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I L. CULHKKT DUI'LCIl, Editor and I'ropr'etor. OpnOK: Corner Shirley & Cha.rlort Sis 19 MI, ,V. />., /; i/nim i rno.-.K ; %  •> P. O. BOX MB. was this man and his fleet! The crisis u as grave, the danger was great. England looked with longing and : with trembling hope to Nel[fon to save her, and lie, with [hij magnificent officers add j men, justified his country's trust. When the hero laydyruisiiNHKD I>A. i r RATES \I i.'.v \\r inevMy HII'I l'nl.st the for fiMt ioMrtfuu; three Mac* :.< „ f T_„f !••[i,,i ;.r.xondi,,-*rt...n;a,, Battle of Trafalgar, but j when we think of that awful cockpit of the 'View" and KorrcE-when -c*m+ ** t? agonies and inJaequa e Artirles art signed with th,u rittrl name medical and surgical ariango or initials, or with ap^nym or are t d remel I|ber lliat marked Communicated, the Editor must ,. not necessarily be held to be in agreement Nelson died UTICICI SUCtl eon with the views therein expressed 0 ui:h tie djtjons WC DlUSt be glad that mode"/expression In such instates, or in i J 1 r, the case of-Letters to the Editor," inscrti l OUT preSent-ClnV IHTOt S .'IIP only means that the matteror point <>/<'i>u> j better tc-ll(l< d and that OUT is considered ol sufheiert in im-i ... ,. _i_ „ !" .l... coiitiibutions help to ma'-portonee to warrant publican ft Zbc Ztioixnc Thursday October 19, 1916. TRAFALGAR DAY. "OUR DAY" celebrations the care of (he wounded more efficient and effective. We learn with much sorrow of the death in action in France <>f MrChas. Bethel of our first Contingent. To will take place for the mostfjenbw him was to love, him part tomorrow. This is as it [and the loss of such a son to such a father is terrible. '1 o Capt. Bethel and the sorely bereaved family tin; sympathy of us all goes out in no stinted measure. should be, because Friday is a more convenient day than Saturday. It is well to remember, however, that the great Battle of Trafalgar was fought on the aist October 1805. To the people of Great Britain, the death of Nelson seemed an irreparableblow, but as the years passt d they saw that Trafalgar was so decisive a* triumph that the genius of Nelson was needed no longer. The possibility of perinI [heatre iis evening. a Napoleonic invasion had j We predict that the deman passed away. Wheil Nelson fnr g/$ m M \ on this evenin Jas. M. Rae Mr. & Mrs. Earle Jas. B. Roberts Great Guano Cay W. S. Rue Geo. I'lolit E. W. Sauodets, Hatchet Bay Kmployees Bah". Gen. Hospital Kagged Island Employees Bah. it 1 •nniongery Bimini A: Cat C> 81 Employees Electrical Dept. 4 Deadman's Cay. Long Island • 9 Employees Jerome E. Pyfrom Isaiah Sweeting & Employ* es Geo. Damianos and an Employee o o 06 4 10 o be very warmly,appreciated b us. I am, Sir. Yours faithfully, • EvEl.YN W RENCH, Hon. Secy, and Organizer 4 1 o 11 Boa id of Education ( flice, Nassau, aoth Sept., 1916. (Circular No. ij* i(>Sir: I I hep to MM yoo ft copy of a letter received* from the 11, .11 Secretary p| the Over Seas CFuB, %  %  • ceilificat* s for yi nn >cl|( "ols. 2. Anv sum, no mailer how small, will be reeeii > <: 1 > me and forwarded on to the Secretary. 3 Amounts to be sent in not 3 91 later than the 31st October, 1916. I have the honour to be, p Sir, Your obedient servant, j. L. Lfdtn BI 1 ai 1 Secy. I'll, of Edacatioi To The P. S. Teacher. 10 10 p 0 2 O 0 3 0 We beg toremindour readers of the Development Board's Exhibition—under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Allardyce—at the Im£7* J 3 7 J. RONALD YOUNG. Hony. Treasurer. We give space to the follow ing with pleasure : TIIK OvKK-Sj-As Ci.rn London, VY. C. 14-8 —16. J. L, Lightbourne, ESq.J Secy. Bd.'of Education) Nassau, Bahamas, B. W. I. Sir : Last hmpire Day the schoolchildren of Great Britain con tributed nearly 3,000,000 pennies to our Fund for providing the preat comfort of tobacco and Simms', Lfoog Island. 281I1 Sept., I9' 6 Th Secretary, Please reteive enclosed herewith seven shillings aurl three pence collected by the children of the Simms' PuMicSChOol toward helpfng wounded soldiers and sailors at the Front. Hoping that it will he received and be of some us" in supplying a smoke for some of our "Tommies" at the Front. I remain, Very truly yours, GI:Q. T SMITH. 'I 'c -icher. From Public School at Rag; Red Island per M. K. Wells. Kiq. embarked with Hardy at Porstmouth on his last voyage and saw the people weep ing around him and f.illi g on their knees and blessing him, he said: -'I had their huzzas before ; I have their harts now'*. No wonder the people were so overwhelmed with emotion 1 Napoleon was beating everybody and bewill compel the Board to give another Exhibition tomorrow evening. • —:o:— cigarettes to the men in the 1 Schoolmaster, 13s. id. kfihtine-line: ... At Christmas we propose to From Millai s School, i'Jeu make a similar collection, and thera, 6 shillings, to extend it to the schoolchildTo A CORRESPONDENT. A JUROR— We received your communication and as a card or covering letter was not attached, we cannot publish tween his might and England same. ren of the Empire. The Central Committee of the Club ask if your Board will be kind enough to gra*8t permission for your Colony to take part in this service. If so, we hope they will be so good as to hare the specimen certificates and circulars (sent to you under separate cover) distributed amongst the Principals of the schools in Tht Ba SUPREME COURT The Supreme, Court met yesterday morning for the oommencemenJ*Wits October Session. Two cases were filed one of which was discharged. The other case—The king vs. Charles Kobinson, stabbing— the prisoner pleading not guilty—the trial waspr 0 %  1 \



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Motor Car For Sale. REO FOUR, 5 passenger Touring Full Equipment £120 Terms:—£50 down, £70 approved for Six Months. J. P SIMMS. Announcement Mr. Oscar E. Johnson TAILOR and CLOTHIER B EGS! to inform liis many Customers that he has just returned from New York where lie became a ^laduate <>l the Mitchell ColUg* oi Amcricuck was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in ttl several brandies of l'ailoring. Modem Technique "d Cutting being !iis specialty. This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill and in his well known three P's viz : Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited, OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, MarketSt. 'the for Modern Printing ICE T HE Bahamas Timber Co. begs to draw attention of the public to the fact that ofey are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. FOR Our Day Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Gove; nor and • Lady Allardyce. A PAGEANT OF The Empire and our Allies. By Boy Scouts and Girl Guides Assisted by 200children from the Public Schools. tN THE Barrack Grounds on the afternoon ol October the 20th. PROGRAMME: Tableaux, Songs, Grand March, Music by the Police Hand. ADMISSION Adults Children 6d. 3d. Tickets can be obtained from the Scouts or Girl Guides, and entrance fee will also be accepted at the Main Gate at the Barracks. All the chairs that it is possible to procure will be on the (in muds and an extra fee of 3d. will b% charged for each seat. The entire proceeds are to be given to the Red Cross "Our Day" fund NOTICE 'j'O ALL whom it may con/ corn: District Grand Offic ers of District No. 3 of the Bahamas of the G. G. A. O. of B. and S. of Love and Charily are as follows: Jas. A. Knowles, D.G.W.S. Earnest A. Lightbourn, D.G.S. Wm. Shcpard, D.D.M. F. Anderson, G.G. Inspector The above are the only authorized officers. Attested, A. J. Johnson, G.GAV.S. Per T. R. Knowles, G.G. D.W.S. Advertise in The Tribune.



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TAILORING I TAILORING I *r A. J. KEMP —TAILOR— And Artistic Cutter GtMttata of ti e Jno. J. Mitchell's School of Garment Cutting (NEW y.KKi Is prepared to give ihe I...t' I for •'• ff kle i IVache.andPe.rs is.id. Lo "K leaf, 1; me llavor and i a tin, English Jam., lib. at 9 d., M ^P a : K C P S 'rd *.nd 5 !" iV.nigar3i.6d per doz. buttles. Made to catch the tradeof have you tried my Oleomar thn5e wl, . know h at g ood garinafrom Armoui fr Co. only tobacco is and have gol tin d is. 6d. per lb. 25s. for 351b. tin*.. of some of the old brands that (net ia!t) All English Soaps'have gene bad. have advanced in prices, but in j Give it a trial and ton will spite of this I am offering Sunlea joy smoking liktfbu used li^ht Soap at 3s. per doz. bars, • to. I Turkish Bath Soap as. ad. per prices 6Jd. per flake—3 %  doz. bars Genuine Carbolic I dozen llak( s .,, 6d per f l akc : SJ 5S 1 ff'l <1 f z n bars { < Satisfaction guaranteed < r H „ x) , H 3 i;tmonty refunded. ,|"-r doz. (two to box) lots of other soap cheap by dosen bars. We have what no other shops ;have Shoe whiteing, clears and | ld Cigars are the best ever, I whiten* at the same time, apj ar) d still at tlie front and good plied by a sponge in the bottle, to the end. or Just a hint -'The Allies" only Gel. per bottle D.M. C. Silk 13d. per ball. Try mv id. Cigars better than the Allied 2d. Cig ar*. Try Them. MARTIN AS BETHEL Prop. TELEPHONE 174. Don't grope in the dark—turn night into day. Large stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulb?. W. A. WEEKS 5 o 4 East Bay St. CRYSTAL ICE O UR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice necessary for home consumption and to let the public share in the benefit. Our prices have been reduced as follows:— 12 lbs. at 4?.d. 24 9d. 48 < Is. 100 Cl 3s. THE London Directory (Published Annually) E NABLES traders throughout tht World to communicate direct with English MANUFACTURERS & DEALER* in each class of Roods. Resides being a 1 complete comnMrrwl guide to London and its suburbs, the Directory contains lists of EXPORT MERCHANTS with the ffoodl they ship, and the Colonial and Foreign Market" tliey supply,' STKAMShlP LINKS arranged under the Ports to which they sail, and indicating the approximate sailings; PROVINCIAL TRADE NOTICES of leading Manufacturers, Merchants, etc., 6d. It is our duty to protect home industries and the figures listed above are intended to give the public an ad vantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed. Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor will receive prompt and courteous attention. DEPOTS. Bay St. City, The Ice House. E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week. Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Giocery Store, open next week. Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open next week. HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON, Prop. J. C. COAKLEY, 304 Bay St HAVh YOUR OLD CHAIRS made new by having them RE-CANEDSatisfaction guaranteed. Orders canbe left at "TRIBUNE" Office or Mrs. EM EI.I US S. BETHEL Fowler's Lane, oft Doweswell St. FOR SALE "Peerless" 7 passenger MOTOR CAR A good investment for any one who contemplates rent in the principal provincial town;, and j WR car Vjurjnothe winter industrial centres of the I. niten Kingdom. h uii" b ulwl A copy of the current edition will be months. To be sold at a moderate price. Apply to WALTER K. MOORE forwarded, freight [.aid, on receipt of Postal Order for 20a. Dealers seeking Agencies can advertise their trade cards for £1, m larger advertisements from £%. THE LONDON DIRECTORY CO., LTD. 15 AbchorchLana, London, EX. Just Arrived Enamel Beds, and Springs, Fancy Goods, and Notions. Shoes. E. C. Griffin. Bay St. and Victoria Ave. There are above 40,000 people of my race in the Bahamas, therefore why should J worry. Instead. I shall simoj^ remain, Yours faithfully, DR. J.A. WRIGHT (Dentist.) 37 Market Street, Nassau, N. P. Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays, 9 to 11 a.m. #•



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ceed 11 cffeded with and a verdict of guilty was returned by the Jury. The prisoner was sentenced to 2i years. The Court adjourned to Thursday next. CARD or THANKSThe willing Hi Ipers Circle of Kings Daughters wishes to convey the thanks of the Circlet) the gentlemen wh.i so I^fnily polished up the Stick* to be suit to t| s wound.',| soldiecs Also to the, gentlemen who so kindly presented the crutch stick MARYA.R08EKTS. • Leader. OBITUARYnounce ,merely .'a continuation of the fighting on the Transylvania front between the Austro-Germans ami Roumanians, Roumanian army lie idquarlcrs report lint m the Alt kivr region tintro,,p< ,,f Ki, ,, 1 i dinaiul have occupied s. i positions held by tinteuton*. i in .;ll othef BI rt..is of ilns front Taking to Bucharest, attacks '• pulsed i v ihe Rooroani ins pt m ih'Duizen V iMe) the Roumanians weje compelled to withdraw si... b< fuuhi i nth. Hard fighting is gmng on from tinwest DI Lutsk through Gnlii i I • < : ithians. In Voflunia attack* by both %  j there leemingry is ;i st".l-m.-ite. : Pi iri. 141;. %  | reports that neither %  the Austin (;. rnfafM oi the Rus%  i. ie Ii n Able to s;ain any adv.• ig in Galfcia (there battles j have tal en place along the Yarna• [lol-Ki.. inn Rive'.' East.f Theo. S. A. Nabbie \f TAILOR S PROFESSIONAL CUTTER 43 KIM", ST. BRANCH, MARLBOBOUQH ST. \A/' A:mt il understood that tin re Is satisfaction. V given in all ..iir worh Have yofi tried us vet ? N 11 th< ti give us .i tnal. Don't fret a I. ut \Vai I.I ive our Special moderate price. Why not i SRN-U for US and get ail that is due Vou b YOU 8 TAILOR. ported several days ago as being in tin; vicinity of Namiquipa. wiaiiza troops aie searching (or V.I In. Lemberg at rl to the OnOctbbei %  :..! there pass-'";,':' 1 * ;''","': v "'" ; td awav %  !• farm., 1 <• Isoccesses U>, lb* Austro-Germans tu away a. farmers Cay, have been attaint. Erurria, Mis Susan Nixon. Mis Nixon was known as devout Christian and a verv rhe In? guns of hoth aides on the s.iiinne f....it ,i,,| t i c greatei pan of the uoil; \fon i\\ I 0 the HOUlh dev tted niother and she will ','Y 1 ' ,"" ^we*^ a small e %  out und Mb ilru coiMwith rioprisoners md (guns f' il nit > the hands of the French, \ viol -in counter-attack by 'he < ieim HIc-1si • I Hi 111v EnS inl was repulsed bv the French i >" the Macrd ni in front thi Itnf.sh hnVe reached the vil 1)-' sadly missed -by all on Farmers Cai. She was lion, • it Frazer's Hog Cay on 4th August, 1820 and thus had lived to be over 96 years of age. 'The Tribune" lepdi pearty sympathy to the j V? r uk 8 miles southwest of De. sorrowing relatives andj n,i '\ Hissir M ng the Cernn River and north of Nidje Mount tin'forces of {he Allies attacked the: Teutons hut were repuKed. friends. "A LITTLE NNNSENSE Now AND THEN" "What did the jurv do to S 1. to Si Bailey's Hawkins ferjtealin'' Mi sheer.?" I und htm not -ruilty, I rut said thai if they was lum they'd take the sheep hack."— Brownings Magazine. Patar—I'rsj glad yod like rout Dew school, son. I low many boys are in vour elatS } Paris:—The Cross of Ibe Legion of Honour was [mined on the breast <>f Norman ['mice, the young American .-.viator, as fee lay on his '. I'II bed in hospital ,,i Geiardnes. Washington. 18th:—The tropical storm this morning is apparently in the midde Gulf Coast and is moving more rapidly. Strong northeast winds ar. expected tonight from Norfolk to Savannah as %  • result of tins storm, I he American steamer Nebraska Young Hopeful-Let's see-one I'" Vu ;'""' *•' |r*terdy, re. •'pnr|ed a wind velocity of 74 miles an hour, with barometer at 29.4 inches. two, three, four—and twelveI've stilll got to lick makes sixteen. Telegrams October rfith, r$i6. Berlin, 16th:— A largely attended meeting of the International Corti. mittoe for German Peace, one of the organizations conducting..agitation for a ruthless warfare, was held here yesterday. Vi^ndna iP ll ;: _W,,il "i 0,hthe %  Xiennaancl Berlin war oll.ces an. I tachments by Villa bandits reEl Paso, Texas, 16:—American Cavalry columns are patrolling south, tart and WM of VoloninDublan, field headquii te.s of the American punitive expedition, for tiefust tune since the Carrizel clash, according to trustworthy advices brought to the border today. The Americans are reported to have established an outpost 20 mijes south of E| V,ille for the l'i. pose it it said ef preventing, surprise attacks on American de Continued from 1st Page ; phase of the war, .followed by the Aog,lo 1 iciich drive 00 the Soin'me, the Italian victory at Gori/.ia, the Allied activity in the 15..lkaus and the enlistment of Ruinania, It demvnstrated that the Germans had passed to ; the defensive, and the onlv question that remained for decision was the length oi tune necessary to complete her defeat. This question remainsto an! veretf, nor is there any who believes that the time v. ill b< -ient or the cost small. Lut in looking at the war today it must be home in mind the decisive element is the spirit of the nations that are fighting The victories of the nt months have convinced Krance, Britain. Russia, Italv that ultimate triumph is inevitable. After Moscow, and even before Leipsic. the conviction had lodged in the minds of the enemies of Napoleon not mer.e ly that he could be beaten, but that be was being beaten, nm\ incidental successes on the field dkl nothing to destroy lids con-' viction. In 1815 Austiia entered the conflict against Napoleon under circumstances strong ly recalling Roumania's recent action,because Vustrfa perceived the Napoleonic edifice was crumbling and desired to share la the spoils of victory. The situation is perfectly simple. Germany has had her chance and she has .not won. She did not succeed in crushing unprepared rre.mies possessing inferior numbers of trained troops when she chose to strike. Now numbers, preparation, ev-j erything has turned against her. Her enemies are bleeding her white and dividing the costs amongst superior numbers. These enemies no longer have the smallest doubt as to the outcome of the war. All the Allied armies feel themselves to be victorious at the present moment and count no sacrifice too great to contribute to the ultimate collapse of the enemy. No one expects to see a material change in the situation before the campaign of n< Kt [Summer. Few people now ex peel peace before 1918, but the summer campaign now ( prriing to an end has abol jshed .'11 doubt in London, Paris, koine, Petrograd. The third phase has only begun, but the end of the third phase 1 is revealed to all. we are looking at Germany in defeat, and the evidences of de feat mount daily. — New York Tribune. FOR SALE A fine American Mare. No reasonable offer deClini d. I'liiee. months approved note acceptable. W. C. B. JOHNSON. Nassau, N. P., • Oct. 18, 1916. New Bicycle Tyres FOP Sale W-e put them on for ybu free of charge. In stock a fine assortment of other bicycle accessories. BRUCE JOHNSON 4a King Street, Nassau. / V



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4 Professional Announcement I jk J, inferior soap in a single 4\" tyS? 1 wash-day. SUNLIGHT SOAP ^IX* V I ^Oo is an absolutely pure Soap, Lv ." A **/? that saves your clothes, time, money, and labour. TRY IT. *f Heat—Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew %  6d. pep tin For Washing up, after ( Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. fop 3d. At The New York House Shingles., J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cvprets at 18s per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—3 36* "Frimes" Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our tame guarantee as theBeits." Any defective shingles can be returned. Alsocheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 C. SAUNDfilU. •



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t u News Foi Jbi very uody" Nulllua aiddlciua |urr in vtilia 'nbumtri Being bound mir to th Do|m.olno Mtr. VOL. XIII \ N&aa\i N.P.. B&ham&i, THUR.SDAY Octobor 19.1916 N*. 290 Defeated Germany. A S w approach the end uf the third campaigning pe riod I t ne Great War one fact stands 'OUt clear beyond all cavil There is no longer any question in the minds of any but the most pronounced of Ger many's sympathizers as to the ultimate outcome of the con flict. It is patent to the least trained military eye that Germany is beaten. What the military men of the world are now This first German conception Wi.s wrecked at the Maine, where the 1'rench won the decisive battle of the whole con flict. After the Marnethe Ger mans were unable to resume their advance to Paris. They \vere decisively beaten in Flan dersand were compelled to turn all their attention to the East to deal with Russia, which was en the point of destroying A us tria. So complete had been the debating is the length of time Russian victory over the Austri that will be required to make'ans that it was not until the last absolute a decision that is no longer a subject of debate. If one goes back over the history of the tremendousstruggle it now becomes perfectly clear that we have lived through two distinct and completed phases, that we are living in the midst of a third, which is marked by very clear And unmistakable circumstances. The first phase of the war was the supreme effort of a nation of 65 000,000 of people, having as an ally another nation of 50,000,000, to destroy the military establishments of three nations with a combined population of 315,000,000 in Europe alone, and with almost unlimited resources outside, be fore these nations could prepare as Germany was prepared Choosing her own moment, choosing her own field of activity, hav/^e unrivalled artillery, ursuvpected resources in the air and on the battlefield. Germany struck. Her great General Staff expected to dispose of France while ^.tain was still without any reaajgfor midable army. It was their view that Austria would hold Russia in check until France was disposed of. j days of April, 1915, that Ger many could regain the initial tive in the East. She has nev er been able to regain it in the West. The failure of the first con ception led directly to the dead lock in the West. But behind the trench lines France and Bri tain were able to recognize their military establishments, two years ago, whenGermany struck France, Britain had rather less than 150,000 available for ser vice on the Continent. -Today she has ten tiroes as many on the Continent. French and Bri tish artillery have now a supe riority over German and the supply of munitions of the Al lies it also superior in the West. Having failed in the West and having been long handi capped in the East by Austrian failure, Germany slowly evolv ed her second conception, which was to attack Russia, while holding bark France and Bri tain in the West Russia was to be assailed, beaten, put out of the war, and German and Aus trian efforts wore to be concen trated on the West. This the Germans hoped could happen before France and Britaia got ready. Here is the genesis of the Russian campaign of 1915. which brought amazing Ger man triumphs on the field,' but failed entirely in its purpose,as is remonstrated by the great and successful Russian campaign of this summer. Meantime Germany, having failed to put Russia 01ft was obliged to go to the aid of her Turkish ally, threatened with destruction by the Allied attack at the Dardanelles. This was a surprisingly successful venture and enlisted Bulgaria, but it necessitated a further delay in the Wesjt, and it was not until February, 1916, that Germany could again turn her attention to the West. Now, as she had been compelled to deal with j Russia a year before she sought to deal with France and make a gcn'ial Allied offensive in the West in 1916 impossible. In addition she hoped to break the will of France and put France out of the war as she had hoped to put Russia out in 1915. Verdun sealed the fate of this conception and ended the second phase of the war. At Verdun Germany lo'st nearly 600,000 men and failed to cripple France, break the French spirit, or even to take the worthless area marked upon the map by the name of the Verdun fortress. With the Verdun failure Ger many passed to the defensive. While she was still striving to crown the Heights of the Meuse, Ru sia launched the terrific drive which crumpled up Austrian armies again and repeated the ruin achieved at Lemberg. Effectively, Germany came now to the position of a man striving to row ashore in a leaky boat and against a strong current. After every stroke of the oars he must pause to bail out his bn t. This is the situation of Germany, accentuated bv the fatigue incident to the tremendous exertions of the immediate past. The Russian attack in June was the first move in the third {Continued on 3rd page THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. The business men of the City who promised, and also those who did not, are hereby reminded that this is the week when they should keep account of their sales and also all receipts. This applies to all, from the fisherman to the Lady seller of fine laces and silks ; as it is hoped that all businesses will carry out the suggestion, to.give a percentage of the weeks sales to "OUR DAY" fund, for the relief of our sick and wounded soldiers and sailors in this terrible but Tightous war. You will be called upon on Friday or as soon after as possible by a representative of the Chamber who will bo pleased to receive as large a contribution as you can pos, sibly make, bearing in mind that the object for which this fund is being raised calls for a real sacrifice on the part of every loyal British subject. No amount will be considered insignificant or too small. Pennies will make Pounds, so let every one do his or her best, and the result will be surprising. The rfonorary Secretary, Hon. J.C.R. Young, will acknowledge through the columns of this Journal the receipt of all contributions. THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. W. C. B. JOHNSON, President .' -j


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02722
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, October 19, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02722

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Full Text
t
u
News Foi Jbi very uody"
Nulllua aiddlciua |urr in vtilia 'nbumtri
Being bound mir to th Do|m.olno Mtr.
VOL. XIII\
N&aa\i N.P.. B&ham&i, THUR.SDAY Octobor 19.1916
N*. 290
Defeated Germany.
AS w approach the end uf
the third campaigning pe
riod I tne Great War one fact
stands 'OUt clear beyond all
cavil There is no longer any
question in the minds of any but
the most pronounced of Ger
. many's sympathizers as to the
ultimate outcome of the con
flict. It is patent to the least
trained military eye that Ger-
many is beaten. What the mili-
tary men of the world are now
This first German conception
Wi.s wrecked at the Maine,
where the 1'rench won the de-
cisive battle of the whole con
flict. After the Marnethe Ger
mans were unable to resume
their advance to Paris. They
\vere decisively beaten in Flan
dersand were compelled to turn
all their attention to the East
to deal with Russia, which was
en the point of destroying A us
tria. So complete had been the
debating is the length of time Russian victory over the Austri
that will be required to make'ans that it was not until the last
absolute a decision that is no
longer a subject of debate.
If one goes back over the his-
tory of the tremendousstruggle
it now becomes perfectly clear
that we have lived through two
distinct and completed phases,
that we are living in the midst
of a third, which is marked by
very clear And unmistakable
circumstances.
The first phase of the war
was the supreme effort of a na-
tion of 65 000,000 of people,
having as an ally another na-
tion of 50,000,000, to destroy
the military establishments of
three nations with a combined
population of 315,000,000 in
Europe alone, and with almost
unlimited resources outside, be
fore these nations could prepare
as Germany was prepared
Choosing her own moment,
choosing her own field of acti-
vity, hav/^e unrivalled artil-
lery, ursuvpected resources in
the air and on the battlefield.
Germany struck. Her great
General Staff expected to dis-
pose of France while ^.tain
was still without any reaajgfor
midable army. It was their
view that Austria would hold
Russia in check until France
was disposed of. j
days of April, 1915, that Ger
many could regain the initial
tive in the East. She has nev
er been able to regain it in the
West.
The failure of the first con
ception led directly to the dead
lock in the West. But behind
the trench lines France and Bri
tain were able to recognize their
military establishments, two
years ago, whenGermany struck
France, Britain had rather less
than 150,000 available for ser
vice on the Continent. -Today
she has ten tiroes as many on
the Continent. French and Bri
tish artillery have now a supe
riority over German and the
supply of munitions of the Al
lies it also superior in the West.
Having failed in the West
and having been long handi
capped in the East by Austrian
failure, Germany slowly evolv
ed her second conception, which
was to attack Russia, while
holding bark France and Bri
tain in the West Russia was to
be assailed, beaten, put out of
the war, and German and Aus
trian efforts wore to be concen
trated on the West. This the
Germans hoped could happen
before France and Britaia got
ready. Here is the genesis of the
Russian campaign of 1915.
which brought amazing Ger
man triumphs on the field,' but
failed entirely in its purpose,as
is remonstrated by the great
and successful Russian cam-
paign of this summer.
Meantime Germany, having
failed to put Russia 01ft was
obliged to go to the aid of her
Turkish ally, threatened with
destruction by the Allied attack
at the Dardanelles. This was
a surprisingly successful venture
and enlisted Bulgaria, but it
necessitated a further delay in
the Wesjt, and it was not until
February, 1916, that Germany
could again turn her attention
to the West. Now, as she had
been compelled to deal with
j Russia a year before she sought
to deal with France and make
a gcn'ial Allied offensive in
the West in 1916 impossible. In
addition she hoped to break the
will of France and put France
out of the war as she had hoped
to put Russia out in 1915.
Verdun sealed the fate of this
conception and ended the sec-
ond phase of the war. At Ver-
dun Germany lo'st nearly 600,-
000 men and failed to cripple
France, break the French spirit,
or even to take the worthless
area marked upon the map by
the name of the Verdun fortress.
With the Verdun failure Ger
many passed to the defensive.
While she was still striving to
crown the Heights of the Meuse,
Ru sia launched the terrific
drive which crumpled up Aus-
trian armies again and repeat-
ed the ruin achieved at Lem-
berg.
Effectively, Germany came
now to the position of a man
striving to row ashore in a lea-
ky boat and against a strong
current. After every stroke of
the oars he must pause to bail
out his bn t. This is the situa-
tion of Germany, accentuated
bv the fatigue incident to the
tremendous exertions of the im-
mediate past.
The Russian attack in June
was the first move in the third
{Continued on 3rd page
THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE.
The business men of the
City who promised, and also
those who did not, are hereby
reminded that this is the
week when they should keep
account of their sales and
also all receipts.
This applies to all, from
the fisherman to the Lady
seller of fine laces and silks ;
as it is hoped that all busi-
nesses will carry out the sug-
gestion, to.give a percentage
of the weeks sales to "OUR
DAY" fund, for the relief of
our sick and wounded sold-
iers and sailors in this terri-
ble but Tightous war.
You will be called upon on
Friday or as soon after as
possible by a representative
of the Chamber who will bo
pleased to receive as large a
contribution as you can pos- ,
sibly make, bearing in mind
that the object for which this
fund is being raised calls for
a real sacrifice on the part of
every loyal British subject.
No amount will be consid-
ered insignificant or too
small. Pennies will make
Pounds, so let every one do
his or her best, and the result
will be surprising.
The rfonorary Secretary,
Hon. J.C.R. Young, will ac-
knowledge through the col-
umns of this Journal the re-
ceipt of all contributions.
The Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce.
W. C. B. JOHNSON, ,
President
.' -j


I
L. CULHKKT DUI'LCIl,
Editor and I'ropr'etor.
OpnOK:
Corner Shirley & Cha.rlort Sis
19 mi, ,V. />., /; i/nim i
rno.-.K ; > P. O. BOX MB.
was this man and his fleet!
The crisis u as grave, the
danger was great. England
looked with longing and
: with trembling hope to Nel-
[fon to save her, and lie, with
[hij magnificent officers add
j men, justified his country's
trust. When the hero laydy-
ruisiiNHKD i>a.i r
RATES
\I i.'.v \\r inevMy hii'I l'nl. lue^y.aodTtw''!.".-..; ., rd tng-and Hardy was able to
lh topy weekly
Monthly ...
Iv ...
Rain
Veailv
'Our Day" Red Cross
Fund-
hanins. You wijlffote that th
circular has been designed t
eliminate as far bs poMibl
Contributions in cash re-. trouble for your Boaid, an
ceived by the Chamber ofjtlieitikindlyco-operationwduH
Commerce lo date.
I'. S. Honevwood $

,. m. enemy ships had struck, N< 1-
i- M son asked if anv of our shins
I
I'WAULK IN ADVANl .,
[had slunk. Hardy replied
'No [ear of that." Men wh
'had that unconquerable

line lor Aiosqueat insertion-.
Advertisements un-ler eight lini
x.'vcitiMiig K.ites: mx pa spirit could not have li>st the
for fiMt ioMrtfuu; three Mac* :.< f T_f !- [i,,i
;.r.xondi,,-*rt...n;a,, Battle of Trafalgar, but
j when we think of that awful
cockpit of the 'View" and
KorrcE-when -c*m+** ' t? agonies and inJaequa e
Artirles art signed with th,- u rittrl name medical and surgical ariango
or initials, or with ap^nym or are t d remelI|ber lliat
marked Communicated, the Editor must ,. ,
not necessarily be held to be in agreement Nelson died UTICICI SUCtl eon
with the views therein expressed 0 ui:h tie djtjons WC DlUSt be glad that
mode"/expression In such instates, or in i j 1 r,
the case of-Letters to the Editor," inscrti l OUT preSent-ClnV IHTOt S .'IIP
only means that the matteror point <>/<'i>u> j better tc-ll(l< d and that OUT
is considered ol sufheiert in im-i ... ,. _i_ .l...
coiitiibutions help to ma'--
portonee to warrant publican ft
Zbc Ztioixnc
Thursday October 19, 1916.
Trafalgar Day.
"OUR DAY" celebrations
the care of (he wounded more
efficient and effective.
We learn with much sorrow
of the death in action in
France <>f Mr- Chas. Bethel
of our first Contingent. To
will take place for the mostfjenbw him was to love, him
part tomorrow. This is as it [and the loss of such a son to
such a father is terrible. '1 o
Capt. Bethel and the sorely
bereaved family tin; sympa-
thy of us all goes out in no
stinted measure.
should be, because Friday is
a more convenient day than
Saturday. It is well to re-
member, however, that the
great Battle of Trafalgar was
fought on the aist October
1805. To the people of Great
Britain, the death of Nelson
seemed an irreparable- blow,
but as the years passt d they
saw that Trafalgar was so
decisive a* triumph that the
genius of Nelson was needed
no longer. The possibility of perinI [heatre iis evening.
a Napoleonic invasion had j We predict that the deman
passed away. Wheil Nelson fnr g/$m'M\on this evenin
Jas. M. Rae
Mr. & Mrs. Earle
Jas. B. Roberts
Great Guano Cay
W. S. Rue
Geo. I'lolit
E. W. Sauodets,
Hatchet Bay
Kmployees Bah".
Gen. Hospital
Kagged Island
Employees Bah.
it 1 nniongery
Bimini A: Cat C> 81
Employees Electric-
al Dept. 4
Deadman's Cay.
Long Island 9
Employees Jerome
E. Pyfrom
Isaiah Sweeting &
Employ* es
Geo. Damianos
and an Employee
o
o
06
4
10
o
be very warmly,appreciated b
us.
I am, Sir.
Yours faithfully,
EvEl.YN W RENCH,
Hon. Secy, and Organizer

4
1
o
11
Boa id of Education ("flice,
Nassau, aoth Sept., 1916.
(Circular No. ij* i(>-
Sir: I
I hep to MM yoo ft copy
of a letter received* from the
11, .11 Secretary p| the Over Seas
CFuB, ' ceilificat* s for
yi nn >cl|( "ols.
2. Anv sum, no mailer how
small, will be reeeii > <: 1 > me
and forwarded on to the Secre-
tary.
3 Amounts to be sent in not
3 91 later than the 31st October,
1916.
I have the honour to be,
p Sir,
Your obedient servant,
j. L. Lfdtn bi 1 ai 1
Secy. I'll, of Edacatioi
To The P. S. Teacher.
10
10 p 0
2 O 0
3 0
We beg toremindour readers
of the Development Board's
Exhibitionunder the dis-
tinguished patronage of His
Excellency the Governor and
Lady Allardyceat the Im-
7* J3 7
J. RONALD YOUNG.
Hony. Treasurer.
We give space to the follow
ing with pleasure :
Tiik OvKK-Sj-As Ci.rn
London, VY. C.
14-8 16.
J. L, Lightbourne, ESq.J
Secy. Bd.'of Education)
Nassau, Bahamas, B. W. I.
Sir :
Last hmpire Day the school-
children of Great Britain con
tributed nearly 3,000,000 pen-
nies to our Fund for providing
the preat comfort of tobacco and
Simms', Lfoog Island.
281I1 Sept., I9'6-
Th Secretary,
Please reteive enclosed here-
with seven shillings aurl three
pence collected by the children
of the Simms' PuMicSChOol to-
ward helpfng wounded soldiers
and sailors at the Front. Hop-
ing that it will he received and
be of some us" in supplying a
smoke for some of our "Tom-
mies" at the Front.
I remain,
Very truly yours,
Gi:q. T Smith.
'I 'c -icher.
From Public School at Rag;
Red Island per M. K. Wells. Kiq.
embarked with Hardy at
Porstmouth on his last voy-
age and saw the people weep
ing around him and f.illi g
on their knees and blessing
him, he said: -'I had their
huzzas before ; I have their
harts now'*. No wonder the
people were so overwhelmed
with emotion 1 Napoleon was
beating everybody and be-
will compel the Board to give
another Exhibition tomor-
row evening.
:o:
cigarettes to the men in the 1 Schoolmaster, 13s. id.
kfihtine-line: ...
At Christmas we propose to From Millai s School, i'Jeu
make a similar collection, and thera, 6 shillings,
to extend it to the schoolchild-
To a Correspondent.
A JurorWe received your
communication and as a card
or covering letter was not
attached, we cannot publish
tween his might and England same.
ren of the Empire.
The Central Committee of
the Club ask if your Board will
be kind enough to gra*8t per-
mission for your Colony to take
part in this service.
If so, we hope they will be so
good as to hare the specimen
certificates and circulars (sent
to you under separate cover)
distributed amongst the Princi-
pals of the schools in Tht Ba
Supreme Court
The Supreme, Court met
yesterday morning for the
oommencemenJ*Wits October
Session. Two cases were filed
one of which was discharged.
The other caseThe king
vs. Charles Kobinson, stab-
bing the prisoner pleading
not guiltythe trial waspr0

1
\


Motor Car For Sale.
REO FOUR, 5 passenger Touring
Full Equipment
120
Terms:50 down, 70 approved for Six Months.
J. P SIMMS.
Announcement
Mr. Oscar E. Johnson
TAILOR and CLOTHIER
BEGS! to inform liis many Customers that he has just returned
from New York where lie became a ^laduate <>l the Mitchell
ColUg* oi Amcricuck was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in ttl
several brandies of l'ailoring. Modem Technique "d Cutting
being !iis specialty.
This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a
Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill
and in his well known three P's viz :
Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited,
OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, MarketSt.
'the
for Modern Printing
ICE
THE Bahamas Timber Co.
begs to draw attention
of the public to the fact that
ofey are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.
FOR
Our Day
Under the distinguished pat-
ronage of His Excellency
the Gove; nor
and
Lady Allardyce.
A PAGEANT OF
The Empire and our
Allies.
By Boy Scouts and
Girl Guides
Assisted by 200children from
the Public Schools.
tN THE
Barrack Grounds
on the afternoon ol
October the 20th.
PROGRAMME:
Tableaux, Songs, Grand
March, Music by the Police
Hand.
Admission
Adults Children
6d. 3d.
Tickets can be obtained from
the Scouts or Girl Guides,
and entrance fee will also be
accepted at the Main Gate at
the Barracks.
All the chairs that it is pos-
sible to procure will be on the
(in muds and an extra fee of 3d.
will b% charged for each seat.
The entire proceeds are to be
given to the Red Cross "Our
Day" fund
NOTICE
'j'O ALL whom it may con-
/ corn: District Grand Offic
ers of District No. 3 of the
Bahamas of the G. G. A. O.
of B. and S. of Love and
Charily are as follows:
Jas. A. Knowles, D.G.W.S.
Earnest A. Lightbourn,
D.G.S.
Wm. Shcpard, D.D.M.
F. Anderson, G.G. Inspector
The above are the only au-
thorized officers.
Attested,
A. J. Johnson, G.GAV.S.
Per T. R. Knowles, G.G.
D.W.S.
Advertise in
The Tribune.


TAILORING I
TAILORING I
*r
A. J. KEMP
TAILOR
And Artistic Cutter
GtMttata of ti e
Jno. J. Mitchell's School of
' Garment Cutting
(NEW y.KKi
Is prepared to give ihe I...t and the best satisfaction to the
general public
Rr.PAIR.INC. CLEANING and
PRESSING carefully attended to.
YOU* PATKONAGE wiii be \o. 572 East Bay St r< et.
appreciated NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
Bicycles for Sale,
Hire and Repaired.
DELANCY TOWN coakicy's
HEAD QUARTERS TIFIake ?obacco-
has for sale ', TJHS! ?!)H;;ro !nladc pfeM
WHIT E SUGAR 4id.,: 1>'Ifor ' f- f klei
IVache.andPe.rs is.id. Lo"K leaf, 1; me llavor and
i a tin, English Jam., lib. at 9d., M^Pa: K*CPS 'rd *.nd 5.
iV.nigar3i.6d per doz. buttles. Made to catch the tradeof
have you tried my Oleomar thn5e wl,. know "hat good
garinafrom Armoui fr Co. only tobacco is and have gol tin d
is. 6d. per lb. 25s. for 351b. tin*.. of some of the old brands that
(net ia!t) All English Soaps'have gene bad.
have advanced in prices, but in j Give it a trial and ton will
spite of this I am offering Sun- lea joy smoking liktfbu used
li^ht Soap at 3s. per doz. bars, to.
I Turkish Bath Soap as. ad. per prices 6Jd. per flake3
doz. bars Genuine Carbolic I dozen llak(.s .,, 6d. perflakc.
: SJ 5S. 1 ff'l <1fznbars {< Satisfaction guaranteed <
! r h x), H 3i;tmonty refunded.
,|"-r doz. (two to box) lots of
other soap cheap by dosen bars.
We have what no other shops
;have Shoe whiteing, clears and | ld Cigars are the best ever,
I whiten* at the same time, ap- j ar)d still at tlie front and good
plied by a sponge in the bottle, to the end.
or
Just a hint -'The Allies"
only Gel. per bottle D.M. C. Silk
13d. per ball. Try mv id. Cigars
better than the Allied 2d. Cig
ar*. Try Them.
MARTIN AS BETHEL Prop.
Telephone 174.
Don't grope in the darkturn night into day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulb?.
W. A. WEEKS 5o4 East Bay St.
CRYSTAL ICE
OUR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice neces-
sary for home consumption and to let the public
share in the benefit. Our prices have been
reduced as follows:
12 lbs. at 4?.d.
24 9d.
48 < Is.
100 Cl 3s.
THE
London Directory
(Published Annually)
ENABLES traders throughout tht
World to communicate direct with
English
MANUFACTURERS & DEALER*
in each class of Roods. Resides being a
1 complete comnMrrwl guide to London
and its suburbs, the Directory contains
lists of
EXPORT MERCHANTS
with the ffoodl they ship, and the Colo-
nial and Foreign Market" tliey supply,'
STKAMShlP LINKS
arranged under the Ports to which they
sail, and indicating the approximate
sailings;
PROVINCIAL TRADE NOTICES
of leading Manufacturers, Merchants, etc.,
6d.
It is our duty to protect home industries and the
figures listed above are intended to give the public an ad
vantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed.
Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor
will receive prompt and courteous attention.
DEPOTS.
Bay St. City, The Ice House.
E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week.
Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today
East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Giocery Store,
open next week.
Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open
next week.
HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON,
Prop.
J. C. COAKLEY,
304 Bay St
HAVh
Your Old Chairs
made new by having them
RE-CANED-
Satisfaction guaranteed.
Orders canbe left at
"TRIBUNE" Office
or
Mrs. EM EI.I US S. BETHEL
Fowler's Lane,
oft Doweswell St.
FOR SALE
"Peerless" 7 passenger
MOTOR CAR
A good investment for any
one who contemplates rent
in the principal provincial town;, and j WR car Vjurjno- the winter
industrial centres of the I. niten Kingdom. h uii"b "ulwl
A copy of the current edition will be months.
To be sold at a moderate
price.
Apply to
WALTER K. MOORE
forwarded, freight [.aid, on receipt of
Postal Order for 20a.
Dealers seeking Agencies can advertise
their trade cards for 1, m larger adver-
tisements from %.
The London Directory Co., Ltd.
15 AbchorchLana, London, EX.
Just Arrived
Enamel Beds,
and Springs,
Fancy Goods,
and Notions.
Shoes.
E. C. Griffin.
Bay St. and Victoria Ave.
There are
above 40,000 people
of my race in the Bahamas,
therefore why should J worry.
Instead. I shall simoj^ remain,
Yours faithfully,
Dr. J.A. WRIGHT
(Dentist.)
37 Market Street,
Nassau, N. P.
Office Hours:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sundays, 9 to 11 a.m.
#


ceed
11
cffeded with and a verdict of
guilty was returned by the
Jury. The prisoner was sen-
tenced to 2i years.
The Court adjourned to
Thursday next.
Card or Thanks-
The willing Hi Ipers Circle
of Kings Daughters wishes
to convey the thanks of the
Circlet) the gentlemen wh.i
so I^fnily polished up the
Stick* to be suit to t| s
wound.',| soldiecs Also to
the, gentlemen who so kindly
presented the crutch stick
MARYA.R08EKTS.
Leader.
Obituary-
nounce ,merely .'a continuation of
the fighting on the Transylvania
front between the Austro-Germans
ami Roumanians, Roumanian army
lie idquarlcrs report lint m the Alt
kivr region tin- tro,,p< ,,f Ki, ,,
1 i dinaiul have occupied s. i
positions held by tin- teuton*.
i in .;ll othef bi rt..is of ilns front
Taking to Bucharest, attacks
' pulsed i v ihe Rooroani ins
pt m ih'- Duizen V iMe)
the Roumanians weje compelled to
withdraw si... b< fuuhi i nth.
Hard fighting is gmng on from
tin- west dI Lutsk through Gnlii i I
<: ithians. In Voflunia
attack* by both -
j there leemingry is ;i st".l-m.-ite. :
Pi iri. 141;. | reports that neither '
the Austin (;. rnfafM oi the Rus-
i. ie I- i n Able to s;ain any
adv.- ig in Galfcia (there battles
j have tal en place along the Yarna-
[lol-Ki.. inn Rive'.'
East.f
Theo. S. A. Nabbie
\f Tailor S Professional Cutter
43 KIM", ST.
BRANCH, MaRLBOBOUQH ST.
\A/' A:mt il understood that tin re Is satisfaction.
V given in all ..iir worh Have yofi tried us vet ?
N 11 th< ti give us .i tnal. Don't fret a I. ut \Vai i.i .
ive our Special moderate price. Why not i
SRN-U for US and get ail that is due Vou b
YOU 8 TAILOR.
ported several days ago as being
in tin; vicinity of Namiquipa.
' wiaiiza troops aie searching (or
V.I In.
Lemberg at rl to the
OnOctbbei .:..! there pass-'";,':'1' * ;''","': "v"'";
td awav ! farm.,1 < Isoccesses U>, lb* Austro-Germans
tu away a. farmers Cay, have been attaint.
Erurria, Mis Susan Nixon.
Mis Nixon was known as
devout Christian and a verv
rhe In? guns of hoth aides on the
s.iiinne f....it ,i,,| ti c greatei pan
of the uoil; \fon i\\ I 0 the HOUlh
dev tted niother and she will ','Y1' ,"" ^we*^ a small
e out und Mb ilru
coiMwith rioprisoners md (guns
f' il nit > the hands of the French,
\ viol -in counter-attack by 'he
< ieim hi- c-1si I Hi 111v EnS inl
was repulsed bv the French
i >" the Macrd ni in front thi
Itnf.sh hnVe reached the vil
1)-' sadly missed -by all on
Farmers Cai. She was lion,
it Frazer's Hog Cay on 4th
August, 1820 and thus had
lived to be over 96 years of
age. 'The Tribune" lepdi
pearty sympathy to the j ,V?r*uk. 8 miles southwest of De.
sorrowing relatives andjn,i'\Hissir-
M ng the Cernn River and north
of Nidje Mount tin'forces of {he
Allies attacked the: Teutons hut
were repuKed.
friends.
"A Little Nnnsense
Now and Then"
"What did the jurv do to S
1. to Si
Bailey's
Hawkins ferjtealin'' Mi
sheer.?"
I und htm not -ruilty, I rut said
thai if they was lum they'd take
the sheep hack."
- Brownings Magazine.
PatarI'rsj glad yod like rout
Dew school, son. I low many boys
are in vour elatS }
Paris:The Cross of Ibe Legion
of Honour was [mined on the breast
<>f Norman ['mice, the young
American .-.viator, as fee lay on his
'. i'Ii bed in hospital ,,i Geiardnes.
Washington. 18th:The tropical
storm this morning is apparently in
the midde Gulf Coast and is mov-
ing more rapidly. Strong northeast
winds ar. expected tonight from
Norfolk to Savannah as result
of tins storm,
I he American steamer Nebraska
Young Hopeful-Let's see-one I'" Vu;'""' *' |r*terdy, re.
'pnr|ed a wind velocity of 74 miles
an hour, with barometer at 29.4
inches.
two, three, fourand twelve- I've
stilll got to lick makes sixteen.
Telegrams
October rfith, r$i6.
Berlin, 16th: A largely attended
meeting of the International Corti.
mittoe for German Peace, one of
the organizations conducting..agi-
tation for a ruthless warfare, was
held here yesterday.
Vi^ndna iPll;:_W,,il"i0,hthe '
Xiennaancl Berlin war oll.ces an. I tachments by Villa bandits re-
El Paso, Texas, 16:American
Cavalry columns are patrolling
south, tart and wm of Volonin-
Dublan, field headquii te.s of the
American punitive expedition, for
tie- fust tune since the Carrizel
clash, according to trustworthy ad-
vices brought to the border today.
The Americans are reported to
have established an outpost 20
mijes south of E| V,ille for the
l'i. pose it it said ef preventing,
surprise attacks on American de
Continued from 1st Page
; phase of the war, .followed by
. the Aog,lo 1 iciich drive 00 the
Soin'me, the Italian victory at
Gori/.ia, the Allied activity in
the 15..lkaus and the enlistment
of Ruinania, It demvnstrated
that the Germans had passed to
; the defensive, and the onlv
question that remained for de-
cision was the length oi tune
necessary to complete her de-
feat. This question remainsto
an! veretf, nor is there any
who believes that the time
v. ill b< -ient or the cost small.
Lut in looking at the war to-
day it must be home in mind
' the decisive element is the
spirit of the nations that are
fighting The victories of the
nt months have convinced
Krance, Britain. Russia, Italv
that ultimate triumph is inevi-
table. After Moscow, and even
before Leipsic. the conviction
had lodged in the minds of the
enemies of Napoleon not mer.e
ly that he could be beaten, but
that be was being beaten, nm\
incidental successes on the field
dkl nothing to destroy lids con-'
viction. In 1815 Austiia enter-
ed the conflict against Napol-
eon under circumstances strong
ly recalling Roumania's recent
action,because Vustrfa perceiv-
ed the Napoleonic edifice was
crumbling and desired to share
la the spoils of victory.
The situation is perfectly
simple. Germany has had her
chance and she has .not won.
She did not succeed in crushing
unprepared rre.mies possessing
inferior numbers of trained
troops when she chose to strike.
Now numbers, preparation, ev-j
erything has turned against her.
Her enemies are bleeding her
white and dividing the costs
amongst superior numbers.
These enemies no longer have
the smallest doubt as to the
outcome of the war. All the
Allied armies feel themselves
to be victorious at the present
moment and count no sacrifice
too great to contribute to the
ultimate collapse of the enemy.
No one expects to see a ma-
terial change in the situation
before the campaign of n< Kt
[Summer. Few people now ex
peel peace before 1918, but
the summer campaign now
( prriing to an end has abol
jshed .'11 doubt in London,
Paris, koine, Petrograd. The
third phase has only begun,
but the end of the third phase1
is revealed to all. we are
looking at Germany in de-
feat, and the evidences of de
feat mount daily.
New York Tribune.
FOR SALE
A fine American Mare.
No reasonable offer deClini d.
I'liiee. months approved note
acceptable.
W. C. B. JOHNSON.
Nassau, N. P.,
Oct. 18, 1916.
New Bicycle Tyres
Fop Sale
W-e put them on for ybu free
of charge.
In stock a fine assortment of
other bicycle accessories.
BRUCE JOHNSON
4a King Street, Nassau.
/
V



4
Professional Announcement
I
DR. W. R. LAMB
American Oculist & Optician
Specialist in Examining the Eye and Correcting Defective
Vision at Hotel Nassau until October 25th inclusive.
HAS the pleasure to again announce to the citizens of New
Providence that tie may be consulted at the above ad-
dress until the time stated. Those wishing a consultation should
make an appointment at their earliest convenience as he will not
remain longer than the 25th. 1
He is fully prepared, as usual, with the most modem instru-
ments and apparatus for thoroughly examining and refracting
the eyes according to the latest and most approved methods as
employed by the most eminent Oculists in the Metropolitan Eye
Infirmaries, and he has the largest and best supply of all desira- ,
ble kinds and styles of lenses and mountings of the best quality
ever brought to Nassau, including several thousands of sphero-
cylindrical, prismatic, bifocal and other kinds of lenses made
specially to order for the correction of artigmatism, weakness of
the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which the ordinary
lenses will not correct.
Those who are troubled with weak eyes, defective vision,
headache, due to eve strain, eye ache, inflammation of the e\es
or the lids, weakness of the osulai muscles or any of the numer-
ous conditions of the eyes requiring a thorough examination or
necessitating the use of glassesand most of these troubles are
permanently cured by. accurate refraction-and properly adjusted
glasseswould do well to embrace the present exceptional op-
portunity of giving their eyes the attention they requirean
opportunity which for completeness of apparatus and supply of
lenses and mountings, thoroughness of examination, perfection
of refraction which biings the vision up to the highest standard
possible and for the best and most satisfactory results is equal in
every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad as thou-
sands of his patients here and elsewhere are willing to attest.
His method of examination with the ophthahmometer,
electric ophthahmosccpe and retinoscope are so careful, tho-
rough and accurate that the diagnoses the cause of the defective
vision or eye trouble, so that the best and most satisfactory re-
sults are always obtained from the glasses he prescribes, which
are accurately fitted and warranted to be conect. They are not
only guaranteed to be absolutely perfect in the correction of the
refraction and for the production of the clearest vision possible,
but for durability and general satisfaction and the immediate
relief of head-ache, eye-ache and other ocular troubles which
call for the use of glasses, they are equal to the best that could
possibly be obtained anywhere abroad.
Comparatively few of those who are using glasses have the
kind their eyei require, the kind which gives the best vision, the
most comfort, and which preserve the sight and keep it normal
all through life. This is because the eyes in most cases have
not had the careful and thorough examination by a qualified
specialist which is most important and necessary when the best
results are desired. As the accomodative power of the eye grad-
ually weakens as one grows older it becomes necessary to make
a change of glasses every three or four years and many make a
great mistake in continuing the use of unsuitable glasses, it it
one of the principal causes of cataract and other serious eye
troubles.
Dr. Lamb it certificated in both medicine and optics, has
thousands of references and testimonials from prominent citizens
f many countries where he hat practised hit profession contin-
uously fei over 35 years, and has established through reliable
and superior service the most extensive eye praetise in the world.
Charges Reasonable. Hours, 9 to 12 a.m., a to 5 p.m.
THE TIGER
is one of the most destructive of animals, and is
a source of much danger to- life.
SUNLIGHT SOAP
preserves and lengthens the life of your clothes, but
it is a source of destruction to all dirt and unclean-
liness. The amount of destruction wrought by a tiger
in a single night, Cannot
be compared to the amount
of destruction* wrought by
-1 >jk j, inferior soap in a single
4\" tyS?1 wash-day. Sunlight Soap
^IX*v'i ^Oo is an absolutely pure Soap,
Lv ." A **/? that saves your clothes,
time, money, and labour.
TRY IT.

*f
HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. pep tin
For Washing up, after (
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. fop 3d.
At The New York House
Shingles.,
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cvprets at 18s
per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market3 36*
"Frimes" Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our
tame guarantee as theBeits."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Alsocheaper grade in stock -
April 6th. 1916 C. SAUNDfilU.
'


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