Lord's first Advent,
which we celebiate at Christ
mas, so the Church now turns
our minds afiesh to His Second
Coming and endeavours t<> get
us ready for it by inviting us to
come out of the gloom of sin
into the light of God, in winch
our own Christian armour can
reflect the sunshine of a Father's
love.
Secondly, This armour is call
ed The Armour oj Light because
it, and the weapons which God
gives us, are the only ones with
which we can hope to drive
back the hosts of darkness. This
is what St. Paul means when
he writes The weapons of our
warfare are not carnal, (i.e. after
the flesh). Many persons want
to overcome evil but they think
that education or cleverness can
do it. But no earthly sword
can beat the Evil One and his**i
gents. We need The sword of
the Spirit God's weapons
alone can win the fight, for only
divine light can drive aua\ the
daikness of sin.
Thirdly, We must remember
that we aie soldiers of a king-
dom of Light. In the Holy
Church, which is God's King
jdoin. the light of the Gospel is
always shining This is repre
tented by the lights upon the
AltarChrist the Light of the
world, in His two natures, per
feet God and peifect Man. The
Lhble calls the works of sin the
deeds oj darkness, and our Lord
Says tliat no man that doeth
evil cometh to the tight.
II. Why should we put on
the Armour of LlOHT ?
Because a still brighter light
is to break upon the world in
the Second Coming of Our Lord
Jesus Christ. No event is men
tioned more frequently in Holy
Scripture. Our Lord spoke it
plainly and said The Son of Mutt
shall come in the glory of His Fa-
ther with His Angels. In many
of His parables he spoke of His
return in great glory. When
He was on His trial before the
High Priest He stated clearly
Hereafter shall ye sec the Son of
Man sitting on the right hand of
power, and coming in the clouds
of Heaven. When He a cended
up to Heaven, on that Holy
Thursday forty days after Eas-
ter, the two men in white as-
sured the upward gazing Apos-



*
The Tribune. Nassau, Saturday November 25,1918

To be had at all Grocers
C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent
lies and others Tkit same Jesus
.. I: ek is I \ken uf r i u into
kta\ in like man
net as i ha\ t \een Him
heaven, I he Apostle St. Paul
l-'ils the Christians <>f Corinll
that the) are u aiting for the
( ming of ilic I. :!. and thou <(
I'll lippi that we the S i
viour, and tii<- Thessalonians
that we wait for His Son from
heaven ; and l'i tus thai wi an
looking far that blessed h >pe and
fous appearing of the threat
God and our S iviour Jesus Christ,
It js that we may be fitted
and prepared f'r that "Last
Day" hikI Our I. id's I lomins
to judge the liv niu and the dead
and to i<' < ive His pi op*le t>
Himself, thai we are urged t<>
put on tins Armour of light
These are days when ever)
Christian soldier must "do his
bit". He must be n o gnii d
as a soldier <>i Christ by Ins at
titude and lo tic, just as the U<>
man soldiers were known hi
once by tin ir appearance. I hi le
i> i ft real fight in progress, but
u i are bound to win, for Chi isl
and llis men cannot be beaten.
*
Si .'a' rs of Christ ai ise
A put your armour on
Stio i; in the strength which
i iod supplies
Through 11 is eternal Son."
(Continued from 1st page)
n portion admittedly beyond
li ti i itorial limits of a vt
DHim d the "Vinland," and this
c | h lamt reft in,| io "In- Kl
jousness with which the United
States govs) nnient regaided the
boveriurf of belligerem wai
ships about American ports and
coas 8 s
"The official romp;.out sail
the British ttOVi in m ill was
aware thai l*e Unil I States
BiiveniK it had al a n (tardi d
tl,,. pi ,ci ii e ol '" Hig' rent rruis
ers |llIr [ling He Ann lican
c s! jn rinse proximitj to tin'
|e) | itorial w .'Hits i if the United
States and making the neigh
bourli"'' I .i stHtin of tlieil ob-
servation- as inconsistent with
,1,,. treatment to I"' i xpected
from ihe naval veaaeli of a
fruii'l'i' powei in tun ol war
and had maintained h t Con
lequ III menace of >uch pro
ceedings io freedom ol Ameri*
can commerce was vexations
and uncourteous to the- tinted
States
Shadowing
Objectionabie-
"We assume ibal the clew of
the United States government
,s still that contained in their
dispatch of the fourth of Oete
Ih r, 1870."
