<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 14,1916. L. GILBKRT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OPFIOK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sla .Nassau, N. P., Bahamas •PHONK SOD, V. O. BOX 183. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday anil Friday— single co(jy J,l Tuesday, aijl Thursday — single copy id %hitdv-single copy ... i |d Weekly j,| Monthly i s. 6d S uarterly i s. M • UYea.lv M ifearlr 1 8< HAYAKLK IN AUVANCK \ihertitini; K.itnt :— MIX pence p BrSttiilMitiqn) three pence |'.er line UMsePi'iid i.neitioii ; aini i)Ticpe:iiiy IHT llue lot subsquent iinierUon. Advertisements undtir eight line 4>. S'l'l'ICE When Correspondence or Articles are signed with the writer's name or initials, or with a pseudonym, or are marked "Communicated," the Editor must not necessarily be held to be in agreement %  vi'.h the views therein expressed or u ilk the mode oj expression In such instances, or in the caseoj"Letters to the Editor," insertion only means that the matter or point of view n t nsidtrid oj sufficient interest and im portance to warrant publication. Zhe tribune Saturday October 14, 1916 So Constantine must surrender his fleet and forts and a useful railway to tiie Allies It was time! This seems to prelude a more vigorous move from tlie South against the Bulgarians. It is needful to strike soon in the Balkans, as the winter sets in early there and is very rigorous. We are all longing for the speedy punish merit of Bulgaria and rehabilitation of Serbia. But the crushing of Bulgaria would mean the isolation of Turkey, the opening of the Dardanelles and a concentration of the Entente forces for a series of shattering blows at the Central Empires. May it be soon! We much regret to learn that two days ago Lady Allardyce received by cable the sad news of the death of her lather, Mr. Molesworth Greene. Much sympathy will go out to Lady Altardyce and those bereaved with her. Mr. Molesworth Greene was over go years of age and to tin' last was remarkably full of physical vigour. He was one of the early Australian squatters, having pro ceeded te Australia in 1842 with his father, a retired .Naval Officer who took up land there. Mr. Molesworth Greene was a well known person throughout the Australian Commonwealth. Every one knew him for a lending Pastoralist and an expert authority on Stock. These early Australian! were a fine race of men. We have read of the wonderful doings of] their descendents at Gallipoli. The vigour and capacity with which Bahamian Red Cross affairs have been managed have shown that the spirit and successes of the deceased gentleman can bf> carried out in other places and in other ways. —:o: — Arable was received this week containing the sad news of the dentil -from pul monary disease—of No 56 Benjamin Smith of the and Bahi.raas Co tingent. It grieves us very much to have to place on record the death of another one of our brave boys. "The Tribune" offers its sympathy to the sorrowing mother—Mrs. Julia Smith — who resides at Fox Hill. —:o:— At the request of His Excellency the Governor the Chamber of Commerce would invite the community, both business and residential, to make as great display of bu ting and flags on Thursday October 19th in honour of "Our Day." We had the pleasure of seeing Red Cross Stamp Fund from the following: Miss K. Allardyce 227, Miss A. Bethel 307. Miss Bertha B. Magne 100, Mis A. H. Lee—1 • ronto, Miss L. Actlifife, Mrs H. Malone—Hope Town. K. L VII and Q. A. Chapter 1 O. D. E Mrs LF. Turtle, Victoria Chapter, I.O. D. L.— Mrs 13 C. de Glanville ro5, Mrs Wheatly Turtle 233, Gordon Chapter, I. O. D. E.—Mrs D. Tudor 526, Mrs F. Burnside, Miss Dorothy Wright—Rock Sound, Mrs Kendrlck— Abaco 263, Miss Sophie Stewart 32s. Miss Ada Ficher I ri 111 dad 1160, Miss IreneNearn, Miss \larv Elizabeth Collins I6OQ, Violet Patrol. 3rd B. G.G. i/y.6, 6th Bah. Boy Scouts 260, Mh Bah. Boy Scouis—Nicolls Town 100, Mr DudleyGamblin, ua Boy "couis 800, Dr a fine lot of miniature colouied photographs,exquisitely framed!.' -the frame* having 310 lags ^ hea|4 Qilrattofc Mr 1 Ed. Johnson 350, Mr Lloyd M. Johnson 51 j, Mr D. Walter— Toronto, Mr Gilbert C. Abbott, Mr Cartington Stewart 100. Mr ed by Miss Leonora S. Johnson, Artist, to the Chamber of Com merce to be pul on sale, the proceeds to be for the "Our Day" Fund. Miss Johnson is to be congratulated PHI such an original idea. -'.&'. — An arrangement has been made for the "Frances E" to bring over the mails that were expected by the freight steamer next week. The "Frances" is expected to arrive early iir the week. CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE FUND for manned and blind Soldiers and Sailors. We have been reqsested by the Private Secretary to acknowledge the following sums which have been received by His Excellency on account of the above Fund.'— Previously acknowledged £'3 8 l8 2 Lantern Lecture by Rev. C. B. Crofts per MrJ. L. Lightbourn 2 o Harbour Island school per Mr W. E Higgs 1 10 Cherokee Sound school per Mr Wilfred Russell 4 Stewart Rae, Mr Autlley Kelly, Mr Francis T. Holmes Thanking you for your co-operation. I have the honour to be. Your obedient servant DR. WALTER HFSS. Local Secy Emigration figures fur Sept 1916. Outwards Males 189 Females 84 Total 273 Inwards 77 23 loO £ r 4 2 12 6 "OUR DAY REO CROSS MOTOR AMBULANCE FUND Previously acknowledged £ W is 0 Rolle Town, Exuma (too late tor Belgian Fund) 5 1 0 Mr. Victor Saunders 10 0 0 Mr. and Mis. George Weech %  i 0 0 Mr. John Rutherford s 2 6 Mrs. G B Adderley 10 10 0 Mr. J. H. Peet .3 1 0 Hon. Wm. and Mrs Miller 10 0 0 Dr. Alburv • S J 0 Mrs. J. Alburv and Miss N. A1 bury 10 10 f) \ Friend s. 0 0 J. L. J. s 0 0 Mr. E. W. T. Mc Pherson 10 0 0 Mr. W. K. Moore 10 ro 0 MrA. D Sherwood Smith 2 2 0 Miss Allaidvce 2 2 0 Miss K. Allardvce t 2 0 Dr W. Hess 2 2 0 Hon. P. W. D. and Mrs. Armbrister 8 8 0 6 — £706 12 The Editor "The Tribune" Dear Sir : May I take the li herty of acknowledging through your columns, receipt of further contributions of stamps to the/ing the following passengers: INTERINSULAR MAILS to be despatched per sch. "Dart" for Harbour Island, Spanish Wells, and the Bluff, Fleu. will be made up and closed on Wednesday next, the i8lh inat, at 2 p.m. The other fortnightly mails on Friday, October 20th at 2 p.m. FOREIGN MAILS to be des patched via Miami, Fla. per "Frances F.," will be made up and closed on Satur day next, the 21st inst at 1 p m. From Saturday, 7th October. The Motor vessel "Panama" artived on Saturday afternoon the 7th from Miami, Fla. with a cargo of crates and s hingles and the follow ing 14 passengers : Messrs. W. P. Sands. James R. Thompson Lphrnme Koker, George Pinder, A if. Dele veaux, G. Rolle, Harold V. Jellicoe ; Masters Roland, Rairal, Lloyd, Winston and Francis Thompson; Miss Mary L. Robinson, Mrs. Ade line Thompson. The S. S. "Monterey" ar rived on Sunday afternoon the 8th from New York with passengers etc.—Already re ported. The S.S. "F.speranza" ar rived on Wednesday evening tlie nth from Mexico and Havana on her way to New York. TheS.S. "F.speranza" sail ed for New York on Thurs day afternoon the 12th tak To be had atall Grocers C L. LofthOUSe-Company's Agent Sir Count eney Honey wood, Messrs. Arthur Baninger, Ralph II. Sands. John W. Greene Edward George, R, E Mac Uelh, Oliver M Karle, W. J. Pinder, Miss Margery Alworth. Miss Agnes S. Mason. Mr. Alfred H. Ma I let t. Julia HiggS, Miss Cecelia Coopi 1. — :o:— The following is a list of cargo shipped per "£speran za." 287 bales sponges, 106 bis. refuse sponges, O38 bales sis nl, 8 bales cotton, 22 cases canded pineapples, 1188 box es grapefruit, q boxes limes, 100 barrels shells, 50 tons brazilletto, 30 tons lignum vitae, 19 empty steel barrels, 19 pkgs. old metal, 8 bales junk, 6 pkgs. sundries. COMMUNICATED. THE EDUCATION THAT WILL STAND THETEST In his lecture last Sunday night at the Adventist chapel Piof. Howell emphasized the thought that true education and genuine religion have one and the same principle as a basis. Me declared that every man who starts out with a sincere de-ire to know the truth will come soon or late to the Bible, the bookol truth. "What is," he inquired, "the basic principal of a true education? Can it be found in this Boob ? I answCI decidedly, unequivocally, yes." But says Mr. Infidel, Mr. Agnostic-, and the undevout scientist, "I will believe nothing but what can be demonstrated by well defined law." Very well. Will you receive what can be thus proved ? You must do so or renounce your law of science and cease to appeal to reathe Lord." And at the last son. You wish to be reason day God will make inquiry of parents, "Where is thy flock that was given thee, thy beautiful flock?" And "what wilt thou say when He shall punish thee?" Jer. 13:20, aj. Shall we not bequeathe to our sons and daughters an inheritance in the training and development of character which shall be to them a priceless treasure—far above that of able and scientific. Wait then, to hear the en'uciatkfn of the principal of a true edcation. Pause reverentlv at the threshold of investigation because, it is that which is to lest your sincerity and the quality of your conduct of life. Be silent in the presence of its announcement—"Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thv mind. 1 And the earthward Btn am of this current of a true education is, "Thou shalt love thv ni ighbor as thyself." No v no man of sound mind will attempt to deny that line is the Fountain from which must flour, does How, the springs wbii h refresh the hearts and nisiids of men. What is the condition of the man from whose life all love for Ins neighbor, his wife, his children, and his God has Bed ? lie is insane. Love, then, is the basis of a right education. "Prove it?" cries the ine verent unbeleiver "no human being ever loved God with all his heart and his neighbor as himself." But hold, friend, not so fast. There is One who loved His neighbor better than Himself ; and He came to this one lost sheep of humanity and with the sinA of the world upon him, proved and demonstrated that God's law could be kept in this world of sin, and revealed the character such obedience will develop. Not only this, but He has offered to help parents in bringing up their children ; and says, "Suffer liitle children, and forbid them not to come unto me ; lor of such is the kingdom of heaven." Is it not clear from that last statement that children are nearer the kingdom than after they have been educated in Jfr f world ? Where is the troffle then? With their wrongeducalion. The Bible holds out to parentssome wonderful promises. Listen: "I will contend with him that contended with thee, and I will save thy children." "All thy children shall be taught of 1 1



PAGE 1

