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L. (HLBKKT UUFUCI1, Editor and Proprietor. OPKIOK: C*rrtr Shirley & Chtvrlolte Sla .VOJMII, iV. P., Htihamas 'HHONK 260. F. O. BOX MM. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, We.liiewiay ami Finlay— single copy |d Tuesday, ari'I Thursday—tingle copy id 3turday—single cony Weelily ... Monthly ... K uarterly ... aKYaarly ... raarly %  id 5>' ... is. 6.1 ..4s. in I PAYARLK IN ADVANCK tfeirtiting Kates :—Six j>ence per line Ibr ftYlt insertion: three pence |>er line hr second insCition ; Blid illicpenin per %  oe for subtipient insertion-. Advertisements under eitflit lines 4s. NOTICE— When Correspondence or Article* are signed with the writer's name or initials, or with a pseudonym, or are marked "Communicated,'' the Editor must not necessarily be held to be in agreement with the views therein expressed or with the mode of expression In such instances, or in the case of" Letters to the Editor," insertion only means that the matter or point 0/ view il considered of sufficient interest and importance to warrant publication. Zhe tribune TUMIIRV. September 2b 1916. The Teutons still keep up their Zeppelin raids on Eng land. That last reported seems to have been the big gest of all and to have done the greatest damage. This reads strangely in view of the comments in the British press on the failure of the last raid. Our British jour nalists were happy in the belief that our anti-aircraft defences are proving a match for these pirates of the air. There are some who think the Germans intend to in crease rather than diminish their Zeppelin activities. It is evident, however, that our measures of protection grow in efficiency, as witness the fact that two of these mons ters were shot down on this last occasion. A private cor respondent who lives in north London saw the descent of the burning air-ship that fell near Potter's Bar early in September. He was deeply impressed with th awful grandeur of the sight. Well —If these raiders come, many of their crews are liable to the horrible fate of those men who, when they reached the earth were only cinders — :o: — We have received a letter from the Publicity Director of the Universal Film Com-_ pany concerning some differences with our Government which have caused him to abandon c rtain plans. We are unable to publish this communication. It makes good copy, because it is written in a sparkling style. But we have not room for it as it is too lengthy, and we question whether under present wnr conditions we would have any right to do so. At the same time we are happy to have tke emphatic nssur ance of the Publicity Director that he is pro-ally and to read the forcible language in which his contention is put. —:o:— So Bahama grape fruit is being shipped as early as this! If only something were done to slop this, our fruit might have a chance to command a better price in the America i market. As with sisal,so withcitrusfruit we are allowed to drift gradually into failure Foreign Mails to be despatched per S. S. "Esperanza will be made up and closed on Thursday next 28th inst at 10.30a.m. Foreign Mails to be despatched via Miami, Fla. per Motor Vessel "Panama" will be made up and closed on Saturday next, the 30th inst, at 8 a.m. The Ward Line S.S. Esper anza arrived on Sunday last the 24th and after transfer ring the following passen gers for Nassau, proceeded South. Messrs. John P. Bethel, John A. Bethel, Lucius Henderson, Harold Loflhouse, Charles Lofthouse, Howard Chipman, Frank Duncombe, James Young, Jr., Albert Moore toger Moore, Andrew O'Brien' Karl A1 bury, Nigi I Burnside, Wif liam Thompson, George Doolittle' John W. Guene ; Dr. J. B. Alhury; Mesdames M. H. Jellicoe, Maud Henderson, Clias. Tucker Sands, R, F. Pyfrom, Sarah Alluny, J. B. Young, Lillian Moore, Florence Black, Ida Randall, Eunice Bethel; Misses Marion Bethel, Edna Moore, Merriel AHury, Alice Alb'uiy, Una Holmes, Agnes Butler, Dorothy Jellicoe. Messis. Oscar Johnson, Emil Gottslelen, Robt. Rodts, William Hall, Dr. Frederick L. Hanh.rd ; Mrs. Isabella Hall. Messrs. Willie Cash, George Bryce. BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD Entertainment by Mrs. M*sekiah Roker and others, Gregory Town, Eleuthera. 8 o Mr. A. L. Hepburn, Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama. 4 o Telegrams 25th September, 1916. London. 23:—On the Somme front in France the British and French forces have made additional gains. General llaig's men made pro gress towards Bapaunie while General Foch's soldiers appar entl) have begun another eflort to eject the enemy from Comb les and its salient in the Entente line north of the Somme, and are meeting with success. After checking the German at taks southwest of Combles, be tween LaPriez Farm and Ran court, the end of the French part of the Entente line which almost encircles the town, the French uudertook local oper ations on the outskirts of Com bles itself. An organized defen se here was captured and several trenches were occupied, 140 prisoners being taken. General Haig's troopstraight ened out their line north of the two villages. The British front there now runs on a direct line north of the two villages, Mar tinpuich and Flers. Two lines of German trenches were taken in the operations. There are also improvements at other position* on the British front. It is announced officially in Paris that the number of prison en taken by the Anglo French forces on the Somme from July 1st to September 18 amounted to more than 65 800. Berlin reports rjff actvitv on the whole of th*"west*rn front German and Roumanian re ports as to the progress or result of the battle in Dobrudja art contradictory. In contradiction of the an nouncement from Bukarast that the forces of the Central Powen were falling backJki 1 in declares that Von MackeT^sen has, by an encircling movement, broken the lesistanceof the Russian! on Roumanians and compelled them to retreat. Beilin sa\s that strong Rou manian forces Were repulsed southeast of Topraisiri, 14 miles southwest of Constanzia, on the Black Sea coast. Berlin & Vienna admit a reverse in the Carpathians by the Rus sian capture of the summit of Smotree heights which had pre viously changed hands many times, but declare that Russian attacks in Volhynia and south ern Bukowina were checked. —:o:— September 26th 1916. London, 25th. Governor, Bahamas. Official News:—On the Somme during the week there have been further advances by the British and French. Violent massed attacks by the Germans were smashed up. 1,5.800 prisoners were taken by the French and British since the 1st of July. The French have gained further ground on the Verdun front. The Russians maintain severe pressure near llalick and Kovel. The Rumanians gained some ground in Transylvania. Russians and Rumanians repulsed the enemy advance and have now resumed the offensive in Dobrudja. The French carried Fiorina, and Serbian -advanced to Cherna, the enemy retiring in disorder towards Monaster. The Serbians have taken the highest point north of Lake Of trovo. In East Africa t here haa been further progressive last remaining German ports have been occupied by naval forces. The Portuguese have crossed into German territory. There was a great Zeppelin raid over London districts and



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•^'dla.-dsonthenightofSatur day-Sunday. Two airships were destroyed in Essex. I here was no military dam age. (Signed) BONAR LAW. London: Latest reports of y* important campaign in the Rumanian province of Dobrud ja indicate that there is lessen inginintansity in the simple bttwean t|, invading army of the Central Power, and the Russian and Rumanian*. The n praise of the behaviour of their rnen-ofellof them. There is an heroic story of a sergeant who c u 8|>t the enemy bombs and hurll 1 J 1 back %  B ain as if he were "elding and throwing at the wicket. He was wounded in the hand and went back for a bit; then came on again, and led a party in rushing a stretch of tr nch. Our Lewis guns did most valuable work, being, as always, hurried well up in front. One Lewis gunner, figffting singlehanded, with dead and wounded around him, had a duel with an enemy machine-gun, and killed the crew, so that the enemy gun was silenced and then captured. As alwa}s, also, enthusiastic praise is given to our stretcherbearers and officers and men of the R.A.M.C"., some of whom worked under fire for 20 hours without a rest. Apart from the mere fact of its success, the clearing of the wood and the gaining of the ground were a matter of no small military importance. From our advanced positions beyond the wood our men now look right down on the village of Flers. So from the left of High Wood we look down from Martinpuich and from the ground bevond Porieres and Courcellette.' All these places now lie, as it were, below our feet. LOST O N Saturday an envelope containing a BILL OF SALE of the RANGER. Finder will please return to W. P. Sands & Son, Bay St., City. A reward will be given. There are above 40,000 people of my race in the Bahamas, therefore why should I worry. Instead, I shall simply remain, Yours faithfully, DR. J.A.WRIGHT (Dentist.) 37 Market Street, Nassau, N. P. Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, 9 to JI a.m. FOP Sale J UST in time for the coming Winter season. A Phaeton in ptrfect order, English harness, and carriage horse. For terms and particulars Apply to N. J. TRENCH East Bay Street. Bicycles for Sale, Hire and Repaired. Don't grope in the dark—turn night into day. Large stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs. W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St. Heat—Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. pep tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House Phone 214 East Bay St. Chas. E. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spirits V



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CRYSTAL ICE O UU PLANT is now able to supply all the Ire necesS.11 y for home consumption nd to let tlie public share in the benefit. Our prices have been reduced as follows :— 12 lbs. at 4Jd. 24 • M 9d. 48 " Is. 6d. 100 • 3s. It is our duty to protect home industries and the figures listed above are intended to give the public an advantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed. •I, Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor will receive prompt and courteous attention. DEPOTS. Bay St. City, The Ice House. L Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week, ahirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today Bast St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store, open next week. Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open next week. HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON, Prop. J. C, Coakley's Flake Tobacco. This Tobacco made express ly for J. C. Coak leyLong leaf, Fine flavor and aroma. Keeps hard and firm. Made to catch the trade of those who know what good tobacco is and have got tired of some of the old brands that have gone bad. 3rd Bahamas Contingent Dependents of members of the 3rd Bahamas Contingent whoareentitled to separation | allowance are requested toi call at the Treasury on Fri day 29th at 11 o'clock where they will be paid the allow Give it a trial and you will) a nce mentioned, up to 30th enjoy smoking like you use d; September. to. Prices 6Jd. per flake—3 dozen Hakes at 6d. per flake. Satisfaction guaranteed 01 money refunded. —* Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, L IM ITE D. Authorized Capital £5,000 LOW BATES FOR WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and Satisfactory Adjustments of Claims. HOME OFFICE:-264 Bay Street, Nassau. Shingles. JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 18s >Kf IO ?' No better 8'Adt than these on the Market-* <6x Primes Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our ""me guarantee as theBests." Any defective shingles can be returned. Alsocheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS. R. H.C. CRAWFORD Chairman, Recruiting Committee. it September, '91ft. fkst a hint —"The Allies" id. Cigars are the best ever, and still at the front and good to the end. J. C. COAKl.EY, • 304 Bay St European Agency. INDENTS promptly execut I ed at lowest cash prices for all kinds of liritish and Continental goods, including Books and Stationery, Root*, Shoes and Leather, Chemical* and Druggists' Sundries, China, Kaithenwnre and Glassware, Cycles, Mot'isaml Accessories Drapery. Millmeiy and Pieca Goods, Fancy QO.MIS mi.l Perfumery, Hardware, Machinery and Metalf, Jewellery, Plate and Watches, Photographic and Optical Goods Provisions and Oilmen's Stores, etc., etc. Commission i\ p.c. to .5 p.c. Trad* Discounts allowtd. S/>e i in I Quotations on Demand. Sample CVufS from £10 upward: Consignments of Product Sold on Account. WILLIAM WILSON k SONS [tetebMshad 1814] 25 Abchurch Lane, London, E.CCable Addiess:/tAJVtM/K£. LOSDONJOHN BUTLER WILL SELL On Wednesday the 4th October at 11 o'clock at the store of John Alfred, Day Street. The en tire stock in trade consisting of Liquors, Groceries and Provis ions etc., etc.' also 1 lot of Turtle Shell and 3 casks Old Metal. TERMS CASH. Advertise in The Tribune. NOTICE. BAHAMA ISLANDS A NY person who can give any *\ information as to the whereabouts of Charles Beason or of Richard Fernander both formerly of this Island of New i Providence and who are believ'ed to have left the Colony many years ago, viz : Charles Beacon about 50 years ago and Richard Fernander about 30 years ago, is requested to communicate with the Attorney General without delay. Richard Fernander is alleged to be an illegitimate son of the late Henry Fernander of New Providence in respect of whose property, escheat proceedings are about to be commenced in the Supreme Court. KENNETH SOLOMON, Acting Attorney General, aist September, 1916. Just Arrived Enamel Beds, and Sprngs, Fancy Goods, and Notions. Shoes. E. C. Qrlffln. Bay St. and VictorU Ar§. ICE T HE Bahamas^lnberCo. begs to draw attention of the public to the fact that they are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. ^



PAGE 1

V "News FOP Everybody" Nulliue aLddlrttia |urare In vtrb me-uistrl Being bound to awee.r to the Do|mat of no Mui.r, VOL. XIII NMMXI N.P.. B&h&mKi, TUESDAY September 26.1916 No. 271 England's Man Of Common Sense. (Concluded from Saturday Sepl 23rd) THE HARD WORKING ORGANIZER TYPEOne day the Afridis rebelled and the little Chitral campaign was on. Besides the other things that Robertson knew, he now knew Afridi, which made him invaluable on the stall He was severely wounded, and for his gallantry and services generally he received the coveted D.S.O., or Distinguished Service Order. Anybody with D.S.O. after his name is somebody in the British army. It is a decoration that counts. He did not cease his study of languages when he returned from India. Hissuccessas a linguist is not the least remarkable feature of his career. The universally accepted dictum about the difficulty of learning a Ian guage after one is forty in no wise dampened his ardor. When he wanted to learn French he had a list of a thousand words made, and memorized them when he was walking, riding,or dressing ; this as a start before he could have • regular teach er. Though he had not been to Woolwich or Sandhurst, the officers' preparatory schools, he now had earned his right to be come a student at the Imperial Staff College. This combines the functions of our War Col lege in Washington and our Staff College at Leavenworth. H-re Tj^nce time officers learn the higher principles, how to directmanyregiments as well as how to lead one regiment; how to solve tactical problems accord ing to modern arms and require ments.and supply, transport, in telligence, and all the other business of war in an age when war is a business. At the Staff College a man gets a tag that stays with him throughout his army career. Officers with Staff College experience have been the responsible organizers of the British new army. When the crisis came they were the ones who knew; all their studies and application became invaluable. Universal opinion was that the two ablest graduates of the Imperial Staff College were Sir William Rnbertson and Sir Douglas Haig, who is now the commander in chief in France. Sir William was doing staff work at the outbreak of the South Aftican War, which looked such an easy task for the British army and which developed into such a formidable one. South Africa was the school of experience, developing leaders for the present war. It found the British army the victim of its inheritance and gave it the kind of shaking up which our army received in the Spanish War. Without South Africa and without the Staff College, Britain would have been far more unprepared than she was at the outbreak of the Great War. There could be no doubt how such a man as the dependable knowing Robertson could be used in South Africa. Such a trained organizer would be kept on the staff. He led no columns in pursuit of the Boers. He had to do with the immense business of organizing and supplying the forces working over vast stretches of country. Lord Roberts and Lord Kitchener often regretted that there were not more Robertsons. The two years' test of merit left him with a fine professional reputation. Of the type interested only in seeing the results of his work, it did; not matter to him whether or not he was known to the public. In all wars many a general owes his public fame to some cap able staff organizer whom he keeps at his elbow. After South Africa the British army instituted reforms. It had learned more respect for the hardworking organizer type. From 1901 Robertson was as sistant director of military operations. With his next step up ward he might be said to havemade up for lost time. The man who became a second lieutenant at twenty six had passed the hundreds of first lieutenants and captains and majors ahead of him. He became a major gene ral For there is a limited pro motion by selection in the 3ri tish army which does Tiot tie the able man down to linear promotion, but gives I im a re ward for his efforts and a chance to make his ability useful to his country in sphere to which he is fitted by nature and ap plication. Most singular honor of all for one of his origin was his choice as head of the Imperial Staff College itself. He became the teacher of the officers of the army. After he left the Staff College he became chief director of mil itaiy operations, which meant that the technical direction of the army's movements was under his hand. This position he held when the Great War began at the age of fifty-three. On that August day the British nation had need for every atom of army brains available. All the men who had studied and thought on their studies in the years of peace became precious national assets. HE PROVIDED THREE MEALS A DAYIndividually, if any man was ready for war, it was Robertson. As director of military operations he bad been in touch with the French army. The Staff details of preparation v. oiked out before the war for sending the the British Expeditionary Force to France had been under his hand. For him and for all other officers who in time of peace had prepared for war the hour of great service had arrived. Where would his own abilities and knowledge be of the most use ? To older men was given the high command; to him the task of seeing that the force which England had sent across the Channel went on time and well equipped. THE ONE SELF MADE LEADER Big changes were coming when the new army was ready, gossip whispered. Sir John French was going to retire. Who would take his place ? Two men were mentioned, the two, in the opinion of the army who under the test of real war had shown themselves the most capable at the British front: Sir William Robertson and Sir Douglas Haig, who commanded the first army under Sir John French. The command in Fiance went to Haig, and Robertson came to England as chief of the Imperial Staff. England looks to them to win more victories but how soon their greatest test is to come you may read or hear from the gossip of the clubs, but never from their own lips. — Col I ley's, Sept. 9,1916. LOST A GOLD WATCH between * the Barracks and the Bai I. of Nassau. Finder will plt-;~< return to TRIBUNE Office. A reward will be given,


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02702
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 26, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02702

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Full Text
V
"News Fop Everybody"
Nulliue aLddlrttia |urare In vtrb me-uistrl
Being bound to awee.r to the Do|mat of no Mui.r,
VOL. XIII
Nmmxi N.P.. B&h&mKi, TUESDAY September 26.1916
No. 271
England's Man Of Common Sense.
(Concluded from Saturday Sepl 23rd)
The Hard Working
Organizer Type-
One day the Afridis rebelled
and the little Chitral campaign
was on. Besides the other things
that Robertson knew, he now
knew Afridi, which made him
invaluable on the stall He was
severely wounded, and for his
gallantry and services generally
he received the coveted D.S.O.,
or Distinguished Service Order.
Anybody with D.S.O. after his
name is somebody in the British
army. It is a decoration that
counts.
He did not cease his study
of languages when he returned
from India. Hissuccessas a lin-
guist is not the least remarkable
feature of his career. The uni-
versally accepted dictum about
the difficulty of learning a Ian
guage after one is forty in no
wise dampened his ardor. When
he wanted to learn French he
had a list of a thousand words
made, and memorized them
when he was walking, riding,or
dressing ; this as a start before
he could have regular teach
er.
Though he had not been to
Woolwich or Sandhurst, the
officers' preparatory schools, he
now had earned his right to be
come a student at the Imperial
Staff College. This combines
the functions of our War Col
lege in Washington and our
Staff College at Leavenworth.
H-re Tj^nce time officers learn
the higher principles, how to
directmanyregiments as well as
how to lead one regiment; how
to solve tactical problems accord
ing to modern arms and require
ments.and supply, transport, in
telligence, and all the other
business of war in an age when
war is a business. At the Staff
College a man gets a tag that
stays with him throughout his
army career. Officers with Staff
College experience have been
the responsible organizers of the
British new army. When the
crisis came they were the ones
who knew; all their studies and
application became invaluable.
Universal opinion was that the
two ablest graduates of the Im-
perial Staff College were Sir
William Rnbertson and Sir
Douglas Haig, who is now the
commander in chief in France.
Sir William was doing staff
work at the outbreak of the
South Aftican War, which
looked such an easy task for
the British army and which de-
veloped into such a formidable
one. South Africa was the school
of experience, developing lead-
ers for the present war. It found
the British army the victim of
its inheritance and gave it the
kind of shaking up which our
army received in the Spanish
War. Without South Africa and
without the Staff College, Bri-
tain would have been far more
unprepared than she was at the
outbreak of the Great War.
There could be no doubt how
such a man as the dependable
knowing Robertson could be
used in South Africa. Such a
trained organizer would be kept
on the staff. He led no columns
in pursuit of the Boers. He had
to do with the immense business
of organizing and supplying the
forces working over vast stretch-
es of country. Lord Roberts and
Lord Kitchener often regretted
that there were not more
Robertsons. The two years' test
of merit left him with a fine
professional reputation. Of the
type interested only in seeing
the results of his work, it did;
not matter to him whether or not
he was known to the public. In
all wars many a general owes
his public fame to some cap
able staff organizer whom he
keeps at his elbow.
After South Africa the British
army instituted reforms. It had
learned more respect for the
hardworking organizer type.
From 1901 Robertson was as
sistant director of military op-
erations. With his next step up
ward he might be said to have-
made up for lost time. The man
who became a second lieuten-
ant at twenty six had passed the
hundreds of first lieutenants and
captains and majors ahead of
him. He became a major gene
ral For there is a limited pro
motion by selection in the 3ri
tish army which does Tiot tie
the able man down to linear
promotion, but gives I im a re
ward for his efforts and a chance
to make his ability useful to
his country in sphere to which
he is fitted by nature and ap
plication.
Most singular honor of all for
one of his origin was his choice
as head of the Imperial Staff
College itself. He became the
teacher of the officers of the
army.
After he left the Staff College
he became chief director of mil
itaiy operations, which meant
that the technical direction of
the army's movements was un-
der his hand. This position he
held when the Great War began
at the age of fifty-three. On that
August day the British nation
had need for every atom of
army brains available. All the
men who had studied and
thought on their studies in the
years of peace became precious
national assets.
He Provided Three
Meals a Day-
Individually, if any man was
ready for war, it was Robertson.
As director of military opera-
tions he bad been in touch with
the French army. The Staff de-
tails of preparation v. oiked out
before the war for sending the
the British Expeditionary Force
to France had been under his
hand. For him and for all other
officers who in time of peace
had prepared for war the hour
of great service had arrived.
Where would his own abilities
and knowledge be of the most
use ? To older men was given
the high command; to him the
task of seeing that the force
which England had sent across
the Channel went on time and
well equipped.
The one Self Made
Leader
Big changes were coming
when the new army was
ready, gossip whispered.
Sir John French was going to
retire. Who would take his
place ? Two men were mention-
ed, the two, in the opinion of
the army who under the test of
real war had shown themselves
the most capable at the British
front: Sir William Robertson
and Sir Douglas Haig, who
commanded the first army un-
der Sir John French.
The command in Fiance
went to Haig, and Robertson
came to England as chief of the
Imperial Staff. England looks
to them to win more victories
but how soon their greatest test
is to come you may read or hear
from the gossip of the clubs,
but never from their own lips.
Col I ley's, Sept. 9,1916.
LOST
A GOLD WATCH between
* the Barracks and the Bai I.
of Nassau. Finder will plt-;~<
return to TRIBUNE Office. A
reward will be given,


L. (HLBKKT UUFUCI1,
Editor and Proprietor.
OPKIOK:
C*rrtr Shirley & Chtvrlolte Sla
.Vojmii, iV. P., Htihamas
'HHONK 260. F. O. BOX MM.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, We.liiewiay ami Finlay
single copy ......... |d
Tuesday, ari'I Thursdaytingle copy id
3turdaysingle cony
Weelily ...
Monthly ...
Kuarterly ...
aKYaarly...
raarly
id
5>'
... is. 6.1
..4s. in I
PAYARLK IN ADVANCK
tfeirtiting Kates :Six j>ence per line
Ibr ftYlt insertion: three pence |>er line
hr second insCition ; Blid illicpenin per
oe for subtipient insertion-.
Advertisements under eitflit lines 4s.
NOTICE When Correspondence or
Article* are signed with the writer's name
or initials, or with a pseudonym, or are
marked "Communicated,'' the Editor must
not necessarily be held to be in agreement
with the views therein expressed or with the
mode of expression In such instances, or in
the case of" Letters to the Editor," insertion
only means that the matter or point 0/ view
il considered of sufficient interest and im-
portance to warrant publication.
Zhe tribune
TumiIrv. September 2b 1916.
The Teutons still keep up
their Zeppelin raids on Eng
land. That last reported
seems to have been the big
gest of all and to have done
the greatest damage. This
reads strangely in view of
the comments in the British
press on the failure of the
last raid. Our British jour
nalists were happy in the
belief that our anti-aircraft
defences are proving a match
for these pirates of the air.
There are some who think
the Germans intend to in
crease rather than diminish
their Zeppelin activities. It
is evident, however, that our
measures of protection grow
in efficiency, as witness the
fact that two of these mons
ters were shot down on this
last occasion. A private cor
respondent who lives in north
London saw the descent of
the burning air-ship that fell
near Potter's Bar early in
September. He was deeply
impressed with th awful
grandeur of the sight. Well
If these raiders come, many
of their crews are liable to
the horrible fate of those
men who, when they reached
the earth were only cinders !
:o:
We have received a letter
from the Publicity Director
of the Universal Film Com-_
pany concerning some differ-
ences with our Government
which have caused him to
abandon c rtain plans. We
are unable to publish this
communication. It makes
good copy, because it is
written in a sparkling style.
But we have not room for it
as it is too lengthy, and we
question whether under pre-
sent wnr conditions we would
have any right to do so. At
the same time we are happy
to have tke emphatic nssur
ance of the Publicity Direc-
tor that he is pro-ally and
to read the forcible language
in which his contention is
put.
:o:
So Bahama grape fruit is
being shipped as early as
this! If only something
were done to slop this, our
fruit might have a chance to
command a better price in
the America i market. As
with sisal,so withcitrusfruit
we are allowed to drift gra-
dually into failure!
Foreign Mails to be despatch-
ed per S. S. "Esperanza will be
made up and closed on Thurs-
day next 28th inst at 10.30a.m.
Foreign Mails to be despatch-
ed via Miami, Fla. per Motor
Vessel "Panama" will be made
up and closed on Saturday next,
the 30th inst, at 8 a.m.
The Ward Line S.S. Esper
anza arrived on Sunday last
the 24th and after transfer
ring the following passen
gers for Nassau, proceeded
South.
Messrs. John P. Bethel, John A.
Bethel, Lucius Henderson, Harold
Loflhouse, Charles Lofthouse, Ho-
ward Chipman, Frank Duncombe,
James Young, Jr., Albert Moore
toger Moore, Andrew O'Brien'
Karl A1 bury, Nigi I Burnside, Wif
liam Thompson, George Doolittle'
John W. Guene ; Dr. J. B. Alhury;
Mesdames M. H. Jellicoe, Maud
Henderson, Clias. Tucker Sands,
R, F. Pyfrom, Sarah Alluny, J. B.
Young, Lillian Moore, Florence
Black, Ida Randall, Eunice Bethel;
Misses Marion Bethel, Edna Moore,
Merriel AHury, Alice Alb'uiy, Una
Holmes, Agnes Butler, Dorothy
Jellicoe.
Messis. Oscar Johnson, Emil
Gottslelen, Robt. Rodts, William
Hall, Dr. Frederick L. Hanh.rd ;
Mrs. Isabella Hall.
Messrs. Willie Cash, George
Bryce.
Bahamian Red Cross
Guild
Entertainment by Mrs. M*se-
kiah Roker and others, Gregory
Town, Eleuthera. 8 o
Mr. A. L. Hepburn,
Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama. 4 o
Telegrams
25th September, 1916.
London. 23:On the Somme
front in France the British and
French forces have made addi-
tional gains.
General llaig's men made pro
gress towards Bapaunie while
General Foch's soldiers appar
entl) have begun another eflort
to eject the enemy from Comb
les and its salient in the Entente
line north of the Somme, and
are meeting with success.
After checking the German at
taks southwest of Combles, be
tween LaPriez Farm and Ran
court, the end of the French
part of the Entente line which
almost encircles the town, the
French uudertook local oper
ations on the outskirts of Com
bles itself. An organized defen
se here was captured and several
trenches were occupied, 140
prisoners being taken.
General Haig's troop- straight
ened out their line north of the
two villages. The British front
there now runs on a direct line
north of the two villages, Mar
tinpuich and Flers. Two lines of
German trenches were taken in
the operations. There are also
improvements at other position*
on the British front.
It is announced officially in
Paris that the number of prison
en taken by the Anglo French
forces on the Somme from July
1st to September 18 amounted
to more than 65 800.
Berlin reports rjff actvitv on
the whole of th*"west*rn front
German and Roumanian re
ports as to the progress or result
of the battle in Dobrudja art
contradictory.
In contradiction of the an
nouncement from Bukarast that
the forces of the Central Powen
were falling backJki 1 in declares
that Von MackeT^sen has, by an
encircling movement, broken
the lesistanceof the Russian!
on Roumanians and compelled
them to retreat.
Beilin sa\s that strong Rou
manian forces Were repulsed
southeast of Topraisiri, 14 miles
southwest of Constanzia, on the
Black Sea coast.
Berlin & Vienna admit a reverse
in the Carpathians by the Rus
sian capture of the summit of
Smotree heights which had pre
viously changed hands many
times, but declare that Russian
attacks in Volhynia and south
ern Bukowina were checked.
:o:
September 26th 1916.
London, 25th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:On the Somme
during the week there have been
further advances by the British
and French. Violent massed
attacks by the Germans were
smashed up.
1,5.800 prisoners were taken
by the French and British since
the 1st of July. The French have
gained further ground on the
Verdun front.
The Russians maintain severe
pressure near llalick and Kovel.
The Rumanians gained some
ground in Transylvania.
Russians and Rumanians re-
pulsed the enemy advance and
have now resumed the offensive
in Dobrudja.
The French carried Fiorina,
and Serbian -advanced to Cher-
na, the enemy retiring in dis-
order towards Monaster.
The Serbians have taken the
highest point north of Lake Of
trovo.
In East Africa there haa been
further progressive last re-
maining German ports have
been occupied by naval forces.
The Portuguese have crossed
into German territory.
There was a great Zeppelin
raid over London districts and


^'dla.-dsonthenightofSatur
day-Sunday. Two airships
were destroyed in Essex.
I here was no military dam
age.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
London: Latest reports of
y* important campaign in the
Rumanian province of Dobrud
ja indicate that there is lessen
inginintansity in the simple
bttwean t|, invading army of
the Central Power, and the
Russian and Rumanian*. The
deadlocked from the Danube to
the Black Sea.
The Rumanians invading
Transylvania report success on
their attacks on Hermannstadt,
300 men and five machine guns
have been captured.
Fall rains are interfering with
activity virtually on all battle
fronts.
In Macedonia the Allies con
tinue progress in Fiorina region
in their effort to open a road to
Monastir. On the centre of the
Macedonian front there is great
artillery activity by the Allies.
Flames have broken out in Doi
ran.
On the Somme front in North
ern France there have been
heavy bombardments, German
attackson the British right flank
east of Courcellette have been
repulsed.
The situation in Greece is
most serious. Former Premier
Venezelos accompanied by Rear
Admiral Condouriotis, com
mander in chief of the Greek
navy, and a number of superior
officers and supporters of Ven
ezelos, left Athens early today
bound probably forCrete whence
it is expected they will go to
Saloniki.
Germans Tied To
_ Posts
v^ne 01 tue extraordinary details
reported by our men (and by offic-
ers of stapding) is that they found
in the enemy trenches the bodies of
entnts tied to posts. One of these
H nhad hi*head carried off y
hell. It it assumed that the tying
of them was done as a measure of
held punishment for some serious
misdemeanour. But it is not nice
to t^jVof, even as a punishment.
As aWays, the officers are loud
>n praise of the behaviour of their
rnen-ofellof them. There is an
heroic story of a sergeant who
c*u8|>t the enemy bombs and hurl-
l 1 j1 back Bain as if he were
"elding and throwing at the wick-
et. He was wounded in the hand
and went back for a bit; then
came on again, and led a party in
rushing a stretch of tr nch.
Our Lewis guns did most valu-
able work, being, as always,
hurried well up in front. One
Lewis gunner, figffting single-
handed, with dead and wounded
around him, had a duel with an
enemy machine-gun, and killed
the crew, so that the enemy gun
was silenced and then captured.
As alwa}s, also, enthusiastic
praise is given to our stretcher-
bearers and officers and men of
the R.A.M.C"., some of whom
worked under fire for 20 hours
without a rest.
Apart from the mere fact of its
success, the clearing of the wood
and the gaining of the ground were
a matter of no small military im-
portance. From our advanced posi-
tions beyond the wood our men
now look right down on the vil-
lage of Flers.
So from the left of High Wood
we look down from Martinpuich
and from the ground bevond
Porieres and Courcellette.' All
these places now lie, as it were,
below our feet.
LOST
ON Saturday an envelope
containing a Bill of
Sale of the Ranger. Finder
will please return to W. P.
Sands & Son, Bay St., City.
A reward will be given.
There are
above 40,000 people
of my race in the Bahamas,
therefore why should I worry.
Instead, I shall simply remain,
Yours faithfully,
Dr. J.A.WRIGHT
(Dentist.)
37 Market Street,
Nassau, N. P.
Office Hours:
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sundays, 9 to ji a.m.
Fop Sale
JUST in time for the com-
ing Winter season. A
Phaeton in ptrfect order,
English harness, and carriage
horse.
For terms and particulars
Apply to
N. J. TRENCH
East Bay Street.
Bicycles for Sale,
Hire and Repaired.
Don't grope in the darkturn night into day. Large
stock of high grade Electric Flashlights, batteries and bulbs.
W, A. WEEKS 504 East Bay St. .
HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. pep tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
Phone 214 East Bay St.
Chas. E. Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
Spirits
V


CRYSTAL ICE
OUU PLANT is now able to supply all the Ire neces-
S.11 y for home consumption nd to let tlie public
share in the benefit. Our prices have been
reduced as follows :
12 lbs. at 4Jd.
24 m 9d.
48 Is. 6d.
100 3s.
It is our duty to protect home industries and the
figures listed above are intended to give the public an ad-
vantage that they have not hitherto enjoyed.
I, Complaints of any kind reported to the proprietor
will receive prompt and courteous attention.
DEPOTS.
Bay St. City, The Ice House.
L Bay St. (near) The Gaydene, open next week,
ahirley St. H. J. Claridges' Grocery Store, open today
Bast St. (new Road) C. C. Smith's Grocery Store,
open next week.
Baillou Mill Road Store, Corner Delancy Hill, open
next week.
HAROLD E. M. JOHNSON,
Prop.
J. C, Coakley's
Flake Tobacco.
This Tobacco made express
ly for J. C. Coak ley-
Long leaf, Fine flavor and
aroma. Keeps hard and firm.
Made to catch the trade of
those who know what good
tobacco is and have got tired
of some of the old brands that
have gone bad.
3rd Bahamas
Contingent
Dependents of members of
the 3rd Bahamas Contingent
whoareentitled to separation |
allowance are requested toi
call at the Treasury on Fri
day 29th at 11 o'clock where
they will be paid the allow
Give it a trial and you will)ance mentioned, up to 30th
enjoy smoking like you used; September.
to.
Prices 6Jd. per flake3
dozen Hakes at 6d. per flake.
Satisfaction guaranteed 01
money refunded.
*
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
L IM ITE D.
Authorized Capital 5,000
LOW BATES FOR
WEEKLY SICK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and Satisfactory Adjustments of Claims.
Home Office:-264 Bay Street, Nassau.
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 18s
>Kf IO?' No better 8'Adt than these on the Market-* <6x
Primes Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our
""me guarantee as theBests."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Alsocheaper grade in stock
April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS.
R. H.C. CRAWFORD
Chairman, Recruiting
Committee.
it September, '91ft.
fkst a hint "The Allies"
id. Cigars are the best ever,
and still at the front and good
to the end.
J. C. COAKl.EY,
304 Bay St
European Agency.
INDENTS promptly execut
I ed at lowest cash prices for
all kinds of liritish and Con-
tinental goods, including
Books and Stationery,
Root*, Shoes and Leather,
Chemical* and Druggists' Sundries,
China, Kaithenwnre and Glassware,
Cycles, Mot'isaml Accessories
Drapery. Millmeiy and Pieca Goods,
Fancy Qo.mIs mi.l Perfumery,
Hardware, Machinery and Metalf,
Jewellery, Plate and Watches,
Photographic and Optical Goods
Provisions and Oilmen's Stores,
etc., etc.
Commission i\ p.c. to .5 p.c.
Trad* Discounts allowtd.
S/>e i in I Quotations on Demand.
Sample CVufS from 10 upward:
Consignments of Product Sold on Ac-
count.
William Wilson k Sons
[tetebMshad 1814]
25 Abchurch Lane, London, E.C-
Cable Addiess:/tAJVtM/K. LOSDON-
John Butler
Will Sell
On Wednesday the 4th Octo-
ber at 11 o'clock at the store of
John Alfred, Day Street. The en
tire stock in trade consisting of
Liquors, Groceries and Provis
ions etc., etc.'
also
1 lot of Turtle Shell and 3 casks
Old Metal.
TERMS CASH.
Advertise in
The Tribune.
NOTICE.
BAHAMA ISLANDS
A NY person who can give any
*\ information as to the
whereabouts of Charles Beason
or of Richard Fernander both
formerly of this Island of New
i Providence and who are believ-
'ed to have left the Colony ma-
ny years ago, viz : Charles
Beacon about 50 years ago and
Richard Fernander about 30
years ago, is requested to com-
municate with the Attorney
General without delay. Richard
Fernander is alleged to be an
illegitimate son of the late
Henry Fernander of New Prov-
idence in respect of whose prop-
erty, escheat proceedings are
about to be commenced in the
Supreme Court.
KENNETH SOLOMON,
Acting Attorney General,
aist September, 1916.
Just Arrived
Enamel Beds,
and Sprngs,
Fancy Goods,
and Notions.
Shoes.
E. C. Qrlffln.
Bay St. and VictorU Ar.
ICE
THE Bahamas^lnberCo.
begs to draw attention
of the public to the fact that
they are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.
^


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