<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

!.. UIUSKRT DlIl'Lill, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICK: Corner Shirley & CUMIOIIO SIN .Vass.iu. .V. P., liahantas 'I'IIONI: p. a itox it.:;. PUBLISHED HAII.V RATES Monday, Wannnday ami Fridajr— single oopy J.j fu lay, and rbunday—tinglecopy i I saturdaf single copy i Id WeeWy 5 Monthly i s. 6.1 Quarterly .. s 6d Half Yearly... Vcailv I P.. I'AVAKLK IN ADVANC'IC tdvettidi D R ites:—Sia pencu j.ci iiae tor in -.t insertion: three peace ir line (in ::.iii(l inseitimi ; ai. i ooepenn) ,ii line lor snlisi|iic'.il iuMTtloiH, Advertisements umler eigOl line4-,. NOTICEWhen Correspondence or Article! are signed with the writer's name vr initials, or with a pseudonym, or are marked "Communicated,' the Editor must not Htcmarily be held to be in agrttnuM with the views therein ex pressed or with the mtdtu)expression In such in::ances,or in the tama) "Letter* to the Editor," insertion only means that the matter or point oj view is considered of sufficient inttt parlance U warrant publication. Zhc tribune Thursday October 26, 1916. On the various war fronts things are for the most part indecisive. For the Allies, the Somme appears to present the most hopeful feat* pros. The British have done well and seem'on the way "from well to better." The French show no weakness and we look for another big combined advance soon. The Serbian move on Monastir, if slow, is still successful. The Jvoimiaiuanshavelrida beat ing in the Dobrudja, but they and their Allies are not running away and may be expected to make a good recovery ere long. The Roumanians on their Transylvanian front look like getting hack some of the ground they were losing. Russia ison the whole about holding on to her gains in Galicia cVc. The strain on Germany's man power must be very heavy, as nearly every where she has to supply troops to stiffen her various allies. But the best men are apparently opposed to us on the Western front and we arc slowly grinding the morale out of them, ^e are still gaining on the whole, and the tough struggles still going are straining our foes more than ourselves. Our losses are distributed, theirs are becoming more concentrated, which is very bad for Germany. The 1 ihiuet containing the samples di cured fiecne de mer which we uoficeti in our issue of the 24th as appearing in Mr. John Cancino's show window still continues to attract attention mid many of our seafarers inn e promised to secure specimens from our waters foe comparison with the ior :ig 1 article, In our ( lit trial oi •' • 24th hist, we inadvertent stated that the Marine Products Hoard had imported the specimen. This we have sinci learnt is not by any means the whole truth, for if the Beche de mer fishery should develop into a permanent industry we shall have to thank His Excellency the Governor who took the gnat est personal interest in pro curing the cured specimen from H<>ng Kong. The Bahamas Police Band will give as usual their Concert on the Library Green this evening. The motor vessel "Frances E." is safe in Miami. She arrived yesterday morning. The Ward Line s. s. "Monterey" arrived from Mexico and Havana last night. She brought the following 5 passengers : K. Bolio Rendon. Enriquete de Artiaga, Kmilo Chistaire, Cnas. Ingmhain, Sarah Johnson. Almost with the dawn of day came a cable bearing GOOD NEWS to all of us that Lance-Corporal Charles Bethel, s umciset Light Infantrv (one of our boys) was NOT KILLED but only wounded in the hip and is now in hospital in France. When we. say "only wounded" we don't mean to speak of it lightly or cheerfully, but it is so different from killed that it makes us feel so much relieved of the sad news of the first cable. We sincerely hope that ere long the news will reach us that he is quite "fit" again. BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD The Guild will be glad to receive contributions of old mosquito netting to be used for stuffing limb pillows. The net should be boiled before being sent in to Government House. "," '' v MAILS The time for closing Interinsular Mails to be despatched per sen. "Columbia," for Inagua, etc., is extended* to 11 a.m. tomorrow (Friday) October 27th. The time for closing Foreign Mails to be despatched via Miami, I'la., per motor Vessel "Panama," is extended to 8 a.m. Saturday the 28th inst. SUPREME COURT 24th—The King vs. Alfred Forbes (Exuma)Shop break ing—was found guilty and sentenced to 18 months im prisoninent. The King vs. Estelle Tay lor-—Larceny—found guilty and sentenced to 9 months imprisonment. 25th—The Court met, but owing to the ill health of the Attorney — Mr. Callender— two cases were po-tponed. The Special Jury summon ed to appear on above date (25th) after being called were discharged until Tuesday morning next, there being some Island eases in connec tion with which there are a number of witnesses here, it is desired that these case* be disposed of before proceeding with the Special case. 26th (todayV— the Court met and adjourned to tomor row morning at jo.30. Born— at Castle IslanWLt. station, on the 2nd of October, to the wifcof Mr. Mi ivin Sawyer—a son. 1 STORM 26th October 1916. \Vashingt01y25th:—Thebaro meter is stiif"quite low over the Caribbean Sea, the West Indies and Southern Florida. It is apparently lowest mar Ja< jniaica and a secondary disturb ancc persist! near the Florida Straits. It is impossible to locate definite!} the storm 1 entei ;ind can only advise Further caution lor vessels sailing in or townid" the stations mentioned. Washington, 36th: — m: 30a.m. — Pressure is still abnormally low over the Caribbean sad West Indies and extending into the Southeastern Graf of Mexico There is more definite evidence of an independent disturbance olf the East Coast of Fl rida and caution is still advised. Later information will be given this afternoon or tonight, Telegrams 25th October, 1916. London, 33:—Important contributions to the discussion on peace was marie by Viscount Grey a*, a luncheon given today by the Foreign Press Association when the foreign secretary after making it plain that the Allies were not prepared to discuss peace terms he welcomed any efforts by neutral countries for a combination to prevent future wars. Diplomatic representatives of all the allied countries were present. The most important passages of the foreign secretary's speech were as follows "I would like to talk not indeed about the conditions of peace which can only be stated and formulated by the Allies together and not In any one of them separately, but about the general objects which the Allies must secure in this war, and to do that I would ask you to recall that we must never forfeit how the war came about S If we are to approach peace in a proper spirit it can only he by recollecting and recalling and never for a moment forget ting what was the real cause of the war. Some people say "Oh, we need not go back over the .71' i