Vicount (irev quoted tins to
the efiect the Unit, d StatesgOV
'run 11 nt would regard as auun-
friendly act the hovering of
of belligerent \ easels n< ai the
\in"inan coast in the track of
'ommercfl to American ports
aitli intent to int rc< pt enemy
merchantmen and continued ;
"In reply to these v'ari us re
quests, pn\ate and sem official
and official, from the Unitxl
States government we asked to
!)> informed on whal ground tiie
claim was made tii.it belligar
ent operations which were legi
timate in one part of the high
se is were illegitimate in ano-
ther, admitting thai the British
slops were not accused of ex
ling their sti icl legal right
'. under international law ami
that the compl nuts made by
the United States government
were not based on any actual
legalit), but on irritation winch
the coatinued 1 iresence ol belli
gereni vi ssels in 1 lose proximit)
I foiled Stales ports naturally
cau d io a n- utral country.
"l,onl Ben sford asks what we
d ii as a matter of fact, though
we had contended that accord
iny to the sti icl principle of in-
ternational law British warships
tvere entitled to operate freel)
anywhere outside ol territorial
water, nd the United States
had not based their request to
to us on international law, but
on the giound of courtesy and
friendliness, and die annoyance
n would cause if vessels wen
lose to then coast, insti actions
-. n -mi by tin' admiralty tu
British \essrN of war at that
lime, with a view lo meeting as
fai as possible the views ol the
United Stall s goi ernment, and
it was impressed upon them
dial no ai is should be commit'
1 A which would be liable to
mince essary irritation.
"That, I believe, isa fan sum-
1 v of wdiat has 1 assed be
veer, the United States govern
nen 1 and ourselves and of what
we 1.....w of theii views, It
amounts to this : That the Uni-
ted States government did re
qu -t us very emp iat cally not
to patrol neat their coast; and
hat instriit tions W< re sent to
i'.ntisli ships of wai.
Yital Point Unknown
"When we Come to what haS
passed with regard to GermarJ
ubmariues we do not know.
and I cannot answer the ques
1 ion as lo what the ttilud 1 if
the United States ai .up- wa
toward the German submarines
on the Spot. We know that
lhey saved life. They rescued
ihe crews after the ships were
sunk and did everything tl
could" to prevent loss of life af-
terward.
"The questions asked mi
What did they do before anv
Vessel was Sunk, and is it true
that ,a German submarine re
|UeSted United Stales vessels of
war to cle.u out of the way in
order thai the operation of sink
Ing the defenci less merchant
ship should be facilitated and
did the I iti I States vessels of
war, in f i< t, comply with that
request and so facilitate the
sinking 1 f v- ssels.
"On that we know nothing
more than what has appealed in
the press. We have no means
>f finding out what actuallv oc
curred unless some of the refu-
gees from the vessel itself are
able to give an account of Ihe
natter. But 1 assume that the
only people who can give an
account of it are the officers of
the German submarine and the
officers of the United States na
vy who were present on the
scene, and thai is a matter which
I assume the United States gov
ernment will inquire into or has
j inquired into, and either is, or
will be, in lull possession in re
gard to the facts We have not
any means ourselves of stating
what the actual facts were.
I will sum up the situation by
saving this : The whole matter
Seems to be in a state o| suspense
so far as we are concerned Ii
is evidently the case that a Ger
man submarine visited a United
States pun and subsequently
sink British and neutral vessels
iff the American coast. We do
not know what precautions
.Yen taken to prevent the sub-
marine from obtaining supplies
or information from the news-
papers or otherwise as to the
movement of merchant ships off
the coast. Nor do we know
whether American ships of war
facilitated the operations of the
submarine by getting out of the
way as r< pu t "It is only the United Stales
government and their officials
who cau ascertain all the lads
and until we know what the
l.u ts actually were and w hat
view the Tailed Males i:m em
men' takes of the
of the German submarine, we
do not piop.ise 10 make any of-
ficial 1 pn 111,1 ion on the sub-
ject, which, in the absence of
furthi 1 information, could only
be hypothetical, though it is ob-
vious 'hat the issues involved
are very important,
"Of course, ihe Ulies ajtoge-
ther have made representation
expressing ver> fully to the
United St..tes government their
view wnh regard lo the danger
of permitting submarines of (he
war powers to visit ports ol the
neutral powers. That was done
befoss tins part irulai I lei man
submarine arrived. The nplv
of the United Mates govern
men! was not favourable to the
views of Ihe Allies mi th.it point
but it is possible there may be
further discussion on the gener
al question.
