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^ "News FOP Everybody" V %  Nullltiw avddlclua lurara In vwraa mavglatrl Swing bound to awwavr to Hi* Do|mM of no Nutor, VolXHt No. 281 NASSAU. H. P.. BAHAMAS. SATl/RnAY. OCTOBER. 7.1916 Prtoo. THREE CENTS roi Our Day Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Allardyce. A PAGEANT OF The Empire and our Allies. By Boy Girl Scouts and Guides Assisted by 2oochildren from the Public Schools. IN THB Barrack Grounds on the afternoon of October the 20th. PR.OGR.AMME i Tableaux, Songs, Grand March, Music by the Police Band. ADMISSION Adults Children 66. 3d. Tickets can be obtained from the Scouts or Girl Guides, and entrance fee will also be acctpted at the Main Gate at the Barracks. All the chairs that it is possible to procure will hi on the Grounds and an extra fee of 3d will be charged for each seat. The entire proceeds are to be given to the Red Cross "Our Day" fund. The New War Minister •* %  And The New Phrase Of The War T '• THERE was something weird—though I ought not to have felt like that—In going in to the spacious building of the War Office the other da> and finding Mr. Lloyd George in the very seat which were occupied for nearly two years by Lord Kitchener. It was not merely that the two men were sooppo site in character, in opinion, und in careers, but that they were known to have been more than once in sharp division of opinion as to the conduct of the War. careers of the French Revolution when a Limoges linen-diaper was improvised into a great general, and priests became great Ministers or diplomatist!, nut then France turned everything upside down in those days of earthquake and eclipse; whereas in England we have had no revolution in our institutions. We go stodgily along, so far as our methods of govern ment are concerned, on the cen tury-old lines of interrupted and slow political development. in the great tariff FOUND. I N a Carrage yesterday—a purse containing money. Owner can enquire at ''TRIBUNE" Office. THE MAN IN THE MOULDIt was no shock to anybody that Lord Kitchener should get sueh a job. He was then the soldier with the biggest reputa tion in the British Empire—save a1td -except Lord Roberts, of course, who was too old for so gigantic a job. THE MAN WHO WAS MADEBut Mr. Lloyd George began in obscurity, in tt Welsh village; he came from Nonconformists and Radicals, and his life had been spent either in his office as a lawyer, or in the Parliament House, or on the platform ; and during all its years until the great War came, he had been among the foremost champions of the hated gospel of Pacifism. It was certainly the strangest transformation of fortune that K. igland has ever known, and could only find its analogy in the strange topsy turvy of the Sanitarv UNION SUITS Reliable Sold by W.Hilton 260 Bay St. BY ACCLAMATIONYet again there comes this paradox. Not only was nobody shocked by this appointment of the little Welsh attorney —the Nonconformist village Radical—to the greatest of offices in the greatest of wars, but Mr. Lloyd George was taken to the War Office by acclamation; the voice of the whole nation called for him, and nobody else could have been appointed without producing something like a popular revolt. What were the qualities in the man that produced this most remarkable result ? And how was it that Mr. Lloyd George has become the darling precisely in those classes which formerly hated and despised hi .1 so that they could scarcely be oivil to him when they met him, and at the dinner-table and in the smoke room poured out on him larger quantities of personal vitupera tion than any public man of his time has had to encounter ? I can speak from personal ex perience of what Mr. Lloyd George had to endure in those pre war days. Often in travell ing I have seen men turn their backs when he appeared ; and once I got sight of a man—it was around the Lake of Como— who shook his stick at him as he turned round the corner. Mr. Lloyd George is a sensitive though a courageous man, and he much prefers to be liked than hated. He beas no malice ; he is absolutely free from vindic tiveness. One of the moststrik ing things I ever heard him say was that personal dislike hr the appetite for revenge were among the most disturbing and refracting emotions of public life ; and that he felt this so stroagly that if ever he found any such feel ing rising in his heart he stamp ed it out with ad iron heel. And thus it was that, even in the midst of the furious conflict ov 1 er his historic budget, you were not surprised to find a good old Tory like Colonel Mark Lock wood taking with him a friend ly cup qf tea, or muncliing the rye bread which it will be re merri^ered was one ot the pieen at resistance controversy. CROSSING THE LINEThe secret of the hold Mr. Lloyd George has on the popu lar imagination is the impres sion he gives to everybody of that iron and inflexible courage which makes him never count the cost whenever he has con vinced himself that he ought to take a certain course. He told me once that when he was making up his mind about anything he passed through a hard, an anxious, and an unhappy time; but when once he had made up his mind, all care dropped from him as a mantle, and he then went on without any further worry, wherever the course he adopted might lead him. This was the kind of courage the man in the street knew was especially necessary ifi one who had to take the chief responsibility for the conduct of the war. Another secret of the hold which Mr. Lloyd George has got of the imagination of the nation is that almost from the first hour of the war he seemed to be the first, and, except for Lord Kitchener, the only one who grasped its giganticdifficulties. I do not know whether he began the war like that-few people did, especially few civilians. Mr. Lloyd George's conversion came, I think, during his first visit to the front. (Continued on 4th page) European Agency. I NDENTS promptly execut ed at lowest cash prices for all kinds of British and Continental goods, including Books and Stationery, Root*. SboM and Leather, Chemicali and Druggists' Sundriei, China, Earthenware aid Glassware, Cycles, Motors and Accessories, I>r;i|.rry, Millinery and Pied Goods, Pam-y Goods and Perfumery, Hardware, Machinery and Metals, Jewellery, Plate and Watches, Photographic and Optical Goods Provisions and Oilmen's Store*, etc., etc. Cemmiitiom a| px. to 5 p*, Tradt Discounts allowed. Special Quotations on Demand, Sample Casts from £10 upwards. Consignments of Produce Sold on Atcount. WILLIAM WILSON A SONS [Established |8i 4 ] 25 Abcharch Lane, London, E. C. Cable AddnsMLONRE, AIAMNDOSU: DELANCY TOWN HEAD QUARTERS HAS FOR SALE W HITE SUGAR. 4t d. pa lb.. Brown Sugar, (light) 4d. per lb., Brooms is. 6d. each, Ragoon rice 5 Jd. per qt., Best flour 2|d. per lb., English jams, Strawberry, Apricot, Mixed fruit, Damson, at ad. per tins Peaches and Pears is. per tins Best cheese is. 3d. per lb. Chicken feed 3d per qt. Cigarettes 15s. per dozen tins. Onions dd. Coal and wood delivered at short notice. Just Added To Stock Oleomargarine at is. 6. or 35s. per 251b. tin —suitable for table use. Vinegar as. 6d. per doz. bottles. Grits 28s, per bbl. Out Island seed corn at 3d. pet qt. MARTINAS BETHEL TELEPHONE 174. RAINCOATS 32/& 42/, Waaddl^aiaW.S.? .VrrnT "€^^^ l im^t^e'm^tm^''lith to W..r" RSJSTht lliund*" " !" ' D '•" la^il>V,,k!£, MaSi, .h .'.id b*otf.'WLrYad OUR GUARANTEE. ILJ..l*"i w TH "" %  '*>•< n'g* *""" „,.._. .,,. saHinMtary la arsry war, r<>n n %  •nil 11 Wl i ni, ai ouraw£naa^nd^llralnra£>urmnn.7 In full lnolu.ll>>> Al.f, D.>.u„-h.r.. ,>mh.H M loohaa. 11 11 !f Til"?* %  aUSUHSflUTS-TaDa Maaaura akoold badrawii modaraialr aioaa. war Hablorar lh anal, em whlah Mia llalin-oat will ba worn. %  a h ssats Mad* u baaaur. ft or Mo. aiira. •END ONLY 4.^,7, in> iwfjf prr PoalOffica Caah #MI 1 Oil (ll "uVmao Barrio, an and raMlvalaa wlia fonrordar li.l Balnooal liUha" Had* la %  > I*nre ilaa la ordarad aand ORB with Taar alnooaloan Dallrarr" in dellrarr. If %  lira — "i •PIOIAL HI aOaUams. lOaUITIB lb* •'• a.u.... 1Mb diiriai ikT na laal In iranall wa niidxriakc to >ir rum %  a Ikawl anaoluulr WlKB I :i>>ui