silver ajd gold, which will time, and iq an unending endure the tests of time, and rltit i bear frt eternity ? ANNOUOCEMENTSTHE OTHER SIDE OF DEATH. The above it the subject announced for Prof. Howell's lecture at the Advcntist Chapel Sunday evening at 7.30. All are invited to attend the presentation of this interesting subject. What has the great future in store for us ? Is it all of life to live .' Will God's great purpose iu the creation of man be carried out ? Come and hear what the Bible says about it. mABRIAQE Reeves—Robinson. On Tuesday afternoon at St. Annes Episcopal Church, Mr. Cleveland 11 Reeves—second son of Mr. and Mrs, H L. Reeves—was married to Miss Mary Lucille Robinson of Tus kegee, Alabama, U. S. A. The Bride was given away by Mr. H. L. Reeves, father of the groom, Mr. H. E. S. Reeves be ing Best Man. Misses Inez Minns and Frances Retves act ed as Maids of Honour. The ceremon) was conducted by the Rev. A. E. Horner assisted by the Rev. C. B. Crofts. THE WAITING CHURCH. A Sermon for the eighteenth Sunday alter Trinity. I Corinthians I, 7.—"So that ye come behind in no gift; waiting for the Coming of Our Lord Jesus Christ, who shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may be blame less in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ." Just as the Church is careful that we should never forget that the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is the chief and central doctrine of Christianity, (as we saw by the Epistle for the eleventh Sunday after Trinity), so the Church is equally careful that the consequence of that wonderful Resurrection shall be kept in our minds—Our Lord's return in glory. This is the subject of the Epistle for the eighteenth Sunday after Trinity. I. The Apostle St. Paul be gins by remmding the members of the Churca in the Greek city of Corinth of the spiritual gifts which they had received. Every thing necessary for salvation had been given to them—sac raments, teaching, faith, power to pray and earnest zeal. These gifts were not to be used selfishly, but were to fill them with Christian Hope—-waiting for the coming of Our Lord Jesus Christ. There are two ways ih which Our Blessed Lord now comes to His people : —1 By the ord inances of His Church, and es pacially by His Blessed Sacra ment, in which His Real Pre %  encetfs manifested to the faith ful. f %  i. In response to our faith and prayer, by the power of the Holy Spirit ; as He said, / will not leave you comfortless I will come to you. These things help us to look forwaid eagerly to Christ's final Advent We do not feel dreed, or fear, but only joy as we look for His Ap pearink.; this is the meaning of the last words in the Bible Eveu so, come. Lord Jesus, and this also is the meaning of the word "waiting", in the text. The New Testament words Be lieving. Praying, Waiting and Watching, express the attitude of the Christian. All the Sac raments and Services of the Church are for the purpose of expressing this Hope and to prepare for its fulfilment. No one can read the New TestaTh9 Tribute, ATassao, Saturday October 14,1916. ment without seeing that it was this expectation of their Lord's return which gave much joy and earnestness to the first members of the Church, for this important subject is mentioned constantly both in the Gospels and Epistles, as well as in the Book Revelation, and this is the reason why every baptised person, after the "laying on of hands" became a regular Com municant. For the Lord's Sup per was to be celebrated, said our Lord, "till He come." II. The Apostle thus proceeds to state the effect, within our selves, of this attitude of wait ing for the coming of our Lord. S. Paul says that Christ shall also confirm you unto the end. This word "confirm" means to strengthen, to make firm. Some times we wonder whether we shall weather the storms of life, just as you watch a boat off a lea shore and wonder if she will clear the point and come safely into the harbour. But the man at the helm knows just what he ought to do. So our Captain of Salvation will steer His ship ol the Church, with every true and obedient soul on board, safely into the heavenly port. When the storm came down on the sea of Galilee Our Lord first rebuked the Apostles, wjth the words where is your faith ? before He rebuked the wind and the waves. Do not be afraid that you will be lost If you are but true to Christ and always faithfully keep the rules of His ship, the Church, He will confirm you unto the end. When St. Paul wrote to tho Thessalonians (1 Thess. V, 23) he uses almost the very same words as those in the text, and he adds Faithful is He that call you. Who also will do it. III. What does the Apostle mean by the expression In the day of Our Lord Jesus Christ ? Evidently it means the Day of Judgment. The present life is our day, called the day of salva tion ; but the Advent will be the Day of the Lord. Happy is that man who has his Lord so con stantly present with him now, that he can look forward with joy and hope to the Saviour's presence in glory at that Day. How important, then, is it that we should use all the stores of blessing provided by Christ in His church, so that we* come behind in no gift. So many socalled Christians neglect sacra ments and other meansof grace and yet think that all will be well at the last. As well might you leave a ship to steer her self, in the hope that she will clear the rocks without help. The chances that a sailor runs are wet known to be great, and many insurance Companies refuse tn give them Insurance at any price, but Your HomeCompany gives them protection at the same cost as those ashore, for they know that many of the people make their living by going to sea, and if they are lost their families will suffer. The best protection you can have is an insurai ce policy. Buy it from the Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, and you will be doing your duty to self and family. Telegrams October 13th, 191(1. London, n:—The demand of the Allies for the handing over of the Greek fleet was taken as a precautionary measure to en sure the safety of the Entente fleet. The Greek minister of marine annouaces that the demand would be complied with before the expiration of the ap pointed time. The Greek navy consists of five battleships, The Lemnos, Kilkis, Psara, Spetesia and Hydra; One armoured cruiser, the Averoff; one coast defense ship; the cruisers Helli and Nauarchos Mialuts; ten gun boats, 17 torpedo-boat destroy ers; nine torpedo-boats, 3 sub marines and several transports and other craft. The Italians have again taken the olfensive a gainst the Austrians in their endeavour to reach Trieste, Austrias chief port of the Adriatic, and at several points south and southeast of Gorizia have made good progress and in addition taken near ly 6 000 prisoners. South of Gorizia the Austrian iiae was broken between Tobara and Vertoiba, (according, to Rome, and on the Carso front entrenchments between Vipacco River and Hill 208 were captured". Here the town of Nova Villa and a strong position around the northern part of the hill fell into the hands of the Italians. Trenches in the Trentino region also have beea won by the Italians and 530 Austrians taken pri sonets. In Transylvania the Teutons continue their drive and Bavarian troops which captured the Rothensturm Pass have crossed the border into Knumania. According toBukarest, which admits the retirement of the Roumanians around Kronstadt. fierce Toutonicattaeks were re pulsed south of Hermanstadt with heavy loss to the attackers. Berlin concedes the capture by French troops of a German salient near Varmandovilliers south of the Somme and also by the British of first line German trenches near Sailly, north of the Somme. Violent counter attacks by the Germans on the newly won po •itions of the French in Chaulnes Wood have been repulsed. In the Vosges Mountains the Germans invaded French trench es but later on were driven out. Washington, 13:—The pressure is rising over the Caribbean but there is still evidence of a disturbance southeast of Swan Island, which lies some 340 miles west of Jamaica. October 14th, 1916. Berlin: — Roumanians have been expelled from further por tions of Transylvania and are being pursued by Austro German forces, it was announced officially today. A great attempt by the Anglo French forces on the Somme front to break through the German lines yesterday failed. Six assaults near Sailly were repuls ed. The battle northeastof Sailly continues. Petrograd:— German troops yesterday took the offensive along the Shara River. The war office announced today that the Germans captured a trench section but were subsequently expelled with heavy losses. Paris:—Forty Britisn and French aeroplanes dropped four tons of explosives last night on the Mauser works at Oberndorff n the Nekar River, in Germany SixGerman machines defending the works were shot down. Bucharest:—The repulse of systematic attacks at several points along the Transylvania front is announced today. In Tarlang Valley to which the Roumanians retired the Roumanian cavalry frustrated six attacks by hostile infantry. Berlin:—A successfully attack by German naval aeroplanes upon Russian transports in the Roumanian harbour of Const a nan. is reported in the ad miralty statement. London:—Progress for the British in yesterdays fighting on the Somme front is announced in todays official statement. British advances were scored be tween Gaudecourt and LesBoeufs and northeast of Gaudecourt 150 Germans were made prison er. Amsterdam:—According to a local newspaper Captain Koen igofthe Deutschland replying to a telegram of congratulation from his native town on his voyage to the United States said he was busy |with preparations for a second tripacross the ocean which would soon begin. Washington:—Admiral Mayo commanding the Atlantic fleet will investigate the reports that belligerent ships established bases on the New England coast and that wireless plants were being operated in violation of American neutrality. Secretary Daniels said that several de stroyers had already been de spatched from Newport north ward and that the work would be done under the admirals di reel ions. • Washington: —Radical chan ges in the treatment of mails on neutral ships are promised in the reply of the British and French governments to the American protest against inter ference with mails. Boston:—It was stated here today that the American des troyer patrol in connection with the recent submarine activities had been ordered effective from New York to Galveston. No295 14th October, 1916 The subjoined Royal Warrants, relating to the Decoration of the "Military Cross" and instituting a Bar for tha Distinguished Service Order, are published for general information. By Command, T. E. D. BRACE Acting Colonial Secretary. MP 699-16. War Office, 26th August, 1916. THE MILITARY CROSS. REVISED ROYAL WARRANTGEORGE THE FIFTH by the Grace of God of Ihe United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of tbe British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of tha Faith, Emperor of India : To all to whom these Prrsents shall come, Greeting : W HEREAS We did hy Royal Warrant under Our Sign Manual dated 28 h December, 1914, institute and create a new Decoration entitled "The Military Cross" to be awarded to Officers of certain ranks in Our Army in recognition of distinguished and, meritorious services in time of war: And whereas We are desirous that certain alterations should be made in the regulations governing the said Decorrftion, We do hereby ordain that the provision! of Our said Royal Warrant shall he cancelled, and that the following regulations shall be substituted in lieu thereof :— Firstly : It is ordained that the Cross shall be designated "The Military Cross.*' Secondly: It is ordained that The Military Cross shall consist of a Cross of Silver having on each arm the Imperial Crown and bearing in the centre the Royal and Imperial Cipher. Thirdly : It is ordained that no person shall be eligible for this Decoration nor be nominated thereto unless he he a captain, a Com. missioned Officer of a lower gr^de, or a Warrant Officer Class I. or Class II. in Our Army, or Our Indian or Colonial Military Forces, and that the Military Cross shall be awarded only to Officers of the abov* ranks on a recommendation to Us by Our Principal Secretary of Slate for War. Fourthly : It is ordained that Foreign Officers of an equivalent rank to those a bo e mentioned, who have been associated in Military Operations with Our Aimy.or Our Indian or Colonial Military Foices, shall he eligible for the award of The Military Cross. Fifthly : It is ordained that anyone who, after having performed services for which the Military Cross is awarded, subsequently performs an approved act of gallantly which, l he had not received the Cross, would have entitled him to it, shall be awarded a bar to be attached to the riband by which the C'oss is suspended, and for every additional such act an additional bar may be added. Sixthly: It is ordained that the names of those upor whom We may be pleased to confer this Dec 01 an on shall he published in the I ondon Gazette, and that a Register thereof shall be kept in the Office of Our Principal Secretary of State for War. Seventhly : It is ordained that the Military Cross shall be worn immediately after all Orders and before all Decorations and Medals (the Victoria Cross alone excepted), and shall be worn on the left breast pendent from a riband of one inch and thiee-eights in width, which shall be in colour white with a purple stripe. Eightly : It is ordained that the Military Cross shall not confer any individual precedence, but shall entitle the recipient to the addition after his name of the letters M. C. Ninthly : It is ordained that any person whom hy an especial Warrant under Our Royal Sign Manual We declare to have forleited lie Military Cross shall return the said Decoration to the Office of Our Principal Secretary of State for Wai, and that his name shall be erased from the Register of those upon whom the said Decoration sh.ll have been conferred. Lastly : We reser v e to Ourself, Our heirs and successors full power of annulling, altering, abrogating, augmenting, interpreting, or dispensing with these Regulations, or any part thereof, by a notification under Our Royal Sign Manual. Given at Our Court of St. James's, this 23rd day of August, 1916, in the seventh year of Our Reign. By His Mwjesty's Command D. LLOYD GEORGE. MEMORANDUM. This Warrant is in substitution for the original Warrant of a8th December, 1914, and the Supplementary Warrant of 31st May, 1916. The insertion of the letters M. C. after the recipient's name, under l lause 8, will be carried out in the October Army List. War Office, 26th August, 1916. ROYAL WARRANT INSTITUTING A BAR FOR THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER. GEORGE, R. I. W HEREAS We are desirous of providing for the recognition of further distinguished services in the case of Officers who have been awarded the "Distinguished Service Order." It is our will and pleasure and we do hereby ordain that anyone who, after having performed services for which the Distinguished Service Order is awarded, subsequently performs an approved act of gallantry which, if he had not received the Order, would have entitled him to it, shall be awarded a Bar to be attached to the riband by which the Older is suspended, and for every additional such act an additional Bar may be added. Given at Our Court at Sr. James's this 33rd day of August, 1916, in the seventh year of our Reign. By His Majesty's Command, D. LLOYD GEORGE.



PAGE 1

The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 14, 1916. Highest prices paid for Crape Fruit Call and See Theo. P. Knowles $ Co. at 376 Bay St. Professional Announcement Announcement I Mr. Oscar E. Johnson TAILOR and CLOTHIER DR. W. R LAMB American Oculist & Optician Specialist in Examining the Eye and Correcting Defective Vision at Hotel Nassau until October 25th inclusive. H AS the pleasure to again announce to tlie citizens of New Providence that lie may be consulted at the above address until the time stated. Those wishing a consultation should make an appointment, at their earliest tunvtnic in c as he will not remain longer than the 25th. He is fully prepared, as usual, with the most modern instru merits and apparatus for thoroughly examining and refracting the eyes according to the latest and most approved methods as employed by the most eminent Oculists 111 the Metropolitan Lye Infirmaries, and lie has the largest and best supply of all desirable kinds and styles of lenses and mountings of the best quality ever brought to Nassau, including several thousands of spherocylindrical, prismatic, bifocal and other kinds of lenses made specially to order for the correction of artigmalisni, weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which the ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled with weak eyes, defective vision, headache, due to eye strain, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes or the lids, weakness of the ocular muscles or any of the numerous conditions of the eyes requiring a thorough examination or necessitating the use of glasses—and most of these troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction and properly adjusted glasses—would do well to embrace the present exceptional opportunity of giving their eyes the attention they require—an opportunity which for completeness of apparatus and supply of lenses and mountings, thoroughness of examination, perfection of refraction which biings the vision up to the highest standard I possible and for the best and most satisfactory results is equal in every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad as thousands of his patients here and elsewhere are willing to attest. His method of examination with the ophthahmometer, electric ophthahmoscope and retinoscope are so careful, thorough and accurate that the diagnoses the cause of the defective vision or eye trouble, so that the best and most satisfactory results are always obtained from the glasses he prescribes, which are accurately fitted and warranted to be correct. They are not only guaranteed to be absolutely perfect in the correction of the refraction and for the production of the clearest vision possible, but for durability and general satisfaction -anil the immediate relief of head-ache, eye-ache and other ocular troubles which call for the use of glasses, they are equal to the best that could possibly be obtained anywhere abroad. Comparatively few e>f those who are using glasses have the kind their eyes requiie, the kind which gives the best vision, the most comfort, and which preserve the sight and keep it normal all through life. This is because the eyes in most cases have not had the careful and thorough examination by a qualified specialist which is most important and necessary when the best results ar* desired. As the accomodative power of the eye gradually weakens as one grows older it becomes necessary to make a change of glasses every three or four years and many make a great mistake in continuing the use of unsuitable glasses, it is one of the principal causes of cataract and other serious eye troubles Dr. Lamb is certificated in both medicine and optics, has thousands of references and testimonials from prominent citizens of many countries where he has practised his profession continuously for over 25 years, and has established through reliable and superior service the most extensive eye practise in the world. Charges Reasonable. Hours, 9 to 12 a.m., 2 to 5 p.m. D EGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned *-* from New York where he became a graduate of the Mitchell College of America& was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting being his specialty. This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a Guarantee to confirm the confide.ice of hi* clientele in his skill and in his well known three P's viz : Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited. OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St. MM ill —1 T EL 1 III M Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, LIMITED. Authorized Capital £5,000 LOW BATES FOB — WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and atisfactory Adjustments of Claims. % % % % % %  — jl %  %  %  %  — ,.,,.. ——_—___ HOME OFFiCE>-2r;4 Bay Street, Nassau. (Continued from 1st page) Behind those men must lie, at least, the country of NoMan "s Land over which they have gone, and all the enemy's aitillery is deluging it with shells. Many times, as you know, th* iiiemy piisoners have reported that they had been days with most inadequate rations because supplies could not come up through our barrage. Yet behind their front line the enemy always has communication tranche** When we push him back and go into that front line ourselves he leave* no communication trenches over No Man's Land, and there is no shelter there till the Pioneers make it. But never once in all this battle have our men had to yield a position once won because sup plies of food or water failed to reach them. THE "SIGNALS" The non military mind, again, probably has no idea of the magnitude of the machine ry of the modern Army for keeping up communication among its several parts. The "Signals" of a single Corps includes a telegraph and telephone system equal to that of a considerable town, with hundreds of milesof wire, all of which has to be kept going under continuous shell fire. It may transmit over 1,000 messages a day, besides receiving 400 or 500 and sending out 000 or 700 of its own origination. These are, in rough, the actual figures of one day's work of a single Corps. In addition to all of which nearly 1,700 sealed messages, or packages, were received in the day from the hands of dispatch iiders. To see the plan of the lines of any "Signals'" unit is a revelation of the ordered complexity of an Army organization of today. And when we advance, as we have advanced here in the last two months, the whole thing must be continually pushed up behind our troops, new lines laid, new posts established through all the shellswept zone. Only the other day I was pretty far forward talking with two officers of the troops hold ing the front line in the^hole which afforded suA shelter as there was. A man, killed by a shell, had literally fallen in at the door a few hours before I came. A sergeant of the R. E. came in and reported that he had got two lines up to "X. B. 1*7" (some 50 yards farther along the trench) and thought he could make a shelter .{or his men there, and then he would go on to "F. C. 3" Fie came in again *fiye minutes later to re port that Corporal Blank was killed bya rifle bullet, "He was the best man I had," he said. I do not know, but I have no doubt that the lines were laid to"F. C. 3" that night. Itisall wonderful, and all done as a matter of course. Nobody thinks that he is a hero, and when a commanding officer wants to know he "can't get any names." One interesting "Signals"unit which is out here is the South African. The personnel of the unit, from the O. C. down, is* composed of men who were in the Government telegraph ser vice in South Africa when the war broke out. — The Times 141/1. Sept., 1916. NOTICE *pHE Recruiting Committee are again enlisting men for Drafts for the Bahamas Contingent. Applicants will be attended to between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Commandant's Office at the Barracks. Enlist now as the vessel for Jamaica will be leaving early in November. R. H. C. CRAWFORD Commandant. PRICE LIST OF Seeds for sale by the Board of Agriculture Beets Eclipse Cabbage Early Jersey Wakefield do. Large Flat Dutcll Carrot Hall Long Oxheart Egg Plant Black Beauty Lettuce Simpsons Black Seeded Okra Perkins Mammoth Pepper Ruby King Radish French Breakfast Turnip Purple Top Improved Watermelon Florida Kavourite Kolhrabi Early White Vienna TOMATO LIVINGSTON GLOBE Cauliflower Gilt Edge Snap Means Dwarf Bush Bountiful Paris Green 3. 8s. 8s. 4S14s. 4s. 2S. 7s. 3s3*3s8s. is. lb. ; 5d iod iod IS, bd 5d 5d iod 5