PAGE 1

%  PPS" old !" i' oid*wground now, ererybody knows it.*' You cannot go baci to it too often. It effects the c D ditions of peace. < iermany talks of lie r peace, h'er statesmen talk of peace tod.iv. They say Ger many must have her guarantees nnst being attacked again. If tins war had beeoXorced on Gei many that would Ve a logii a! statement. It is precisely because it w;is not forced on Germany but was forced by Germans on Europe that it is the Allies who must have guaiantees for future peace. Germany waatbeaggrea sor. *lo July, iqi4, no one thought-ol attacking Germany. It is said that RuSSa was the first li; mobilize. That I under stand is what is represented in Germany as justification fur the statement that .the war was not an aggressive uai on Germany's part but was forced upon her. The Russians never made the moblization of which Germany complained until alter Gerraauy refused a conference, and never made, it until after the report appeared in G< tma j that i ii i many had ordered m ihiliaation and that report telegraphed to l'etroerad. The whole plan of campaign of the German General Staff was to attack through Belgium and now it is represented that they had to attack through Belgium because other people had plan ned to attack through Belgium. I would like nothing better than to see those statements that Russian moblixation was ag go ssiva one and that any other power! bad trafficked on the neutrality ol Belgium or plann ed an attack through Belgium, 1 would like to see those state inents investigated before an in dependent impartial tribunal. German organization is sue cessful in some things but in nothing more successful than in preventing the truth from reach ing tteir people and in present Ing to them a point of view Which is not that of truth. When England proposed a conference Russia France and Italy accepted the confertnee and one power refused it. When four powers offered a conference and one /ac-wer refused it, is it the pnwc% which offer the conference who are forcing war or the power that refuses it ? The Emperor pf Russia offered the Hague Tribunal. When one sovereign offers the Hague Tri bunal and another refused it is it the sovereign who offered re 'erence to the Hague who is forcing war ?" London, 23: — Before the rapid advance of the Germans, Bulgarians and Turks and despite heavy rains and sogg; ground the Russians and Rounmnians are in retreat along the entire front but according to Petrograd are offering stubborn resistance. 'tside "from the operations in Dobrudja another British si,. at the ierman line in the SoRV me region which netted them moie than 1.000 yards of trenches east of Gueudecourt and I.esBoeufa and carried their froot nearer the I.apaume-I'cronne road, is the most notable incident of the lighting on any of the fronts. Again, described by Paris as appreciable, is also recorded for the French northeast of Mofval which lies just to the south of the region where the British and Germans were in Conflict. Berlin touching on the fighting against the British am! French Sunday between LeSars and Rahcourt says the attacks of the Allies were sanguinarily repulsed. It is admitted in tier man official communications that the Germans withdrew Sunday night from the north of Chaulues to a prepare d position lying east of the northern pail of Cnaulnes wood. On the Transylvania front stubborn fighting is still in progress between the Teutonic Allies and the Roumanians for the mountains passes and the territory inside Roumania which has been captured by the Austro Germans. The Russians have been clear ed from the Narayuvka River region of Galicia and the Teu tons have hurled a violent at attack against the Russians north of Brodv mar the Volhy nia Galicia holder. The attack was repulsed according to Pet rograd, advices. Berlin reports that the Bui garians and Germans have halt ed the Serbians attacks at the bend of the Cerna River and the latter are now on the defensive. Bad weather still hampers op erations on the Macedonian front. The Italians have begun a lively bombardment of Austrian positions on the Carso Plateau northwest of Trieste probablv leading up to another attempt soon to press forward towards Austrian chief seaport. Ten Steamers and two sailing vessels, all of them neutrals aie reported having been sunk but u hether by mines or submarines is not stated. Five of the steam eis were Norwegian, two Greek, wo Danish, and one Dutch The sailing craft were a Danish BCboonei and a Swedish bark. The British steamer Cabetia, of 4309 tons, is believed to have been sunk. October 2WI1, 1916. Via Jamaica. London:— %  -South of the Ancre there was intermittent hostile shelling. Paris:—On the Verdun front theFrench launched an attack on the right bank of the Metric. The German line was broken on a front of four miles. The village and fort of Douaumont was taken by the French. So far 3500 prisoners have been captured in the attack. Pi trogr id: — The Occupation of Constanta and Medjidie In Dobrudja by the forces of the Central Powers was reported to day. Saloniki:—On the Strumatlere is no change. A. successful raid was carried out on enemy trench es northeast of Machukovo. Via Key (Vest Berlin:—There have been 1. 797. 523 casualties in the Russian armies >iii< • June 1st. Petrograd:—The Austro Germans were dislodged from a set ies of heights south of Dornau.itra near the frontier junction of Bukowina-Transylvanin Rou mania. Berlin:—The Russian Rou manian armies have cjvacuated the Danube town of Tcheinavoda' Von Mackensens army con tinues its attacks all along the Dobrudja front. Sofia:—The Bulgarian, Turkish and German forces continue the pursuit of the routed enemy in Dobiudja. Paris:—German counter at tacks to recapture the ground won by the French north of Verdun last night were repulsed Haudremont Quarry, Damloup Battc y and Douaumont Fort are still in possession of the French. The Gen,urns com mander of Douaumont was among the prisoners taken. London:—Five more Norwcg ian ships have been "ink by German submarines. Bucua) t ..I the Roumanians in Transylvania is announced. New York:—The Morgans an Bounce a new British loan by American bankers, f 300. OOO. 000 at fiveand one hall percent. A bomb exploded at the HOth Street .station of the Lenox Subway by strikers caused consider able damage and the injury of a HIIIUIK r of people. Washington:—Bids for.4he construction of four battleships and twenty destroyers were open today. All of the bids ran close to the limit placed by the department. As the bids are within the limits there will be no necessity for the construction of government yards, except as a question of policy. WANTED S HOE-MAKER for repair work. $10. guaranteed on piece work. Steady job. Write at once. BOSTON SHOE STORS 711 Ave, D, Miami, Fla, J. C. Coakley's Flake Tobacco. This Tobacco made express ly for J. C. CoaklevLong leaf, Fineflavor and aroma. Keeps hard and firm. Made to catch the trade of those who know what good tobacco is and have got tired of some of the old brands that have gone bad. Give it a trial and you will enjoy smoking like you used to. Prices hU\. per flake—3 dozen flakes at od. per flake. Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. Just a hint— "The Allies" id. Cigars are the best ever, and still at tlie ftont and good to the end. J. C. COAKLEY, 304 Bay 3t Good Organ For Sale Apply at 49 Dorchester Street V