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y The Tribtmi Nassau, Saturday Octobsr 7, 29/6. L. fllLBRRT DOPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OKFICK: Crr\r Shirley & Chivrlolte Si* Nassau, A/. P., Co/iamai THONB 260. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES .Monday, Wedneulay and Friday— •ingle copy |d T W' day, and Thurvlay—single copy id ShterAy—single copy ... i|d WeU 5.1 Monthly i s. 6d (Juartarly 4 *. 6d HalfYearlv o s. Tearly l et. PAYABLE IN ADVANCli Vitowlfciuf Uftte* :— Ma pence per lui |>r tin inMrtion: three pence per lin (be scoud inlet tion ; ariiiifl8|>enny pe DM tor subtyuent insertions. AflvettiAemeots under eight lines 4s. NOTICE— When "Correspondence" or Articles are signed with the writer's name tr initials, or wilfc a pseudonym, or are marked "Communicated,' the Editor mutt not necessarily be held to be in agreement with the views therein expressed or with the mode oj expression In such instances, or in the case of "Letters to the Editor," insertion only meant that the matter or point of view M considered 0/ sufficient interest and importance to warrant publication. Zhe 'Cribune SeL.rurdo.y. October 7 1916. For the last few days th^ news from all fronts has been meagre. This is usually the prelude to great doings. We shall wait patiently to see whether that will turn out to be true in this instance. A singular silence hangs over Greece. Perhaps the King is delaying action as long as possible, in the interests of his sweet German friends. That may prove a fatal policy from the point of view of his own material interests. But perhaps "Tino" is so spiritual that he is willing to sacrifice even life for his great German ideal. We however, are not inclined to credit him thus far. We have heard little from the Somme lately. The next news is likely to be inspiriting The Etussians are making a mighty effort round Lemberg. More power to their elbows! There is hope in the news from Asia Minor. It will be grand if Russia can nw make a further big advance towards Constantinople. Just what significance is to be attached to the Allied advance on theSaloniki front it is hard to say. We have been requested to state that the Chamber of Commerce will meet on Monday evening at 5.30 to con sider the "Our Day" scheme. —:o:— The Board of Agriculture, will meet on Tuesday afternoon, the 10th instant, at half past five o'clock in their Board Room. (Masonic Temple) to discuss remedial measures for the Blue—Gray fly Citrus trees disease. All growers of citrus fruit and all persons interested in the Citrus Industry, are invited to attend. —:o:— We acknowledge with thanks a copy of the "Laugh and Grow Fat" Magazinefor September. "OUR DAY" BRITISH RED CROSS' In connection with Lord Lansdowri's Appeal for funds on "Our Day" on behalf of our wounded soldiers and tailors, we have been requested by tha Governor to state that the fol lowing list contains the names to date of tht subscribers to the British Red Cross Ambulance Fund, 1916. Last year £3650 was contributed locally for the purchase of four Motor Ambulance Cars, in addition to £155 for general Red Cross purposes. His Excellency hopes that it will be possible this year to obtain from those who so generously helped in 1915, and, others the purchase money for at least two more Motor Ambulances. It it proposed to devote all contributions received tor "Our Day" other than the above, i.e tliose obtained through the Chamber of Commerce, the proceeds of the Pageant and the Cinema Exhibition, salary or earnings rlonated on "Our Day", percentage on takings in houses of business, as also the offertor ies on "Our Day" Sunday, Ac, to general Red Cross purposes. RED CROSS MOTOR AMBULANCE FUND. The Governor and Lady Allardyee £ His Honour the Chief Justice & Mrs. Tudor The Honble. the Speaker* Mrs. Harcourt Malcolm The Hon. J;.s. P. Sands Mr. C E. Bethell I. S. J. The Hon. Kenneth Solomon The Hon. LR C. & Mrs. Young Mr. John Cancino Mr. Frank Holmes The Hon. G.H. Gamblin Messrs W.J. Pinder &Co. Mr. T. G. Johnson TheHon.T.E.D.Brace John S. George & Co. Miss E. L. Johnson Mr. W.C.B. Johnson aoo o o 50 52 10 o 25 o o 25 o o 65 o o 10 o o 31 10 o 15 o o 550 10 o o 35 o 20 o 10 25 5 10 10 o o o See that you tnke advan tape of the bargains at Mr. Zachary Taylor's store next week. Look for his advertismant. Bahamian Red Cross Guild. STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT FROM SEPTEMBER 1915 TO SEPTEMBER 1916. £"594 '5 o —:or— We have pleasure in inserting the following:— September 18, 1916. Dear Sir: The Lord Mayor and the other members of the National Committee for Relief in Belgium desire me to express tijeir deep gratitude for the magnificent contribution of £500 which has been collected under the auspices of His Excellency the Governor and the St. Andrew Society in the Bahamas. We sincerely apnreciate this substantial contribution towards the alleviation of the distress, which 1 regret to say is increasing, and we should be grateful if you would express to His Excellency, to the members of the St. Andrew Society, and to all those in the Bahamas who have so generously contributed, our sincere thanks. I enclose the Hon. Treasurer's formal receipt, and trust that you will accept for yourself our congratulations upon the success of your kind efforts. Yours faithfullv, W. A. M. GOODE, Hon. Secretary. The Hon. Jas. P. Sands, M. E. C. C/r. Total amount collected I have examined the accounts of the Bahamas Red Cross Guild and find them to be correct, as shown by the above Statement. The balance in hand agrees with the bank account. G. H. GAMBLIN. 1264 19 Dr. Sent to British Red Cross Society Spent on purchase of materials Now c/r in Bank in Nassau G. MAUD MILLER, Hon. Treasurer. CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE, President. 1000 352 12 1264 o 4 3 19 o 7 a 9 Work of the Bahamian Red Cross Guild. YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30th, 1916. Articles Forwarded to the British Red Cross Society 1 Parcel of Underwear, 3 Parcels to Belgians. MUFFLERS 310 HANDKERCHIEFS 7761 TOWELS 66 SHIRTS 18 BANbAGES 205 GAUZE PADS l33 PYJAMAS 6 WASHERS 8a 1 CARDIGA S 3 COMFORT BAGS 607 HELMETS ao MITTENS 9 SOCKS 3 6 3 PNEUMONIA JACKETS 7 LINT PILLOWS 438 PILLOW CA8ES 75* BOTTLE COVERS OLD LINEN 8 Buud les KETTLE HOLDERS 80 PUZZLES 4 CHEST PROTECTORS 31 WALKING STICK8 168 BUNDLES OF OLD GLOVES I CUSHIONS 19 SWEATERS 5 PACKAGES OF SWEETS 9 TOTAL 19038 L. GAMBLIN, Acting Hon. Secretary, Bahamian Red Cross Guild. CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE, President. CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE FUND for maimed and blind Soldiers and Sailors. We have been requested by the Private Secretary to acknowledge the following sum which lias been received by His Excellency on account of the above Fund:— Previously acknowledged £i37 ,8 2 Victoria School, per Mr. Wallace Thompson and children 1 o o £138 18 a The Ward Line S.S."Montery" left New York at 6 p.m on Thursday the 5th with 32 passengers and 39 pkgs. for Nassau. —*o:Trom Saturday, Sept. 30th. The motor vessel "Frances E."arrived on Saturday afternoon from Miami, Fla. with a cargo of shingles and shoes and the following 9 passengers: Messrs. Daniel Fernandez Jas. McDonald, Wm. Johnson, Wm. H. Sweeting, W. T. Swany, Gabriel Cooper, Benj Ferguson, Thos Malone, Adam Rutherford. The Sch "Hatlie Darling" arrived from Miami, Fla. on Thursday morning with a cargo of lumber and the fol lowing 7 passengers: Messrs. Wm. Smith, Thos. Major, Jas. Major, Richard Major; Mrs. S. Murry, Miss Ivan Murry, Miss Annie Ingraham. We desire to call attention to the following:— UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS, SCOTLAND WALKER TRUST PRIZES FOR ESSAYS ON PRAYER. At this time of world tragedy the significance of prayer in daily life is everywhere becoming more widley recognized, and it is felt that the time may have come for gathering together a record of the thoughts of those who have realized its meaning and power and are willing to share their experiences with others. With this end in view, and with the object publishing what may seem helpful, the Walker Trustees invite essays on:— PRAYER : The meaning, the reality and the power of prayer: its place and value to the individual, to the Church, and to the State : in the everyday affairs of life, in the healing of sickness ;ind disease : in times of distress and of national danger, and in rela tion to national ideals and to world progress. It is suggested that the length of an essay be from 4,000 to 6,000 words but no word limit is imposed. A Prize of £w is offered for the most widely helpful essay—open to anyone in any part of the world. (Contri, butors may write in any language.) Note.— The Trustees may, at their discretion, allot additional prizes. (Special Prizes are offered to Students and Graduate* of St. Andrews University. CONDITIONS:— 1. Each essay must be enclos ed in a sealed packet, bearing on the outside the motto se lected by the competitor, and the words, "Walker TrustEssay on Prayer(Open Prize). The name or address of the competitor must not appear on essay or on the sealed packet enclosing it, but a sealed envelope having the motto of the competitor on the outside and contain inganote of the competitor's name and address, with a signed declaration that the essay is his or her own pro duCtion, shall accompany the essay. 2. The Walker Trustees shall have right to publish essays for whicfl prizes shall be awarded, and they shall have the sole right of publication for the period of one year after 1st June 1917. 3. Essays should, when prac t.cal,beeithertyp. W rittenon one side of the leavei, or printed. i < A" y



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\ V v S 4The Walker Trustees retain full power to determine the award of the prizes. 5. All essays must reach the hands of the Secretary, The University, St. Andrews, Scot land, on or before 1st June 1917. Announcement of the award will be published in the "Athenaeum" for October 1917. and in the "Times" of 17th October, and "British Weekly" for the week ending 20th October, 1917. ANDREW BENNET, T .. Secretary. 1 he. University, St Andrews, May iqi6. (Further copies of this notice can be obtained from the Secretary.) The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 7,1916. (Communicated) WEDDINO AT HARBOUR ISLAND. A very pretty wedding took place at Haibour Island on Monday nth of September, at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, when Mr. Albert Sweeting was married to Miss Fannie Albury, eldest and only daughter of Mr. Alexander Albury of this place. The Bridegroom is the youngest son of Mr. Thomas Sweeting, part owner of the Sclir. Admirals Early in the morning flags and decorations were put up by the young men. The young boy. had to take a trip to Nurse Bay in a motor boat in order to get some cedar for decorations. 'Ihe Chapel was very nicely decorated for the event by the ladies as sisted by the young men. The decorations at the entrance of the Chape as also its interior surpassed all that was ever seen. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Leonard Edge. Mr. Eddie Albury acted as best man and Miss Ivy Curry maid of honour. Misses Maud Albury, Daisy Albury and Mildred Johnson were the bridesmaids. Messrs Cyril Sturrup, Cyril Albury, and Willie Thompson acted as groomsmen. The Flower girls were UnaThompson,Nellie Thompson, Jeane Sweeting and Guandelin, Bethel. The ceremo ny was grand and effective. Two hymns were sung. The bride looked charming in a white net dress, she was the prettiest bride we have had for many a day, no fault to be found Much credit is due to Miss Rosamond Roberts, for the neat and stylish way she made the dress. It fitted to perfection. She was given away by her father. The Chapel contained many specta tors. After the ceremony the happy couple proceeded toCapt. Robert Tnompson's house, Dun moreStreet, where they received the congratulations of many friends. The games were played in Dunmore Street, because the number of guests being so many the house could not contain them. They were entertained by Mr. Stafford Johnson with his guitar. Lots of cakes and ice cream was given around to the guests. At 10 o'clock the guests much pleased, returned to their homes. Miss Eunice Sweeting presid ed at the organ and furnished the music for the occasion with much credit. The largest number of Bridal presents ever received, was re ceived at this wedding. The number wa 147, from a silver waiter to a half dozen glasses. know a man is to live with him. And I will say to know Dr. Culmer is to deal with him. His manner is altogether different from his looks. On July 29th, my son met with a Sad Accident which resulted in a broken limb. He was examined by Dr. Pitt, and found that his leg was broken. He then recommended me to the General Hospital where the lad might get good treatment. In entering the Hospital, 1 found Dr. Culmer at his post and he quickly hurried out after seeing the carriage to find out what was my trouble. And in finding out he directed me to the ward with the patient where he got treatment beyond my expectation. I can truthfully say that the nurses are extremely nice; and seem to know their bus* iness when called upon. I will say to my friends who might be labouring under the burden of prejudice against the Hospital as I did. But the amount of care that is taken in this Hospital is surprising. The diet is nicely cooked, and served in a decent way to every individual patient; after which the nurs es go around and see that every one is taking it, and if unable they will sit and feed them. It will pay those who nev er visited the B.G.H. to do so and carry their sick ones for treatment. I am sure Dr. Culmer can please you as he pleased me and I am hard to be pleased. My boy remained in the Hospital for 14 days (or two weeks) after which Dr. Culmer delivered him up to me and his orders was to bring him once a week for treatment. 1 did so and in 8 weeks he was well enough to walk around. So my advice to tick ones is to see Dr. Culmer our great native Dr. Thanking you for Space Yours trulv CJ. GIBSON. Barber. H he was larily reclining on a trench bench. Just above him was the parapet, beyond that the narrow band of no mans land between the Austrian and Turkish lines—that awful space upon which Death had already enrolled a legion. As he dozed a comrade passed, and jerking his thumb carelessly upward to the parapet, said, "We're going over at four". It was the short introduction to an epic—the soldier's way of describing a feat of the valour of which the world has not yet ceased to speak, ^he awful simplicity of it—"loing over at four." 'Goint'overat four"it waspnwd alone Like the ea -y lilt of some marching tone, But earn brown f.ice had a (trim intent, for the soldier knew what the warning meant Not the careless world, but the quirk !" e I brentli 8poke the Invitation t<> strive with death*' That nprn space where theswift fat.cam A hundredfold with each sheet of flame, With some huddled heaps on the withered grass To mark the way that the atorjnm pass The la,I,| 01 that leads to the parapet May reach beyond it and fu ther yet. 'I hroufih space profound to that disfant star Where souls ..f the lost immortals are. Nor din of battle nor dread of ball Mark the last parade for the last roll call And hirhtl ;„ e out till that final day When t heamp awakes ti the rceille And the word is passed down the ranks once in in, Get ready Anzac, "Going over at Pour. COLLAR If you will give these collars a trial and keep track of their many trips to the laundry you will soon appreciate their worth. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RKTAILEHS CLUKTT. PBABODJT & CO.. Inc MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A' C. L LOFTHOUSE Exclusive. Agent, — The Times. Telegrams 7th October, 191b. Paris:—On the western end of the Macedonian front the Serbians and Allies pushed their lines well across the Serbian frontier directly south of Monastir and with in seven miles of that city. Petrograd:—General Brussi loff is persisting in his determined efforts to win Lemberg [he Russians captured posisitions south of Brzezany. r Berlin:—In Volhynia and Northern Galicia UieAustroGerman armies are obstinately withstanding Russian olfensive attacks which are more violent than ever. ST. JOHNS CATHEDRAL Meeting St. Rev. G. A. Thompson, S.T. D., Minister. Tomorrow 11 a.m. sermon from a visiting preacher from Andros Island. 2 p.m. a wedding. 7.30 p.m"The sin of malice," the last of a series of sermons. The public are cordially invited. Good Music. Oct. 6th, 1916. The Editor "Tribune" Dear Sir, Will you kindly publish this letter concerning the treatment of my boy at the B. G. H. Two young women, entering a street car. found that there was only standing room. "Pll soon get a seat," said one, in n loud whisper, to her companion. "Now, you see I *he turned to a sedate -looking gentleman. 'y dear Mr. C.rren,'' she exclaimed, 'How delighted I am to meet vou You are almost a stranger. Will I accept your seat? Well. I do feel tired. Thank vou so much!" The man aroce. "Sit down, Jane my girl," said he, as he courteously pointed to the vacant seat. "You're not often out on washing day. You must feel tired, I'm sure I How's your mistress?" Going* Over at Four The curt current phrases of rank and file in or on the eve of action are often more dramatic than the finest superlatives that historian or war correspondent have applied to battle. A sergeant of the Anzacs told me Petrograd:-In Turkish Armenia Grand Duke Nicholas continues successfully his new offensive west and south west of Trebizonde. The I inks are being driven back towards the River Karshut. Sofia: —The Russians and Roumanians have failed to force Von Mackensens line in Dobrudja. London:—The British on theSomme frot gained ground along the Pozieres-Bapaume road. Paris reports only activity on the French section of the Somrae front. Thp German Crown Prince has resumed active hostilities at Verdun where there ishea vy artillery fire. Sir, it is an old adage toithat on a quiet day on GallipoLondon:—The Cunard Line steamer Franconia has been sunk. She was employed in the government service. The British steamer Isle of Hastings, the Greek steamer Samos and the Norweigian steamer Cedric also have been sunk. Berlin:—The Roumanians in Transylvania have been defeated by General Fattenhevm. "OUR UNHAPPY DIVISIONS SERMON FOR THE SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY. Ephesians iv, 46. "There is one body and one Spirit, even as ye are called in one hope of your Calling. One Lord, one faith, one baptism. One God and Father of all, Who is above all, and through all, and in you all The world is full of disunion and divisions. These have brought about the present ter nble war. Unhappily the spi rit of disunion has invaded and rent asunder the Church, so that at the present time the One body founded by Christ and His Apostles is rent into hundreds of opposing sects and denominations. This spirit of schism was already working in the Church when St. Paul wrote hie. letter to the Christians in Kphesus. So he lays down tae principles of religious unity. I. There is One Body. Our Loid could not have founded two churches, much less two hundred The word "church es" (in the plural) is only used in the New Testament to denote branches of the same Church, such as the churches in Jerusalem, Rome and Antioch The word is never used of separate and opposing bodies of Christians, as in the case nowa-days. The Apostles|would be astonished and grieved if they saw our present "unhappy di visions (as they are called in the Book of Common Prayer). As there can only be one soul in one human body, so, says St. Paul, There is On< Body and One Spirit. All the baptized are members of that Budv. The same Holy Spirit give's Grace to each member, and every one has the same blessed hope— One hope of your calling, Our present religious divisions are as if the hand should refuse to help the head, or the feet re fuse to carry the hands. Our unity with Christ our Head is intended to be perfect. Thus the Apostle continues to harp on the word "one" :— II. One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism, One God and Father. First.our unity In in our One Lord, who is the one Sacrifice for the sins of the whole world. fl Christ divided? asks the Apostle. Oh that Christians would pause in their disputes to give an answer I Secondly, theic is One Faith, the Faith saints. Christ intends that there shall be one Holy Faith for all time, and throughout all the earth. What a scandal it is before the heathen and other unbelievers that those who nominally profess to hold the One Faith should not really do so. This is one reason why foreign missions aie so slow in winning the nations for Cnrist for He prayed in P.is last great earthly prayer Father . grant that they all may be one .... that the world may believe. Thirdly, the Apostle speaks of One Baptism. 1. Because all aie united into the One Name—Father, Son, and Holy Ghost 2. Baptism is One, because it is that which Christ appointed and is not mans invention. 3Because theie can be but One Spirit in the One Body of y which Baptism makes us members. 4Because when baptism has once been administered it ecu '•ever be repealed. As we can only be born once into h, e so Baptism is our one new Birth into God's Church and Kingdom of Grace. • It is therefore an act of sacrilege if a person who already bas been solemnly baptised should consent to be re-baptised. Such an act would have filled the Apostles with horror This is what the Church means when it states in the ancient Creed "I believe in ONK bap tum for the remission of sins. III. One God and Father oj all, that is, God in the unity o| t|, e Blessed Trinily. The Three.in One Godhead is the fount of unity. We cannot imagine disunion in the Godhead ; and those who are truly united to the Trinity by their member •hip with Jesus Christ, are sol emnly called to bring this unity into fhe Church, and to pro mote it in a sin divided world. To sum up the teaching of this chapter :— St. Paul exhorts all Chris tians to keep the bond of peace for the following seven reasons; 1. Because there is but One Body, of which we aie mem hers. 2. Because the Holy Spirit, in this Body, is but One. 3. Because we have the same One Hope in Christ, of the re surrection. 4. Because the holy Faith, revealed to us, is but One. 5. Because we have but One Lord and Saviour. 6. Because we have been made members of one family and born afresh by the Holy Spirit in the One Baptism. 7Because there is One God and Father in whom we live and move and have our being. It is the bounden duty of nil Christian people to pray for the removal of "our unhappy divisions", and to do all in their power to bring about re union, in the One Body, of all who are baptized into the Bles sed Tri.iity. BARGAINS BARGAINS AT ZACHARY TAYLORS STORE 8 10 Market Street pOI.Ot'RED Crepes and V-/ Swiss 36 to 40 inches wide at onjy 6d. por yard. 12 hair pins in pkgs. for only a half penny. White Voiles and Swiss at only 6d. per vard. Don't miss this sale which begins Monday niorn' is VIM rairn, in$ vaitn ing. which was once delivered to th\ Oct 5th. )



PAGE 1

w*m*a*w The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 7, 1 916. Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, LIMITED. Authorized Capital £5,000 LOW KATES FOB WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and atistactory Adjustments of Claims. HOME OFFICE: — 264 Bay Street, Nassau. CRYSTAL ICE O UR PLANT is now able to supply'all the Ice necessary for home consumption and to let the public share in the benefit. Our prices have been reduced as follows :— 12 lbs. at 4*d. 24 " 9d. 48 " Is. 6d. 100 c< 8s. • It is our duty to protect home industries and the figures listed above are intended to give the public an advantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed. Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor will receive prompt and courteous attention. DEPOTS. Hay St. City, The Ice House. E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week. Shirley St. H. J. Claridges'Grocery Store, open today East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store, open next week. Baillou Hill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open next week. HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON, Prop. T Keeping Guard HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these preserving the balance of trade. -THI SHOE £ STOIE is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan With these reinforcements he Big Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man kets abroad. G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Biff 4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 18s per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—5 360c "Primes" Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our same guarantee as the Bests.' Any defective shingles can be returned. Alsocheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDBRS. (Continued from 1st page) A GREAT ADVENTURE AND AN ANECDOTE1 remember well the first time lie returned home from that ex pedition. His companions were Lord Reading and Sir Charles Henry. And when he came back he said at once to all his friends that it was going to be a long war and a difficult war, and that we must put all our strength into it it we were going to win it. "Yes," I said, "we must set our teeth." "Ay," was his reply, "and perhaps tighten our belt6." THE TITLE. "SHELLS. SHELLS. SHELLS This conversation took place in the November of 1914. I was shocked; I was even a little incredulous when Mr. Lloyd George spoke to me like that— remember I am talking of nearly two years ago. Probably he perceived that, for he reminded me that, by temperament, he was a sanguine man, an incur able optimist, and that if he spoke thus pessimistically—if a realisation of fact can be tiuly described as pessimistic—it was because he had proofs of what he said. It was as far back as that, too, that Mr. Lloyd George spoke to me of the part that big guns and innumerable shells would play in the war. But the big guns were not coming, nor the big shells. In these tones he spoke to me whenever I -aw him, until at last, one morning in the month of March, 1915, he drew such a picture of what part munitions would play in this war, that I could stand it no longer; and at a St. Patrick's Day celebration among my own constituents I made a speech to which I gave myself the title, "Shells, Shells, Shells." How commonplace, how obvious, it all seems now; yet how hard it was to get it into the mind of the nation—at least, into the mindsof her rulers—a year ago. AN EARLY BIRD AND A ORE AT QOLFER. What sort of a life does this man lead who has responsibilities so heavy? It is a life of continuous work. It begins early in the morning—sometimes too early, for now and then over work and over anxie ty inteifere with his sleep, and at five or six o'clock he is star ing awake. He then turns to some of the papers beside his bed, and begins his work when he ought to be asleep. In olden days he had always his Saturday and Sunday at Walton Heath; and on Saturdays he played golf all day long with the same keenness as he gives to every occupation. Now he rarely gets to Walton Heath till late on Saturday, Sometimes he is very tired; sometimes thatextranrdi nary power of recuperation he has finds him fresh even at the end of a week. He sees hit friends at certain hours; at others he throws himself into a hammock or sits across two chairs, and makes up for his ar rears in sleep. If you want to see him at his best you must go to Walton Heath and watch him among his friends. The simplicity and modesty which he retains amid all his dazzling changes of fortune have left him the same pleasant, unpretin tious, genial companion he was in the days of his obscurity, and accounts largely for the person al popularity he enjoys. Walton Heath is one of the best places for sleep in the United Kingdom, and even the day and a half he spends there weekly make a great difference to him. FORTUNE'S IFAVOURITE. Such is the man on whose shoulders is borne the heavy burden of this war. The energy, the cheerfulness, and the courage which he has retained through aH these trying years justify the confidence the nation has in his powtr to win through. He is fortune's favourite child; and it is just like his luck—though luck has had little to do with it —that from the moment he entered the War Office the turn of the military tide has come; and we all take up our papers with the hope, and almost the certainty, that it will bring us news of another milestone passed on the road to resounding Victory. —T. P.'s Journal, Aug. 1916. i % v NOTICE T HE Recruiting Committee are again enlisting men for Drafts for the Bahamas Contingent. Applicants will be attended to between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Commandant's Office at the Barracks. Enlist now as the vessel for Jamaica will be leaving early in November. R. H. C. CRAWFORD Commandant. MlttrmJCkM W/W.IM..'>l..,|**. A Special Appeal on Behalf of Baby Naturally a Healthy Mother t should feed her own child, and no cause, save inability, should prevent her doing no. But there are many mothers who, though willing, cannot wholly or even partially, nurse their children. Either they have DO milk for them, or it is poor in quality and deficient in sus/'uianeo. The Question then arises what food should be given to Baby. Carefully consider this highly important point Remember, that the right food, given at the proper ago will lay a sura foundation for future health and happiness. Ordinary cow's milk is totally unsuitable as a food for young infants; it is acid, contains indigestible curd and is frequently swarming with dangerous germs, especially in summer time. FarinaceousFoodsmustnotbegiven.as a child under six months of age cannot digest starch. A Satisfactory Solution of the difficult problem of feeding children by hand is provided by using the 'Allenburys' Foods. Prepared as directed, these pure Foods closely resemble healthy mother's milk in composition, nutritive value and digestibility. They are the outcome of prolonged scientific investigation, carried out with all the resource* of wide manufacturing facilities and experience. Decide to use the 'Allenburys' Foods. By so doing the many serious ailments which follow the use of unsuitable food will be avoided, and Baby will be equipped with sound health and strength. The Method of Simplicity and Certainty *MenburgsF


PAGE 1

\ \ "News FOP B verybody" Nulliua tvddlctua |urr in vtrk mavgiatri Baring bound to iwnr to the> Dogma.* ol no Maetar. VelXHL No. 281 NASSAU. H. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. OCTOBER. 7. 1 916 Prica. THREE CENTS V roi Our Day Under the distinguished patronage of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Allardyce. A PAGEANT OF The Empire and our Allies. By Boy Scouts and Girl Guides Assisted by 200 children from the Public Schools. IN THB Barrack Grounds on the afternoon of October the 20th. PR.O0R.AMME i Tableaux, Songs, Grand March, Music by the Police Band. ADMISSION Adults Children 66. 3d. Tickets can be obtained from the Scouts or Girl Guides, and entrance fee will also be accepted at the Main Gate at the Barracks. All the chairs that it is possible to procure will bt on the Grounds and an extra fee of 3d will be charged for each seat. The entire proceeds are to be given to the Red Cross "Our Day" fund. FOUND. I N a Carrage yesterday—a purse containing money. Owner can enquire at "TRIBUNE" Office. %  %  The New War Minister ** And The New Phrase Of The War T.P. THERE was something weird—though I ought not to have felt like that—In going in to the spacious building of the War Office the other day and finding Mr. Lloyd George in the very seat which were occupied for nearly two years by Lord Kitchener. It was not merely that the two men were sooppo site in character, in opinion, nnd in careers, but that they were known to have been more than once in sharp division of opinion as to the uonduct of the War. THE MAN IN THE MOULD It was no hock to anybody that Lord Kitchener should get such a job. He was then the soldier with the biggest reputa tian in the Bntish Empire—save aiifd -*cept Lord Roberts, of course, who was too old for so gigantic a job. THE MAN WHO WAS MADEBut Mr. Lloyd George began in obscurity, in a Welsh village; he came from Nonconformists and Radicals, and his life had been spent either in his office as a lawyer, or in the Parliament House, or on the platform ; and during all its years until the great War came, he had been among the foremost champions of the hated gospel of Pacifism. It was certainly the strangest transformation of fortune that England has ever known, and could only find its analogy in the strange topsy t'urvy of the Sanitarv UNION SUITS v MM M4|K Reliable Sold by W.Hilton 260 Bay St. careers of the French Revolution when a Limoges linen-diaper was improvised into a great general, and priests became great Ministers or diplomatists. But then France turned everything upside down in those days of earthquake and eclipse; whereas in England we have had no revolution in our institutions. We go strdgily along, so far as our methods of govern ment are concerned, on the cen tury-old lines of interrupted and slow political development. BY ACCLAMATIONYet again there comes this paradox. Not only was nobody shocked by this appointment of the little Welsh attorney —the Nonconformist village Radical—to the greatest of offices in the greatest of wars, but Mr. Lloyd George was taken to the War Office by acclamation; the voice of the whole nation called for him, and nobody else could have been appointed without producing something like a popular revolt. What the qualities in the man that produced this most remarkable result ? And how was it that Mr. Lloyd George has become the darling precisely in those classes which formerly hated and despised hi .1 so that they could scarcely be civil to him when they met him, and at the dinner-table and in the smoke room poured out on him larger quantities of personal vitupera tion than any public man of his time has had to encounter ? I can speak from personal ex perience of what Mr. Lloyd George had to endure in those pre war days. Often in tiavell ing I have seen men turn their backs when he appeared; and once I got sight of a man—it was around the Lake of Como— who shook his stick at him as he turned round the corner. Mr. Lloyd George is a sensitive though a courageous man, and he much prefers to be liked than hated. He bea s no malice ; he is absolutely free from vindic tiveness. One of the moststrik ing things I ever heard him say was that personal dislike br the appetite for revenge were among the most disturbing and refracting emotions of public life ; and that he felt this so strongly that if ever he found any such feel ing rising in his heart he stamp ed it out with ad iron heel. And thus it was that, even In the midst of the furious conflict ov er his historic budget, you were not surprised to find a good old Tory like Colonel Mark Lock wood taking with him a friend ly cup of tea, or munching the rye bread which it will be re menptyered was one ol the pieeet ue resistance in the great tariff controversy. CROSSING THE LINEThe secret of the hold Mr. Lloyd George has on the popu lar imagination is the impres sion he gives to everybody of that iron and inflexible courage which makes him never count the cost whenever he has con vinced himself that he ought to take a certain course. He told me once that when he was mak ing up his mind about anything he passed through a hard, an anxious, and an unhappy time ; but when once he had made up his mind, all care dropped from him as a manlle, and he then went on without any further worry, wherever the course he adopted might lead him. This was the kind of courage the man in the street knew was especially necessarj ir. one who had to take the chief responsibility for the con war. Another secret of the hold which Mr. Lloyd George has got were of the imagination of the nation is that almost from the first hour of the war he seemed to be the first, and, except for Lord Kitchener, the only one who grasped its gigantic difficulties. I do not know whether he began the war like that —few people did, especially few civilians. Mr. Lloyd George's conversion came, I think, during his first visit to the front. (Continued on 4th page) European Agency. I NDENTS promptly execut ed at lowest cash prices for all kinds of British and Continental goods, including Books and Stationery, Boot*, Shoe* and Leather, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries, China, Earthen ware and Glassware, Cycles, Motors and Accessories, Dra|ry, Millinery and Piece Goods, Fancy Goods and Perfumery, Hardware, Machinery and Metals, Jewellery, Plate and Watches, Phoiographic and Optical Goods Provisions and Oilmen's Stores, etc., etc. Commitsion ? \ p.c. to 5 p.c. Tradt Discounts allowed. Special Quotations on Dtmand. Sample Caws from £10 upward*. Consignments of Produce Sold on Atcount. WILLIAM WILSON tout [Established 1H14] 25 Abcharch Lane, London, E.C Cable Address LONRE. A1ANND0NU: DELANCY TOWN HEAD QUARTERS HAS FOR SALE W HITE SUGAR. 4 ,d. pe lb.. Brown Sugar, (light) 4(1. per lb., Brooms is. 6d. each, Ragoon rice 5^d. per qt., Best *J?15FS!L**m 2jd. per lb., English jams, ' ' the Strawberry, Apricot. Mixed fruit, Damson, at o,d. per tins Peaches and Pears is. per tins Best cheese is. 3d. per lb. Chicken feed 3d per qt. Cigarettes 15s. per dozen tins. Onions 4 d. Coal and wood delivered at short notice. Just Added To Stock Oleomargarine at is. 6. or 35s. per 351b. tin—suitable for table use. Vinegar as. 6d. per doz. bottles. Grits 284, per bbl. Out Island seed corn at 3d. perqt. MARTINAS BETHEL TELEPHONE 174. RtADY TO WKAR ^ft / O. AQ% I RAINCOATS &^/ <**' % %  %  v -ntw•nmwer-m, m •**• iTl## ooidi. (Itaoa Cole)). WEATHER" Reedy to Wear Ralnnet la a Taller mad* EarjnfA upoa aktoa poulbl* on hutm buloatd as r.iarda OaZStfle aSi flalsn. It In mute whiob %  Shor Proof, Porous aud Odourlna, yet oil then qaalleln ban been &WBr wlW!,M Iron. CLOTH BTalBS iBlAinii^ obtained without too aSse -lata %  Dilution promote* health end prarenl* oTsr-hoolIni all cllmotet. end now Ui mow tryln nl]nj**jn oondiUonihnroT*dll**U too* the boat RatDcoel obtainable Ho IKhi weight prarent* fotiiina and ooanrTeeT phyeloal %  aiiaj. jromote* health end prerenle uTer-heetlnf. %  rbonl and drln qulr-kly_ after a_lorm. Quality coaal Bijljaf TODII nsL, OUR uitural nooau ri ,. Th eaarmnlspd Rainproof cloth li BOBA it Wlti. in. at tsssseal yon oan nn poete**echargee you tiara paid oat. beautifully eat theuldara alls PerTest Tha full dirt tall* below kneae. Curt* GUARANTEE. JUl^TOTC our oapeon, and •• will retnr* ymir mooer In full Inoludlim AU, p> ? E *2 R,PT,ON : W~"~ ~ fwiw. %  fonBtoM Straps. Boots* Modal aaaPranUn Collar and button* to ch. naek. Hada In thadaa ol •fawn. Draa, fawn, Oreea and %  as.iki. Bleern ara Hnad poplin and body with plaid autterUI 32/-Vr' MteMrL wrrl r r u"aLL.WEtTHBB" EMnoeat, mada from warranted Rainproof Material, (uaraateadtoirlraaatlifaotlda. Haadytowaar. No. fOSt-Prlo. ... HA (I7.H) ^atMBwmSBEF matarli iarlM. vln, or espeneln ma%  ooillted i mak.. "Oarblrcerd •• rial. The Dyn and an tarasei 1 human lafeaulty 1 ohlaary produce U a nllabl* Rainproof jnaterli... *>he futnt to linht procurabla. A thorouaoly aatlafaotory BalnooaLln arary mpaot. rbady Id waar. Ao. TUluO-Priea • If(IIO.0S) Staek BLsaa-l K11 ra latrfa rim M or as a, astra) at M BraaM Lanfth IT a II Inohaa. M twa moderately einaa, nerar tlghiovor m ftalntoet will be worn. S TIKIIIQ M11SU % % % %  BTI Tape Moaaan Daal badrawn moderat the eoal. orar wklob th. S faM esa l l Mad* to Maaaura IS or eSe. eitra. • %  NO ONLY 4/jE^tSSLTS than beacoj par PoatOmoa "Cash an Dallyery E rrloa and the balanoa paid on dullvary. If Jnooat la to be Had* to Maaaara or fcilra Lanailnl*ordered nod ONE^ulm* of tbe ralae win your order. %  P10IAL W1I eUAHARTEI S IMT11 th* tafa d*ll.ry *f %  r Onti durlac trie War. rlhoald any ooja he loat In transit, we undertake to replace worn ahaoluiel ij safe b lent In tre,nilt. w* ^m__ eeWaia>arO)at#ly rRB or CHAlUilR8 LTD. (EsUUiir* H4§>. Tadkara Wooilaa Marahaatl ii 9me: nunou tmtum. T TOWH MODEB for Oe U np l eSaalBBBwaBBBl.


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02712
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, October 07, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02712

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Full Text

\
\

"News Fop B verybody"
Nulliua tvddlctua |urr in vtrk mavgiatri
Baring bound to iwnr to the> Dogma.* ol no Maetar.
VelXHL No. 281
NASSAU. H. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. OCTOBER. 7.1916
Prica. THREE CENTS
V
roi
Our Day
Under the distinguished pat-
ronage of His Excellency
the Governor
and
Lady Allardyce.
A PAGEANT OF
The Empire and our
Allies.
By Boy Scouts and
Girl Guides
Assisted by 200 children from
the Public Schools.
IN THB
Barrack Grounds
on the afternoon of
October the 20th.
PR.O0R.AMME i
Tableaux, Songs, Grand
March, Music by the Police
Band.
Admission
Adults Children
66. 3d.
Tickets can be obtained from
the Scouts or Girl Guides,
and entrance fee will also be
accepted at the Main Gate at
the Barracks.
All the chairs that it is pos-
sible to procure will bt on the
Grounds and an extra fee of 3d
will be charged for each seat.
The entire proceeds are to be
given to the Red Cross "Our
Day" fund.
FOUND.
IN a Carrage yesterdaya
purse containing money.
Owner can enquire at
"Tribune" Office.
"
The New War Minister **
And The New Phrase Of The War
T.P.
THERE was something
weirdthough I ought not to
have felt like thatIn going in
to the spacious building of the
War Office the other day and
finding Mr. Lloyd George in the
very seat which were occupied
for nearly two years by Lord
Kitchener. It was not merely
that the two men were sooppo
site in character, in opinion, nnd
in careers, but that they were
known to have been more than
once in sharp division of opinion
as to the uonduct of the War.
The Man in the
Mould
It was no hock to anybody
that Lord Kitchener should get
such a job. He was then the
soldier with the biggest reputa
tian in the Bntish Empiresave
aiifd -*cept Lord Roberts, of
course, who was too old for so
gigantic a job.
The Man who was
Made-
But Mr. Lloyd George began
in obscurity, in a Welsh village;
he came from Nonconformists
and Radicals, and his life had
been spent either in his office as
a lawyer, or in the Parliament
House, or on the platform ; and
during all its years until the
great War came, he had been
among the foremost champions
of the hated gospel of Pacifism.
It was certainly the strangest
transformation of fortune that
England has ever known, and
could only find its analogy in
the strange topsy t'urvy of the
Sanitarv
UNION
SUITS
v
MM M4|K
Reliable
Sold by
W.Hilton
260 Bay St.
careers of the French Revolution
when a Limoges linen-diaper
was improvised into a great
general, and priests became
great Ministers or diplomatists.
But then France turned every-
thing upside down in those days
of earthquake and eclipse;
whereas in England we have
had no revolution in our insti-
tutions. We go strdgily along,
so far as our methods of govern
ment are concerned, on the cen
tury-old lines of interrupted
and slow political development.
By Acclamation-
Yet again there comes this
paradox. Not only was nobody
shocked by this appointment
of the little Welsh attorney
the Nonconformist village
Radicalto the greatest of offi-
ces in the greatest of wars, but
Mr. Lloyd George was taken to
the War Office by acclamation;
the voice of the whole nation
called for him, and nobody else
could have been appointed with-
out producing something like a
popular revolt. What
the qualities in the man that
produced this most remarkable
result ? And how was it that
Mr. Lloyd George has become
the darling precisely in those
classes which formerly hated
and despised hi .1 so that they
could scarcely be civil to him
when they met him, and at the
dinner-table and in the smoke
room poured out on him larger
quantities of personal vitupera
tion than any public man of his
time has had to encounter ?
I can speak from personal ex
perience of what Mr. Lloyd
George had to endure in those
pre war days. Often in tiavell
ing I have seen men turn their
backs when he appeared; and
once I got sight of a manit
was around the Lake of Como
who shook his stick at him as
he turned round the corner. Mr.
Lloyd George is a sensitive
though a courageous man, and
he much prefers to be liked than
hated. He bea s no malice ; he
is absolutely free from vindic
tiveness. One of the moststrik
ing things I ever heard him say
was that personal dislike br the
appetite for revenge were among
the most disturbing and refract-
ing emotions of public life ; and
that he felt this so strongly that
if ever he found any such feel
ing rising in his heart he stamp
ed it out with ad iron heel. And
thus it was that, even In the
midst of the furious conflict ov '
er his historic budget, you were
not surprised to find a good old
Tory like Colonel Mark Lock
wood taking with him a friend
ly cup of tea, or munching the
rye bread which it will be re
menptyered was one ol the pieeet
ue resistance in the great tariff
controversy.
Crossing The Line-
The secret of the hold Mr.
Lloyd George has on the popu
lar imagination is the impres
sion he gives to everybody of
that iron and inflexible courage
which makes him never count
the cost whenever he has con
vinced himself that he ought to
take a certain course. He told
me once that when he was mak
ing up his mind about anything
he passed through a hard, an
anxious, and an unhappy time ;
but when once he had made up
his mind, all care dropped from
him as a manlle, and he then
went on without any further
worry, wherever the course he
adopted might lead him. This
was the kind of courage the
man in the street knew was es-
pecially necessarj ir. one who
had to take the chief responsi-
bility for the con
war.
Another secret of the hold
which Mr. Lloyd George has got
were of the imagination of the nation
is that almost from the first
hour of the war he seemed to be
the first, and, except for Lord
Kitchener, the only one who
grasped its gigantic difficulties.
I do not know whether he be-
gan the war like that few peo-
ple did, especially few civilians.
Mr. Lloyd George's conversion
came, I think, during his first
visit to the front.
(Continued on 4th page)
European Agency.
INDENTS promptly execut
ed at lowest cash prices for
all kinds of British and Con-
tinental goods, including
Books and Stationery,
Boot*, Shoe* and Leather,
Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries,
China, Earthen ware and Glassware,
Cycles, Motors and Accessories,
Dra|ry, Millinery and Piece Goods,
Fancy Goods and Perfumery,
Hardware, Machinery and Metals,
Jewellery, Plate and Watches, '
Phoiographic and Optical Goods
Provisions and Oilmen's Stores,
etc., etc.
Commitsion ? \ p.c. to 5 p.c.
Tradt Discounts allowed.
Special Quotations on Dtmand.
Sample Caws from 10 upward*.
Consignments of Produce Sold on At-
count.
William Wilson tout
. [Established 1H14]
25 Abcharch Lane, London, E.C
Cable AddressLONRE. A1ANND0NU:
DELANCY TOWN
HEAD QUARTERS
HAS FOR SALE
WHITE SUGAR. 4,d. pe
lb.. Brown Sugar, (light)
4(1. per lb., Brooms is. 6d. each,
Ragoon rice 5^d. per qt., Best
*J?15FS!L**m 2jd. per lb., English jams,
' ' the Strawberry, Apricot. Mixed
fruit, Damson, at o,d. per tins
Peaches and Pears is. per tins
Best cheese is. 3d. per lb. Chic-
ken feed 3d per qt. Cigarettes
15s. per dozen tins. Onions 4d.
Coal and wood delivered at
short notice.
Just Added To Stock
Oleomargarine at is. 6. or 35s.
per 351b. tinsuitable for table
use. Vinegar as. 6d. per doz.
bottles. Grits 284, per bbl. Out
Island seed corn at 3d. perqt.
MARTINAS BETHEL
Telephone 174.
RtADY TO WKAR ^ft / O. AQ% I
RAINCOATS &^/ <**'
- v -ntwnmwer-m, m ** ,iTl## ooidi. (Itaoa Cole)).
WEATHER" Reedy to Wear Ralnnet la a Taller mad* EarjnfA upoa aktoa
poulbl* on hutm buloatd as r.iarda OaZStfle aSi flalsn. It In mute
whiob ! Shor Proof, Porous aud Odourlna, yet oil then qaalleln ban been
&WBrwlW!,M"
Iron. CLOTH
BTalBS iBlAinii^
obtained without too
aSse
-lata
Dilution promote* health end prarenl* oTsr-hoolIni
all cllmotet. end now Ui mow tryln nl]nj**jn oondiUonihnroT*dll**U too* the boat RatDcoel
obtainable Ho IKhi weight prarent* fotiiina and ooanrTeeT phyeloal aiiaj.
jromote* health end prerenle uTer-heetlnf.
rbonl and drln qulr-kly_ after a_lorm. Quality coaal
Bijljaf
TODII
nsL,
OUR
uitural
nooau ri !
,. Th eaarmnlspd Rainproof cloth li bob-
A it Wlti. in. at
tsssseal
yon oan nn
poete**echargee you tiara paid oat.
beautifully eat theuldara alls PerTest
Tha full dirt tall* below kneae. Curt*
GUARANTEE. JUl^TOTC
our oapeon, and will retnr* ymir mooer In full Inoludlim AU, p>
?E*2R,PT,ON: W~"~ ~ fwiw.
fonBtoM Straps. Boots* Modal aaaPranUn Collar and button* to ch. naek. Hada In thadaa ol
fawn. Draa, fawn, Oreea and as.iki. Bleern ara Hnad poplin and body with plaid autterUI
32/-Vr'MteMrLwrrl"r*ru"aLL.WEtTHBB"
' EMnoeat, mada from warranted Rainproof Material,
(uaraateadtoirlraaatlifaotlda. Haadytowaar.
No. fOSt-Prlo. ... HA (I7.H)
^atMBwmSBEF
matarli
iarlM.
vln, or espeneln ma-
ooillted i mak.. "Oarblrcerd
rial. The Dyn and an
tarasei1
human lafeaulty
1 ohlaary produce U___
a nllabl* Rainproof jnaterli...
*>he futnt to linht procurabla. A thorouaoly aat-
lafaotory BalnooaLln arary mpaot. rbady Id
waar. Ao. TUluO-Priea If- (IIO.0S)
Staek BLsaa-l K11 ra latrfa rim M or as a, astra)
at M
BraaM
Lanfth
IT
a

II Inohaa.
M
twa moderately einaa, nerar tlghiovor
' m ftalntoet will be worn.
STIKIIIQ M11SU BTI Tape Moaaan
Daal badrawn moderat
the eoal. orar wklob th.
SfaMesall Mad* to Maaaura IS or eSe. eitra.
NO ONLY 4/jE^tSSLTS
than beacoj par PoatOmoa "Cash an Dallyery "
Errloa and the balanoa paid on dullvary. If
Jnooat la to be Had* to Maaaara or fcilra
Lanailnl*ordered nod ONE^ulm* of tbe
ralae win your order.
P10IAL W1I eUAHARTEI
SIMT11 th* tafa d*ll.ry *f
r Onti durlac trie War. rlhoald any
ooja he loat In transit, we undertake to
replace worn ahaoluiel
ij
safe b lent In tre,nilt. w* ^m__
eeWaia>arO)at#ly rRB or CHAlUil-
R8 LTD. (EsUUiir* H4>.
Tadkara Wooilaa Marahaatl
ii 9me: nunou tmtum.
T
TOWH MODEB
for OeUnpl '
eSaalBBBwaBBBl. .


^
"News Fop Everybody"

V

*
Nullltiw avddlclua lurara In vwraa mavglatrl
Swing bound to awwavr to Hi* Do|mM of no Nutor,
VolXHt No. 281
NASSAU. H. P.. BAHAMAS. SATl/RnAY. OCTOBER. 7.1916
Prtoo. THREE CENTS
roi
Our Day
Under the distinguished pat-
ronage of His Excellency
the Governor
and
Lady Allardyce.
A PAGEANT OF
The Empire and our
Allies.
By
Boy
Girl
Scouts and
Guides
Assisted by 2oochildren from
the Public Schools.
IN THB
Barrack Grounds
on the afternoon of
October the 20th.
PR.OGR.AMME i
Tableaux, Songs, Grand
March, Music by the Police
Band.
Admission
Adults Children
66. 3d.
Tickets can be obtained from
the Scouts or Girl Guides,
and entrance fee will also be
acctpted at the Main Gate at
the Barracks.
All the chairs that it is pos-
sible to procure will hi on the
Grounds and an extra fee of 3d
will be charged for each seat.
The entire proceeds are to be
given to the Red Cross "Our
Day" fund.
The New War Minister *
And The New Phrase Of The War T" '
THERE was something
weirdthough I ought not to
have felt like thatIn going in
to the spacious building of the
War Office the other da> and
finding Mr. Lloyd George in the
very seat which were occupied
for nearly two years by Lord
Kitchener. It was not merely
that the two men were sooppo
site in character, in opinion, und
in careers, but that they were
known to have been more than
once in sharp division of opinion
as to the conduct of the War.
careers of the French Revolution
when a Limoges linen-diaper
was improvised into a great
general, and priests became
great Ministers or diplomatist!,
nut then France turned every-
thing upside down in those days
of earthquake and eclipse;
whereas in England we have
had no revolution in our insti-
tutions. We go stodgily along,
so far as our methods of govern
ment are concerned, on the cen
tury-old lines of interrupted
and slow political development.
in the great tariff
FOUND.
IN a Carrage yesterdaya
purse containing money.
Owner can enquire at
''Tribune" Office.
The Man in the
Mould-
It was no shock to anybody
that Lord Kitchener should get
sueh a job. He was then the
soldier with the biggest reputa
tion in the British Empiresave
a1td -except Lord Roberts, of
course, who was too old for so
gigantic a job.
The Man who was
Made-
But Mr. Lloyd George began
in obscurity, in tt Welsh village;
he came from Nonconformists
and Radicals, and his life had
been spent either in his office as
a lawyer, or in the Parliament
House, or on the platform ; and
during all its years until the
great War came, he had been
among the foremost champions
of the hated gospel of Pacifism.
It was certainly the strangest
transformation of fortune that
K.igland has ever known, and
could only find its analogy in
the strange topsy turvy of the
Sanitarv
UNION
SUITS
Reliable
Sold by
W.Hilton
260 Bay St.
By Acclamation-
Yet again there comes this
paradox. Not only was nobody
shocked by this appointment
of the little Welsh attorney
the Nonconformist village
Radicalto the greatest of offi-
ces in the greatest of wars, but
Mr. Lloyd George was taken to
the War Office by acclamation;
the voice of the whole nation
called for him, and nobody else
could have been appointed with-
out producing something like a
popular revolt. What were
the qualities in the man that
produced this most remarkable
result ? And how was it that
Mr. Lloyd George has become
the darling precisely in those
classes which formerly hated
and despised hi .1 so that they
could scarcely be oivil to him
when they met him, and at the
dinner-table and in the smoke
room poured out on him larger
quantities of personal vitupera
tion than any public man of his
time has had to encounter ?
I can speak from personal ex
perience of what Mr. Lloyd
George had to endure in those
pre war days. Often in travell
ing I have seen men turn their
backs when he appeared ; and
once I got sight of a manit
was around the Lake of Como
who shook his stick at him as
he turned round the corner. Mr.
Lloyd George is a sensitive
though a courageous man, and
he much prefers to be liked than
hated. He beas no malice ; he
is absolutely free from vindic
tiveness. One of the moststrik
ing things I ever heard him say
was that personal dislike hr the
appetite for revenge were among
the most disturbing and refract-
ing emotions of public life ; and
that he felt this so stroagly that
if ever he found any such feel
ing rising in his heart he stamp
ed it out with ad iron heel. And
thus it was that, even in the
midst of the furious conflict ov 1
er his historic budget, you were
not surprised to find a good old
Tory like Colonel Mark Lock
wood taking with him a friend
ly cup qf tea, or muncliing the
rye bread which it will be re
merri^ered was one ot the pieen
at resistance
controversy.
Crossing The Line-
The secret of the hold Mr.
Lloyd George has on the popu
lar imagination is the impres
sion he gives to everybody of
that iron and inflexible courage
which makes him never count
the cost whenever he has con
vinced himself that he ought to
take a certain course. He told
me once that when he was mak-
ing up his mind about anything
he passed through a hard, an
anxious, and an unhappy time;
but when once he had made up
his mind, all care dropped from
him as a mantle, and he then
went on without any further
worry, wherever the course he
adopted might lead him. This
was the kind of courage the
man in the street knew was es-
pecially necessary ifi one who
had to take the chief responsi-
bility for the conduct of the
war.
Another secret of the hold
which Mr. Lloyd George has got
of the imagination of the nation
is that almost from the first
hour of the war he seemed to be
the first, and, except for Lord
Kitchener, the only one who
grasped its giganticdifficulties.
I do not know whether he be-
gan the war like that-few peo-
ple did, especially few civilians.
Mr. Lloyd George's conversion
came, I think, during his first
visit to the front.
(Continued on 4th page)
European Agency.
INDENTS promptly execut
ed at lowest cash prices for
all kinds of British and Con-
tinental goods, including
Books and Stationery,
Root*. SboM and Leather,
Chemicali and Druggists' Sundriei,
China, Earthenware aid Glassware,
Cycles, Motors and Accessories,
I>r;i|.rry, Millinery and Pied Goods,
Pam-y Goods and Perfumery,
Hardware, Machinery and Metals,
Jewellery, Plate and Watches, '
Photographic and Optical Goods
Provisions and Oilmen's Store*,
etc., etc.
Cemmiitiom a| px. to 5 p*,
Tradt Discounts allowed.
Special Quotations on Demand,
Sample Casts from 10 upwards.
Consignments of Produce Sold on At-
count.
William Wilson a Sons
. [Established |8i4]
25 Abcharch Lane, London, E. C.
Cable AddnsMLONRE, AIAMNDOSU:
DELANCY TOWN
HEAD QUARTERS
HAS FOR SALE
WHITE SUGAR. 4td. pa
lb.. Brown Sugar, (light)
4d. per lb., Brooms is. 6d. each,
Ragoon rice 5Jd. per qt., Best
flour 2|d. per lb., English jams,
Strawberry, Apricot, Mixed
fruit, Damson, at ad. per tins
Peaches and Pears is. per tins
Best cheese is. 3d. per lb. Chic-
ken feed 3d per qt. Cigarettes
15s. per dozen tins. Onions dd.
Coal and wood delivered at
short notice.
Just Added To Stock
Oleomargarine at is. 6. or 35s.
per 251b. tinsuitable for table
use. Vinegar as. 6d. per doz.
bottles. Grits 28s, per bbl. Out
Island seed corn at 3d. pet qt.
MARTINAS BETHEL
Telephone 174.
RAINCOATS 32/- & 42/-
, Waaddl^aiaW.S.? .VrrnT "^^^lim^t^e'm^tm^''lith to W..r"
RSJSTht lliund*" "'D '" la^il>V,,k!, MaSi, .h .'.id b*otf.'WLrYad
OUR GUARANTEE. ILJ..l*"iw"TH"" '*>< n'g* *"""
,.._.__ .____.,,. saHinMtary la arsry war, r<>n n nil 11 Wl i ni, ai
ourawnaa^nd^llralnra>urmnn.7 In full lnolu.ll>>> Al.f, D.>.u-h.r.. ,>mh.H DESCRIPTION. 1&&2!2#terlfa
("liar aad bntiona io ilia naok. Mada In ahadaa ol
&r..r,.vtfrr
Waia-hi paakaY I Ibfc
W-\WE,2
SlMTaa an llnad poplin and body
arLa_wTlaararaii"LLWI
-K:
plaid saassttal.
For 42/-
t
LLWIaTHIB
-.JiiproolMasi
Haady in waar.
(SV- IIT.Sf)
, r.** "f'l '"' "arraiiiad Rainproof Malarial.
1f!SSeV^"4StF
:W""/ * inha, or aipanalra tna:
Drill
Human lasaaulir __
aMnar Droduoa fa oaaiiud to maka
a raliaMa llalnproof malarial
Iroard
r-. .....-.. Tha Draauaadan
ana raataat to lishl procurable. A thoroqiblr !
laraatorr luinmu n merr raapari. Saadr
. itilOO-Prlaa II (llii
took Uaas-i llitr r
Braaat
Langtk
IT
.OS)
lira)
SrgaaliaiS'f or St a. ,_
at > M loohaa.
11 11
!f Til"?* aUSUHSflUTS-TaDa Maaaura
akoold badrawii modaraialr aioaa. war Hablorar
lh anal, em whlah Mia llalin-oat will ba worn.
ahssats Mad* u baaaur. ft or Mo. aiira.
END ONLY 4.^,7,
in> iwfjf prr PoalOffica Caah #mi
1 Oil (ll
"uVmao
Barrio, an
and
_________raMl-
valaa wlia fonrordar
li.l
Balnooal liUha" Had* la >
I*nre ilaa la ordarad aand ORB
with Taar
alnooaloan
Dallrarr"
in dellrarr. If
lira

"i
PIOIAL HI aOaUams.
lOaUITIB lb* ' a.u....
1Mb diiriai ikT
na laal In iranall wa niidxriakc to
>ir rum
a Ikawl anaoluulr WlKB I
:i>>ui ('iiano k.
.Hf LTD. IfMaWlirH. ||4D),
UTOL.
tor "
MODUS
1 waar.

J


y
The Tribtmi, Nassau, Saturday Octobsr 7, 29/6.
L. fllLBRRT DOPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OKFICK:
Crr\r Shirley & Chivrlolte Si*
Nassau, A/. P., Co/iamai
THONB 260. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
.Monday, Wedneulay and Friday
ingle copy ......... |d
TW'day, and Thurvlaysingle copy id
ShterAysingle copy ... i|d
WeU ............ 5.1
Monthly ............is. 6d
(Juartarly...........4*. 6d
HalfYearlv............os.
Tearly ............let.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCli
Vitowlfciuf Uftte* : Ma pence per lui
|>r tin inMrtion: three pence per lin
(be scoud inlet tion ; ariiiifl8|>enny pe
Dm tor subtyuent insertions.
AflvettiAemeots under eight lines 4s.
NOTICE When "Correspondence" or
Articles are signed with the writer's name
tr initials, or wilfc a pseudonym, or are
marked "Communicated,' the Editor mutt
not necessarily be held to be in agreement
with the views therein expressed or with the
mode oj expression In such instances, or in
the case of "Letters to the Editor," insertion
only meant that the matter or point of view
M considered 0/ sufficient interest and im-
portance to warrant publication.
Zhe 'Cribune
SeL.rurdo.y. October 7 1916.
For the last few days th^
news from all fronts has been
meagre. This is usually the
prelude to great doings. We
shall wait patiently to see
whether that will turn out to
be true in this instance. A
singular silence hangs over
Greece. Perhaps the King is
delaying action as long as
possible, in the interests of
his sweet German friends.
That may prove a fatal policy
from the point of view of his
own material interests. But
perhaps "Tino" is so spiritual
that he is willing to sacrifice
even life for his great German
ideal. We however, are not
inclined to credit him thus
far. We have heard little from
the Somme lately. The next
news is likely to be inspirit-
ing The Etussians are mak-
ing a mighty effort round
Lemberg. More power to
their elbows! There is
hope in the news from Asia
Minor. It will be grand if
Russia can nw make a fur-
ther big advance towards
Constantinople.
Just what significance is
to be attached to the Allied
advance on theSaloniki front
it is hard to say.
We have been requested
to state that the Chamber of
Commerce will meet on Mon-
day evening at 5.30 to con
sider the "Our Day" scheme.
:o:
The Board of Agriculture,
will meet on Tuesday after-
noon, the 10th instant, at
half past five o'clock in their
Board Room. (Masonic Tem-
ple) to discuss remedial mea-
sures for the BlueGray fly
Citrus trees disease.
All growers of citrus fruit
and all persons interested in
the Citrus Industry, are in-
vited to attend.
:o:
We acknowledge with
thanks a copy of the "Laugh
and Grow Fat" Magazinefor
September.
"OUR DAY"
BRITISH RED CROSS'
In connection with Lord
Lansdowri's Appeal for funds on
"Our Day" on behalf of our
wounded soldiers and tailors,
we have been requested by tha
Governor to state that the fol
lowing list contains the names
to date of tht subscribers to the
British Red Cross Ambulance
Fund, 1916. Last year 3650
was contributed locally for the
purchase of four Motor Ambu-
lance Cars, in addition to 155
for general Red Cross purposes.
His Excellency hopes that it
will be possible this year to ob-
tain from those who so gener-
ously helped in 1915, and, others
the purchase money for at least
two more Motor Ambulances.
It it proposed to devote all
contributions received tor "Our
Day" other than the above, i.e ,
tliose obtained through the
Chamber of Commerce, the pro-
ceeds of the Pageant and the
Cinema Exhibition, salary or
earnings rlonated on "Our Day",
percentage on takings in houses
of business, as also the offertor
ies on "Our Day" Sunday, Ac,
to general Red Cross purposes.
RED CROSS MOTOR
AMBULANCE FUND.
The Governor and
Lady Allardyee
His Honour the Chief
Justice & Mrs.
Tudor
The Honble. the
Speaker* Mrs. Har-
court Malcolm
The Hon. J;.s. P.
Sands
Mr. C E. Bethell
I. S. J.
The Hon. Kenneth
Solomon
The Hon. LR C. &
Mrs. Young
Mr. John Cancino
Mr. Frank Holmes
The Hon. G.H. Gam-
blin
Messrs W.J. Pinder
&Co.
Mr. T. G. Johnson
TheHon.T.E.D.Brace
John S. George & Co.
Miss E. L. Johnson
Mr. W.C.B. Johnson
aoo o o
50
52 10 o
25 o o
25 o o
65 o o
10 o o
31 10 o
15 o o
550
10 o o
35 o
20 o
10
25
5
10 10
o
o
o
See that you tnke advan
tape of the bargains at Mr.
Zachary Taylor's store next
week. Look for his advertis-
mant.
Bahamian Red Cross Guild.
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT FROM SEPTEMBER 1915 TO SEPTEMBER 1916.
"594 '5 o
:or
We have pleasure in in-
serting the following:
September 18, 1916.
Dear Sir:
The Lord Mayor and the
other members of the Na-
tional Committee for Relief
in Belgium desire me to ex-
press tijeir deep gratitude for
the magnificent contribution
of 500 which has been col-
lected under the auspices of
His Excellency the Governor
and the St. Andrew Society
in the Bahamas.
We sincerely apnreciate
this substantial contribution
towards the alleviation of
the distress, which 1 regret
to say is increasing, and we
should be grateful if you
would express to His Excel-
lency, to the members of the
St. Andrew Society, and to
all those in the Bahamas
who have so generously con-
tributed, our sincere thanks.
I enclose the Hon. Treasu-
rer's formal receipt, and trust
that you will accept for your-
self our congratulations upon
the success of your kind ef-
forts.
Yours faithfullv,
W. A. M. GOODE,
Hon. Secretary.
The Hon. Jas. P. Sands,
M. E. C.
C/r.
Total amount collected
I have examined the ac-
counts of the Bahamas Red
Cross Guild and find them
to be correct, as shown by
the above Statement. The
balance in hand agrees
with the bank account.
G. H. GAMBLIN.
1264
19
Dr.
Sent to British Red Cross Society
Spent on purchase of materials
Now c/r in Bank in Nassau
G. MAUD MILLER,
Hon. Treasurer.
CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE,
President.
1000
352
12
1264
o
4
3
19
o
7
a
9
Work of the Bahamian Red Cross Guild.
YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30th, 1916.
Articles Forwarded to the British Red Cross Society
1 Parcel of Underwear, 3 Parcels to Belgians.
MUFFLERS
310
HANDKERCHIEFS
7761
TOWELS
66
SHIRTS
18
BANbAGES
205
GAUZE PADS
l33
PYJAMAS
6
WASHERS
8a 1
CARDIGA S
3
COMFORT BAGS
607
HELMETS
ao
MITTENS
9
SOCKS
363
PNEUMONIA
JACKETS
7
LINT PILLOWS
438
PILLOW CA8ES
75*
BOTTLE COVERS
OLD LINEN
8 Buud les
KETTLE HOLDERS
80
PUZZLES
4
CHEST PROTECTORS
31
WALKING STICK8
168
BUNDLES OF OLD
GLOVES
I
CUSHIONS
19
SWEATERS
5
PACKAGES OF
SWEETS
9
TOTAL 19038
L. GAMBLIN, Acting Hon. Secretary, Bahamian Red Cross Guild.
CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE, President.
CHILDREN OF THE EM-
PIRE FUND
for maimed and blind
Soldiers and Sailors.
We have been requested by
the Private Secretary to ac-
knowledge the following sum
which lias been received by His
Excellency on account of the
above Fund:
Previously acknow-
ledged i37 ,8 2
Victoria School, per
Mr. Wallace Thomp-
son and children 1 o o
138 18 a
The Ward Line S.S."Mon-
tery" left New York at 6 p.m
on Thursday the 5th with 32
passengers and 39 pkgs. for
Nassau.
*o:-
Trom Saturday, Sept. 30th.
The motor vessel "Frances
E."arrived on Saturday after-
noon from Miami, Fla. with
a cargo of shingles and shoes
and the following 9 passen-
gers:
Messrs. Daniel Fernandez
Jas. McDonald, Wm. John-
son, Wm. H. Sweeting, W. T.
Swany, Gabriel Cooper, Benj
Ferguson, Thos Malone,
Adam Rutherford. '
The Sch "Hatlie Darling"
arrived from Miami, Fla. on
Thursday morning with a
cargo of lumber and the fol
lowing 7 passengers:
Messrs. Wm. Smith, Thos.
Major, Jas. Major, Richard
Major; Mrs. S. Murry, Miss
Ivan Murry, Miss Annie In-
graham.
We desire to call attention
to the following:
UNIVERSITY OF
ST. ANDREWS, SCOTLAND
WALKER TRUST PRIZES
FOR ESSAYS ON PRAYER.
At this time of world tra-
gedy the significance of pray-
er in daily life is everywhere
becoming more widley recog-
nized, and it is felt that the
time may have come for gath-
ering together a record of the
thoughts of those who have
realized its meaning and
power and are willing to
share their experiences with
others.
With this end in view, and
with the object publishing
what may seem helpful, the
Walker Trustees invite essays
on:
Prayer : The meaning, the
reality and the power of
prayer: its place and value
to the individual, to the
Church, and to the State :
in the everyday affairs
of life, in the healing of
sickness ;ind disease : in
times of distress and of na-
tional danger, and in rela
tion to national ideals and
to world progress.
It is suggested that the
length of an essay be from
4,000 to 6,000 words but no
word limit is imposed.
A Prize of w is offered
for the most widely helpful
essayopen to anyone in any
part of the world. (Contri,
butors may write in any lan-
guage.)
Note.The Trustees may,
at their discretion, allot ad-
ditional prizes.
(Special Prizes are offered
to Students and Graduate* of
St. Andrews University.
CONDITIONS:
1. Each essay must be enclos
ed in a sealed packet, bearing
on the outside the motto se
lected by the competitor, and
the words, "Walker Trust-
Essay on Prayer(Open Prize).
The name or address of the
competitor must not appear
on essay or on the sealed
packet enclosing it, but a
sealed envelope having the
motto of the competitor on
the outside and contain
inganote of the competitor's
name and address, with a
signed declaration that the
essay is his or her own pro
duCtion, shall accompany the
essay.
2. The Walker Trustees shall
have right to publish essays
for whicfl prizes shall be
awarded, and they shall have
the sole right of publication
for the period of one year
after 1st June 1917.
3. Essays should, when prac
t.cal,beeithertyp.Writtenon
one side of the leavei, or
printed.
- i
<
A"
y


\
V
v
S
4- The Walker Trustees retain
full power to determine the
award of the prizes.
5. All essays must reach the
hands of the Secretary, The
University, St. Andrews, Scot
land, on or before 1st June
1917.
Announcement of the
award will be published in
the "Athenaeum" for October
1917. and in the "Times" of
17th October, and "British
Weekly" for the week ending
20th October, 1917.
ANDREW BENNET,
T. .. Secretary.
1 he. University,
St Andrews, May iqi6.
(Further copies of this notice
can be obtained from the
Secretary.)
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 7,1916.
(Communicated)
weddino at Harbour Island.
A very pretty wedding took
place at Haibour Island on Mon-
day nth of September, at the
Wesleyan Methodist Chapel,
when Mr. Albert Sweeting was
married to Miss Fannie Albury,
eldest and only daughter of Mr.
Alexander Albury of this place.
The Bridegroom is the youngest
son of Mr. Thomas Sweeting,
part owner of the Sclir. Admirals
Early in the morning flags and
decorations were put up by the
young men. The young boy.
had to take a trip to Nurse Bay
in a motor boat in order to get
some cedar for decorations. 'Ihe
Chapel was very nicely decorat-
ed for the event by the ladies as
sisted by the young men. The
decorations at the entrance of
the Chape as also its interior
surpassed all that was ever seen.
The ceremony was performed
by the Rev. Leonard Edge. Mr.
Eddie Albury acted as best man
and Miss Ivy Curry maid of
honour. Misses Maud Albury,
Daisy Albury and Mildred
Johnson were the bridesmaids.
Messrs Cyril Sturrup, Cyril Al-
bury, and Willie Thompson act-
ed as groomsmen. The Flower
girls were UnaThompson,Nellie
Thompson, Jeane Sweeting and
Guandelin, Bethel. The ceremo
ny was grand and effective.
Two hymns were sung. The
bride looked charming in a
white net dress, she was the
prettiest bride we have had for
many a day, no fault to be found
Much credit is due to Miss Rosa-
mond Roberts, for the neat and
stylish way she made the dress.
It fitted to perfection. She was
given away by her father. The
Chapel contained many specta
tors. After the ceremony the
happy couple proceeded toCapt.
Robert Tnompson's house, Dun
moreStreet, where they received
the congratulations of many
friends. The games were played
in Dunmore Street, because the
number of guests being so many
the house could not contain
them. They were entertained
by Mr. Stafford Johnson with his
guitar. Lots of cakes and ice
cream was given around to the
guests. At 10 o'clock the guests
much pleased, returned to their
homes.
Miss Eunice Sweeting presid
ed at the organ and furnished
the music for the occasion with
much credit.
The largest number of Bridal
presents ever received, was re
ceived at this wedding. The
number wa 147, from a silver
waiter to a half dozen glasses.
know a man is to live with
him. And I will say to know
Dr. Culmer is to deal with
him.
His manner is altogether
different from his looks. On
July 29th, my son met with
a Sad Accident which result-
ed in a broken limb. He was
examined by Dr. Pitt, and
found that his leg was brok-
en. He then recommended
me to the General Hospital
where the lad might get good
treatment.
In entering the Hospital, 1
found Dr. Culmer at his post
and he quickly hurried out
after seeing the carriage to
find out what was my trouble.
And in finding out he direct-
ed me to the ward with the
patient where he got treat-
ment beyond my expectation.
I can truthfully say that the
nurses are extremely nice;
and seem to know their bus*
iness when called upon. I
will say to my friends who
might be labouring under
the burden of prejudice
against the Hospital as I did.
But the amount of care that
is taken in this Hospital is
surprising. The diet is nicely
cooked, and served in a de-
cent way to every individual
patient; after which the nurs
es go around and see that
every one is taking it, and if
unable they will sit and feed
them.
It will pay those who nev
er visited the B.G.H. to do so
and carry their sick ones for
treatment.
I am sure Dr. Culmer can
please you as he pleased me
and I am hard to be pleased.
My boy remained in the Hos-
pital for 14 days (or two
weeks) after which Dr. Cul-
mer delivered him up to me
and his orders was to bring
him once a week for treat-
ment. 1 did so and in 8 weeks
he was well enough to walk
around. So my advice to tick
ones is to see Dr. Culmer our
great native Dr.
Thanking you for Space
Yours trulv
CJ. GIBSON.
Barber.
H he was larily reclining on a
trench bench. Just above him
was the parapet, beyond that
the narrow band of no mans
land between the Austrian and
Turkish linesthat awful space
upon which Death had already
enrolled a legion. As he dozed
a comrade passed, and jerking
his thumb carelessly upward to
the parapet, said, "We're going
over at four". It was the short
introduction to an epicthe
soldier's way of describing a feat
of the valour of which the world
has not yet ceased to speak, ^he
awful simplicity of it"loing
over at four."
'Goint'overat four"- it waspnwd alone
Like the ea-y lilt of some marching tone,
But earn brown f.ice had a (trim intent,
for the soldier knew what the warning
meant
Not the careless world, but the quirk.
e I brentli
8poke the Invitation t<> strive with death*'
That nprn space where theswift fat.- cam
A hundredfold with each sheet of flame,
With some huddled heaps on the wither-
ed grass
To mark the way that the atorjnm pass
The la,I,|01 that leads to the parapet
May reach beyond it and fu ther yet.
'I hroufih space profound to that disfant
star
Where souls ..f the lost immortals are.
Nor din of battle nor dread of ball
Mark the last parade for the last roll call
And hirhtl ;e out till that final day
When t heamp awakes ti the rceille
And the word is passed down the ranks
once in in,
Get ready Anzac, "Going over at Pour.
COLLAR
If you will give these
collars a trial and keep
track of their many
trips to the laundry you
will soon appreciate
their worth.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RKTAILEHS
CLUKTT. PBABODJT & CO.. Inc
MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. a'
C. L LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive. Agent,
The Times.
Telegrams
7th October, 191b.
Paris:On the western end
of the Macedonian front the
Serbians and Allies pushed
their lines well across the
Serbian frontier directly
south of Monastir and with
in seven miles of that city.
Petrograd:General Brussi
loff is persisting in his deter-
mined efforts to win Lemberg
[he Russians captured posi-
sitions south of Brzezany.
r Berlin:In Volhynia and
Northern Galicia UieAustro-
German armies are obstinat-
ely withstanding Russian
olfensive attacks which are
more violent than ever.
ST. JOHNS CATHEDRAL
Meeting St.
Rev. G. A. Thompson, S.T.
D., Minister. Tomorrow 11
a.m. sermon from a visiting
preacher from Andros Island.
2 p.m. a wedding. 7.30 p.m-
"The sin of malice," the last
of a series of sermons. The
public are cordially invited.
Good Music.
Oct. 6th, 1916.
The Editor "Tribune"
Dear Sir,
Will you kindly publish
this letter concerning the
treatment of my boy at the
B. G. H.
Two young women, entering a street
car. found that there was only standing
room.
"Pll soon get a seat," said one, in n
loud whisper, to her companion. "Now,
you see I
*he turned to a sedate -looking gentle-
man.
" 'y dear Mr. C.rren,'' she exclaimed,
'How delighted I am to meet vou You
are almost a stranger. Will I accept your
seat? Well. I do feel tired. Thank vou
so much!"
The man aroce.
"Sit down, Jane my girl," said he, as he
courteously pointed to the vacant seat.
"You're not often out on washing day.
You must feel tired, I'm sure I How's
your mistress?"
Going* Over at Four
The curt current phrases of
rank and file in or on the eve of
action are often more dramatic
than the finest superlatives that
historian or war correspondent
have applied to battle. A ser-
geant of the Anzacs told me
Petrograd:-In Turkish
Armenia Grand Duke Nicho-
las continues successfully his
new offensive west and south
west of Trebizonde. The
I inks are being driven back
towards the River Karshut.
Sofia: The Russians and
Roumanians have failed to
force Von Mackensens line
in Dobrudja.
London:The British on
theSomme frot gained ground
along the Pozieres-Bapaume
road.
Paris reports only activity
on the French section of the
Somrae front.
Thp German Crown Prince
has resumed active hostilities
at Verdun where there ishea
vy artillery fire.
Sir, it is an old adage toithat on a quiet day on Gallipo-
London:The Cunard Line
steamer Franconia has been
sunk. She was employed in
the government service. The
British steamer Isle of Hast-
ings, the Greek steamer
Samos and the Norweigian
steamer Cedric also have
been sunk.
Berlin:The Roumanians
in Transylvania have been
defeated by General Fatten-
hevm.
"OUR UNHAPPY DIVISIONS
SERMON FOR THE
SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY
AFTER TRINITY.
Ephesians iv, 46. "There is
one body and one Spirit, even
as ye are called in one hope
of your Calling. One Lord,
one faith, one baptism. One
God and Father of all, Who
is above all, and through all,
and in you all "
The world is full of disunion
and divisions. These have
brought about the present ter
nble war. Unhappily the spi
rit of disunion has invaded and
rent asunder the Church, so that
at the present time the One
body founded by Christ and
His Apostles is rent into hun-
dreds of opposing sects and de-
nominations.
This spirit of schism was al-
ready working in the Church
when St. Paul wrote hie. letter
to the Christians in Kphesus.
So he lays down tae principles
of religious unity.
I. There is One Body. Our
Loid could not have founded
two churches, much less two
hundred The word "church
es" (in the plural) is only used
in the New Testament to de-
note branches of the same
Church, such as the churches in
Jerusalem, Rome and Antioch
The word is never used of sep-
arate and opposing bodies of
Christians, as in the case now-
a-days. The Apostles|would be
astonished and grieved if they
saw our present "unhappy di
visions (as they are called in
the Book of Common Prayer).
As there can only be one soul
in one human body, so, says St.
Paul, There is On< Body and One
Spirit. All the baptized are
members of that Budv. The
same Holy Spirit give's Grace
to each member, and every one
has the same blessed hope
One hope of your calling, Our
present religious divisions are
as if the hand should refuse to
help the head, or the feet re
fuse to carry the hands. Our
unity with Christ our Head is
intended to be perfect. Thus
the Apostle continues to harp
on the word "one" :
II. One Lord, One Faith, One
Baptism, One God and Father.
First.our unity In in our One
Lord, who is the one Sacrifice
for the sins of the whole world.
fl Christ divided? asks the
Apostle. Oh that Christians
would pause in their disputes
to give an answer I Secondly,
theic is One Faith, the Faith
saints. Christ intends that
there shall be one Holy Faith
for all time, and throughout all
the earth. What a scandal it
is before the heathen and other
unbelievers that those who
nominally profess to hold the
One Faith should not really do
so. This is one reason why
foreign missions aie so slow in
winning the nations for Cnrist
for He prayed in P.is last great
earthly prayer Father . grant
that they all may be one ....
that the world may believe.
Thirdly, the Apostle speaks
of One Baptism.
1. Because all aie united in-
to the One NameFather, Son,
and Holy Ghost
2. Baptism is One, because
it is that which Christ appoint-
ed and is not mans invention.
3- Because theie can be but
One Spirit in the One Body of y
which Baptism makes us mem-
bers.
4- Because when baptism has
once been administered it ecu
'ever be repealed. As we can
only be born once into h,e, so
Baptism is our one new Birth
into God's Church and King-
dom of Grace.
It is therefore an act of sacri-
lege if a person who already
bas been solemnly baptised
should consent to be re-baptis-
ed. Such an act would have
filled the Apostles with horror
This is what the Church means
when it states in the ancient
Creed "I believe in onk bap
tum for the remission of sins.
III. One God and Father oj all,
that is, God in the unity o| t|,e
Blessed Trinily. The Three.-
in One Godhead is the fount of
unity. We cannot imagine
disunion in the Godhead ; and
those who are truly united to
the Trinity by their member
hip with Jesus Christ, are sol
emnly called to bring this unity
into fhe Church, and to pro
mote it in a sin divided world.
To sum up the teaching of
this chapter :
St. Paul exhorts all Chris
tians to keep the bond of peace
for the following seven reasons;
1. Because there is but One
Body, of which we aie mem
hers.
2. Because the Holy Spirit,
in this Body, is but One.
3. Because we have the same
One Hope in Christ, of the re
surrection.
4. Because the holy Faith,
revealed to us, is but One.
5. Because we have but One
Lord and Saviour.
6. Because we have been
made members of one family
and born afresh by the Holy
Spirit in the One Baptism.
7- Because there is One God
and Father in whom we live and
move and have our being.
It is the bounden duty of nil
Christian people to pray for
the removal of "our unhappy
divisions", and to do all in
their power to bring about re
union, in the One Body, of all
who are baptized into the Bles
sed Tri.iity.
BARGAINS
BARGAINS
At Zachary Taylors
STORE
8 10 Market Street
pOI.Ot'RED Crepes and
V-/ Swiss 36 to 40 inches
wide at onjy 6d. por yard.
12 hair pins in pkgs. for only
a half penny. White Voiles
and Swiss at only 6d. per
vard. Don't miss this sale
which begins Monday niorn-
' is vim rairn, in$ vaitn ing.
which was once delivered to th\ Oct 5th.
)


w*m*a*w
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday October 7,1916.
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
LIMITED.
Authorized Capital 5,000
-------------LOW KATES FOB------------
WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and atistactory Adjustments of Claims.
Home Office:264 Bay Street, Nassau.
CRYSTAL ICE
OUR PLANT is now able to supply'all the Ice neces-
sary for home consumption and to let the public
share in the benefit. Our prices have been
reduced as follows :
12 lbs. at 4*d.
24 9d.
48 Is. 6d.
100

c<
8s.
It is our duty to protect home industries and the
figures listed above are intended to give the public an ad-
vantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed.
Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor
will receive prompt and courteous attention.
DEPOTS.
Hay St. City, The Ice House.
E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week.
Shirley St. H. J. Claridges'Grocery Store, open today
East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store,
open next week.
Baillou Hill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open
next week.
HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON,
Prop.
T
Keeping Guard
HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these
preserving the balance of trade.
-THI
SHOE STOIE
is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
With these reinforcements he Big Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man
kets abroad.
G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Biff 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 18s
per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market5 360c
"Primes" Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our
same guarantee as the Bests.'
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Alsocheaper grade in stock
April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDBRS.

(Continued from 1st page)
A Great Adventure
and an Anecdote-
1 remember well the first time
lie returned home from that ex
pedition. His companions
were Lord Reading and Sir
Charles Henry.
And when he came back he
said at once to all his friends
that it was going to be a long
war and a difficult war, and
that we must put all our
strength into it it we were go-
ing to win it. "Yes," I said,
"we must set our teeth." "Ay,"
was his reply, "and perhaps
tighten our belt6."
The Title. "Shells.
Shells. Shells "
This conversation took place
in the November of 1914. I was
shocked; I was even a little in-
credulous when Mr. Lloyd
George spoke to me like that
remember I am talking of near-
ly two years ago. Probably he
perceived that, for he reminded
me that, by temperament, he
was a sanguine man, an incur
able optimist, and that if he
spoke thus pessimisticallyif a
realisation of fact can be tiuly
described as pessimisticit was
because he had proofs of what
he said. It was as far back as
that, too, that Mr. Lloyd George
spoke to me of the part that big
guns and innumerable shells
would play in the war. But the
big guns were not coming, nor
the big shells. In these tones he
spoke to me whenever I -aw
him, until at last, one morning
in the month of March, 1915, he
drew such a picture of what
part munitions would play in
this war, that I could stand it
no longer; and at a St. Patrick's
Day celebration among my own
constituents I made a speech to
which I gave myself the title,
"Shells, Shells, Shells." How
commonplace, how obvious, it
all seems now; yet how hard it
was to get it into the mind of
the nationat least, into the
mindsof her rulersa year ago.
AN EARLY BIRD AND A ORE AT QOLFER.
What sort of a life does this
man lead who has responsibili-
ties so heavy? It is a life of
continuous work. It begins
early in the morningsome-
times too early, for now and
then over work and over anxie
ty inteifere with his sleep, and
at five or six o'clock he is star
ing awake. He then turns to
some of the papers beside his
bed, and begins his work when
he ought to be asleep. In olden
days he had always his Saturday
and Sunday at Walton Heath;
and on Saturdays he played
golf all day long with the same
keenness as he gives to every
occupation. Now he rarely gets
to Walton Heath till late on
Saturday, Sometimes he is very
tired; sometimes thatextranrdi
nary power of recuperation he
has finds him fresh even at the
end of a week. He sees hit
friends at certain hours; at
others he throws himself into a
hammock or sits across two
chairs, and makes up for his ar
rears in sleep. If you want to
see him at his best you must go
to Walton Heath and watch
him among his friends. The
simplicity and modesty which
he retains amid all his dazzling
changes of fortune have left him
the same pleasant, unpretin
tious, genial companion he was
in the days of his obscurity, and
accounts largely for the person
al popularity he enjoys. Walton
Heath is one of the best places
for sleep in the United Kingdom,
and even the day and a half he
spends there weekly make a
great difference to him.
FORTUNE'S IFAVOURITE.
Such is the man on whose
shoulders is borne the heavy
burden of this war. The energy,
the cheerfulness, and the courage
which he has retained through
aH these trying years justify the
confidence the nation has in his
powtr to win through. He is
fortune's favourite child; and it
is just like his luckthough
luck has had little to do with it
that from the moment he en-
tered the War Office the turn of
the military tide has come; and
we all take up our papers with
the hope, and almost the cer-
tainty, that it will bring us news
of another milestone passed on
the road to resounding Victory.
T. P.'s Journal, Aug. 1916.
i ? v
NOTICE
THE Recruiting Committee
are again enlisting men
for Drafts for the Bahamas
Contingent. Applicants will
be attended to between 8 a.m.
and 4 p.m. at the Command-
ant's Office at the Barracks.
Enlist now as
the vessel for Jamaica
will be leaving early
in November.
R. H. C. CRAWFORD
Commandant.
MlttrmJCkM
W/W.IM..'>l..,|- **.
A
Special
Appeal
on Behalf of Baby
Naturally a Healthy Mother
t should feed her own child, and no cause, save inability,
should prevent her doing no. But there are many
mothers who, though willing, cannot wholly or even
partially, nurse their children. Either they have do
milk for them, or it is poor in quality and deficient
in sus/'uianeo.
The Question then arises
what food should be given to Baby. Carefully consider
this highly important point Remember, that the
right food, given at the proper ago will lay a sura
foundation for future health and happiness. Ordinary
cow's milk is totally unsuitable as a food for young
infants; it is acid, contains indigestible curd and is
frequently swarming with dangerous germs, especially
in summer time. FarinaceousFoodsmustnotbegiven.as
a child under six months of age cannot digest starch.
A Satisfactory Solution
of the difficult problem of feeding children by hand is
provided by using the 'Allenburys' Foods. Prepared
as directed, these pure Foods closely resemble healthy
mother's milk in composition, nutritive value and
digestibility. They are the outcome of prolonged
scientific investigation, carried out with all the resource*
of wide manufacturing facilities and experience.
Decide to use
the 'Allenburys' Foods. By so doing the many serious
ailments which follow the use of unsuitable food will
be avoided, and Baby will be equipped with sound
health and strength.
The Method of Simplicity and Certainty
*MenburgsF MILK FOOD No. I. MILK FOOD No. 2. MALTED FOOD No. 3.
Fran birth o J month* Froa j to 6 months. From 6 mooihe upward*.
The Allenburyi' Rusks (Malted).
A oaaful addition to baby's dietary when 10 monibi old and aftwr.
The 'Allenburya' Foods are made under special precast
by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand.
WTWrlf Imr free * "Infant ara/n anaf M.n.femsaf"
4 navea of valajaala Inlc-mallan lor ever-r mmlhmr.
Allen & Hanburys Ltd., London, England.
A.D. 1715. EetabW-ad 200 Years. AJD. 1915.
<
JOHN BUTLER
Office: 367 Bay St., East
'Phone 245
Commission Merchant! Auctioneer and
Real Estate Agent
V
EXPORTER
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
-----------------AGENT-----------------
NORWCIH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
/


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