PAGE 1

i U News FOP Everybody" NVJIIIVJ* o.ddl> in. (urnra in verb* mnu'a'rl Being bound miwint to ih UOIIIIM olno Muier, NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. OCTOBER. 14. 1916 Price. THREE CENT* FOR Our Day Making Good The Advance. Wnder the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Allardyce. A PAGEANT OF r he Empire and our Allies. y Boy Scouts and Girl Guides ssisted by 200children from the Public Schools. IN THE arrack Grounds on the afternoon of October the 20th. PROGRAMME: ableaux, Songs, Grand arch, Music by the Police and. ADMISSION Kdults Children 6d. 3d. ickets can be obtained from lie Scouts or Girl Guides, id entrance fee will also be .•cepted at the Main Gate at lie Barracks. ] All the chairs that it is posible to procure will be on the grounds and an extra fee of 3d ill be Charged for each seat. The entire proceeds are to be iven to the Red Cross "Our ay" fund. Work of Engineers and Transport. SILENT EFFICIENCY> an, \ LOST Monday the 9th between the Market and the Park—a silver open-face watch. 8/is offered for its return to "TRIBUNE" Office. I ^ t\ BRITISH HEADQUARTERS, Sept 1 a. The day 00 the British front has again been comparatively quiet, as quietness is understood here nowadays. The desultory shelling of the artillery would be considered heavy in times of ordinary trench warfare, and there has been infantry fighting in the region east of Ginchy and about High Wood, with the result that new prisoners to the number of nine officers and 160 men have come down. Of these, live officer! anil over 100 men came from Ginchy neigh lionrhood. It will be noticed that the proportion of officers again is large Our operations, however, have •been small. In theeombmed offensive of the Allies, this has been a "French Day," and I understand that the French have done extremely well. The thun der of their guns has been stupendous, and is at his moment We learn of a magnificient advance out Uancourt way. But of this you will hear more adequately from another source. All that 1 would like to say on the subject is to bear testimony to the immense enthuas asm which every French success arouses in our Army It mikes our men almost as happy ts if they had done the thing themselves. I believe the French CRYSTAL G ICE < at 4td. ss 9d. M Is 6d S< 3s. k UR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice necessary for home consumption and to let the publicshare in the benefit. Our prices have been reduced as follows :— 12 lbs f 24 • 48 100 It is our duty to protect home industries and the figures listed above are intended to give the public an advantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed. Complaints of any kind reported (o the proprietor will receive prompt and courreous attenti6n. DEPOTS. Bay St. City,-The Ice Hodse. E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week. Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery*Store,open today East St, (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store, open next week. Baillou Hill Road^tore, Corner Delancy Hill, open next week. HAROLD E. M JOHNSON, Prop. feeling isas cordial to us as ours is to them, and I doubt ll ever in history two Allies worked together in such perfect unanimity or with moie ungrudging ad miration ol the Other's gallan try. One could not wish a more geneious comradeship to exist. In all this fighting, admiration for the splendid work of our ar tillery and for the gallantry of the infantry has a tendency to blind one to, or to make it dim Cult to speak of, the equally gallant work of others, as the! Royal Engineers, the Pioneers, the Transport. For the Artillery indeed, no praise could be too high. The way in which our new gunners have, in so short a time, become able to hold their own against the German artillery with all its length of training, and the way in which they have, individually and in the mass, stood the attain of this tremendoitf battle, are among the most truly miracul oils things in all the miracle of these Armies. MODESTY OF THE ENGINEERSAs for the Engineers, they— well, they have been the Royal Engineers, God bless them It is a tradition ol the Sappers that they always do their job and never make a fuss about it. Only to day a commanding of ficer of troops which have borne a heavy share in recent opera tiorts complained to me that, in making up his list of recommen dations foi honours, he couldn't get the Engineer officers to give him any names. "Oh, they hav all done well" they said; "that's all right." "And," said the commanding officer to me, "it was all right. They had all done well, d d well ; but some bod) must have done particu lailv well, and I wanted names! Extraordinary chaps !" he added m e d i t a t i v e 1 v ; "Marvellous clmps I" And I believe that to be th< feeling of every officer in the Armv. The work of the Engineers and the Pioneers is often carried on, of coupe, in circumstances of the greatest possible danger. Consolidating newly won posl tions end eotrenchitg have more frequently than not, to be done under heavy fire, from which the men who are working cannot take shelter as the in fantfy in th/ sasne place may be able to do. On the stedfastness and rapidity oft heir work de pends,the safety of all the troops who have to hold the positions, probably the retention ofthe positions themselves. Often their casualties are heavy ; but whatever they may be, the work goes on Again and again I have heaid officers speak with the ut most gratitude and admiration of the work of the Pioneers : Again and again I have heard it insisted that it is to them that the chief for the final success of a "push" ought to be given. There are, in all this Army, which is so extraordinarily in articulate in its own praise, on troops who talk less and work more gallantly lhan they. Of the transport and all the machine on which the getting of suppliis up to, and keeping communication open with, the troops in advanced positions I have spoken several times. Probably those at a distance have never formulated in their minds any notion of what it means to get food and, especially, water — not to mention bombs and supplies of ammunition—up to the men who have pushed for ward into some perilous and even desperate position, such as we are winning every day and holding only by virtue of the amaiing tenacity of our men. (Continued on 4th page) "Elgin' ARROW COLLAR Made of a fine white Moire Madras—an attractive novelty that is in good form. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BKST HETAII.F.RS CLUKTT, PEABODY & CO., Inc. MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent, New Bicycle Tyres FOP Sale We put them on for you free of charge. In stock a fine assortment of other bicycle accessories. BRUCE JOHNSON 42 King Street, Nassau. T Keeping Guard HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than lighting for the Hag. Not the least of these preserving thebalance ol trade. SHOE ^if STORE is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have' succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotoum" sums up 310 eateecontaining 6(150 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan r With .these reinforcements he Big Four will be abje to keepthe enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on. purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man kets abroad. G. T, KNPW-LSS, Prop. Big4, \^^A iBay St. (Sponge Exchange) %  9


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02718
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, October 14, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02718

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
i
U
News Fop Everybody"
NvjIIIvj* o.ddl> in. (urnra in verb* mnu'a'rl
Being bound miwint to ih Uoiiiim olno Muier,
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. OCTOBER. 14. 1916
Price. THREE CENT*
FOR
Our Day Making Good The Advance.
Wnder the distinguished pat-
ronage of His Excellency
the Governor
and
Lady Allardyce.
A PAGEANT OF
r he Empire and our
Allies.
y Boy Scouts and
Girl Guides
ssisted by 200children from
the Public Schools.
IN THE
arrack Grounds
on the afternoon of
October the 20th.
PROGRAMME:
ableaux, Songs, Grand
arch, Music by the Police
and.
Admission
Kdults Children
6d. 3d.
ickets can be obtained from
lie Scouts or Girl Guides,
id entrance fee will also be
.cepted at the Main Gate at
lie Barracks.
] All the chairs that it is pos-
ible to procure will be on the
grounds and an extra fee of 3d
ill be Charged for each seat.
The entire proceeds are to be
iven to the Red Cross "Our
ay" fund.
Work of Engineers and Transport.
Silent Efficiency-
>
an,
\ LOST
Monday the 9th be-
tween the Market and
the Parka silver open-face
watch. 8/- is offered for its
return to
"Tribune" Office.
I ^ t\
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS,
Sept 1 a.
The day 00 the British front
has again been comparatively
quiet, as quietness is understood
here nowadays. The desultory
shelling of the artillery would
be considered heavy in times of
ordinary trench warfare, and
there has been infantry fight-
ing in the region east of Ginchy
and about High Wood, with
the result that new prisoners to
the number of nine officers and
160 men have come down. Of
these, live officer! anil over 100
men came from Ginchy neigh
lionrhood. It will be noticed
that the proportion of officers
again is large
Our operations, however, have
been small. In theeombmed of-
fensive of the Allies, this has
been a "French Day," and I un-
derstand that the French have
done extremely well. The thun
der of their guns has been stup-
endous, and is at his moment
We learn of a magnificient ad-
vance out Uancourt way. But
of this you will hear more ade-
quately from another source.
All that 1 would like to say
on the subject is to bear testi-
mony to the immense enthuas
asm which every French suc-
cess arouses in our Army It
mikes our men almost as happy
ts if they had done the thing
themselves. I believe the French
CRYSTAL
G
ICE
<

at 4td.
ss 9d.