PAGE 1

seat — the Treffury. He does not lend! his money to the State —he giv-1 cs it. This new citizen is some •' times a man, sometimes a worn, in. sometimes a child." A firm at Sandakau sends £500 to the Chancellor of the Bahequer. An American citizen from Summit, New Jersey, sends a cheque payable to the British Empire. Other cheques are from China, Sas katchewan, and from a Canadian who sends £"200 to repay his training at Keyham Engineering College nearly fifty years ago. An old man of seventy sends 10s. as a start out of an income of 30s. a week. Many gifts come from officers on active service, some of whom send a year's pay. A working man gives £20 10s. adding thai he knows it is only a drop in the ocean, but "every drop may help us to gain the victory." Many of the most munificent gifts are anonymous and many are from women— one of whom declines to accept Exchequer bonds in return as it would feel like the price of blood. Then there is a splendid letter from a donkeyman on a tramp steamer, who asks the authorities not to mind his grammar ; "grammar does not count at a rule with gentlemen" ; a touching epistle from an old Irishman with two boys at home, one with jaundice in his stomach and the other not right in his head ; and a shilling from a little girl of seven, who has two uncles fighting, and cleared her moneybox to help the State, —'The Spectator.' New Bicycle Tyres For Sale DRINK We put them on for you free of charge. In stock a fine assortment of other bicycle accessories. BRUCE JOHNSON 42 King Street, Nassau. Just Arrived Enamel Beds, and Springs, Fancy Goods, and Notions. Shoes. E. C. Griffin. Bay St. and Victoria Ate. WELCH'S Grape Juice PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. J Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. At BLACK'S 222 Bay St. And The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colonial. Theo. S. A. Nabbie TAILOR & PROFESSIONAL CUTTER 43 KING ST. BRANCO, 60 MARI.BOROUGH ST. W E want it understood that there is satisfaction given in all our work. Have you tried us yet ? No I then give us a trial. Don't fret about War prices, we have our special moderate price. Why not come or SEND for US and get all that is clue you from YOUR TAILOR. JOHN BUTLER Office: 367 Bay St., East Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Real Estate Agent •EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods AGENT 'Phone 2 1 • 1917* Announcement "Reo Six"" 7 passenger Touring £250 "Reo Fojlir" 5 passenger Touring 205 NOTE. In July closing the Reo year 1916 I made a Special offer of £246 on the Reo 8ix, 7 passenger Touring Car as I had done the previous year on the. Reo Four, 5 passenger Touring, but no one need confuse these special offers which are transient, with regular prices. Yours, J. P. SIMMS, Reo Agent W. A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES to inform his friends and the "Public that he has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the business of an under taker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted to his care, with system and des patch ; and respectfully soli cits their patronage. Get my price first and prove that they are the very lowest for first class work. NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich Bahamas Contingent NOTICE. The pictures of the Draft for the Bahamas Contingent which are being presented by W. C. B. Johnson Esq., Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly, are now ready. Relatives of the men who are entitled io the pictures, and whose names were placed on record before the Draft left may apply at Lhe Commandant's office 05F any day between the hours of 9.30 a.m. and 3 p.m. for same. Advertise in The Tribune. I



PAGE 1

V "News FOP Everybody ^ Nvilllvi. tiiidirtiis |urar In verbs mtvftrl Being bound to .wear to the Dogmm of no Master. "" %  I %  !" VOL. XIII Ni vvi N.P.. B.h&mM.THLR.SDAY October 26.1916 No. 296 Raemakers's Visit to theSomme. Eulogy of our Soldiers. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) PARIS, SEPT. I. Valuable propaganda work is being done by Louis Raemaekers, who, in the Journal, describes with pen and picture his visit to the "contemptible little Army" in the North of France. He witnessed the troops re turning to rest from the battles of Bazentin-le-Petit, Poziers, and Delville Wood, covered with sweat, mud, and blood, but with heads erect. "What grand fellows!" he cries, in an out burst of admiration. "You had only to look at them to know that the rest was not of their seeking." And the soldiers pre paring what had lately been German roads and trenches were equally fine. Working under shrapnel and shell, they merely stepped aside for a moment when the peril was too threatening. Raetnaekers wonders how the German f<*tresses were ever taken. Speaking of the British officers, Raemaekers says:— At home, in Holland, where we have a body of officers of whom we can be justly proud, how often have I heard it strongly declared in military circles thai it is impossible for the New great British Armies to have officers sufficiently knowing their trade. \ ask them, now, what they tl.'m< of the verdict of the German Officeis taken prisoners by the British, who, describing the preparation and execution of the recent attacks, declared "Es war eninfach alles tadellos" ("It was all simply perfect"). Let these short-sighted dogma ridden neutrals, whether diplomatic or military, wait a bit longer. Their eyes will be opened. —'The Times' Fortunately, however, the commanders have to assist them the Government officials of British East Africa, who have knowledge of the natives, tlieir ways, their languages, &c. The efforts of these officials have been successful.The natives have come to beleive that we have come to stay, Cattle, meal, and other produce are forthcoming, and labour and material have been furnished.— Reuter. GERMAN WAYI OF 8PREADINB "TRUTH.' M One of the greatest problems in the campaign in German East Africa is that of the population other than German. The natives have welcomed us, but there is the class of trader who has thrived on the country and its people aided by the corrupt Government official. When the British come along, these traders find their means of profit-making stopped; the coloured Government official finds his occupation gone; and both are passively hostile, The natives, on the other hand, bring in their produce and receive full value in cash, and in distress come to the British and are well treated, but not pampered. Before retiring from any cen tre of a considerable population the Germans make it a practice to call together the djumbas and lesser chiefs of the neighbouring villages. A lecture on the course of the war, according to the German ideas, is given. A map o'f Europe is exhibited, and it is made to appear that the French, Serbians, Russians.and Belgians have been defeated and pushed back. The lecturer adds that the end in Europe is near and the success of the* Central Powers certain. When peace comes in two oi three months the Germans sfey they will return, and then woe betide any who have helped or been too friendly to the British. All suspects will be shot. Under the heading of "Treasury Romances" the papers of last Saturday print a most inspiriting study by Mr. James Douglas of the "voluntary contributions to war expeases'' made in the last two years. For, as he observes at the outset, "the war has created a new kind of citizen hitherto unknown to (Continued oh 4th page) "OUR D A Y" RED CROSS FUND. Contributions received by the Chamber of Commerce to date. Previously reported £223 4 1 Young & Son's sponging fleet • 300 Miss Alice Albury a o o Frank Duncombe 2 a o The Senior Censor 10 6 The Junior Censor 10 6 Little Store up East 10 o Bruce Bethel's Liquor Store 1 o 7 Mr. Moses 300 H. E. R.Kelly 1 1 o Allan Johnson 1 00 J.H.C. Minus x 00 Cash Subscription 10 o J. A. Demeritte 10 o "Busv Bee" 1 1 o W. E. W. 5 D. Wilkinson 10 o Edw. Saunders to o P. C 10 Curry o "Big Four" o o Staff 4 Amelia Armoury Cash and staff Mrs. T. H. Sands Eliza Russell Cash Friend and employees 1 Albury Drug Store a Miss and W. S. Wilson Cash Miss Taylor x Miss M. Stewart Geo. F. Minns Miss Inez Minns T. A. Roker 1 Robert Manna Andrew Crawford 1 Officers and men of Imperial Light House Service ** Baptist Union colection 3 B. U. Sunday School 1 B. U. Junior Class Sophie Thompson Louisa Thompson Lucy F. Fountain Palmetto Point The Shamrock 1 R. J. Bowe, Mr. & Mrs. 1 T. G. Johnson 5 J. S. Johnson staff 7 Gregory Town x Miss Jessie Sutton Miss Helen Johnson A Friend 5 Dr. Bleby 3 Dr. W. M. Hare Hugh de Glanville and staff G Fitzgerald, Exuma John Cancino Charlotte St. Sisal Room HiggiBros. 5 Staff Roval Bank of Canada 2 Cheapside a Red Cross Friend Nassau Boat works employees l H. N. Chipman Colonial Pharmacy 1 Friend Another friend Andrew Roberts Carr Mme. Jellieoe l mmm> 10 o 12 O 0 O 1 O 10 a 2 o o O 4 o 9 10 7 3 to 3 10 0 a 0 o o 2 0 O O O O 17 7 o o 10 o 2 4 8 o o o 5 o o 3 8 o 12 7 o 4 3 3 5 4 o o o o 10 o o 8 o 8 o 6 o o o xo o o o 5 6 o 3 2 o a o 10 o £3i7 6, J. R. C. YOUNG, Hon. Treasurer. V


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02728
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, October 26, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02728

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
V
"News Fop Everybody
^
' Nvilllvi. tiiidirtiis |urar In verbs mtvftrl
Being bound to .wear to the Dogmm of no Master.
"" I ' "
VOL. XIII
Ni
vvi N.P.. B.h&mM.THLR.SDAY October 26.1916
No. 296
Raemakers's Visit to theSomme.
Eulogy of our Soldiers.
(from our own correspon-
dent.)
PARIS, Sept. I.
Valuable propaganda work is
being done by Louis Raemaek-
ers, who, in the Journal, describ-
es with pen and picture his vis-
it to the "contemptible little
Army" in the North of France.
He witnessed the troops re
turning to rest from the battles
of Bazentin-le-Petit, Poziers,
and Delville Wood, covered
with sweat, mud, and blood, but
with heads erect. "What grand
fellows!" he cries, in an out
burst of admiration. "You had
only to look at them to know
that the rest was not of their
seeking." And the soldiers pre
paring what had lately been
German roads and trenches were
equally fine. Working under
shrapnel and shell, they merely
stepped aside for a moment
when the peril was too threaten-
ing. Raetnaekers wonders how
the German f<*tresses were ever
taken.
Speaking of the British offic-
ers, Raemaekers says:
At home, in Holland, where
we have a body of officers of
whom we can be justly proud,
how often have I heard it strong-
ly declared in military circles
thai it is impossible for the New
great British Armies to have of-
ficers sufficiently knowing their
trade. \ ask them, now, what
they tl.'m< of the verdict of the
German Officeis taken prisoners
by the British, who, describing
the preparation and execution
of the recent attacks, declared
"Es war eninfach alles tadellos"
("It was all simply perfect"). Let
these short-sighted dogma rid-
den neutrals, whether diploma-
tic or military, wait a bit longer.
Their eyes will be opened.
'The Times'
Fortunately, however, the
commanders have to assist them
the Government officials of Bri-
tish East Africa, who have
knowledge of the natives, tlieir
ways, their languages, &c. The
efforts of these officials have
been successful.The natives have
come to beleive that we have
come to stay, Cattle, meal, and
other produce are forthcoming,
and labour and material have
been furnished.Reuter.
GERMAN WAYI OF 8PREADINB
"TRUTH.' M
One of the greatest problems
in the campaign in German East
Africa is that of the population
other than German.
The natives have welcomed
us, but there is the class of trad-
er who has thrived on the coun-
try and its people aided by the
corrupt Government official.
When the British come along,
these traders find their means of
profit-making stopped; the
coloured Government official
finds his occupation gone; and
both are passively hostile, The
natives, on the other hand, bring
in their produce and receive full
value in cash, and in distress
come to the British and are
well treated, but not pampered.
Before retiring from any cen
tre of a considerable population
the Germans make it a practice
to call together the djumbas and
lesser chiefs of the neighbouring
villages. A lecture on the course
of the war, according to the
German ideas, is given. A map
o'f Europe is exhibited, and it is
made to appear that the French,
Serbians, Russians.and Belgians
have been defeated and pushed
back. The lecturer adds that
the end in Europe is near and
the success of the* Central Pow-
ers certain. When peace comes
in two oi three months the Ger-
mans sfey they will return, and
then woe betide any who have
helped or been too friendly to
the British. All suspects will be
shot.
Under the heading of "Trea-
sury Romances" the papers of
last Saturday print a most
inspiriting study by Mr. James
Douglas of the "voluntary con-
tributions to war expeases''
made in the last two years. For,
as he observes at the outset,
"the war has created a new kind
of citizen hitherto unknown to
(Continued oh 4th page)
"OUR D A Y"
Red Cross Fund.
Contributions received by the
Chamber of Commerce to date.
Previously reported 223 4 1
Young & Son's
sponging fleet 300
Miss Alice Albury a o o
Frank Duncombe 2 a o
The Senior Censor 10 6
The Junior Censor 10 6
Little Store up East 10 o
Bruce Bethel's Liquor
Store 1 o 7
Mr. Moses 300
H. E. R.Kelly 1 1 o
Allan Johnson 1 00
J.H.C. Minus x 00
Cash
Subscription 10 o
J. A. Demeritte 10 o
"Busv Bee" 1 1 o
" W. E. W. 5
D. Wilkinson 10 o
Edw. Saunders to o
P. C 10
Curry o
"Big Four" o o
Staff 4
Amelia Armoury
Cash and staff
Mrs. T. H. Sands
Eliza Russell
Cash
Friend and employees 1
Albury Drug Store a
Miss and W. S. Wilson
Cash
Miss Taylor x
Miss M. Stewart
Geo. F. Minns
Miss Inez Minns
T. A. Roker 1
Robert Manna
Andrew Crawford 1
Officers and men of
Imperial Light House
Service **
Baptist Union colection 3
B. U. Sunday School 1
B. U. Junior Class
Sophie Thompson
Louisa Thompson
Lucy F. Fountain
Palmetto Point
The Shamrock 1
R. J. Bowe, Mr. & Mrs. 1
T. G. Johnson 5
J. S. Johnson staff 7
Gregory Town x
Miss Jessie Sutton
Miss Helen Johnson
A Friend 5
Dr. Bleby 3
Dr. W. M. Hare
Hugh de Glanville and
staff *
G Fitzgerald, Exuma
John Cancino *
Charlotte St. Sisal Room
HiggiBros. 5
Staff Roval Bank of
Canada 2
Cheapside a
Red Cross Friend
Nassau Boat works em-
ployees l
H. N. Chipman
Colonial Pharmacy 1
Friend
Another friend
Andrew Roberts Carr
Mme. Jellieoe l
mmm>
10 o
12 O
0 O
1 O
10 a
2 o
o
O
4
o
9
10
7
3
to
3
10 0
a 0
o o
2 0
O O
O O
17 7
o o
10 o
2
4
8
o
o
o
5
o o
3
8 o
12 7
o 4
3 3
5 4
o o
o o
10 o
o
8
o
8
o
6 o
o o
xo o
o o
5
6 o
3
2 o
a o
10 o
3i7 6,
J. R. C. YOUNG,
Hon. Treasurer.
V


!.. UIUSKRT DlIl'Lill,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICK:
Corner Shirley & CUmIoiio Sin
.Vass.iu. .V. P., liahantas
'I'iioni: p. a itox it.:;.
PUBLISHED HAII.V
RATES
Monday, Wannnday ami Fridajr *
single oopy ...... J.j
fu lay, and rbundaytinglecopy i I
saturdaf single copy i Id
WeeWy ...... ..... 5
Monthly ............is. 6.1
Quarterly........ .. ,s. 6d
Half Yearly...
Vcailv ...........IP..
I'AVAKLK IN ADVANC'IC
tdvettidi d R ites:Sia pencu j.ci iiae
tor in -.t insertion: three peace ir line
(in ::.iii(l inseitimi ; ai. i ooepenn) ,ii
line lor snlisi|iic'.il iuMTtloiH,
Advertisements umler eigOl line- 4-,.
NOTICE- When Correspondence or
Article! are signed with the writer's name
vr initials, or with a pseudonym, or are
marked "Communicated,' the Editor must
not Htcmarily be held to be in agrttnuM
with the views therein ex pressed or with the
mtdtu)expression In such in::ances,or in
the tama) "Letter* to the Editor," insertion
only means that the matter or point oj view
is considered of sufficient inttt
parlance U warrant publication.
Zhc tribune
Thursday October 26, 1916.
On the various war fronts
things are for the most part
indecisive. For the Allies,
the Somme appears to pre-
sent the most hopeful feat*
pros. The British have done
well and seem'on the way
"from well to better." The
French show no weakness
and we look for another big
combined advance soon. The
Serbian move on Monastir, if
slow, is still successful. The
Jvoimiaiuanshavelrida beat
ing in the Dobrudja, but they
and their Allies are not run-
ning away and may be ex-
pected to make a good recov-
ery ere long. The Rouman-
ians on their Transylvanian
front look like getting hack
some of the ground they were
losing. Russia ison the whole
about holding on to her gains
in Galicia cVc. The strain on
Germany's man power must
be very heavy, as nearly every
where she has to supply troops
to stiffen her various allies.
But the best men are appar-
ently opposed to us on the
Western front and we arc
slowly grinding the morale
out of them, ^e are still
gaining on the whole, and
the tough struggles still go-
ing are straining our foes
more than ourselves. Our
losses are distributed, theirs
are becoming more concen-
trated, which is very bad for
Germany.
The 1 ihiuet containing the
samples di cured fiecne de
mer which we uoficeti in our
issue of the 24th as appearing
in Mr. John Cancino's show
window still continues to
attract attention mid many
of our seafarers inn e prom-
ised to secure specimens from
our waters foe comparison
with the ior :ig 1 article,
In our ( lit trial oi ' 24th
hist, we inadvertent stated
that the Marine Products
Hoard had imported the spe-
cimen. This we have sinci
learnt is not by any means
the whole truth, for if the
Beche de mer fishery should
develop into a permanent
industry we shall have to
thank His Excellency the
Governor who took the gnat
est personal interest in pro
curing the cured specimen
from H<>ng Kong.
The Bahamas Police Band
will give as usual their Con-
cert on the Library Green this
evening.
The motor vessel "Frances
E." is safe in Miami. She
arrived yesterday morning.
. The Ward Line s. s. "Mon-
terey" arrived from Mexico
and Havana last night. She
brought the following 5 pas-
sengers :
K. Bolio Rendon.
Enriquete de Artiaga,
Kmilo Chistaire, Cnas. In-
gmhain, Sarah Johnson.
Almost with the dawn of
day came a cable bearing
GOOD NEWS to all of us
that Lance-Corporal Charles
Bethel, sumciset Light Infan-
trv (one of our boys) was
NOT KILLED but only
wounded in the hip and is
now in hospital in France.
When we. say "only wound-
ed" we don't mean to speak
of it lightly or cheerfully, but
it is so different from killed
that it makes us feel so much
relieved of the sad news of
the first cable. We sincerely
hope that ere long the news
will reach us that he is quite
"fit" again.
Bahamian Red Cross
Guild
The Guild will be glad to
receive contributions of old
mosquito netting to be used
for stuffing limb pillows.
The net should be boiled be-
fore being sent in to Govern-
ment House.
"," '' v '
MAILS
The time for closing Inter-
insular Mails to be despatch-
ed per sen. "Columbia," for
Inagua, etc., is extended* to
11 a.m. tomorrow (Friday)
October 27th.
The time for closing For-
eign Mails to be despatched
via Miami, I'la., per motor
Vessel "Panama," is extended
to 8 a.m. Saturday the 28th
inst.
Supreme Court
24thThe King vs. Alfred
Forbes (Exuma)Shop break
ingwas found guilty and
sentenced to 18 months im
prisoninent.
The King vs. Estelle Tay
lor-Larcenyfound guilty
and sentenced to 9 months
imprisonment.
25thThe Court met, but
owing to the ill health of the
Attorney Mr. Callender
two cases were po-tponed.
The Special Jury summon
ed to appear on above date
(25th) after being called were
discharged until Tuesday
morning next, there being
some Island eases in connec
tion with which there are a
number of witnesses here, it
is desired that these case* be
disposed of before proceeding
with the Special case.
26th (todayV the Court
met and adjourned to tomor
row morning at jo.30.
Bornat Castle IslanWLt.
station, on the 2nd of Octo-
ber, to the wifcof Mr. Mi ivin
Sawyera son.
_________1 _________
STORM
26th October 1916.
\Vashingt01y25th:Thebaro
meter is stiif"quite low over
the Caribbean Sea, the West
Indies and Southern Florida. It
is apparently lowest mar Ja<
jniaica and a secondary disturb
ancc persist! near the Florida
Straits. It is impossible to locate
definite!} the storm 1 entei ;ind
can only advise Further caution
lor vessels sailing in or townid"
the stations mentioned.
Washington, 36th: m: 30a.m.
Pressure is still abnormally
low over the Caribbean sad
West Indies and extending into
the Southeastern Graf of Mexico
There is more definite evidence
of an independent disturbance
olf the East Coast of Fl rida
and caution is still advised.
Later information will be given
this afternoon or tonight,
Telegrams
25th October, 1916.
London, 33:Important con-
tributions to the discussion on
peace was marie by Viscount
Grey a*, a luncheon given today
by the Foreign Press Association
when the foreign secretary after
making it plain that the Allies
were not prepared to discuss
peace terms he welcomed any
efforts by neutral countries for a
combination to prevent future
wars.
Diplomatic representatives of
all the allied countries were pre-
sent. The most important pas-
sages of the foreign secretary's
speech were as follows "I
would like to talk not indeed
about the conditions of peace
which can only be stated and
formulated by the Allies togeth-
er and not In any one of them
separately, but about the general
objects which the Allies must
secure in this war, and to do
that I would ask you to recall
that we must never forfeit how
the war came about S
If we are to approach peace
in a proper spirit it can only he
by recollecting and recalling
and never for a moment forget
ting what was the real cause of
the war. Some people say "Oh,
we need not go back over the
.71'
i


PPS"
old i'
oid*wground now, ererybody
knows it.*' You cannot go baci
to it too often. It effects the c D
ditions of peace. < iermany talks
of lie r peace, h'er statesmen talk
of peace tod.iv. They say Ger
many must have her guarantees
nnst being attacked again. If
tins war had beeoXorced on Gei
many that would Ve a logii a!
statement. It is precisely because
it w;is not forced on Germany
but was forced by Germans on
Europe that it is the Allies who
must have guaiantees for future
peace. Germany waatbeaggrea
sor. *lo July, iqi4, no one
thought-ol attacking Germany.
It is said that RuSSa was the
first li; mobilize. That I under
stand is what is represented in
Germany as justification fur the
statement that .the war was not
an aggressive uai on Germany's
part but was forced upon her.
The Russians never made the
moblization of which Germany
complained until alter Gerraauy
refused a conference, and never
made, it until after the report
appeared in G< tma j that i ii i
many had ordered m ihiliaation
and that report telegraphed to
l'etroerad.
The whole plan of campaign
of the German General Staff was
to attack through Belgium and
now it is represented that they
had to attack through Belgium
because other people had plan
ned to attack through Belgium.
I would like nothing better than
to see those statements that
Russian moblixation was ag
go ssiva one and that any other
power! bad trafficked on the
neutrality ol Belgium or plann
ed an attack through Belgium,
1 would like to see those state
inents investigated before an in
dependent impartial tribunal.
German organization is sue
cessful in some things but in
nothing more successful than in
preventing the truth from reach
ing tteir people and in present
Ing to them a point of view
Which is not that of truth.
When England proposed a
conference Russia France and
Italy accepted the confertnee
and one power refused it. When
four powers offered a conference
and one /ac-wer refused it, is it
the pnwc% which offer the
conference who are forcing war
or the power that refuses it ?
The Emperor pf Russia offered
the Hague Tribunal. When one
sovereign offers the Hague Tri
bunal and another refused it is
it the sovereign who offered re
'erence to the Hague who is
forcing war ?"
London, 23: Before the rapid
advance of the Germans, Bul-
garians and Turks and despite
heavy rains and sogg; ground
the Russians and Rounmnians
are in retreat along the entire
front but according to Petrograd
are offering stubborn resistance.
'tside "from the operations in
Dobrudja another British si,.
at the ierman line in the SoRV
me region which netted them
moie than 1.000 yards of trench-
es east of Gueudecourt and I.es-
Boeufa and carried their froot
nearer the I.apaume-I'cronne
road, is the most notable inci-
dent of the lighting on any of
the fronts.
Again, described by Paris as
appreciable, is also recorded for
the French northeast of Mofval
which lies just to the south of
the region where the British and
Germans were in Conflict.
Berlin touching on the fight-
ing against the British am!
French Sunday between LeSars
and Rahcourt says the attacks
of the Allies were sanguinarily
repulsed. It is admitted in tier
man official communications
that the Germans withdrew
Sunday night from the north of
Chaulues to a prepare d position
lying east of the northern pail
of Cnaulnes wood.
On the Transylvania front
stubborn fighting is still in
progress between the Teutonic
Allies and the Roumanians for
the mountains passes and the
territory inside Roumania which
has been captured by the Austro
Germans.
The Russians have been clear
ed from the Narayuvka River
region of Galicia and the Teu
tons have hurled a violent at
attack against the Russians
north of Brodv mar the Volhy
nia Galicia holder. The attack
was repulsed according to Pet
rograd, advices.
Berlin reports that the Bui
garians and Germans have halt
ed the Serbians attacks at the
bend of the Cerna River and the
latter are now on the defensive.
Bad weather still hampers op
erations on the Macedonian
front.
The Italians have begun a
lively bombardment of Austrian
positions on the Carso Plateau
northwest of Trieste probablv
leading up to another attempt
soon to press forward towards
Austrian chief seaport.
Ten Steamers and two sailing
vessels, all of them neutrals aie
reported having been sunk but
u hether by mines or submarines
is not stated. Five of the steam
eis were Norwegian, two Greek,
wo Danish, and one Dutch
The sailing craft were a Danish
BCboonei and a Swedish bark.
The British steamer Cabetia,
of 4309 tons, is believed to have
been sunk.
October 2WI1, 1916.
Via Jamaica.
London:-South of the Ancre
there was intermittent hostile
shelling.
Paris:On the Verdun front
theFrench launched an attack on
the right bank of the Metric. The
German line was broken on a
front of four miles. The village
and fort of Douaumont was
taken by the French. So far 3500
prisoners have been captured in
the attack.
Pi trogr id: The Occupation
of Constanta and Medjidie In
Dobrudja by the forces of the
Central Powers was reported to
day.
Saloniki:On the Strumatle- re
is no change. A. successful raid
was carried out on enemy trench
es northeast of Machukovo.
Via Key (Vest
Berlin:There have been 1.
797. 523 casualties in the Rus-
sian armies >iii< June 1st.
Petrograd:The Austro Ger-
mans were dislodged from a set
ies of heights south of Dorna-
u.itra near the frontier junction
of Bukowina-Transylvanin Rou
mania.
Berlin:The Russian Rou
manian armies have cjvacuated
the Danube town of Tcheinavo-
da' Von Mackensens army con
tinues its attacks all along the
Dobrudja front.
Sofia:The Bulgarian, Turk-
ish and German forces continue
the pursuit of the routed enemy
in Dobiudja.
Paris:German counter at
tacks to recapture the ground
won by the French north of
Verdun last night were repulsed
Haudremont Quarry, Dam-
loup Battc y and Douaumont
Fort are still in possession of
the French. The Gen,urns com
mander of Douaumont was
among the prisoners taken.
London:Five more Norwcg
ian ships have been "ink by
German submarines.
Bucua)
t ..I the Roumanians in
Transylvania is announced.
New York:The Morgans an
Bounce a new British loan by
American bankers, f 300. OOO.
000 at fiveand one hall percent.
A bomb exploded at the HOth
Street .station of the Lenox Sub-
way by strikers caused consider
able damage and the injury of a
hiiiuIk r of people.
Washington:Bids for.4he
construction of four battleships
and twenty destroyers were
open today. All of the bids ran
close to the limit placed by the
department. As the bids are
within the limits there will be
no necessity for the construction
of government yards, except as
a question of policy.
WANTED
SHOE-MAKER for repair
work. $10. guaranteed
on piece work. Steady job.
Write at once.
BOSTON SHOE STORS
711 Ave, D,
Miami, Fla,
J. C. Coakley's
Flake Tobacco.
This Tobacco made express
ly for J. C. Coaklev-
Long leaf, Fineflavor and
aroma. Keeps hard and firm.
Made to catch the trade of
those who know what good
tobacco is and have got tired
of some of the old brands that .
have gone bad.
Give it a trial and you will
enjoy smoking like you used
to.
Prices hU\. per flake3
dozen flakes at od. per flake.
Satisfaction guaranteed or
money refunded.
Just a hint"The Allies"
id. Cigars are the best ever,
and still at tlie ftont and good
to the end.
J. C. COAKLEY,
304 Bay 3t
Good Organ
For Sale
Apply at
49 Dorchester Street
V


seat

the Treffury. He does not lend!
his money to the State he giv-1
cs it. This new citizen is some '
times a man, sometimes a wo-
rn, in. sometimes a child." A firm
at Sandakau sends 500 to the
Chancellor of the Bahequer. An
American citizen from Summit,
New Jersey, sends a cheque pay-
able to the British Empire. Oth-
er cheques are from China, Sas
katchewan, and from a Canad-
ian who sends "200 to repay his
training at Keyham Engineering
College nearly fifty years ago.
An old man of seventy sends 10s.
as a start out of an income of
30s. a week. Many gifts come
from officers on active service,
some of whom send a year's pay.
A working man gives 20 10s.
adding thai he knows it is only
a drop in the ocean, but "every
drop may help us to gain the
victory." Many of the most
munificent gifts are anonymous
and many are from women
one of whom declines to accept
Exchequer bonds in return as it
would feel like the price of
blood. Then there is a splendid
letter from a donkeyman on a
tramp steamer, who asks the
authorities not to mind his
grammar ; "grammar does not
count at a rule with gentle-
men" ; a touching epistle from
an old Irishman with two boys
at home, one with jaundice in
his stomach and the other not
right in his head ; and a shill-
ing from a little girl of seven,
who has two uncles fighting,
and cleared her moneybox to
help the State,
'The Spectator.'
New Bicycle Tyres
For Sale
DRINK
We put them on for you free
, of charge.
In stock a fine assortment of
other bicycle accessories.
BRUCE JOHNSON
42 King Street, Nassau.
Just Arrived
' Enamel Beds,
and Springs,
Fancy Goods,
and Notions.
Shoes.
E. C. Griffin.
Bay St. and Victoria Ate.
WELCH'S
Grape
Juice
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
J Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.

At BLACK'S
222 Bay St.
And The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
Theo. S. A. Nabbie
Tailor & Professional Cutter
43 king st. branco, 60 mari.borough st.
WE want it understood that there is satisfaction
given in all our work. Have you tried us yet ?
No I then give us a trial. Don't fret about War prices,
we have our special moderate price. Why not come or
SEND for US and get all that is clue you from
YOUR TAILOR.
JOHN BUTLER
Office: 367 Bay St., East
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Real Estate Agent
EXPORTER
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
--------------------AGENT--------------------
'Phone 2
1
' 1917*
Announcement
"Reo Six""
7 passenger Touring 250
"Reo Fojlir"
5 passenger Touring 205
NOTE.
In July closing the Reo
year 1916 I made a Special
offer of 246 on the Reo 8ix,
7 passenger Touring Car as I
had done the previous year
on the. Reo Four, 5 passenger
Touring, but no one need
confuse these special offers
which are transient, with
regular prices.
Yours,
J. P. SIMMS,
Reo Agent
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his
friends and the "Public
that he has just received a
complete outfit of facilities
for the business of an under
taker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals
that may be entrusted to his
care, with system and des
patch ; and respectfully soli
cits their patronage. Get my
price first and prove that
they are the very lowest for
first class work.
NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
Bahamas Contingent
NOTICE.
The pictures of the Draft
for the Bahamas Contingent
which are being presented by
W. C. B. Johnson Esq., Dep-
uty Speaker of the House of
Assembly, are now ready.
Relatives of the men who
are entitled io the pictures,
and whose names were placed
on record before the Draft
left may apply at Lhe Com-
mandant's office 05F any day
between the hours of 9.30
a.m. and 3 p.m. for same. .
Advertise in
The Tribune.
I


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM