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L. (JILHKKT DUPUOH, Editor and Proprietor. OKKIOK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte St. Xuvsau, .V. P., Bahamas •PHONK aw. p. o. BOX m. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wetinewlay and Friday— siCR.'e copy j,l TueMlay, and Thursday—single copy id Saturday -single copy ,\A Weekly K Monthly Ouarterly RalfYearly Yearly ... is. bd .. as. 6d 18s PAYABLK IN ADVANCK ^ &f '•ttjslnu Hates:— Sia pence per liu Ipr Ml irumrtioii; three pence i>ei lin rfcrseeoud insertion ; aii


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-4 %  HI largest vessels sunk by a sub marine being only 700 tons smaller than the Arabic. Petrograd:—The great bat tie in Volhynia continues and the Russians have sue ceeded in some places in en tering the Teutons lines and consolidating the positions taken. %  London: — Professor Spy ridon Lambros will try to form a Greek cabinet outside of the politicians, according to an Athens report. London: —The British steamship Jupiter, 2824 tons gross, is believed to have been sunk. >Jew York:—It is reported that there was great activity of German submarines off the American coast mi Sunday and that three of the craft are in American waters. The re ports state that nine ships were sunk between Boston and the Jersey Coast. October ioth.1916. Boston, Mass, 8:— The sub marine arm of the Genii..w navy ravaged shipping off the eastern coast of the Unit ed states today and four Bri tish, one Dutch and one Nor wegian steamer were sent to the bottom of the Atlantic or left derelict off Nantucket Shoals. The steamers were the Stephano, Strathdene, West Point and Kingston (British), the Bloomorsdyk (Dutch) and the Christian (Norwegian). Tonight under the light of the Hunters Moon the destroyer llotialla of the United States navy was pick ing up passengers and crews of the destroyed vessels and bringing them into Newport Rhode Island. So far as is known there was no loss of life though ay a late hour the crew of the steamer Kingston had not been accounted for. A submarine held up the Am ericaD steamer Kansas, bound to Genoa with a cargo of steel, but later she was re leased. The Kingston had Announcement Mr. Oscar E. Johnson TAILOR and CLOTHIER B EGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned from New York where lie became a graduate of the Mitchell College of America& wai awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting being his specialty. This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill and in his well known three P's viz : Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited. OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St. A Highest prices paid for Crape Fruit Call and See Theo. P. knowles $ Co. at 376 Bay St. 83 passengers aboard, all of whom were saved. '1 he bos tile submarine is believed to be the U. 53 which made a call at Newport yesterday and disappeared at Sunset. Some naval men however declared that at least two submarines are operating close to the American coast though outside the three mile limit. New Bicycle Tyres For Sale We put them on for you free of charg$. In stock a fine assortment of other bicycle accessories. BRUCE JOHNSON 42 King Street, Nassau. Bahamas Chamber of Comerce 'OUR DAY'Oct. 19 RED CROSS FUND W. C. B. Johnson, Esq. Pres. Hon. J. R. C. Young, Treas. Committee: Chas. E. Albury, Esq. Arthur B. Sutton, Esq. R. W. Sawyer, Esq. Contributions of Money, Produce, Sisal, etc. will be received at Office of the Chamber in Masonic Building by CHAS. J. ABBOTT, Secy, to Committee. Under the distinguished patronage of His EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR AND LADY ALLARDYCE The Development Board will exhibit at Imperial Theatre October 19th at 8.30 p m. in aid of "Our Day" RED CROSS FUND The Filmt used by the Submarine Film Corporation in the Advertising of Nassau under their contract "Beautiful Nassau" "Empire Day in Nassau" "Departure of 3rd Contingent." All new to Nassau audiences. Interspersed with musical selections by well known artists. Box seats 3s. Orchestra seats 2s. Gallery is Seats reserved. ICE T HE Bahamas Timber Co. begs to draw attention 'of the public to the fact that they are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.



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ed by a new enemy, whose power is not to be despised, fur Roumania has quite a large army of the most capable sol ditrsin Europe. Nor is it in military power Only that the entrance of Roumania Rives new strength to the Allies. Roumania is one of (he great grain growing countries of the world, ranking second to Rus sia in Europe. Roumania has also valuable minerals—iron, oil, coal, copper and nickelthings which play important parts in the great war game. Hitherto the Teutonic enemy has been able to draw on these useful supplies from Roumania as a neutral country. Now that Roumania takes her place on the Allies* side this source of supply to the enemy is cut off and all the resources of the country became at the disposal of the Allies. Roumania's action will go far to persuade the doubters everywhere—even in Germany—that the ultimate victory of the Allies is assured. In this way, as well as in the material aid which the event brines to the A Mies, the entrance of Roumania into the war is an event of vtry great importance. — The Journal of Commerce Sept 5th, 1916. Heat—Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. pep tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House Bicycles for Sale, Hire and Repaired. Don't grope in the dark—turn night into day. Large stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs. W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St. - Professional Announcement DR. W. R. LAMB American Oculist 6t Optician Specialist in Examining the Eye and Correcting Defective Vision at Hotel Nassau until October 25th inclusive. H AS the pleasure to again announce to the citizens of New Providence that he may be consulted at the Mbove address until the time staled. Those wishing a consultation should make an appointment at their earlitst convenience as he will not remain longer than the 25th. He is fully prepared, as usual, with the most modern instru incuts and apparatus for thoroughly examining and refracting the eyes according to the latest and most approved methods as employed by the most eminent Oculists in the Metropolitan Eye Infirmaries, and he has the largest and best supply of all desirable kinds and styles of lenses and mountings ol the best quality ever brought to Nassau, including several thousands of spheiocylindrical, prismatic, bijoeal and other kinds of lenses made specially to order for the correction of artigmatis..., weakness of the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which the ordinary lenses will not correct. Those who are troubled with weak eyes, defective vision, headache, due to eye strain, eye ache, inflammation of the e)es or the lids, weakness of the ocular muscles or any of the numerous conditions of the eyes requiring a thorough examination or necessitating the use of glasses—and most of these troubles are permanently cured by accurate refraction and properly adjusted glasses —would do well to embrace the present exceptional c pportunity of giving their eyes the attention they require— an opportunity which for completeness of apparatus and supply of lenses and mountings, thoroughness of examination, perfection of refraction which biings the vision up to the highest standard possible and for the last and most satisfactory results is equal in every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad as thousands of his patients here and elsewhere are willing to attest. This method of examination with the ophthahmometer, electric ophthahmiscrope and relinoscrope are so careful, thorough and accurate that the diagnoses the cause of the defective vision or eye trouble, so that the best and most satisfactory results are always obtained from the glasses the pre^cubos, which are accurately fitted and warranted to be conect. They are not only guaranteed to be absolutely perfect in the correction of the refraction and for the production of the clearest vision possible, but for durability and general satisfaction and the immediate relief of headache, eye-ache and other ocular troubles which for the use of glasses, they are equal to the best that could possibly be obtained anywhere abroad. Comparatively few of those who are using glasses have the kind their eyes require, the kind which gives the best vision, the most comfort, and which preserve the sight and keep it noimal all through life. This is because the eyes in most cases have not had the careful and thorough examination bv a qualified specialist which is best important Vnd necessary when the best results are desired. As the accumulative power of the eye gradually weakens as one grows older it becomes necessary to make a change of glasses every three or four years and many make a great mistake in continuing the use of unsuitable glasses, it is one of the principal causes of cataract and other aerious eye troubles. J Dr. Lamb is certificated in both medicine and optics, has thousands of references and testimonials from prominent citizens of many countries where he has practised his profession continuously for over 25 years, and has established through reliable and superior service the most extensive eye practise in the world. Charges Reasonable. Hours, 9 to 12 a.m., 2 to 5 p.m.



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"News FOP Everybody" Nulllua tvddirma |\irar In verb* mi>iirl B*(ng bound lo •%*•. r to tho Dogmaf of no Master. VOL. XIII N„>u N.P.. Bfth^mM. TUESDAY October 10.1916 N*. 33 Telegrams October o,th, 1916. Newport, Rhode Island, 7th : —Tlie Imperial German 11a val submarine U. 53 dropped anchor in Newport harbour today. Almost before the offi cers of the American fleet of warships through which the stranger had nosed her way recovered from their astonish ment the undet-sea fighter had delivered a message for the German Ambassador and weighing anchor turned Bentons Reel" Lightship and dis appeared beneath the waves just inside the three mile lim it. As she came and went she flew the naval ensign, two guns were mounted on the decks and eight torpedoes plainly visible were mounted under the forward deck giving mute assurance that the warship was ready for a fight. Lieut. Captain Hans Rose who hung up anew woilds record in bringing an armed submarine in battle array across the Atlantic said he had called at Newport simply to mail a letter to Count Bernstorff. He requested neither provisons nor fuel and would be on his way, he said, long be fore the expiration of the 24 hours during which a belligerent ship may remain in port. Londdn, 7:—Entente Allies forces are pressing hard upon the Teuton and Bulgarian troops in the Balkans both in Macedonia and Dobrudj*. The invaders have been com pelled to give ground. On a front of ten miles near the Struma River British troops have occupied five vil lages !rWrepulsed a Bulgarian attack against Nevolyn. Further west on the Macedonian front near the Cerna River the Serbians have de boiiched from ibc Kaima kalon Plateau and advanced detachments have reached the belavoda River 10 miles east of Monastir. Near the western end of the Entente line in the region of Lake Bulkoca near the bela.is chiza Plateau Italian troops have advanced. Russian and Roumanian troops have taken ground from Von Mackensen in Pobrudja. The Russians have occupied two villages and have repulsed attacks. Advancing on the right flank the Roumanians have occupied some trenches and checked attacks in the canter. An unconfirmed wireless despatch from Rome received in London says that another Roumanian expedition is re ported to have crossed the Danube into Bulgarian terri torv apparently behind the lines held by Von Macken sens forces. Bukarest officially reports artillery duels along the Danube but does not specify the sector. There has been no change in the Eastern or Western fronts. Petrograd reports fighting in both Volhynia and Galicia and claims the repulse of Austro German attacks in those fields. The artillery fire on the Somme front continues but virtually no infantry engage ments are reported. Berlin states that the artillery battle has spread to the north of the Ancre. In Transylvania the AustroGernian troops continue to advance. Roumanians who retreated across the Alt River are being pursued through Dneister Forest, according to Berlin re purls. Bukarest reports that the Roumanians have returned to the offensive near Petroseny. Grand Duke Nicholaseontin UCS his offensive along the Black >ea coast in Armenia and re ports the capture of the Petra kala fortifications from the Turks. Constantinople claims the repulse of Russian attacks I along the coast. Washington, 7:—Official de Dial* from the state department and frora the German Ambassa dor Las failed to down the per listen) reports that Ambassador Cieiard returning from Berlin is bringing direct word from Em peror William askingl'resident Wilson to intercede for peace: ROUMANIA N ATIONS, like individuals. are inclined to be selfish In most ca-es it is too much to expect that they shall be governed by altruism. The small nations in or near the Balkan Peninsula have from the beginning of the great war been keen observers of the conflict, each one anxious to note how the tide is running and toascertain, if possible, the direction in which her own interest lay. Some of them felt that they had territorial interests that might be affected. They wanted to hold fast to what they had and their "national aspirations" led them to covet portions of their neighbors' vineyard. To re main neutral up to a certain point and then to cast in thtir lot with the probable winner, who would have control of the spoils of war, seemed to be the desire of most of their slatesmen. Bulgaria was at an farly stage persuaded that her interests were with Germany and Austria, rather than with the Entente Allies. Serbia and Montenegro were easily crushed by their powerful enemy. Bulgaria apparently feared a similar fate and sought to save her self by joining the Teutonic powers, a decision that is prob ably regretted by most of the Bulgarians today. In Greece the statesmanship of Venizelos enabled him to see that the in terests of (hat Kingdom lay on the side of the Allies, but the King, influenced, it is believed by his wife, sister to the German Kaiser, was able to resist this view and to maintain a nomi nal neutrality, in which he set himself against the sentiment I of his people, a course that has so far brought him only humil ialion. Roumania has been Irankly following a policy of opportunism, listening to the suggestions of the diplomats of the several powers, each of whom said, "Codlin's )our friend, not Short," and waiting to see what might happen. It is under these circumstances that Roumania now makes de cision to come of! the fence and cast in her lot with the Allies. The decision is of much con sequence in many ways. 1 he geographical position of Rou mania makes her action most important, for Austria Hungary adjoins on the North and West, and thus the Austrians are ob liged to provide a new line of defence at a moment when their resources are already under much pressure. Bulgaria lies on the South, and if she de clares war on Roumania she will have her hands full on the Danube. Thus the nations al lied with Germany are menac (Continued on Fourth Page)


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02714
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, October 10, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02714

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Full Text
"News Fop Everybody"
Nulllua tvddirma |\irar In verb* mi>iirl
B*(ng bound lo %*. r to tho Dogmaf of no Master.
VOL. XIII
N>u N.P.. Bfth^mM. TUESDAY October 10.1916
N*. 33
Telegrams
October o,th, 1916.
Newport, Rhode Island, 7th :
Tlie Imperial German 11a
val submarine U. 53 dropped
anchor in Newport harbour
today. Almost before the offi
cers of the American fleet of
warships through which the
stranger had nosed her way
recovered from their astonish
ment the undet-sea fighter
had delivered a message for
the German Ambassador and
weighing anchor turned Ben-
tons Reel" Lightship and dis
appeared beneath the waves
just inside the three mile lim
it.
As she came and went she
flew the naval ensign, two
guns were mounted on the
decks and eight torpedoes
plainly visible were mounted
under the forward deck giv-
ing mute assurance that the
warship was ready for a fight.
Lieut. Captain Hans Rose
who hung up anew woilds
record in bringing an armed
submarine in battle array
across the Atlantic said he
had called at Newport simply
to mail a letter to Count
Bernstorff.
He requested neither pro-
visons nor fuel and would be
on his way, he said, long be
fore the expiration of the 24
hours during which a belli-
gerent ship may remain in
port.
Londdn, 7:Entente Allies
forces are pressing hard upon
the Teuton and Bulgarian
troops in the Balkans both in
Macedonia and Dobrudj*.
The invaders have been com
pelled to give ground.
On a front of ten miles near
the Struma River British
troops have occupied five vil
lages !rWrepulsed a Bulgar-
ian attack against Nevolyn.
Further west on the Mace-
donian front near the Cerna
River the Serbians have de
boiiched from ibc Kaima
kalon Plateau and advanced
detachments have reached the
belavoda River 10 miles east
of Monastir.
Near the western end of the
Entente line in the region of
Lake Bulkoca near the bela.is
chiza Plateau Italian troops
have advanced.
Russian and Roumanian
troops have taken ground
from Von Mackensen in
Pobrudja. The Russians have
occupied two villages and
have repulsed attacks.
Advancing on the right
flank the Roumanians have
occupied some trenches and
checked attacks in the canter.
An unconfirmed wireless
despatch from Rome received
in London says that another
Roumanian expedition is re
ported to have crossed the
Danube into Bulgarian terri
torv apparently behind the
lines held by Von Macken
sens forces.
Bukarest officially reports
artillery duels along the
Danube but does not specify
the sector.
There has been no change
in the Eastern or Western
fronts.
Petrograd reports fighting
in both Volhynia and Galicia
and claims the repulse of
Austro German attacks in
those fields.
The artillery fire on the
Somme front continues but
virtually no infantry engage
ments are reported. Berlin
states that the artillery bat-
tle has spread to the north of
the Ancre.
In Transylvania the Austro-
Gernian troops continue to ad-
vance. Roumanians who re-
treated across the Alt River are
being pursued through Dneister
Forest, according to Berlin re
purls.
Bukarest reports that the
Roumanians have returned to
the offensive near Petroseny.
Grand Duke Nicholaseontin
UCShis offensive along the Black
>ea coast in Armenia and re
ports the capture of the Petra
kala fortifications from the
Turks. Constantinople claims
the repulse of Russian attacks
I along the coast.
Washington, 7:Official de
Dial* from the state department
and frora the German Ambassa
dor Las failed to down the per
listen) reports that Ambassador
Cieiard returning from Berlin is
bringing direct word from Em
peror William askingl'resident
Wilson to intercede for peace:
ROUMANIA
NATIONS, like individuals.
are inclined to be selfish
In most ca-es it is too much to
expect that they shall be gov-
erned by altruism. The small
nations in or near the Balkan
Peninsula have from the begin-
ning of the great war been keen
observers of the conflict, each
one anxious to note how the
tide is running and toascertain,
if possible, the direction in
which her own interest lay.
Some of them felt that they had
territorial interests that might
be affected. They wanted to
hold fast to what they had and
their "national aspirations" led
them to covet portions of their
neighbors' vineyard. To re
main neutral up to a certain
point and then to cast in thtir
lot with the probable winner,
who would have control of the
spoils of war, seemed to be the
desire of most of their slates-
men. Bulgaria was at an farly
stage persuaded that her inter-
ests were with Germany and
Austria, rather than with the
Entente Allies. Serbia and
Montenegro were easily crushed
by their powerful enemy. Bul-
garia apparently feared a simi-
lar fate and sought to save her
self by joining the Teutonic
powers, a decision that is prob
ably regretted by most of the
Bulgarians today. In Greece
the statesmanship of Venizelos
enabled him to see that the in
terests of (hat Kingdom lay on
the side of the Allies, but the
King, influenced, it is believed
by his wife, sister to the German
Kaiser, was able to resist this
view and to maintain a nomi
nal neutrality, in which he set
himself against the sentiment
I of his people, a course that has
so far brought him only humil
ialion. Roumania has been
Irankly following a policy of
opportunism, listening to the
suggestions of the diplomats of
the several powers, each of
whom said, "Codlin's )our
friend, not Short," and waiting
to see what might happen. It
is under these circumstances
that Roumania now makes de
cision to come of! the fence and
cast in her lot with the Allies.
The decision is of much con
sequence in many ways. 1 he
geographical position of Rou
mania makes her action most
important, for Austria Hungary
adjoins on the North and West,
and thus the Austrians are ob
liged to provide a new line of
defence at a moment when their
resources are already under
much pressure. Bulgaria lies
on the South, and if she de
clares war on Roumania she
will have her hands full on the
Danube. Thus the nations al
lied with Germany are menac
(Continued on Fourth Page)


L. (JILHKKT DUPUOH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OKKIOK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte St.
Xuvsau, .V. P., Bahamas
phonk aw. p. o. BOX m.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wetinewlay and Friday
siCR.'e copy ......... j,l
TueMlay, and Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturday -single copy ,\a
Weekly ............ K
Monthly .........
Ouarterly......
RalfYearly......
Yearly ......
... is. bd
.. as. 6d
18s
PAYABLK IN ADVANCK
^?'ttjslnu Hates: Sia pence per liu
Ipr Ml irumrtioii; three pence i>ei lin
rfcrseeoud insertion ; aii Uue lor Miliwjiiei.t iilMrtiOltt,
Arivtrtiwmeiits under eight lines 4.
NOTICE-When Correspondence or
Articles art signed with the writers name
tr initials, or with a pseudonym, or are
marked "Communicated," the Editor mutt
not necessarily be held to be in agreement
with the views therein expressed or with the
mode of expression In such instances, or in
the case of" Letters to the Editor," insertion
only means that the matter or point oj view
is considered oj sufficient interest and im-
portance to warrant publication.
from an unsatisfactory peace.
They simply must go on un-
til the German menace is re-
moved from their borders
And what about our Empire?
Can we aftord to face the
prospect oi another life and
death struggle witha bitterly
jealous foe?
JUST A MATTER OF COURSE.
made up and closed on Friday
next, the 13111 inst., at 8 a. m.
:o:
The Ward Lice S. S. "Mon
terey" arrived from New York
on Sunday afternoon, and after
transferring the following pas
sengers for Nassau to the tender
"Colonia" proceeded to Hava
na.
Sir Joseph and Lady Brown,
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Drice, Mr.
Ube Crfbune
Tuesday October 10, 1916
Every now and again we
catch sinister rumours to the
effect that Jewish financiers
of various nations are inter-
vening with a view to letter-
ing Germany off from the re-
tribution that is her due. The
dirty intrigues of these high
financiers have caused many
a bloody war and now if they
can work it, this outlaw
among the nations is to be
left with strength enough to
come at us again. It is said
that when the time is ripe
the Kaiser will put himself
unconditionally into the
hands of the mediators and
either President Wilson or
the Pope will offer mediation.
The pacifists in the various
belligerent nations are to be
worked-up into activity and
a special campaign of sympa-
thy for Germany is to be
worked up inthe neutral na-
tions. Much as we dread the
awful power of these interna-
tional financiers, we believe
that the interest of France
and Russia will save them
learn that the car in question
did not vn stop to observe the
damage done. The child, we
are told, got off with broken
legs. It is a---------shame that
the public should be thus en-
dangered by some cars that are
driven so furiously and reckless-
ly through our streets.
The Board of Agriculture,
will meet on Tuesday after
noon, the 10th instant, at
half past five o'clock in their
Board Room, (Masonic Tem-
ple) to discuss remedial mea-
sures for the Blue-Gray fly
Citrus trees disease.
All growers of citrus fruit
and all persons interested in
the Citrus Industry, are in
vited to attend.
Dr. VV. R. Lamb, The Ameri-
can Ocuiist and Optician was
among the passengers that ar-
rived per S. S. "Monterey" on
Sunday. He will be leaving
again on the 3/,th inst. Many
will welcome this news and it
would be well for those desirous
of consulting him to lose no
time. The Doctor will be
found at the Hotel Nassau as
will be seen by his announce
ment in another column.
Sheldrake,, Henry Zimmerman,
Win. Sowers, Fred Kyle, Robt.
MacBeth, Vincent Brown, Geo,
Hearn, H. C. Strong, Austidis
Damianas, Theophilis Mangos,
Jay F. Reseller. Win. Engle,
Mrs. F. H. Fisher and Infant,
Mrs. C. L, Loft house, Misses I,.
K. Mrombom, \I. A. Strombom,
Molly Burns.Effie North, Leono
ra McNeil,
Mrs Leonora Rodgers, Master
Arnold Rodgeis,
A young contributor sends ihe
fnlluwiag :
A is for Arsenal that makes Ihe
hi? guns
That will soon drive from Belgium
the arrogant Huns!
A's for our Air-corpsthe frailest
and free,
They give the Zepp* pepper on
land and on sea.
A's the alarm German "subs'' hop-
ed we'd feel
I'm British Jack Tars will soon
bring them to heel.
Mr. Theophilus P. Knowles,
who arrived recently from
America, represents several of
the principal Fruit markets in
the United States. As will be
seen in his advertisement in
another column, he is paying
the highest prices for Grape
fruit, Tomatoes, Peppers, ete.
Foreign Mails to be de
An Irish soldier returning from tho wa.
on leave was asked by a friend tvh.i.
struck him most at ihe liont,
"Shuie," said Fat, "the thing that struck
me most was the number of bullets flying
bout that didn't hit me."
Two Irishmen were working on a
farm. When dinner time came they were
called to dine off a basin of br th. The
farmer's wife had only one spoon, so she
gave Pat a f< irk. Poor Fat was getting
nothing, While Mike was very busy. When
the broth was about one third Kone Fat
said:' Arrali, now, Mike, you dig a bit
now and I'll shovel."
STORM.
Telegram

Washington.gth:There is a
disturbance of marked char-
acter nearSt. Thomas moving
northwest. Barometer at St.
Thomas is 29.26 inches. All
vessels in or sailing toward
spatc'he'd'vi.'" Miami!' Fto. p.% ,hat locality are warned to
Motor vessel "Panama" will belexerc,se Sreat caution.
October 10th, 1916.
London, 10th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:'The Som-
me offensive was resumed
Saturday. We captured Le-
Sars and are making progress
at other points, taking near
ly nine hundred prisoners.
The French also at Lacked
brilliantly and obtained their
objective.
In Galicia there has been
heavy fighting throughout
the week which was appar-
ently indecisive.
The Italians gained im-
portant successes in mountain
fighting.
On the Struma front we
defeated the Bulgarians and
advanced, capturing, numer-
ous villages. The allied arm-
ies are advancing on Monas
tir.
The Roumanians have le
tired from Biasso.
(Signed)
130NAR LAW.
London: British troops
north of the Somme made
progress during the night
and established pests fast of
LeSars and toward Butte de
Warlencourt.
Athens:Serbian troops in
considerable force have
crossed the Cerna River at
two points and are advanc
ing rapidly north. 'I hey cap
tured the village of Skochivir
taking 100 Bulgarian prison
ers.
Paris:The steamship Gal
lia, an auxiliary crusier, car
raying 2.000 Serbian and
French soldiers was torpedo
ed and sunk Wednesday by
a submarine. 1300 men were
picked up by a French cruis
er and landed on the southern
coast of Medina. The torpedo
caused explosion of tfie am
munition in the hold of the
Gallia and also destroyed the
wireless apparatus making it
impossible to send call for
help. The Galia was a 15.100
ton ship and was one of the
V


-4
HI
largest vessels sunk by a sub
marine being only 700 tons
smaller than the Arabic.
Petrograd:The great bat
tie in Volhynia continues
and the Russians have sue
ceeded in some places in en
tering the Teutons lines and
consolidating the positions
taken.
London: Professor Spy
ridon Lambros will try to
form a Greek cabinet outside
of the politicians, according
to an Athens report.
London: The British
steamship Jupiter, 2824 tons
gross, is believed to have been
sunk.
>Jew York:It is reported
that there was great activity
of German submarines off the
American coast mi Sunday
and that three of the craft are
in American waters. The re
ports state that nine ships
were sunk between Boston
and the Jersey Coast.
October ioth.1916.
Boston, Mass, 8: The sub
marine arm of the Genii..w
navy ravaged shipping off
the eastern coast of the Unit
ed states today and four Bri
tish, one Dutch and one Nor
wegian steamer were sent to
the bottom of the Atlantic or
left derelict off Nantucket
Shoals. The steamers were
the Stephano, Strathdene,
West Point and Kingston
(British), the Bloomorsdyk
(Dutch) and the Christian
(Norwegian). Tonight under
the light of the Hunters Moon
the destroyer llotialla of the
United States navy was pick
ing up passengers and crews
of the destroyed vessels and
bringing them into Newport
Rhode Island. So far as is
known there was no loss of
life though ay a late hour the
crew of the steamer Kingston
had not been accounted for.
A submarine held up the Am
ericaD steamer Kansas, bound
to Genoa with a cargo of
steel, but later she was re
leased. The Kingston had
Announcement
Mr. Oscar E. Johnson
TAILOR and CLOTHIER
BEGS to inform his many Customers that he has just returned
from New York where lie became a graduate of the Mitchell
College of America& wai awarded a DIPLOMA of efficiency in the
several branches of Tailoring. Modern Technique and Cutting
being his specialty.
This testimonial from such a high quarter will serve as a
Guarantee to confirm the confidence of his clientele in his skill
and in his well known three P's viz :
Price, Push, Punctuality. Patronage Solicited.
OSCAR E. JOHNSON, No. 9, Market St.
A
Highest prices paid for
Crape Fruit
Call and See
Theo. P. knowles $ Co.
at 376 Bay St.
83 passengers aboard, all of
whom were saved. '1 he bos
tile submarine is believed to
be the U. 53 which made a
call at Newport yesterday and
disappeared at Sunset. Some
naval men however declared
that at least two submarines
are operating close to the
American coast though out-
side the three mile limit.
New Bicycle Tyres
For Sale
We put them on for you free
of charg$.
In stock a fine assortment of
other bicycle accessories.
BRUCE JOHNSON
42 King Street, Nassau.
Bahamas
Chamber of Co- merce
'OUR DAY'Oct. 19
Red Cross Fund
W. C. B. Johnson, Esq. Pres.
Hon. J. R. C. Young, Treas.
Committee:
Chas. E. Albury, Esq.
Arthur B. Sutton, Esq.
R. W. Sawyer, Esq.
Contributions of Money,
Produce, Sisal, etc. will be
received at Office of the
Chamber in Masonic Build-
ing by
Chas. J. Abbott,
Secy, to Committee.
Under the distinguished
patronage of
His Excellency the
Governor
and Lady Allardyce
The Development Board will
exhibit at
Imperial Theatre
October 19th at 8.30 p m.
in aid of
"Our Day"
RED CROSS FUND
The Filmt used by the Sub-
marine Film Corporation in
the Advertising of Nassau
under their contract "Beauti-
ful Nassau" "Empire Day
in Nassau" "Departure of
3rd Contingent." All new to
Nassau audiences. Intersper-
sed with musical selections
by well known artists.
Box seats 3s.
Orchestra seats 2s. Gallery is
Seats reserved.
ICE
THE Bahamas Timber Co.
begs to draw attention
'of the public to the fact that
they are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.


ed by a new enemy, whose
power is not to be despised, fur
Roumania has quite a large
army of the most capable sol
ditrsin Europe. Nor is it in
military power Only that the
entrance of Roumania Rives
new strength to the Allies.
Roumania is one of (he great
grain growing countries of the
world, ranking second to Rus
sia in Europe. Roumania has
also valuable mineralsiron,
oil, coal, copper and nickel-
things which play important
parts in the great war game.
Hitherto the Teutonic enemy
has been able to draw on these
useful supplies from Roumania
as a neutral country. Now that
Roumania takes her place on
the Allies* side this source of
supply to the enemy is cut off
and all the resources of the
country became at the disposal
of the Allies. Roumania's ac-
tion will go far to persuade the
doubters everywhereeven in
Germanythat the ultimate
victory of the Allies is assured.
In this way, as well as in the
material aid which the event
brines to the A Mies, the entrance
of Roumania into the war is an
event of vtry great importance.
The Journal of Commerce
Sept 5th, 1916.

HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. pep tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
Bicycles for Sale,
Hire and Repaired.
Don't grope in the darkturn night into day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs.
W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St.
-
Professional Announcement
DR. W. R. LAMB
American Oculist 6t Optician
Specialist in Examining the Eye and Correcting Defective
Vision at Hotel Nassau until October 25th inclusive.
HAS the pleasure to again announce to the citizens of New
Providence that he may be consulted at the Mbove ad-
dress until the time staled. Those wishing a consultation should
make an appointment at their earlitst convenience as he will not
remain longer than the 25th.
He is fully prepared, as usual, with the most modern instru
incuts and apparatus for thoroughly examining and refracting
the eyes according to the latest and most approved methods as
employed by the most eminent Oculists in the Metropolitan Eye
Infirmaries, and he has the largest and best supply of all desira-
ble kinds and styles of lenses and mountings ol the best quality
ever brought to Nassau, including several thousands of spheio-
cylindrical, prismatic, bijoeal and other kinds of lenses made
specially to order for the correction of artigmatis..., weakness of
the ocular muscles and other eye troubles which the ordinary
lenses will not correct.
Those who are troubled with weak eyes, defective vision,
headache, due to eye strain, eye ache, inflammation of the e)es
or the lids, weakness of the ocular muscles or any of the numer-
ous conditions of the eyes requiring a thorough examination or
necessitating the use of glassesand most of these troubles are
permanently cured by accurate refraction and properly adjusted
glasses would do well to embrace the present exceptional c p-
portunity of giving their eyes the attention they require an
opportunity which for completeness of apparatus and supply of
lenses and mountings, thoroughness of examination, perfection
of refraction which biings the vision up to the highest standard
possible and for the last and most satisfactory results is equal in
every respect to the best obtainable anywhere abroad as thou-
sands of his patients here and elsewhere are willing to attest.
This method of examination with the ophthahmometer,
electric ophthahmiscrope and relinoscrope are so careful, tho-
rough and accurate that the diagnoses the cause of the defective
vision or eye trouble, so that the best and most satisfactory re-
sults are always obtained from the glasses the pre^cubos, which
are accurately fitted and warranted to be conect. They are not
only guaranteed to be absolutely perfect in the correction of the
refraction and for the production of the clearest vision possible,
but for durability and general satisfaction and the immediate
relief of headache, eye-ache and other ocular troubles which
for the use of glasses, they are equal to the best that could pos-
sibly be obtained anywhere abroad.
Comparatively few of those who are using glasses have the
kind their eyes require, the kind which gives the best vision, the
most comfort, and which preserve the sight and keep it noimal
all through life. This is because the eyes in most cases have
not had the careful and thorough examination bv a qualified
specialist which is best important Vnd necessary when the best
results are desired. As the accumulative power of the eye grad-
ually weakens as one grows older it becomes necessary to make
a change of glasses every three or four years and many make a
great mistake in continuing the use of unsuitable glasses, it is
one of the principal causes of cataract and other aerious eye
troubles. J
Dr. Lamb is certificated in both medicine and optics, has
thousands of references and testimonials from prominent citizens
of many countries where he has practised his profession contin-
uously for over 25 years, and has established through reliable
and superior service the most extensive eye practise in the world.
Charges Reasonable. Hours, 9 to 12 a.m., 2 to 5 p.m.


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