M Is 6d
S< 3s.
kUR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice neces-
sary for home consumption and to let the public-
share in the benefit. Our prices have been
reduced as follows :
, 12 lbs
f 24
48
100
It is our duty to protect home industries and the
figures listed above are intended to give the public an ad-
vantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed.
Complaints of any kind reported (o the proprietor
will receive prompt and courreous attenti6n.
DEPOTS.
Bay St. City,-The Ice Hodse.
E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week.
* Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery*Store,open today
East St, (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store,
open next week.
Baillou Hill Road^tore, Corner Delancy Hill, open
next week.
HAROLD E. M JOHNSON,
Prop.
feeling isas cordial to us as ours
is to them, and I doubt ll ever
in history two Allies worked to-
gether in such perfect unanimity
or with moie ungrudging ad
miration ol the Other's gallan
try. One could not wish a more
geneious comradeship to exist.
In all this fighting, admiration
for the splendid work of our ar
tillery and for the gallantry of
the infantry has a tendency to
blind one to, or to make it dim
Cult to speak of, the equally
gallant work of others, as the!
Royal Engineers, the Pioneers,
the Transport. For the Artillery
indeed, no praise could be too
high. The way in which our
new gunners have, in so short
a time, become able to hold
their own against the German
artillery with all its length of
training, and the way in which
they have, individually and in
the mass, stood the attain of
this tremendoitf battle, are
among the most truly miracul
oils things in all the miracle of
these Armies.
Modesty of the
Engineers-
As for the Engineers, they
well, they have been the Royal
Engineers, God bless them It
is a tradition ol the Sappers
that they always do their job
and never make a fuss about it.
Only to day a commanding of
ficer of troops which have borne
a heavy share in recent opera
tiorts complained to me that, in
making up his list of recommen
dations foi honours, he couldn't
get the Engineer officers to give
him any names. "Oh, they hav
all done well" they said; "that's
all right." "And," said the
commanding officer to me, "it
was all right. They had all done
well, d--------d well ; but some
bod) must have done particu
lailv well, and I wanted names!
Extraordinary chaps !" he added
m e d i t a t i v e 1 v ; "Marvellous
clmps I" And I believe that to
be th< feeling of every officer in
the Armv.
The work of the Engineers
and the Pioneers is often carried
on, of coupe, in circumstances
of the greatest possible danger.
Consolidating newly won posl
tions end eotrenchitg have
more frequently than not, to be
done under heavy fire, from
which the men who are working
cannot take shelter as the in
fantfy in th/ sasne place may be
able to do. On the stedfastness
and rapidity of-their work de
pends,the safety of all the troops
who have to hold the positions,
probably the retention of- the
positions themselves. Often
their casualties are heavy ; but
whatever they may be, the work
goes on Again and again I have
heaid officers speak with the ut
most gratitude and admiration
of the work of the Pioneers :
Again and again I have heard
it insisted that it is to them that
the chief for the final success of
a "push" ought to be given.
There are, in all this Army,
which is so extraordinarily in
articulate in its own praise, on
troops who talk less and work
more gallantly lhan they.
Of the transport and all the
machine on which the getting
of suppliis up to, and keeping
communication open with, the
troops in advanced positions I
have spoken several times. Pro-
bably those at a distance have
never formulated in their minds
any notion of what it means to
get food and, especially, water
not to mention bombs and
supplies of ammunitionup to
the men who have pushed for
ward into some perilous and
even desperate position, such as
we are winning every day and
holding only by virtue of the
amaiing tenacity of our men.
(Continued on 4th page)
"Elgin'
ARROW
COLLAR
Made of a fine
white Moire
Madrasan at-
tractive novelty
that is in good
form.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BKST HETAII.F.RS
CLUKTT, PEABODY & CO., Inc.
MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent,
New Bicycle Tyres
Fop Sale *
We put them on for you free
of charge.
In stock a fine assortment of
other bicycle accessories.
BRUCE JOHNSON
42 King Street, Nassau.
T
Keeping Guard
HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than lighting for the Hag. Not the least of these
preserving the- balance ol trade.
SHOE ^if STORE
is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have'
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotoum" sums up
310 eateecontaining 6(150 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
r
With .these reinforcements he Big Four will be
abje to keepthe enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on. purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man
kets abroad.
G. T, KNPW-LSS, Prop. Big- 4,
\^^A iBay St. (Sponge Exchange)
9


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 14,1916.
L. GILBKRT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OPFIOK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sla
.Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
PHONK SOD, V. O. BOX 183.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wednesday anil Friday
single co(jy ......... J,l
Tuesday, aijl Thursdaysingle copy id
%hitdv-single copy ... i |d
Weekly ............ j,|
Monthly ............is. 6d
Suarterly............is. M
UYea.lv............m.
ifearlr ............18<
HAYAKLK IN AUVANCK
\ihertitini; K.itnt: mix pence p
BrSttiilMitiqn) three pence |'.er line
UMsePi'iid i.neitioii ; aini i)Ticpe:iiiy iht
llue lot subsquent iinierUon.
Advertisements undtir eight line 4>.
S'l'l'ICE When Correspondence or
Articles are signed with the writer's name
or initials, or with a pseudonym, or are
marked "Communicated," the Editor must
not necessarily be held to be in agreement
vi'.h the views therein expressed or u ilk the
mode oj expression In such instances, or in
the caseoj"Letters to the Editor," insertion
only means that the matter or point of view
n t nsidtrid oj sufficient interest and im
portance to warrant publication.
Zhe tribune
Saturday October 14, 1916
So Constantine must sur-
render his fleet and forts and
a useful railway to tiie Al-
lies It was time! This
seems to prelude a more vi-
gorous move from tlie South
against the Bulgarians. It
is needful to strike soon in
the Balkans, as the winter
sets in early there and is very
rigorous. We are all long-
ing for the speedy punish
merit of Bulgaria and reha-
bilitation of Serbia. But the
crushing of Bulgaria would
mean the isolation of Tur-
key, the opening of the Dar-
danelles and a concentration
of the Entente forces for a
series of shattering blows at
the Central Empires. May
it be soon!
We much regret to learn
that two days ago Lady Al-
lardyce received by cable the
sad news of the death of her
lather, Mr. Molesworth
Greene. Much sympathy
will go out to Lady Altar-
dyce and those bereaved with
her. Mr. Molesworth Greene
was over go years of age and
to tin' last was remarkably
full of physical vigour. He
was one of the early Austra-
lian squatters, having pro
ceeded te Australia in 1842
with his father, a retired .Na-
val Officer who took up land
there. Mr. Molesworth
Greene was a well known
person throughout the Aus-
tralian Commonwealth. Ev-
ery one knew him for a lend-
ing Pastoralist and an expert
authority on Stock. These
early Australian! were a fine
race of men. We have read
of the wonderful doings of]
their descendents at Galli-
poli. The vigour and capa-
city with which Bahamian
Red Cross affairs have been
managed have shown that
the spirit and successes of
the deceased gentleman can
bf> carried out in other places
and in other ways.
:o:
Arable was received this
week containing the sad
news of the dentil -from pul
monary diseaseof No 56
Benjamin Smith of the and
Bahi.raas Co tingent.
It grieves us very much to
have to place on record the
death of another one of our
brave boys.
"The Tribune" offers its
sympathy to the sorrowing
motherMrs. Julia Smith
who resides at Fox Hill.
:o:
At the request of His Ex-
cellency the Governor the
Chamber of Commerce would
invite the community, both
business and residential, to
make as great display of
bu ting and flags on Thurs-
day October 19th in honour
of "Our Day."
We had the pleasure of seeing
Red Cross Stamp Fund from the
following:
Miss K. Allardyce 227, Miss
A. Bethel 307. Miss Bertha B.
Magne 100, Mis A. H. Lee1
ronto, Miss L. Actlifife, Mrs H.
MaloneHope Town. K. L VII
and Q. A. Chapter 1 O. D. E -
Mrs LF. Turtle, Victoria Chap-
ter, I.O. D. L. Mrs 13 C. de
Glanville ro5, Mrs Wheatly
Turtle 233, Gordon Chapter, I.
O. D. E.Mrs D. Tudor 526,
Mrs F. Burnside, Miss Dorothy
WrightRock Sound, Mrs Ken-
drlck Abaco 263, Miss Sophie
Stewart 32s. Miss Ada Ficher
I ri 111 dad 1160, Miss IreneNearn,
Miss \larv Elizabeth Collins
i6oq, Violet Patrol. 3rd B. G.G.
i/y.6, 6th Bah. Boy Scouts 260,
Mh Bah. Boy ScouisNicolls
Town 100, Mr DudleyGamblin,
ua Boy "couis 800, Dr
a fine lot of miniature colouied
photographs,exquisitely framed!.' "
-the frame* having 310 lags ^hea|4 Qilrattofc Mr
1 Ed. Johnson 350, Mr Lloyd M.
Johnson 51 j, Mr D. Walter
Toronto, Mr Gilbert C. Abbott,
Mr Cartington Stewart 100. Mr
ed by Miss Leonora S. Johnson,
Artist, to the Chamber of Com
merce to be pul on sale, the
proceeds to be for the "Our
Day" Fund.
Miss Johnson is to be con-
gratulated phi such an original
idea.
-- '.&'.
An arrangement has been
made for the "Frances E" to
bring over the mails that were
expected by the freight steamer
next week. The "Frances" is
expected to arrive early iir the
week.
Children Of The
Empire Fund
for manned and blind
Soldiers and Sailors.
We have been reqsested by
the Private Secretary to ac-
knowledge the following sums
which have been received by
His Excellency on account of
the above Fund.'
Previously acknow-
ledged '38 l8 2
Lantern Lecture by
Rev. C. B. Crofts per
MrJ. L. Lightbourn 2 o
Harbour Island school
per Mr W. E Higgs 1 10
Cherokee Sound school
per Mr Wilfred Rus-
sell 4
Stewart Rae, Mr Autlley Kelly,
Mr Francis T. Holmes
Thanking you for your co-op-
eration.
I have the honour to be.
Your obedient servant
DR. WALTER HFSS.
Local Secy
Emigration figures fur Sept
1916.
Outwards
Males 189
Females 84
Total 273
Inwards
77
23
loO
r42 12 6
"OUR DAY
REO CROSS MOTOR AMBULANCE
FUND
Previously acknow-
ledged W is 0
Rolle Town, Exuma
(too late tor Bel-
gian Fund) 5 1 0
Mr. Victor Saunders 10 0 0
Mr. and Mis. George
Weech i 0 0
Mr. John Rutherford s 2 6
Mrs. G B Adderley 10 10 0
Mr. J. H. Peet .3 1 0
Hon. Wm. and Mrs
Miller 10 0 0
Dr. Alburv S J 0
Mrs. J. Alburv and
Miss N. A1 bury 10 10 f)
\ Friend s. 0 0
J. L. J. s 0 0
Mr. E. W. T. Mc
Pherson 10 0 0
Mr. W. K. Moore 10 ro 0
Mr- A. D Sherwood
Smith 2 2 0
Miss Allaidvce 2 2 0
Miss K. Allardvce t 2 0
Dr W. Hess 2 2 0
Hon. P. W. D. and
Mrs. Armbrister 8 8 0 6
706 12
The Editor "The Tribune"
Dear Sir :
May I take the li
herty of acknowledging through
your columns, receipt of further
contributions of stamps to the/ing the following passengers:
Interinsular Mails to be
despatched per sch. "Dart"
for Harbour Island, Spanish
Wells, and the Bluff, Fleu.
will be made up and closed
on Wednesday next, the i8lh
inat, at 2 p.m.
The other fortnightly mails
on Friday, October 20th at 2
p.m.
Foreign Mails to be des
patched via Miami, Fla. per
"Frances F.," will be made
up and closed on Satur
day next, the 21st inst at 1
p m.
From Saturday, 7th October.
The Motor vessel "Pana-
ma" artived on Saturday af-
ternoon the 7th from Miami,
Fla. with a cargo of crates
andshingles and the follow
ing 14 passengers :
Messrs. W. P. Sands. James
R. Thompson Lphrnme Kok-
er, George Pinder, A if. Dele
veaux, G. Rolle, Harold V.
Jellicoe ; Masters Roland,
Rairal, Lloyd, Winston and
Francis Thompson; Miss
Mary L. Robinson, Mrs. Ade
line Thompson.
The S. S. "Monterey" ar
rived on Sunday afternoon
the 8th from New York with
passengers etc.Already re
ported.
The S.S. "F.speranza" ar
rived on Wednesday evening
tlie nth from Mexico and
Havana on her way to New
York.
TheS.S. "F.speranza" sail
ed for New York on Thurs
day afternoon the 12th tak
To be had atall Grocers
C L. LofthOUSe-Company's Agent
Sir Count eney Honey wood,
Messrs. Arthur Baninger,
Ralph II. Sands. John W.
Greene Edward George, R, E
Mac Uelh, Oliver M Karle,
W. J. Pinder, Miss Margery
Alworth.
Miss Agnes S. Mason.
Mr. Alfred H. Ma I let t.
Julia HiggS, Miss Cecelia
Coopi 1.
:o:
The following is a list of
cargo shipped per "speran
za."
287 bales sponges, 106 bis.
refuse sponges, O38 bales sis
nl, 8 bales cotton, 22 cases
canded pineapples, 1188 box
es grapefruit, q boxes limes,
100 barrels shells, 50 tons
brazilletto, 30 tons lignum
vitae, 19 empty steel barrels,
19 pkgs. old metal, 8 bales
junk, 6 pkgs. sundries.
COMMUNICATED.
The Education That
Will Stand theTest
In his lecture last Sunday
night at the Adventist chapel
Piof. Howell emphasized the
thought that true education
and genuine religion have
one and the same principle
as a basis. Me declared that
every man who starts out
with a sincere de-ire to know
the truth will come soon or
late to the Bible, the bookol
truth. "What is," he inquir-
ed, "the basic principal of a
true education? Can it be
found in this Boob ? I answ-
CI decidedly, unequivocally,
yes."
But says Mr. Infidel, Mr.
Agnostic-, and the undevout
scientist, "I will believe no-
thing but what can be de-
monstrated by well defined
law." Very well. Will you
receive what can be thus
proved ? You must do so or
renounce your law of science
and cease to appeal to rea- the Lord." And at the last
son. You wish to be reason day God will make inquiry
of parents, "Where is thy
flock that was given thee,
thy beautiful flock?" And
"what wilt thou say when
He shall punish thee?" Jer.
13:20, aj. Shall we not be-
queathe to our sons and
daughters an inheritance in
the training and develop-
ment of character which
shall be to them a priceless
treasurefar above that of
able and scientific. Wait
then, to hear the en'uciatkfn
of the principal of a true ed-
cation. Pause reverentlv at
the threshold of investigation
because, it is that which is to
lest your sincerity and the
quality of your conduct of
life. Be silent in the presence
of its announcement"Thou
shalt love the Lord thy God
with all thy heart, and with
all thy soul, and with all thv
mind.1 And the earthward
Btn am of this current of a
true education is, "Thou
shalt love thv ni ighbor as
thyself."
No v no man of sound mind
will attempt to deny that
line is the Fountain from
which must flour, does How,
the springs wbii h refresh the
hearts and nisiids of men.
What is the condition
of the man from whose life
all love for Ins neighbor, his
wife, his children, and his
God has Bed ? lie is insane.
Love, then, is the basis of a
right education.
"Prove it?" cries the ine
verent unbeleiver "no hu-
man being ever loved God
with all his heart and his
neighbor as himself." But
hold, friend, not so fast.
There is One who loved His
neighbor better than Him-
self ; and He came to this
one lost sheep of humanity
and with the sinA of the
world upon him, proved and
demonstrated that God's law
could be kept in this world
of sin, and revealed the
character such obedience
will develop.
Not only this, but He has
offered to help parents in
bringing up their children ;
and says, "Suffer liitle child-
ren, and forbid them not to
come unto me ; lor of such is
the kingdom of heaven." Is it
not clear from that last state-
ment that children are nearer
the kingdom than after they
have been educated in Jfrf
world ? Where is the troffle
then? With their wrongedu-
calion.
The Bible holds out to
parentssome wonderful prom-
ises. Listen: "I will con-
tend with him that con-
tended with thee, and I will
save thy children." "All thy
children shall be taught of
1
1


silver ajd gold, which will
time, and
iq an unending
endure the tests of time, and
rltit i
bear frt
eternity ?
Annouocements-
the other side of death.
The above it the subject announced for
Prof. Howell's lecture at the Advcntist
Chapel Sunday evening at 7.30. All are
invited to attend the presentation of this
interesting subject.
What has the great future in store for
us ? Is it all of life to live .' Will God's
great purpose iu the creation of man be
carried out ? Come and hear what the
Bible says about it.
mABRIAQE
ReevesRobinson.
On Tuesday afternoon at St.
Annes Episcopal Church, Mr.
Cleveland 11 Reevessecond
son of Mr. and Mrs, H L.
Reeveswas married to Miss
Mary Lucille Robinson of Tus
kegee, Alabama, U. S. A. The
Bride was given away by Mr.
H. L. Reeves, father of the
groom, Mr. H. E. S. Reeves be
ing Best Man. Misses Inez
Minns and Frances Retves act
ed as Maids of Honour. The
ceremon) was conducted by the
Rev. A. E. Horner assisted by
the Rev. C. B. Crofts.
THE WAITING CHURCH.
A Sermon for the eighteenth
Sunday alter Trinity.
I Corinthians I, 7."So that ye
come behind in no gift; wait-
ing for the Coming of Our
Lord Jesus Christ, who shall
also confirm you unto the
end, that ye may be blame
less in the day of our Lord
Jesus Christ."
Just as the Church is careful
that we should never forget
that the Resurrection of Jesus
Christ is the chief and central
doctrine of Christianity, (as we
saw by the Epistle for the elev-
enth Sunday after Trinity), so
the Church is equally careful
that the consequence of that
wonderful Resurrection shall
be kept in our mindsOur
Lord's return in glory. This is
the subject of the Epistle for
the eighteenth Sunday after
Trinity.
I. The Apostle St. Paul be
gins by remmding the members
of the Churca in the Greek city
of Corinth of the spiritual gifts
which they had received. Every
thing necessary for salvation
had been given to themsac
raments, teaching, faith, power
to pray and earnest zeal.
These gifts were not to be used
selfishly, but were to fill them
with Christian Hope-waiting
for the coming of Our Lord Jesus
Christ.
There are two ways ih which
Our Blessed Lord now comes
to His people : 1 By the ord
inances of His Church, and es
pacially by His Blessed Sacra
ment, in which His Real Pre
encetfs manifested to the faith
ful. f
i. In response to our faith
and prayer, by the power of
the Holy Spirit ; as He said, /
will not leave you comfortless I
will come to you. These things
help us to look forwaid eagerly
to Christ's final Advent We
do not feel dreed, or fear, but
only joy as we look for His Ap
pearink.; this is the meaning of
the last words in the Bible
Eveu so, come. Lord Jesus, and
this also is the meaning of the
word "waiting", in the text.
The New Testament words Be
lieving. Praying, Waiting and
Watching, express the attitude
of the Christian. All the Sac
raments and Services of the
Church are for the purpose of
expressing this Hope and to
prepare for its fulfilment. No
one can read the New Testa-
Th9
Tribute, ATassao, Saturday October 14,1916.
ment without seeing that it
was this expectation of their
Lord's return which gave much
joy and earnestness to the first
members of the Church, for this
important subject is mentioned
constantly both in the Gospels
and Epistles, as well as in the
Book Revelation, and this is
the reason why every baptised
person, after the "laying on of
hands" became a regular Com
municant. For the Lord's Sup
per was to be celebrated, said
our Lord, "till He come."
II. The Apostle thus proceeds
to state the effect, within our
selves, of this attitude of wait
ing for the coming of our Lord.
S. Paul says that Christ shall
also confirm you unto the end.
This word "confirm" means to
strengthen, to make firm. Some
times we wonder whether we
shall weather the storms of life,
just as you watch a boat off a
lea shore and wonder if she will
clear the point and come safely
into the harbour. But the man
at the helm knows just what he
ought to do. So our Captain
of Salvation will steer His ship
ol the Church, with every true
and obedient soul on board,
safely into the heavenly port.
When the storm came down on
the sea of Galilee Our Lord
first rebuked the Apostles, wjth
the words where is your faith ?
before He rebuked the wind
and the waves. Do not be
afraid that you will be lost
If you are but true to Christ and
always faithfully keep the rules
of His ship, the Church, He
will confirm you unto the end.
When St. Paul wrote to tho
Thessalonians (1 Thess. V, 23)
he uses almost the very same
words as those in the text, and
he adds Faithful is He that call
you. Who also will do it.
III. What does the Apostle
mean by the expression In the
day of Our Lord Jesus Christ ?
Evidently it means the Day of
Judgment. The present life is
our day, called the day of salva
tion ; but the Advent will be the
Day of the Lord. Happy is that
man who has his Lord so con
stantly present with him now,
that he can look forward with
joy and hope to the Saviour's
presence in glory at that Day.
How important, then, is it
that we should use all the stores
of blessing provided by Christ
in His church, so that we* come
behind in no gift. So many so-
called Christians neglect sacra
ments and other meansof grace
and yet think that all will be
well at the last. As well might
you leave a ship to steer her
self, in the hope that she will
clear the rocks without help.
The chances that a sailor runs are wet
known to be great, and many insurance
Companies refuse tn give them Insurance
at any price, but Your HomeCompany
gives them protection at the same cost as
those ashore, for they know that many of
the people make their living by going to
sea, and if they are lost their families will
suffer. The best protection you can have
is an insurai ce policy. Buy it from the
Imperial West Indian Assurance Associa-
tion, and you will be doing your duty to
self and family.
Telegrams
October 13th, 191(1.
London, n:The demand of
the Allies for the handing over
of the Greek fleet was taken as
a precautionary measure to en
sure the safety of the Entente
fleet. The Greek minister of
marine annouaces that the de-
mand would be complied with
before the expiration of the ap
pointed time.
The Greek navy consists of
five battleships, The Lemnos,
Kilkis, Psara, Spetesia and
Hydra; One armoured cruiser,
the Averoff; one coast defense
ship; the cruisers Helli and
Nauarchos Mialuts; ten gun
boats, 17 torpedo-boat destroy
ers; nine torpedo-boats, 3 sub
marines and several transports
and other craft.
The Italians have again taken
the olfensiveagainst the Austri-
ans in their endeavour to reach
Trieste, Austrias chief port of
the Adriatic, and at several
points south and southeast of
Gorizia have made good pro-
gress and in addition taken near
ly 6 000 prisoners.
South of Gorizia the Austrian
iiae was broken between Tobara
and Vertoiba, (according,
to Rome, and on the
Carso front entrenchments be-
tween Vipacco River and Hill
208 were captured".
Here the town of Nova Villa
and a strong position around
the northern part of the hill fell
into the hands of the Italians.
Trenches in the Trentino re-
gion also have beea won by the
Italians and 530 Austrians taken
pri sonets.
In Transylvania the Teutons
continue their drive and Bava-
rian troops which captured the
Rothensturm Pass have crossed
the border into Knumania.
According toBukarest, which
admits the retirement of the
Roumanians around Kronstadt.
fierce Toutonicattaeks were re
pulsed south of Hermanstadt
with heavy loss to the attackers.
Berlin concedes the capture
by French troops of a German
salient near Varmandovilliers
south of the Somme and also by
the British of first line German
trenches near Sailly, north of
the Somme.
Violent counter attacks by the
Germans on the newly won po
itions of the French in Chaul-
nes Wood have been repulsed.
In the Vosges Mountains the
Germans invaded French trench
es but later on were driven out.
Washington, 13:The pres-
sure is rising over the Caribbean
but there is still evidence of a
disturbance southeast of Swan
Island, which lies some 340
miles west of Jamaica.
October 14th, 1916.
Berlin: Roumanians have
been expelled from further por
tions of Transylvania and are
being pursued by Austro Ger-
man forces, it was announced
officially today.
A great attempt by the Anglo
French forces on the Somme
front to break through the Ger-
man lines yesterday failed. Six
assaults near Sailly were repuls
ed. The battle northeastof Sailly
continues.
Petrograd: German troops
yesterday took the offensive
along the Shara River. The
war office announced today that
the Germans captured a trench
section but were subsequently
expelled with heavy losses.
Paris:Forty Britisn and
French aeroplanes dropped four
tons of explosives last night on
the Mauser works at Oberndorff
n the Nekar River, in Germany
SixGerman machines defending
the works were shot down.
Bucharest:The repulse of
systematic attacks at several
points along the Transylvania
front is announced today. In
Tarlang Valley to which the
Roumanians retired the Rou-
manian cavalry frustrated six
attacks by hostile infantry.
Berlin:A successfully attack
by German naval aeroplanes
upon Russian transports in
the Roumanian harbour of
Const a nan. is reported in the ad
miralty statement.
London:Progress for the
British in yesterdays fighting on
the Somme front is announced
in todays official statement.
British advances were scored be
tween Gaudecourt and LesBoe-
ufs and northeast of Gaudecourt
150 Germans were made prison
er.
Amsterdam:According to a
local newspaper Captain Koen
igofthe Deutschland replying
to a telegram of congratulation
from his native town on his
voyage to the United States said
he was busy |with preparations
for a second tripacross the ocean
which would soon begin.
Washington:Admiral Mayo
commanding the Atlantic fleet
will investigate the reports that
belligerent ships established
bases on the New England coast
and that wireless plants were
being operated in violation of
American neutrality. Secretary
Daniels said that several de
stroyers had already been de
spatched from Newport north
ward and that the work would
be done under the admirals di
reel ions.
Washington: Radical chan
ges in the treatment of mails on
neutral ships are promised in
the reply of the British and
French governments to the
American protest against inter
ference with mails.
Boston:It was stated here
today that the American des
troyer patrol in connection with
the recent submarine activities
had been ordered effective from
New York to Galveston.
No- 295
14th October, 1916
The subjoined Royal War-
rants, relating to the Decora-
tion of the "Military Cross"
and instituting a Bar for tha
Distinguished Service Order,
are published for general in-
formation.
By Command,
T. E. D. BRACE
Acting Colonial Secretary.
MP 699-16.
War Office,
26th August, 1916.
THE MILITARY CROSS.
REVISED ROYAL WARRANT-
George the Fifth by the Grace
of God of Ihe United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Ireland and
of tbe British Dominions beyond
the Seas King, Defender of tha
Faith, Emperor of India : To all
to whom these Prrsents shall
come, Greeting :
WHEREAS We did hy Royal
Warrant under Our Sign
Manual dated 28 h December, 1914,
institute and create a new Decora-
tion entitled "The Military Cross"
to be awarded to Officers of certain
ranks in Our Army in recognition
of distinguished and, meritorious
services in time of war:
And whereas We are desirous
that certain alterations should be
made in the regulations governing
the said Decorrftion, We do hereby
ordain that the provision! of Our
said Royal Warrant shall he can-
celled, and that the following reg-
ulations shall be substituted in lieu
thereof :
Firstly : It is ordained that the
Cross shall be designated "The
Military Cross.*'
Secondly: It is ordained that
The Military Cross shall consist of
a Cross of Silver having on each
arm the Imperial Crown and bear-
ing in the centre the Royal and
Imperial Cipher.
Thirdly : It is ordained that no
person shall be eligible for this
Decoration nor be nominated there-
to unless he he a captain, a Com.
missioned Officer of a lower gr^de,
or a Warrant Officer Class I. or
Class II. in Our Army, or Our In-
dian or Colonial Military Forces,
and that the Military Cross shall
be awarded only to Officers of the
abov* ranks on a recommendation
to Us by Our Principal Secretary
of Slate for War.
Fourthly : It is ordained that
Foreign Officers of an equivalent
rank to those a bo e mentioned,
who have been associated in Mili-
tary Operations with Our Aimy.or
Our Indian or Colonial Military
Foices, shall he eligible for the
award of The Military Cross.
Fifthly : It is ordained that any-
one who, after having performed
services for which the Military
Cross is awarded, subsequently
performs an approved act of gal-
lantly which, l he had not receiv-
ed the Cross, would have entitled
him to it, shall be awarded a bar
to be attached to the riband by
which the C'oss is suspended, and
for every additional such act an
additional bar may be added.
Sixthly: It is ordained that the
names of those upor whom We
may be pleased to confer this Dec
01 an on shall he published in the
I ondon Gazette, and that a Regis-
ter thereof shall be kept in the
Office of Our Principal Secretary
of State for War.
Seventhly : It is ordained that
the Military Cross shall be worn
immediately after all Orders and
before all Decorations and Medals
(the Victoria Cross alone except-
ed), and shall be worn on the left
breast pendent from a riband of
one inch and thiee-eights in width,
which shall be in colour white
with a purple stripe. *
Eightly : It is ordained that the
Military Cross shall not confer
any individual precedence, but
shall entitle the recipient to the
addition after his name of the
letters M. C.
