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% I I .1 — L. OILBKKT UUI'UCH, Editor and Proprietor. OPPIOK: Carrier Shirley 6. Charlolle Si. \assau, N. P., Bahamas PHONK 200. !. p. BOX 163 PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Weo.nee.iay and Friday— SMflecowr Inesday, and Thursday—single o>py *lw4y -tingle Copy Months ." ui(ily ... • IfYearly Yrlv We note that after many years of faithful and efficient service the Hon. T. Vincent Matthews has resigned his position as Receiver General and retired on a well earned ii. It ul %  1*1 5-' 6.1 6d A lenglity programme con sisting of songs, recitations and dialogues, was very credibly rendered. The singing was melodious and the dialogues excited considerable laughter. Mr. Samuel A. Ferguson , ,, \ %  c i\ir. Samuel A. rergusnn depension from he Public Ser| s rves much credit fl f r traini n.^ill T!, ngS t he P'"" to such a high pitch. PAYAHLK IN ADVANOK *#rMng Rate* :—.- %  m _|.ei line t insertion; three pence |.ei line ft OH(l IIIMI t|, m ; ai.J lfnC|.eilil> |„ i ne for siiDajueiii insertions. AflTeitiseinants utuiej ei-l.t lines .,-,. NOTICE-When "Correspondenceor Articles are sigud with the writer's name er initials, or^ith a pseudonym, or are marhed "Communicated," the Editor mutt not necessarily be held to be in agreement with the uifios therein expressed or with the mode of expression It such instances.or in the case of "Letters to the Editor," insertion only means that the matter or point of view •t considered of sufficient interest and importance to warrant publication. Vbe {Tribune Thursday. October 5 1916, ^—-—•— rn_ ^__ The Great Russian General firusilofi has recently stat td in an interview with the Correspondent of an linglish paper that he hopes the War will be over in August next year. He says this with caution, but the important point is that a General of his calibre should say it at all. Another Correspondent in Russia says that the Russian expectation is to see the whole Balkan end of the War cut out before the end of this year. Next Spring would then witness a mighty concentration of force against the arch-sinner Germany. We are longing for the time when this ghoulish foe shall feel the weight of a terrible retribution. Really, the revelations that continually come in of her calculated ferocities make us feel that only when her pride has been humbled and she has learned sympathy through suffering, will she be fit to take a place again among the civilized nations. to the Bahamas and we are glad that one of ourselves rose by sheer merit and hard work to be head of so important a Department. We note that another Bahamian P. W. D. Armbrister, Esq has been provisionally appointed in place of Mr. Matthews. We extract the following from the "Dawlish Gazette" of Saturday, i6th September. It will be remembered that Dr. Lawyer was in our city just a few months ago. •'Dr. Annie Lawyer, of Ontario Canada, who is slaying with friends, the Misses Mai man, at 13 Barton Crescent, Dawlish, went up to London last week and signed on with the War OfTice for medical duty at Mai ta." —:o:— Really, some motor car drivers are a danger to the public. This morning a certain young man racing along Shirley Street must have seen a woman in front of him. He never dreamed of blowing the motor horn and shaved the woman so close as to knock a tray she was carrying right out of her hands. After doing this he never even troubled to look back. Bah." —:o: — The usual weekly Concert by the Police Rand will be given this even on the Library Green. Mr. Thompson the Public School Teacher was present and gave a very interesting address. Addresses were also given by other gentlemen that were pres ent and the hearty singing of the National Anthem, brought that very enjoyable evening to a close. I am Yours. A VISITOR A German Jew was arrested in Huston not long ago, says Everybody's, and when he was taken to the police Station his condition wasiound to be so un clean that he was oiderrd to take a bath. "Vot! Go in de rater?" he asked. "Yes, take a bath. You need it. How long is it since you had a bath, anyway?" With his hands aligned upward and outward he answer ed,"l nefer vas arrested before! Once an old lady was being shown over Nelson's ship Victory. As the party approach ed the spot whera Nelson met his death, thcattandant pointed to the brass plate fixed in the deck and said: "That is where Nelson fell." The old lady was impressed, but not in the right u a\. "Nowondeif" she said, "f nearly tripped over that thing myseif."—New York Time* IB Farmer's Hill, Exuma The Editor of The Tribune Dear Sir, Kindly publish the following in the columns of your paper : On the night of the 17th inst. the Superintendent of the Sunday School at this settlement gave a fin* entertainment. At o'clock the curtain dropped. 7 Ihere were a large number of r ,.,„,.„ ,, visitors present, and every one sufficient men were sent across October 4th, 1916. London, a:—The invasion of Bulgaria by Roumanian trnnps between Rustchuk and Tortukai was made under fire of the enemys guns. This move is consider eda most important one. Jusl how many men were thrown across the river is not disclosed but the strategic value of the maneuvre is seemingly two-fold qo miles eastward of Turtukai lies Varna the chief seaport of Bulgaria on the Black Sea. If enjoyed themselves to the full. [ the border and are marched a long the' Dobiudja-Bulgarian frontier towards Varna not alone would ihc seaport be in danger but the movement wuuld con stitute a serious menace towards the isolation of the German Bulgaiinn-Turkish forces oper ating against the Roumanians on the north. Simultaneously wilh the cress ingofthe Danube comes a re port from Bukarcst that4| fresh attackalong the entire Dobrudja front has resulted in the defeat of the center and right flanks of the troops of the Central Powers The Roumanians on both sides of the Great Kokul River in Transylvania have advanced •gainst the Teuton!, while west ward in the viciniry of Ossoca and near Petroseny the AuslroI lungarians have captured posi tions from the Roumanians. The fighting in Galiria has resulted in successes for the ^eutons in the northeast and for the Russians in the southeast. According to reports from Berlin and Vienna the Teutons have recaptured ground lost in Saturdays fighting and made prisoners 2306 Russians. The Russians in the Narayuvka Zlota Lipa sector repulsed vicious attacks oi the Teutons inflicting heavy casualties. Little news of the fighting in Macedonia is to be had. Both sides apparently are continuing their attacks and counter at lacks with no important advan tnge to either. Aside from bombardments which are especially severe on the Carso Plateau little fighting is taking place on the AustroItalian front. The entire crew of the Zep pelin which was brought down in flames Sunday, near London, perished. London:-A number of Norwegian steamers have been sunk by a German submarine which has reached the Arctic Sea. The Germans have sunk Norwegian steamers valued at |g. 000.000 up to date. New York:-Tacit admission is made by labour leaders that the attempts tocreteat a sjfoipa thetic strike in aid of theJrrike ing street car men has failed. —:o:— 5th October", 1916. Paris:—The French captured a strongly fortified German defensive on the Somme front be



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* tween Morval and St. Pierre Vaast Wood. Loodon:— On the Somme fronl the town ofEaucourt l'Ab baye has been entirely taken by the British after several days fighting. On the Greek Macedonian front the British have advanced on tin west bank of the Struma and captured part of the Village of YeoMeni. The Bulgarians cnuntet-attacked thrice. The fighting continues. Inquest into the death of the crew of the Zeppelin destroyed Sunday shows that 19 bodies have been recovered. It is reported from Vienna that Emperor Francis Joseph is seriously ill from bronchitis. Men are urgently needed for the armies and munition factories says a statement from the rrnri power distribution board which directs that certain class es heretofore exempt be no longer exempted. The board is considering the employment of women, and men over military age. Berlin: —An tncircling movement by Von Mackensen compelled the Roumanians to hasti ly recross the Danube between Ruslchuk and Turtukai. The Teutonic Allies gained ground wcstofObosse height. I'lie Russians continue to fiercely assault the Auslro Ger mans Prince Leopold defeated the Russians heavily west of Lutsk. Strong French attacks on the Somme front, near St Pierre Vaast were repulsed as were British attacks near Thitpval and Moquet Farm. Bukarest:—The Roumanians defeated the Teutons near Fog ares, Transylva.iia. They were also victorious in the region of OJorkim. Rome:—The Italians repulsed several attacks against southern heights in Travignolo Astico Valley then counter attacked the northern slopes of Colbricon gaining new ground toward the mountain. Tokio:— The Emperor has requesteiOount Saki Terauchi former war\^]nister to form a new cabinet. Washington:—Navy yard bids for construction of new ships show prices to be 33 per cent higher than those offered last December. 5th October, 1916. London, 3rd:— Never were such a number of planes em ployed and never did they play such an important pa'rt as in the battle of the Somme. The was tage of British planes at the front has been supplied by new planet flown across the Channel from England where, after coming from the factory, they were tested out at a home aero drome. The record time in crossing the Channel at its narrowest point, 822 miles, is 8 minutes. When the Associated Press correspondent who was in Lon don for a day's leave from the fiont asked a certain general at the war office for permission to fly back instead Of returning by boat, train and automobile the answer was, "Perfectly easy", and to prove it he called up the commander of the flying corps and in five miuutesall was ar ranged over the telephone. Birmingham, 3rd:—In his ad dress before t he Congregational Union Viscount Bryce said, in part: "If there is to be a recurrence of wars, becoming more terrible with the increasing march of science, we may well despair of the future". Ho recalled that Premier Asquith, Sir Edward Grey and Mr Malfour had expressed energeti cally andsinceiely the need of a league such as he had suggested and said that severa groups of thinkers were at work on the plans. "To establish any machinery for perserving peace,'' continued Lord Bryce, "would be impossible without the co-operation of the neutral states, and espec ially the greatest of all neutral states. We have betn writing and watching to see if America would depart from her old policy of complete isolation and bear her part in the effort for securing a permanent alliance for peace. An influential league for that purpose has already been form ed there and now two momen tous events have happened on which I dwelt because they have been little noticed here. President Wilson delivered four months ago a powerful and luminous speech in which he announced that the United States could not stand aloof from a movement in which the highest interests humanity were concerned and that he felt sure the people of the United States were prepared to join in ar.y feasible schemt for the preven tion of future vrars." London, 3rd. —Although the Roumanians continue to gain ground against the Austro Germans at various points in Transylvania the situation in Dobrudja which attained added interest since the crossing of the Danube into Bulgaria by Roumanian forces remains un certain. Bukarest says that violent fighting continues all along the lines south of the railway running from Constanza to the Danube with the Teutons offering stubborn resistance to the Roumanian and Russian lorces. Nothing is vouchsafed however concerning the troops which invaded Bulgaria. Sofia says the Roumanians who made their way across the Danube were several bat talions, and Berlin reports the destruction behind them of the pontoon bridges by which they crossed. An unofficial despatch from Rome says that field Marshal Von Mackensen has ordered the evacuation of Debruja for tresses of Silistra and Turukai recently captured by the Teutons in the fear of their being enveloped by the Rou manians. Heavy rains are interfering with the operations of the British and French on the Somme front but nevertheless Paris records the capture of an important trench north of Kancourt and the taking of more prisoners while London reports show that the fighting in the vicinity of Eaucourt l'Abbaye is proceeding satisfactorily. Violent fighting has been in progress west of Lutsk and in Galicia in the region of the ZIota Lipa River. According to Petrograd neither the Russians nor Teu tons have been able to gain any marked advantages west of Lutsk. FOUND. I N a Carrage yesterday—a purse containing money. Owner can enquire at /'TRIBUNE" Office. PROFESSIONAL ANNOUNCEMENTDR. W. R LAMB, American Oculist and Optician wishes to announce to the citizens of New Providence that he intends to visit Nassau again in October and will have as usual superior faculities for attending to the eyes and correcting defecetiv vision. * % NOTICE T HE Recruiting Committee are again enlistlfeg men for Drafts for the Bahamas Contingent. Applicants will be attended to between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the Commandant's Office at the Barracks. Enlist now as the vessel for Jamaica will be leaving early in November. R. H. C.XRAWFORD Commandant. FOP Sale H OUSE and lot No. 58 Delancy St. Apply to the owner on the Premises. • MRS. BOSFIELD NOTICE A NY person having any claim against the Estate of Joseph Wallace deceased will present their accounts, and any person indebted to the Said Joseph Wallace will make payment to Jacob Bethel Exector. Sept. 19th 1916 There are above 40,000 people of my race in the Bahamas, therefore why should I worry. Instead. I shall simply remain, Yours faithfully, DR. J.A.WRIGHT (Dentist.) 37 Market Street, Nassau, N. P. Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays, 9 to 11 a.m.



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Heat—Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. pep tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House THE MOST STRIKING feature of the POLAR BEAR is its beautiful white coat, which is in keeping with the whiteness of its surroundings in the Arctic regions. The snow in those regions, however, is not whiter than clothes washed with SUNLIGHT SOAP. < The beauty of SUNLIGHT SOAP is in i'.s purity, and the easy way in which it releases dirt from clothes, without injury to the fabric no matter how fine it may be. It is manufactured with the purest materials and there is ,£1,000 Guarantee of Purity on every bar. Try it on your Nert Wh-uy. t Bicycles for Sale, Hire and Repaired. CRYSTAL ICE O UR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice necessary for home consumption nd to let the public share in the benefit. Our prices have been reduced as follows :— lbs at 4;d. 12 24 48 100 < << • Is 3s. 6d. Don't grope in the dark—turn night into day. Large stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs. W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St. Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, LIMITED. Authorized Capital £6,000 LOW RATES FOB It is our duty lo protect home industries and the figures listed above rue Intended to give the public an advantage that thrv have not hitherto enjoyed. Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor will receive prompt and courteous attention. DEPOTS. Nay St. City, The Ice House. E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week. Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store, open next week. Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open next week. HAROLD E. M JOHNSON, Prop WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and atisfactory Adjustments of Claims. HOME OFFICE: — 264 Bay Street, Nassau. The Tribune for Modern Printing.



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* "News FOP Everybody" tibnm Nulllua addict. !• |urr In varba mnttlatrl Being bound to awea.r lo the Do|m&i of no Muster. '"I VOL. XIII Namu N.P.. B&hkmM. THURSDAY October 5.1916 He. 279 4b4_ Britain's Ship Yards Busiest in The World. London, Aug. n,—(Correspondence of The Associated i'ress—There is a certain small section of British water-froni where mure ships Hre under con i struction today than the entire shipbuilding facilities of any other nation could undertake at one time. They include every type of craft from submarines to battleships and from steam trawlers to Atlantic liners. Most governments lay down their battleships and cruisers singly, and the lesser craft per haps in pairs, but here battle %  hips loom up as twins light vruisers by the half dozeu, des treyers in rows of ten, with • ii'iny braces of long submarines, and an occasional monitor. The war fleet under the ham mer and the paint brush here would rank in the naval list above the establishments of several modest maritime powers It could demolish the two squad rons which fought the battle of M-inila Bay with o.ie volley, and then steam against the combin ed American and Spanish fleets of Santiago with confidence. And the merchant ships in the stocks are as many as the United States mercantile marine has added to its register in several years. TRINCD CREWS READY TO MAN. "We have trained crews ready to sttttron board all these ships as sorf?;-as they are fitted," a naval dnWef remarktd. Under tutelage of Hugh Law, Nationalist member of parlia ment for West Donegal, a party of correspondents spent a crowd ed day on land, on water and on ships in dock, at this base. They saw some things which they are not permitted to des cribe in detail, and many things which they cannot describe for lack of technical knowledge; lor the ordinary man the visit furnished mostly illumination upon the vast scale on which sea po w er is arranged, and upon the kind of men who manage it, and their hard but cheerful lives. The general stage setting for this swift review of the fighting ami trading vessels under con struction consisted of several miles of water front lines as thickly as could be crowded with skeletons and hulls. The stocks carried everything of the final type—until next year, or next week, for every nnvnl cam paign means new ideas, new devices, new lines of construe tion. Two years of active service under war conditions have brought a great advance to the British navy, already acknow ledged to be leader in most na val matters. Every ship, is the last woid in its class, eccord ing to the war bought judge ment of engineers and fighting officers. In one noticeable de tail at least British naval archi tecls appear to have been con vetted to the principal of one feature of American warships. Monitor* Still Valuable Craft. The monitors make appeal to an American because there is a suspicion that other navies were disposed to scoff at them for years. Yet here they are, with all their superficial changes and embellishments, a tribute to what the brain of John Fricesson conceived in the sixties. The monitors have been very useful to the British navy in this war. They have been employed in the shnllow waters off the coast of Belgium, and even more effectively at Gallipoli. The correspondents there described them fully. Two or three strata of the outlying hull may be penetrating by torpedoes, and the monitor can still keep at woik with her guns. There were several so-called destroyers certainly as long as many light cruisers of earlier times, roof them extended side by side in one row, and others elsewhere. Just where the super destroyer leaves off and the light cruiser begins is not a matter of length today. Beyond the destroyers was a line of long, thin skeletons of submarines, whose size could not be judged at all accurately in a passing view, even if it could be reported. Compared with the now old-fashioned submarine they are as the Aquitania to the Philadelphia. Polished tv a fcev* Motor Car. Floating alongside a dock was a brand new submarine, painted and polished like a touring car fresh from the shop Her young commander stood alongside and proudly pointed out some of her attractions. From his transparent enthusiasm she mij,lit have been a pleasure yacht instead of the vehicle for the most dangerous form of adventure that fighting men undertake. "Of course we are not in the same class with Horton and Holbrook,'* he explained, "but I hope you will hear something from X Seven teen" pointing to the number painted on the turret. He observed also that this thing could submerge in 20 seconds. The shipbuilding district was a realm of private enterprises, factories and yards where rich firms carry on their own work independently and with no visi bla traditions of discipline, and no outward signs of professional comradeship, except perhaps in the luxurious offices decorated with models of dead and gone ships dating from eras of wooden and iron hulls, where the directors entertain their friends in peaceful times and now by brief but earnest after lunch speech gave unneeded assurances they were working as hard as the men who wear gold braid. Beatty'e Squad of Ships. The trip included a view of Beatty's battleship spuadron. There they were—and that it about all that can be said. They were prepared to steam for action at five minutes' notice and they did not care to steam for action with a cargo of newspaper men and a Nationalist member of parliament. Two destroyers conveyed the visitors around the squadron. There was considerable fresh paint visible in splashes, more on the German officially sunk Warspit than elsewhere, but what that meant in the way of damage was Greek to the out sider. Two facts impressed an American. That the command ers of the larger ships averaged about 10 years younger than the commanders of ships of the same class in the American navy, and the numberand vari ty and adaptability of the sup ply craft, the navys commissary department. The only thing approaching leasure discovered was on some of the destroyers. These sea scouts work in shifts. Four days on active duty (a very active duty), foilr days in port ready to start at the drop of the I at, and four days outfitting with more or less shore leave, is their pro gram. — The New York Times Advertise in fht Tribune.


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02710
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, October 05, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02710

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Full Text
*
"News Fop Everybody"
tibnm
Nulllua addict.! |urr In varba mnttlatrl
Being bound to awea.r lo the Do|m&i of no Muster.
'"I
VOL. XIII
Namu N.P.. B&hkmM. THURSDAY October 5.1916
He. 279
4b4-
_
Britain's Ship Yards Busiest in
The World.
London, Aug. n,(Corres-
pondence of The Associated
i'ressThere is a certain small
section of British water-froni
where mure ships Hre under con i
struction today than the entire
shipbuilding facilities of any
other nation could undertake
at one time. They include every
type of craft from submarines
to battleships and from steam
trawlers to Atlantic liners.
Most governments lay down
their battleships and cruisers
singly, and the lesser craft per
haps in pairs, but here battle
hips loom up as twins light
vruisers by the half dozeu, des
treyers in rows of ten, with
ii'iny braces of long submarines,
and an occasional monitor.
The war fleet under the ham
mer and the paint brush here
would rank in the naval list
above the establishments of
several modest maritime powers
It could demolish the two squad
rons which fought the battle of
M-inila Bay with o.ie volley, and
then steam against the combin
ed American and Spanish fleets
of Santiago with confidence.
And the merchant ships in the
stocks are as many as the United
States mercantile marine has
added to its register in several
years.
TRINCD CREWS READY TO
MAN.
"We have trained crews ready
to sttttron board all these ships
as sorf?;-as they are fitted," a
naval dnWef remarktd.
Under tutelage of Hugh Law,
Nationalist member of parlia
ment for West Donegal, a party
of correspondents spent a crowd
ed day on land, on water and
on ships in dock, at this base.
They saw some things which
they are not permitted to des
cribe in detail, and many things
which they cannot describe for
lack of technical knowledge;
lor the ordinary man the visit
furnished mostly illumination
upon the vast scale on which
sea po w er is arranged, and upon
the kind of men who manage
it, and their hard but cheerful
lives.
The general stage setting for
this swift review of the fighting
ami trading vessels under con
struction consisted of several
miles of water front lines as
thickly as could be crowded
with skeletons and hulls. The
stocks carried everything of the
final typeuntil next year, or
next week, for every nnvnl cam
paign means new ideas, new
devices, new lines of construe
tion.
Two years of active service
under war conditions have
brought a great advance to the
British navy, already acknow
ledged to be leader in most na
val matters. Every ship, is the
last woid in its class, eccord
ing to the war bought judge
ment of engineers and fighting
officers. In one noticeable de
tail at least British naval archi
tecls appear to have been con
vetted to the principal of one
feature of American warships.
Monitor* Still Valuable Craft.
The monitors make appeal to
an American because there is a
suspicion that other navies were
disposed to scoff at them for
years. Yet here they are, with
all their superficial changes
and embellishments, a tribute
to what the brain of John
Fricesson conceived in the six-
ties. The monitors have been
very useful to the British navy
in this war. They have been
employed in the shnllow
waters off the coast of Belgium,
and even more effectively at
Gallipoli. The correspondents
there described them fully. Two
or three strata of the outlying
hull may be penetrating by
torpedoes, and the monitor can
still keep at woik with her guns.
There were several so-called
destroyers certainly as long as
many light cruisers of earlier
times, roof them extended side
by side in one row, and others
elsewhere. Just where the super
destroyer leaves off and the
light cruiser begins is not a
matter of length today. Beyond
the destroyers was a line of long,
thin skeletons of submarines,
whose size could not be judged
at all accurately in a passing
view, even if it could be report-
ed. Compared with the now
old-fashioned submarine they
are as the Aquitania to the
Philadelphia.
Polished tv a fcev* Motor Car.
Floating alongside a dock
was a brand new submarine,
painted and polished like a
touring car fresh from the shop
Her young commander stood
alongside and proudly pointed
out some of her attractions.
From his transparent enthus-
iasm she mij,lit have been a
pleasure yacht instead of the
vehicle for the most dangerous
form of adventure that fighting
men undertake. "Of course we
are not in the same class with
Horton and Holbrook,'* he ex-
plained, "but I hope you will
hear something from X Seven
teen" pointing to the number
painted on the turret. He ob-
served also that this thing could
submerge in 20 seconds.
The shipbuilding district was
a realm of private enterprises,
factories and yards where rich
firms carry on their own work
independently and with no visi
bla traditions of discipline, and
no outward signs of professional
comradeship, except perhaps in
the luxurious offices decorated
with models of dead and
gone ships dating from eras
of wooden and iron hulls, where
the directors entertain their
friends in peaceful times and
now by brief but earnest after
lunch speech gave unneeded as-
surances they were working as
hard as the men who wear
gold braid.
Beatty'e Squad of Ships.
The trip included a view of
Beatty's battleship spuadron.
There they wereand that it
about all that can be said. They
were prepared to steam for ac-
tion at five minutes' notice and
they did not care to steam
for action with a cargo of news-
paper men and a Nationalist
member of parliament.
Two destroyers conveyed the
visitors around the squadron.
There was considerable fresh
paint visible in splashes, more
on the German officially sunk
Warspit than elsewhere, but
what that meant in the way of
damage was Greek to the out
sider. Two facts impressed an
American. That the command
ers of the larger ships averaged
about 10 years younger than
the commanders of ships of the
same class in the American
navy, and the numberand vari
ty and adaptability of the sup
ply craft, the navys commissary
department.
The only thing approaching
leasure discovered was on some
of the destroyers. These sea
scouts work in shifts. Four days
on active duty (a very active
duty), foilr days in port ready to
start at the drop of the I at, and
four days outfitting with more
or less shore leave, is their pro
gram.
The New York Times
Advertise in
fht Tribune.


% I -_____________________I .1______'
L. OILBKKT UUI'UCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OPPIOK:
Carrier Shirley 6. Charlolle Si.
\assau, N. P., Bahamas
PHONK 200. !. p. box 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Weo.nee.iay and Friday
SMflecowr .........
Inesday, and Thursdaysingle o>py
*lw4y -tingle Copy
Months ."
ui(ily ...
IfYearly......
Yrlv
We note that after many
years of faithful and efficient
service the Hon. T. Vincent
Matthews has resigned his
position as Receiver General
and retired on a well earned
ii.
It
ul
1*1
5-'
6.1
6d
A lenglity programme con
sisting of songs, recitations and
dialogues, was very credibly
rendered. The singing was
melodious and the dialogues
excited considerable laughter.
Mr. Samuel A. Ferguson
, ,, \ c i\ir. Samuel A. rergusnn de-
pension from he Public Ser- |s,rves much credit flfr traini
n.^ill T!, ngS'the P'"" to such a high
pitch.
PAYAHLK IN ADVANOK
*#rMng Rate* :.- m
_- |.ei line
t insertion; three pence |.ei line
ft OH(l iiimit|,m ; ai.J lfnC|.eilil> | i
ne for siiDajueiii insertions.
AflTeitiseinants utuiej ei-l.t lines .,-,.
NOTICE-When "Correspondence- or
Articles are sigud with the writer's name
er initials, or^ith a pseudonym, or are
marhed "Communicated," the Editor mutt
not necessarily be held to be in agreement
with the uifios therein expressed or with the
mode of expression It such instances.or in
the case of "Letters to the Editor," insertion
only means that the matter or point of view
t considered of sufficient interest and im-
portance to warrant publication.
Vbe {Tribune
Thursday. October 5 1916,
^-rn_______^__
The Great Russian Gener-
al firusilofi has recently stat
td in an interview with the
Correspondent of an linglish
paper that he hopes the War
will be over in August next
year. He says this with cau-
tion, but the important point
is that a General of his cali-
bre should say it at all. An-
other Correspondent in Rus-
sia says that the Russian ex-
pectation is to see the whole
Balkan end of the War cut
out before the end of this
year. Next Spring would
then witness a mighty con-
centration of force against
the arch-sinner Germany.
We are longing for the time
when this ghoulish foe shall
feel the weight of a terrible
retribution. Really, the rev-
elations that continually
come in of her calculated
ferocities make us feel that
only when her pride has been
humbled and she has learned
sympathy through suffering,
will she be fit to take a place
again among the civilized
nations.
to the Bahamas and we are
glad that one of ourselves
rose by sheer merit and hard
work to be head of so im-
portant a Department. We
note that another Bahamian
P. W. D. Armbrister, Esq
has been provisionally ap-
pointed in place of Mr. Mat-
thews.
We extract the following
from the "Dawlish Gazette" of
Saturday, i6th September. It
will be remembered that Dr.
Lawyer was in our city just a
few months ago.
'Dr. Annie Lawyer, of Ontario
Canada, who is slaying with
friends, the Misses Mai man, at
13 Barton Crescent, Dawlish,
went up to London last week
and signed on with the War
OfTice for medical duty at Mai
ta."
:o:
Really, some motor car
drivers are a danger to the
public. This morning a cer-
tain young man racing
along Shirley Street must
have seen a woman in front
of him. He never dreamed
of blowing the motor horn
and shaved the woman so
close as to knock a tray she
was carrying right out of her
hands. After doing this he
never even troubled to look
back. Bah."
:o:
The usual weekly Concert by
the Police Rand will be given
this even on the Library Green.
Mr. Thompson the Public
School Teacher was present
and gave a very interesting ad-
dress.
Addresses were also given by
other gentlemen that were pres
ent and the hearty singing of
the National Anthem, brought
that very enjoyable evening to
a close.
I am Yours.
A VISITOR
A German Jew was arrested
in Huston not long ago, says
Everybody's, and when he was
taken to the police Station his
condition wasiound to be so un
clean that he was oiderrd to
take a bath. "Vot! Go in de
rater?" he asked. "Yes, take a
bath. You need it. How long is
it since you had a bath, any-
way?" With his hands aligned
upward and outward he answer
ed,"l nefer vas arrested before!
Once an old lady was being
shown over Nelson's ship
Victory. As the party approach
ed the spot whera Nelson met
his death, thcattandant pointed
to the brass plate fixed in the
deck and said:
"That is where Nelson fell."
The old lady was impressed,
but not in the right u a\.
"Nowondeif" she said, "f
nearly tripped over that thing
myseif."New York Time*
IB
Farmer's Hill, Exuma
The Editor of The Tribune
Dear Sir,
Kindly publish the
following in the columns of
your paper :
On the night of the 17th inst.
the Superintendent of the Sun-
day School at this settlement
gave a fin* entertainment. At
o'clock the curtain dropped.
7
Ihere were a large number of .....r............ ,.,,. ,,
visitors present, and every one sufficient men were sent across
October 4th, 1916.
London, a:The invasion of
Bulgaria by Roumanian trnnps
between Rustchuk and Tortukai
was made under fire of the ene-
mys guns. This move is consider
eda most important one. Jusl
how many men were thrown
across the river is not disclosed
but the strategic value of the
maneuvre is seemingly two-fold
qo miles eastward of Turtukai
lies Varna the chief seaport of
Bulgaria on the Black Sea. If
enjoyed themselves to the full.[the border and are marched a
long the' Dobiudja-Bulgarian
frontier towards Varna not alone
would ihc seaport be in danger
but the movement wuuld con
stitute a serious menace towards
the isolation of the German
Bulgaiinn-Turkish forces oper
ating against the Roumanians
on the north.
Simultaneously wilh the cress
ingofthe Danube comes a re
port from Bukarcst that4| fresh
attackalong the entire Dobrudja
front has resulted in the defeat
of the center and right flanks of
the troops of the Central Powers
The Roumanians on both sides
of the Great Kokul River in
Transylvania have advanced
gainst the Teuton!, while west
ward in the viciniry of Ossoca
and near Petroseny the Auslro-
I lungarians have captured posi
tions from the Roumanians.
The fighting in Galiria has
resulted in successes for the
^eutons in the northeast and for
the Russians in the southeast.
According to reports from
Berlin and Vienna the Teutons
have recaptured ground lost in
Saturdays fighting and made
prisoners 2306 Russians.
The Russians in the Naray-
uvka Zlota Lipa sector repulsed
vicious attacks oi the Teutons
inflicting heavy casualties.
Little news of the fighting in
Macedonia is to be had. Both
sides apparently are continuing
their attacks and counter at
lacks with no important advan
tnge to either.
Aside from bombardments
which are especially severe on
the Carso Plateau little fighting
is taking place on the Austro-
Italian front.
The entire crew of the Zep
pelin which was brought down
in flames Sunday, near London,
perished.
London:-A number of Nor-
wegian steamers have been sunk
by a German submarine which
has reached the Arctic Sea. The
Germans have sunk Norwegian
steamers valued at |g. 000.000
up to date.
New York:-Tacit admission
is made by labour leaders that
the attempts tocreteat a sjfoipa
thetic strike in aid of theJrrike
ing street car men has failed.
:o:
5th October", 1916.
Paris:The French captured
a strongly fortified German de-
fensive on the Somme front be-


*
tween Morval and St. Pierre
Vaast Wood.
Loodon: On the Somme
fronl the town ofEaucourt l'Ab
baye has been entirely taken by
the British after several days
fighting.
On the Greek Macedonian
front the British have advanced
on tin west bank of the Struma
and captured part of the Village
of YeoMeni. The Bulgarians
cnuntet-attacked thrice. The
fighting continues.
Inquest into the death of the
crew of the Zeppelin destroyed
Sunday shows that 19 bodies
have been recovered.
It is reported from Vienna
that Emperor Francis Joseph is
seriously ill from bronchitis.
Men are urgently needed for
the armies and munition facto-
ries says a statement from the
rrnri power distribution board
which directs that certain class
es heretofore exempt be no
longer exempted. The board is
considering the employment of
women, and men over military
age.
Berlin: An tncircling move-
ment by Von Mackensen com-
pelled the Roumanians to hasti
ly recross the Danube between
Ruslchuk and Turtukai.
The Teutonic Allies gained
ground wcstofObosse height.
I'lie Russians continue to
fiercely assault the Auslro Ger
mans
Prince Leopold defeated the
Russians heavily west of Lutsk.
Strong French attacks on the
Somme front, near St Pierre
Vaast were repulsed as were
British attacks near Thitpval
and Moquet Farm.
Bukarest:The Roumanians
defeated the Teutons near Fog
ares, Transylva.iia. They were
also victorious in the region of
OJorkim.
Rome:The Italians repulsed
several attacks against southern
heights in Travignolo Astico
Valley then counter attacked
the northern slopes of Colbricon
gaining new ground toward the
mountain.
Tokio: The Emperor has
requesteiOount Saki Terauchi
former war\^]nister to form a
new cabinet.
Washington:Navy yard bids
for construction of new ships
show prices to be 33 per cent
higher than those offered last
December.
5th October, 1916.
London, 3rd: Never were
such a number of planes em
ployed and never did they play
such an important pa'rt as in the
battle of the Somme. The was
tage of British planes at the
front has been supplied by new
planet flown across the Channel
from England where, after
coming from the factory, they
were tested out at a home aero
drome. The record time in
crossing the Channel at its
narrowest point, 822 miles, is
8 minutes.
When the Associated Press
correspondent who was in Lon
don for a day's leave from the
fiont asked a certain general at
the war office for permission to
fly back instead Of returning by
boat, train and automobile the
answer was, "Perfectly easy",
and to prove it he called up the
commander of the flying corps
and in five miuutesall was ar
ranged over the telephone.
Birmingham, 3rd:In his ad
dress before t he Congregational
Union Viscount Bryce said, in
part: "If there is to be a recurr-
ence of wars, becoming more
terrible with the increasing
march of science, we may well
despair of the future".
Ho recalled that Premier As-
quith, Sir Edward Grey and Mr
Malfour had expressed energeti
cally andsinceiely the need of a
league such as he had suggested
and said that severa groups of
thinkers were at work on the
plans.
"To establish any machinery
for perserving peace,'' continued
Lord Bryce, "would be impos-
sible without the co-operation
of the neutral states, and espec
ially the greatest of all neutral
states. We have betn writing
and watching to see if America
would depart from her old policy
of complete isolation and bear
her part in the effort for securing
a permanent alliance for peace.
An influential league for that
purpose has already been form
ed there and now two momen
tous events have happened on
which I dwelt because they have
been little noticed here. Presi-
dent Wilson delivered four
months ago a powerful and
luminous speech in which he
announced that the United
States could not stand aloof
from a movement in which the
highest interests humanity were
concerned and that he felt sure
the people of the United States
were prepared to join in ar.y
feasible schemt for the preven
tion of future vrars."
London, 3rd. Although the
Roumanians continue to gain
ground against the Austro Ger-
mans at various points in
Transylvania the situation in
Dobrudja which attained added
interest since the crossing of
the Danube into Bulgaria by
Roumanian forces remains un
certain.
Bukarest says that violent
fighting continues all along the
lines south of the railway run-
ning from Constanza to the
Danube with the Teutons offer-
ing stubborn resistance to the
Roumanian and Russian lorces.
Nothing is vouchsafed however
concerning the troops which
invaded Bulgaria.
Sofia says the Roumanians
who made their way across
the Danube were several bat
talions, and Berlin reports
the destruction behind them
of the pontoon bridges by
which they crossed.
An unofficial despatch from
Rome says that field Marshal
Von Mackensen has ordered
the evacuation of Debruja for
tresses of Silistra and Turu-
kai recently captured by the
Teutons in the fear of their
being enveloped by the Rou
manians.
Heavy rains are interfering
with the operations of the
British and French on the
Somme front but nevertheless
Paris records the capture of
an important trench north of
Kancourt and the taking of
more prisoners while London
reports show that the fight-
ing in the vicinity of Eau-
court l'Abbaye is proceeding
satisfactorily.
Violent fighting has been
in progress west of Lutsk and
in Galicia in the region of
the ZIota Lipa River.
According to Petrograd
neither the Russians nor Teu
tons have been able to gain
any marked advantages west
of Lutsk.
FOUND.
IN a Carrage yesterdaya
purse containing money.
Owner can enquire at
/'Tribune" Office.
Professional
Announcement-
Dr. W. R Lamb, American
Oculist and Optician wishes to
announce to the citizens of New
Providence that he intends to
visit Nassau again in October
and will have as usual superior
faculities for attending to the
eyes and correcting defecetiv
vision.
* %
NOTICE
THE Recruiting Committee
are again enlistlfeg men
for Drafts for the Bahamas
Contingent. Applicants will
be attended to between 8 a.m.
and 4 p.m. at the Command-
ant's Office at the Barracks.
Enlist now as
the vessel for Jamaica
will be leaving early
in November.
R. H. C.XRAWFORD
Commandant.
Fop Sale
HOUSE and lot No. 58 De-
lancy St. Apply to the
owner on the Premises.
Mrs. BOSFIELD
NOTICE
ANY person having any
claim against the Estate
of Joseph Wallace deceased
will present their accounts,
and any person indebted to
the Said Joseph Wallace will
make payment to Jacob
Bethel Exector.
Sept. 19th 1916
There are
above 40,000 people
of my race in the Bahamas,
therefore why should I worry.
Instead. I shall simply remain,
Yours faithfully,
Dr. J.A.WRIGHT
(Dentist.)
37 Market Street,
Nassau, N. P.
Office Hours:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sundays, 9 to 11 a.m.


HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. pep tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
THE MOST STRIKING
feature of the Polar Bear is its beautiful white coat,
which is in keeping with the whiteness of its sur-
roundings in the Arctic regions. The snow in those
regions, however, is not whiter than clothes washed with
SUNLIGHT
SOAP. <
The beauty of Sunlight
Soap is in i'.s purity, and
the easy way in which it
releases dirt from clothes,
without injury to the fabric
no matter how fine it may
be. It is manufactured with
the purest materials and
there is ,1,000 Guarantee
of Purity on every bar.
Try it on your Nert Wh-uy. t
Bicycles for Sale,
Hire and Repaired.
CRYSTAL ICE
OUR PLANT is now able to supply all the Ice neces-
sary for home consumption nd to let the public
share in the benefit. Our prices have been
reduced as follows :
lbs at 4;d.
12
24
48
100
<

<<

Is
3s.
6d.
Don't grope in the darkturn night into day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs.
W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St.
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
LIMITED.
Authorized Capital 6,000
-----------------LOW RATES FOB----------------
It is our duty lo protect home industries and the
figures listed above rue Intended to give the public an ad-
vantage that thrv have not hitherto enjoyed.
Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor
will receive prompt and courteous attention.
DEPOTS.
Nay St. City, The Ice House.
E. Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week.
Shirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today
East St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store,
open next week.
Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open
next week.
HAROLD E. M JOHNSON,
Prop
WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and atisfactory Adjustments of Claims.
Home Office:264 Bay Street, Nassau.
The Tribune
for Modern Printing.


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