"Therefore, when I say that
we do not propose to make offi-
cial representation until we
know the full facts and the view
of the United Slates govern
ment, that applies only to the
spe< ml procei dings of the < !ei
man submniue, which w? un
demand are now 11 subject on
tin special consider 1 tion ol the
United States g'lVfmniriit, who
are tin mselves ascei ta ling the
full facts of the case and vv ill, I
suppose, in due course let it be
known to the world what view
tin v lake.
"We shall then be able to d
cide whether it is ne 1 ary for
us to make any official reprr
sen tat ion on the subject, and, if
so, whal the nature of this offi
cial r.....ei entation si all 1
Lord Beresford expressed Ihe
hope that the situation would
not be allowed to remain as it
was, as it would lead to irrita
tion.
"We do not want political
questions raised between these
two great countries," he said,
but they are certain to be rais
ed unless some definite conclu
sion is reached or some commu
ideation made between the two
governments which will clear
up the question.
"The Clarion,"
Belize, I londuras.
NOTICE.
ON and after Dec. 1st,' 1916,
the ! height on Sisal con
veyed by my vessels from the
Out Islands, to Nassau N.P. will
be advanced to Two Shillings
per 100 lbs. Till further notice.
(Signed)
WAI.TKR K. MOORE.
To DEAF PEOPLE
"French Orlene" absolutely cures den mess and
noises in the head, no matter how severe or longstanding
the case may be. Hundreds of persons whose cases were
supposed to be incurable have been permanently cured
by this new remedy.
I his wonderful preparation goes direct to the ac-
tual scat of the trouble, and one Box is ample toe}]'actual-
ly cure any ordinary case.
MRS. HOW 16, ol /' rttand Crescent,
says "1 ba "Orlene" bai
pletaly cored ma afn-r twelve jrssut'
Log."
Miss RANCIS, ot Bradford Strett,
Birmingham, -..iv> "Yournewrema
for nearly 26 years. Ii is indc I ;i
tplendid preparation, and she wiihea
me to convey to you her luinllell
thanks.
UBS. WILDE 1
says: "I .nu delighted, I triad the
new 'Orlene* f. >r the bead-a
cd almoat at one, and the he
has returned enabling me tn hear or-
:, 1 iv..' . 1 1
Mr. JOHN MA.YNARD, of Hose St.,
il\ Ims lieen tin- nu sins of curing my, Gfatt . I J - "After spending near-
mother's deafness aftai being a suferesi ly fifty pounds 00 various so called
Vuti's" il is wonderful t find mys If
completely cured at such a 11
rust. The'Orlene'is indeed a splen
did remedy."
&r Every sufferer should try this new remedy, for
there is nothing better at any price.
Price 4/6 per Box, post free, with full directions.
Address:'ORLENE,' Co., io, South View,
Watling Street, Dartford, Kent, England.
Please mention this paper.
iiifiiiiauwii*
niiiiiiMliitiiMnMiiiui(iiiiitnifniiMiiininii,iiMi
TAILORING
A. J. KEMP
-TAILOR
And Artistic Cutter
Graduate ol ihe
Jno. J. Mitchell's School of
Garment Cutting
m w v rk
iroceedings Is prepared to give the I-it.-: rial
and the bi 11 n 1 iafactino to the
id public
REPAIRING. CLKAN1NG nnd
PR.ESSING carefully attended 10.
TAILORING I
YOUR PATRONAGE
appreciated.
will lie
No. 572 [Last Bay Street
Nassau Bahamas.
U"*l
THE ABNORMAL DEVELOPMENT
of the Giraffe is remarkable, but the abnormal
development of the demand for Bvnuoht Soap is
still more remarkable. It is not known how many
people have ever seen a Giraffe, but it is known
that there are millions and millions of carctul
housewives all over the world using .,
Sunlight SoapVi
These housewives no longer dread
the advent of Wfl 1, with
Sunlight Soap as tb< 1 ally, they
are assured dt a quick I all
dirt and uncleanlincso. SuUi.1 >HT
Soap saves your clothes.
T.tY IT
N XT
IN YOUR
W ASK
?
ft 11

w
&M
Shingles.
UST received from Jacksonville5 l9"Besl Cjp
No bettei grade than Muse on the Via
at 18s
.5 ;
iea our
,!Primea>" Cypreaa at 32$. per 1000. Tins grade
same guaranti 1 .is l he Bests
Anv defective shingles can be returm .1
r\lsocheapef grade in it
April6th. 1916 C. C SAUNDKRS.


The Tribune, assau, Saturday November 25,1916
*
NOTICE
This is to inform the public that
in future
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
will be sold in the Bahamas
by the undersigned ONLY
Wm. HILTON,
260 Bay Street.
T. S. HILTON,
The Park Store.
Nov. 18, 1916
~4
A nnouncemenl

Mr. Oscar E. Johnson
TAILOR and CLOTHIER
BEGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned
from New York where he became a graduate of the Mitchell
Zollege of America& was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the
several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting
eing his specialty.
This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a
Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill
and in his well known three P's viz :
Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited.
OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St.
(and No. io George St.)
To Pay
21s. For 100 lbs. RICE
Is Equivalent To-
ps
Od. for 224 lbs.
BUT

47s.
Bicycles for Sale,
Hire and Repaired.
Don't grope in the darkturn night into day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs.
W, A. WEEKS
504 East Bay St.
FOR SALE.
A SET of Encyclopedia
Britannica29Volumes.
Newnever been used. For
information,
Apply to
Tribune Office.
FOR RENT
THAT desirable Cottage,
corner Marl borough St.
and Nassau Court. Posses-
sion can be had 1st Decem-
ber. For further particulars,
Apply
J. W. DAVIS,
6-io Marlborough St.
Our IOO lb. Bags
Is Superior Rice.
SEE FOR YOURSELF
At The New York House
Shingles.
JUSr received from Jacksonville 5 x iq"Best Cypress at 1
per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market5 3'
"Primes" Cypress at 3JS. per 1000. This grade carriei
same guarantee as theBests."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Alsocheaper grade in stock
April6th. 1916 C. C SAUNDERS.
8s
carries our
' NOTICE.
ON and after Dec. 1st,! 1916,
the Freight on Sisal con
veyed by my vessels from the
Out Islands^ to Nassau N. P. will
be advanced to Two Shillings
per 100 lbs. Till further notice.
(Signed)
WALTER K. MOORE.
Notice
THIS is to inform my
Patrons and the Public,
that I have opened my
Public Black Smith Shop;
and am now ready to do
anything in the line fo Gene
ral repair or new work Horse-
shoeing a specialty. All work
done Mechanicallv
P. A. HUYLER
I
4


The True Safeguard
of Baby's Health
^JMenburgs'FbDds
THE milk of a healthy mother con fe is a de-
gree of immunity to infection to the young
infant. Many mothers, however, though
willing, cannot nurse their babies for various
reasons. In such cases the greatestoare should
be taken in selecting a proper substitute. Ordi-
nary cow's milk cannot be regarded as a safe
food for infants; it is acid, contains indigestible
curd, and is almost invariably contaminated
with harmful germs. By using the "Allenburys"
Foods, which are freo from all dangerous
organisms, and effectually replaco human
milk, security for baby is ensured and vigorous
growth and health are promoted. Tho
"Allenburys" Foods are largely used and
recommended by the Medical and Nursing
Professions; they have stood the test of timo
and have become a household necessity all
over tho world.
The 'Allenburys' Infant Dietary
Mothtr and Child. Baby b'i mmlhl.
FtJJram tnrin n Ita'AllrnHnyi' Fotii
^
*>

W2
&>\
MILK FOOD No. I.
Prom Birtb to 3 months
MILK FOOD No. 2.
From 3 to 6 month*
MALTED FOOD No. 3
From 6 month, upwards.
The 'Allenburys' Foods ire made under special processes
by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand.
" Wrllrlorlrer haok'lnlitiit Feeding nn Allen & Hanburys Ltd., London, England.
A.D. 1715. Established 200 Yean. A.DI9I5.
^M,LENBURYS^^
Simpl.il sod Rir
'
'The Tribune" Office
FO R
Commercial and Artstic Printing.
Telegrams
November 34th, 1916.
Via Key West. War Summary
22nd.
In the Somme region of France
both sides an' almost inactive ex
cepring for lie artillery wings
winch arc bombarding intermit-
tent ly on v;n iuus sei low,
Skirmishr* und artillery
conth u on I istro Ital-
ian and Russian fi nnts.
In the Wuilariii.ui regi n of Rou
mama the Austro Germans are
everywhere keeping up their pres-
stne against the Roumanians and
(here have been fort 1 c uning no
official ->r unofficial despatches
which would indicate that the
perilous position of the Rouma-
nians had be* n ameliorated.
Pttrogtad reports that the Rou-
manians are still in retreat from
the Jiul Valley towards Qrajova
hut this report probably anted
the announcement of tlie capture
of the Crajova railway junction by
the forces ol the Central Powers. A
retieat on Crajova would surely
throw the Roumanians into the
hands of their enemy to the north
east. In the All Valley, and in the
Rothcuthurm Pass sector more
ground has been taken from the
Roumanians by the Teutons, while
in the region around Campalun||
the Roumanians in 1 strong offen-
sive have been held by the stiffness
of the front of the invaders.
Late repoi is from Berlin concern
ing the fighting were to the effect
that northeast ol Monxstii attacks
by the Allies hid failed. Paris had
previously announced that the Gei
mans and Bulgarians were offering
strong resistance a'ong their new
line running bom Snegova tluee
miles north of Monastic to Hill
1051, 13 miles northeast of the
town, while a Serbian official
statement credited the Serbians
and their allies with the caplme
of the village of Paralevoand Dob-
rimor, northeast ol Monastir,
On 1 he extreme western flank of
the Macedonian theatre between
Lakes Presba and Ochrisa the belli-
gerenl forces have come into con-
tact, P.iris reports the capture by
Entente troops of the town ol Las
kovets on the west bank of Lake
Presba.
The Turks have launched a heavy
attack against Sultan.ibad, Persia,
but were repulsed with he,ivy losses
by 'he Russians, according to Pet-
rograd advices.
B\ order of the Entente com-
mander the Minisiersof the Central
Powers with their staff have left
Greece.
Paris: Energetic resistance is
being offered by lie Germans and
Bulgarians on the Macedonia front
north of Monastir, the war office
announces. 1 he advance of the
Allies was delayed by heavy tug
500 more prisoners were taken,
' Berlin:The capture by the
,,,,, forces ol the height neat Para
lova 10 miles northeast of Vonas-
tir ,.] announced olficially.Berween
Lake Presba and Lake Ocbl
and on the Mou istir PJains the
vanguad of the Allies forces came
within reach of our forces east of
Para lova. We captured a height
.Hid maintained it againststl
Fit racks The invasion of Routn
continues um h "ian
attacks have beonchecked
ground was gainedon the Rothen-
thurm Pass road and in the Alt
Valley.
On the western front M|
weather has greately interfered
with the f'gbting activity. South
of I.abassee Canal patiols of An-
hall InfantrV Regiment No93.and
Magdeburg Pioneer BattaliooNo.
4 entered British trenches and after
destroying that defensive bn;
back more lhan a 1 prisoners 11
one maceine gun.
:o:- -
251 h November, iqi6.
Via Jamaica.
London:We bombarded the
enemy lines near Ranstrt east
of Aogres and north ol Labassee
Canal. An unsuccessful attack
by a German column upon a
small British position in Ger-
man East Africa resulted in the
Germans being driven off With
heavy losses.
Saloniki: Serbian headquao
ten announce that our troops
successfully followed up their
attack on the whole front taking
the village of Budamirtsa and
surrounding heights. Severe
losses were inflicted on the ene
my and 186 Germans arid 300
llulgaiians were captured.
Paris:There has been inter
mittent artillery action along
the whole front. .
The British successfully mid
ed Kjupri on the Struma front,
Via Key West.
Berlin.The war office an
nouncea that army groups 01
Von Mackensen have crossed tl ic
Danube in several places, v.or
man forces in Wallachia have
reached the Alt River.
Bucharest:-Roumanian lor
ces have assumed the offenssjjB
in Dobrudja and have advance
along the entire front captuun^
several towns 15 miles north ot
theTchernavoda-Constanza rail
road. j+\
London:-The virtual? n
quest of Wallachia by Teuton ~
forces is announced by Bei '
Orsova and TernuSeverin on the
Danube have been captured by
Austro-German troops.


- etrognd:The Russians in
^obrudja pushing south have
reached Lake Tashaul ia miles
north of Constanza and have
crossed theCartal Hiver.
Siloniki:TheSt-rbwuismade
further inroads on < ierman-Bul
garian lines nerlheastof Monas
*;r- Within the bend of the
Cerna River the Germans were
forced to flee.
London:The British hospi
tal ship Braemer Castle, 6200
t^ns, enroute from Saloniki to
Maria with wounded, was tor
pedoed in the Aegean Sea ac
cording to report from Ailii-ns.
There was no loss of lile.
'Vtrograd:Alexander Ire
P"ff. Rusaian Minister of Kail
ways, has been appointed pr
mier. The retiring piemier Slur
rner, has be*>n appointed Grand
Chamberlain of the Imperial
Court.
Milan: A newspaper says
that British naval forces recent
ly captured a large German sub
marine and landed two officers
and 13 sailors of the crew at an
Italian port.
London:The British steam
er Krnaston has been sunk. Crew
saved.
Juarez,Mexico:Villa renew
ed attacks on Chihuahua again
today but was repulsed. One
general two colonels and 100
men of Carranza forces were
killed. 400 of Villa's forces
were left dead on the field. Villa
personally directed the fighting
from a nearby hill.
Atlantic City:A protocol
providing for the withdrawal of
American troops in Mexico and
for patrol of the border was
signed by the American-Mexican
joint commission. American
troops will be withdrawn 14
days after the protocol is finally
approved unless the border i
endangered by bandits Kach
country will patrol its own side
of the border. The United
States reserves the right to pur
sue into Mexico any marauding
force.
The Nassau Bargain
House.
Xmas Goods
THE Largest
display of
and finest
Toys, Fire-
works, Doll's etc. ever seen in
this City. Personally selected
by the proprietor while in
America. We are exhibiting
same at our 3 stores in Mar-
ket and Bay Sts.
The tipper floor of the De-
partment Store in Hay St.
will be opened up on Satur-
day 25th irist. from 8 a.m.
until 9 p.m., and the Public,
are respectfully invited to!
come and see one of the larg-
est varieties of Toys ever seen
in this city. Toy* from 3d!
each to 30s.
We have also been opening
up Gents* Palm Beach Suits
at 1. also Boys' and Youth's
Palm Beach Suits at 12s and
14s. Boys, Wht. Duck Pants,
Gents Overcoats, Black Al-
paca Coats, Boys' Suits at 2s.
to 4s. Ladies' White Chin
cliilla Coats, Gents' fast HI
line quality and fitting
Tweed Suits sold in N. Y. at
35. our price $15. Another
Big Stock of Furniture. Chi
na, Muslin Underwear &C,
You can buv almost anything
at A. F. MOO UK'S 3 stores.
A. F. MOORE.
Xmas 1916.
The Branch Tailoring Dept.
60 Marborou^h St.
Opposite Hotel Colonial.
EXPERIENCE bought is
C give me a chance at a suit
and Cutter.
lost, then
for you. Tailor
nothing
T. S. N'ABI.IK.
JOHN BUTLER
Office: 367 Bay St., East I "
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Real .Estate Agent
ne 245
EXPORTER
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
--------------------AGENT-----------------------
NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
NOTICE
*OF REMOVAL
KEMOVED from 404 Ba\
Street City, to Georg<
Street No. 11. All work dont
witKj^ieatness and despatch,
ps licrc-tofore. Patronagi
solicited.
JOS. H. S. BOWEN,
Tailor.
New Bicycle Tyres
For Sale
We put them on for you free
of charge.
New American
Bicycles for sale.
Moderate Prices.
BRICK JOHNSON
42 King Street, Nassau.
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
1.1 M I TE D.
Authorized Capita 5,000
------- LOW RATES FOR -----------
WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and at is factory Adjustments of Claims.
HOME OfPICB:264 Bay Street, Nassau.
Phone 214
Private School
ARK vou going to be a stai
or a 'tick ? Why not try
Thompson's Private School ?
Terms reasonable.
Apply to
Tribuni Office.
Chas. E.
East Bay St.
Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
Spir
its


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