Ninthly : It is ordained that any
person whom hy an especial War-
rant under Our Royal Sign Manu-
al We declare to have forleited
lie Military Cross shall return the
said Decoration to the Office of
Our Principal Secretary of State
for Wai, and that his name shall
be erased from the Register of
those upon whom the said Decora-
tion sh.ll have been conferred.
Lastly : We reserve to Ourself,
Our heirs and successors full pow-
er of annulling, altering, abrogat-
ing, augmenting, interpreting, or
dispensing with these Regulations,
or any part thereof, by a notifica-
tion under Our Royal Sign
Manual.
Given at Our Court of St.
James's, this 23rd day of
August, 1916, in the seventh
year of Our Reign.
By His Mwjesty's Command
D. LLOYD GEORGE.
MEMORANDUM.
This Warrant is in substitution
for the original Warrant of a8th
December, 1914, and the Supple-
mentary Warrant of 31st May,
1916. The insertion of the letters
M. C. after the recipient's name,
under l lause 8, will be carried out
in the October Army List.
War Office,
26th August, 1916.
ROYAL WARRANT
INSTITUTING A BAR FOR
THE DISTINGUISHED
SERVICE ORDER.
GEORGE, R. I.
WHEREAS We are desirous of
providing for the recogni-
tion of further distinguished ser-
vices in the case of Officers who
have been awarded the "Distin-
guished Service Order."
It is our will and pleasure and
we do hereby ordain that anyone
who, after having performed ser-
vices for which the Distinguished
Service Order is awarded, subse-
quently performs an approved act
of gallantry which, if he had not
received the Order, would have en-
titled him to it, shall be awarded
a Bar to be attached to the riband
by which the Older is suspended,
and for every additional such act
an additional Bar may be added.
Given at Our Court at Sr.
James's this 33rd day of
August, 1916, in the sev-
enth year of our Reign.
By His Majesty's Command,
D. LLOYD GEORGE.


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 14, 1916.
Highest prices paid for
Crape Fruit
Call and See
Theo. P. Knowles $ Co.
at 376 Bay St.
Professional Announcement
Announcement
I
Mr. Oscar E. Johnson
TAILOR and CLOTHIER

DR. W. R LAMB
American Oculist & Optician
Specialist in Examining the Eye and Correcting Defective
Vision at Hotel Nassau until October 25th inclusive.
HAS the pleasure to again announce to tlie citizens of New
Providence that lie may be consulted at the above ad-
dress until the time stated. Those wishing a consultation should
make an appointment, at their earliest tunvtnic in c as he will not
remain longer than the 25th.
He is fully prepared, as usual, with the most modern instru
merits and apparatus for thoroughly examining and refracting
the eyes according to the latest and most approved methods as
employed by the most eminent Oculists 111 the Metropolitan Lye
Infirmaries, and lie has the largest and best supply of all desira-
ble kinds and styles of lenses and mountings of the best quality
ever brought to Nassau, including several thousands of sphero-
cylindrical, prismatic, bifocal and other kinds of lenses made
specially to order for the correction of artigmalisni, weakness of
the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which the ordinary
lenses will not correct.
Those who are troubled with weak eyes, defective vision,
headache, due to eye strain, eye ache, inflammation of the eyes
or the lids, weakness of the ocular muscles or any of the numer-
ous conditions of the eyes requiring a thorough examination or
necessitating the use of glassesand most of these troubles are
permanently cured by accurate refraction and properly adjusted
glasseswould do well to embrace the present exceptional op-
portunity of giving their eyes the attention they requirean
opportunity which for completeness of apparatus and supply of
lenses and mountings, thoroughness of examination, perfection
of refraction which biings the vision up to the highest standard
I possible and for the best and most satisfactory results is equal in
every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad as thou-
sands of his patients here and elsewhere are willing to attest.
His method of examination with the ophthahmometer,
electric ophthahmoscope and retinoscope are so careful, tho-
rough and accurate that the diagnoses the cause of the defective
vision or eye trouble, so that the best and most satisfactory re-
sults are always obtained from the glasses he prescribes, which
are accurately fitted and warranted to be correct. They are not
only guaranteed to be absolutely perfect in the correction of the
refraction and for the production of the clearest vision possible,
but for durability and general satisfaction -anil the immediate
relief of head-ache, eye-ache and other ocular troubles which
call for the use of glasses, they are equal to the best that could
possibly be obtained anywhere abroad.
Comparatively few e>f those who are using glasses have the
kind their eyes requiie, the kind which gives the best vision, the
most comfort, and which preserve the sight and keep it normal
all through life. This is because the eyes in most cases have
not had the careful and thorough examination by a qualified
specialist which is most important and necessary when the best
results ar* desired. As the accomodative power of the eye grad-
ually weakens as one grows older it becomes necessary to make
a change of glasses every three or four years and many make a
great mistake in continuing the use of unsuitable glasses, it is
one of the principal causes of cataract and other serious eye
troubles
Dr. Lamb is certificated in both medicine and optics, has
thousands of references and testimonials from prominent citizens
of many countries where he has practised his profession contin-
uously for over 25 years, and has established through reliable
and superior service the most extensive eye practise in the world.
Charges Reasonable. Hours, 9 to 12 a.m., 2 to 5 p.m.
D EGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned
*-* from New York where he became a graduate of the Mitchell
College of America& was awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the
several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting
being his specialty.
This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a
Guarantee to confirm the confide.ice of hi* clientele in his skill
and in his well known three P's viz :
Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited.
OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St.
mM ill 1 T EL 1 III M
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
LIMITED.
Authorized Capital 5,000
---------------- LOW BATES FOB-----------
WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and atisfactory Adjustments of Claims.
. jl ! -------- ,.,,.. --------____
Home OFFiCE>-2r;4 Bay Street, Nassau.
(Continued from 1st page)
Behind those men must lie,
at least, the country of NoMan "s
Land over which they have
gone, and all the enemy's aitil-
lery is deluging it with shells.
Many times, as you know, th*
iiiemy piisoners have reported
that they had been days with
most inadequate rations be-
cause supplies could not come
up through our barrage. Yet be-
hind their front line the enemy
always has communication
tranche** When we push him
back and go into that front line
ourselves he leave* no commu-
nication trenches over No Man's
Land, and there is no shelter
there till the Pioneers make it.
But never once in all this battle
have our men had to yield a
position once won because sup
plies of food or water failed to
reach them.
The "Signals"
The non military mind,
again, probably has no idea of
the magnitude of the machine
ry of the modern Army for keep-
ing up communication among
its several parts. The "Signals"
of a single Corps includes a
telegraph and telephone system
equal to that of a considerable
town, with hundreds of milesof
wire, all of which has to be kept
going under continuous shell
fire. It may transmit over 1,000
messages a day, besides receiv-
ing 400 or 500 and sending out
000 or 700 of its own origina-
tion. These are, in rough, the
actual figures of one day's work
of a single Corps. In addition
to all of which nearly 1,700
sealed messages, or packages,
were received in the day from
the hands of dispatch iiders. To
see the plan of the lines of any
"Signals'" unit is a revelation of
the ordered complexity of an
Army organization of today.
And when we advance, as we
have advanced here in the last
two months, the whole thing
must be continually pushed up
behind our troops, new lines
laid, new posts established
through all the shellswept zone.
Only the other day I was
pretty far forward talking with
two officers of the troops hold
ing the front line in the^hole
which afforded suA shelter as
there was. A man, killed by a
shell, had literally fallen in at
the door a few hours before I
came. A sergeant of the R. E.
came in and reported that he
had got two lines up to "X. B.
, 1*7" (some 50 yards farther along
the trench) and thought he
could make a shelter .{or his
men there, and then he would
go on to "F. C. 3" Fie came in
again *fiye minutes later to re
port that Corporal Blank was
killed bya rifle bullet, "He was
the best man I had," he said.
I do not know, but I have no
doubt that the lines were laid
to"F. C. 3" that night. Itisall
wonderful, and all done as a
matter of course. Nobody
thinks that he is a hero, and
when a commanding officer
wants to know he "can't get
any names."
One interesting "Signals"unit
which is out here is the South
African. The personnel of the
unit, from the O. C. down, is*
composed of men who were in
the Government telegraph ser
vice in South Africa when the
war broke out.
The Times
141/1. Sept., 1916.
NOTICE
*pHE Recruiting Committee
are again enlisting men
for Drafts for the Bahamas
Contingent. Applicants will
be attended to between 8 a.m.
and 4 p.m. at the Command-
ant's Office at the Barracks.
Enlist now as
the vessel for Jamaica
will be leaving early
in November.
R. H. C. CRAWFORD
Commandant.
PRICE LIST
OF
Seeds for sale by the Board of Agriculture
Beets Eclipse
Cabbage Early Jersey Wakefield
do. Large Flat Dutcll
Carrot Hall Long Oxheart
Egg Plant Black Beauty
Lettuce Simpsons Black Seeded
Okra Perkins Mammoth
Pepper Ruby King
Radish French Breakfast
Turnip Purple Top Improved
Watermelon Florida Kavourite
Kolhrabi Early White Vienna
TOMATO LIVINGSTON GLOBE
Cauliflower Gilt Edge
Snap Means Dwarf Bush Bountiful
Paris Green
3.
8s.
8s.
4S-
14s.
4s.
2S.
7s.
3s-
3*-
3s-
8s.
is.
lb.
;
5d
iod
iod
IS, bd
5d
5d
iod
5 3d
7*
7*
qd
oz.
pkt.
6d. Apt.
is. lb. pkge.
Subject to being on hand and fluctuations in prices.
Less than an ounce not sold.
GIL13ERT C. ABBOTT.
Acting Secretary,
Board of Agriculture.
Bicycles for Sale/
Hire and Repaired.
Don't grope in the darkturn night irito day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, battfries and bulbs.
504 East Bay St.
W, A. WEEKS


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM