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The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9, 1916. L. OILBKKT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OFKICK: Carnar Shirley & Charlotte St Satsau, N. P., Bahamm HHONK IBS. p. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Nlon.tay, WeJnesiiay and Fiiclay — str-gle copy ... l,| TatMiay, an-! Thursday—lingl* oopy i• i ^turifay—single copy ij.i WatWa 5,1 Monthly i s. 6.1 B uarterly 4 s. fxl alfYcailv gt, fpiirlv I8s We are asked to announce that the new Ice Plant of Mr. H. H. M. Johnson is making ice for the first time today. The Annual Festival of the Combined Churches, St. James' and Charity Tabernacle, Free town, will be held on Tuesday next the 12th inst. Don't for et! I'AYAHI.I. IN \l>VANCi. \terrtiMiii> Rota — M ounce per line b MM inwrtian; three peaea si line fctt ?coinl insertion ; aiKlMn) 1 1 the for suhtqnent imerti 1 > %  Advertisements under eight line* 4s. NOTIi' I When Cert %  -. %  r Article* ate signed with IJ or initials, "r \vil/i i t r art marked "Comm uni ca t e d the bdil t rnrntt not n tcet earily be he'd It b* in agreement u ilk the 1: ti then in / ilk the moil* %  . Install 11, or in tke cast of "Letter* to tke Editor," in meant th It is an appeal on behalf of courages us to hope that the our sick and wounded, those constantly increasing de who have been fighting our bat mands for our help may be ties at the Front, and, coming met by a correspond as it does very near to each one ing increase of generosity ol US, ought to receive our deep throughout the Umpire. We rst sympathy and support. | s |, a ll | Je trulv grateful to'you With greater activity in the if vou win ;iSsist (Uir work held, such as our operations on by organising an appeal and the>o m meandatbalomk,.the ^^ |fc s ? !" .,. men for the month of August I shall be greatly obliged alone amounted to very neatly if you will kindly commuiii 130,000. icate the contents of this ca Oo "Our Day," 1915, the Ba lb leg ram to your Ministers hanias contributed no less a and recommend the proposal sum than £2,650 for motor am to their fovourable consider bulancesas well as providing ation. £155 for general Red Cross Their Majesties the King purposes. Although, in view of and Queen and her Majesty the very many charitable de Queen Alexandra are giving mands which have since been us their generout patronage, made on the coinnuinitv, it , r ,, would be unreasonable to ex ; "" 1 << that you Will also pect a similar liberal cootribu e your way to help us m tion this year, the Chamber of the same splendid maum-i as Commerce is anxious to assist you did last year, and that His Excellency in obtaining a we may have the invaluable result which will reflect credit assistance also of Ladv Al Nassau, N. P., September 9, 1916. The Editor of The Tribune. Sir.— May I take the liberty of acknowledging through your columns the receipt of further contributions of stamps to the Red Cross Stamp Fund, from the following: — Lady Allardyce, Miss K. Allardvce, 300 stamps; Gordon Chapter I. O. 1). L: -Mrs. Tudor, 140 stamps; Misses Mat thews, Miss A. M. Hay, Miss H. Twyoam, Miss Defries; Miss [ %  '. M. Halanen, Miss Meade Mc Donald, Mrs. S. V. S. Albury, IOO stamps ; Miss Kathleen Al bury, 100 stamps ; Mrs Brooks over 1000 stamps ; The Misses Knight, New York City ; K. E. and O. A. chapter l.'O. D. E. 408 stamps; Mrs Along, Trin idad; The Lady Supci mtendent; LaunCeSton, Tasmania ; Miss Garden,Grenadaj Miss Sarah Jessamy, Tobago; Miss Ada Tricher, Trinidad, iooostamps Miss Sophy bethel, Lotus Pat rol. 1st Bahama ("nil Guides, 3700 stamps; Hibiscus Patrol 1st Bahama Girl Guides, 2100 stamps;3ndBHriama Girl Guides 1600 stamps; Mr. C. O.Anderson, 1 1st Babamma Wolf Cubs, 300 1 stamps; gth Bahama Scouts The Current, 1000 stamps ; Mr. J. S. Hall, 587 stamps; Mr, Robert F. Abraham. Grenada : Mr. S. V, S Albury, 100 stamps; Mr. Harold Albury, loostamps; Mr. Alan Stewart, Mr Jack Culmer, Imperial West Indian Assurance Association. Thanking you for your co operation, I have the honour to be Your obedient servant DR. WALTER HESS, Local Secretary. will tell you—lots of us eat si avengeisand don't know it. "Over the hill" the people raise pigs in abundance and they allow them to go all about without being penned up a day. They eat every thing that they happen to run up against, viz: d' ad chick ens, snakes, cats, and dozens of other things. Imagine a pig eating something of the sort and killed the next day for use on your table By the way, is it lawful for owners of such animals to allow them to run about this way, I sincerely hope that somebody will see to it and save the health of the com munity. Thanking you for space I reside, OVER THE HILL. SHIPPING on the Colony, and suggest that employers, while giving a per : centage of their day's sales, should invite each one of their employes to set aside one day's pay on "Our Day." Thursday, 'lie 19th October, in order that it may be entirely devoted to, our wounded soldiers and sai Ion. The Chamber will receive any sums, however small, donated for that purpose from private in dividuals, artificers, ratpentets. labourers, wharf hands and Oth ers. In the case of other iadividu als, such as peasant proprietors, small farmers and spout:' who are unable to conveniently set aside one day's earnings, the following alternative is recommended : namely, that contri buttons in sisal, sponge, poa toes, green truck, or any other saleable commodity be substitu ted in lieu of cash, and forward ed as soon as possible to the Chamber of Commerce, which undertakes to dispose of it for the benefit of our "Our Day." laidvce. Signed) LANSDOWNE, President, British Red Cross Society. — :o: — BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD St. Agnes Sunday School Gregory Town Lieu thera 14 o —:o:— DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE RED CROSS GUILDCollected by Mrs. Km drick, Hope Town Abaco £ 4 0 — :o:— CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE FUND FOR MAIMED AND BLIND SOLDIERS AND SAILORS We have been requested bv the Private Secretary to acknowledge the following sums which have been received by His Excellency on ac Mr. and Mis. Theodore Hany Payne -the newly weds-leavt s today for a short trip to iovernors Harbour, hlcuthcin. (Communicated) CRICKETA return Cricket Mati h was played on the Eastern Parade yesterday afternoon, between tb *M. David'sCric ketClub,and theSt.Andrew's Cricket Club which resulted in a victory tor the latter by 15 runs. The top score of 11 runs was mad-' l>\ Lionel Lunn. Splendid bowling was done by C Sweeting. The playing of both Cluds was remarkably good, but the bowling Of St. Andrew's was too much for the St. David's Team. The follow ing is the scores for both innings, St. David's 35 runs, Si .\ idrewV 59th September, iojf>. EditOl of "I he Tribune" Dear Sir: Kindlv allow me to give the public a little in formation through your col uinns : It is certainly a good thing that we don't know what we eat most of the t ime. It is a miracle just how we manage to live under it. Just imagine eating a scavenger! Well, 1 The S. S. "Monterey" left New York at 4 p.m. on Thinsday, the 7th, with 23 passtigers and 30 packages for Nassau. 'The Motor vessel "Panama" left Miami, T la. yesterday nun ing for Nassau. 'The motor vessel "Frances E." arrived from Miami, Fla. mi Saturday afternoon, the 2nd, with a cargo of it e and shingles and the following 17 passengi is; Messrs. George C. Roberts, Thomas Cleaie, Gustavus Cleare, Thaddeus Nixon, VinnieHiggs,MyrtlandKemp Chas. Bleby, James H. Peet, Alonzo Gt 1 ft 111, AIIK d Scott, iH. M. Hare, Wm. E. Sands, .1. R. Knowles, II. S. Bragg, W :T.l\. Trapp; ttfesdaaies Sarah Davis, Lydia Miller. The S. S. "'Antilla'" arrivi d from New York on Wednesday morning, the 6th, w ith a general 1 argo. ST. JOHNS CATHEDRAL Meeting Street. R( \. (1. A. Thompson, S.T. I). Minister. Inspiring si t vices tomorrow. 11 a.m. "t n seen Environment" 7.30p.m. Tne troubling of Si loams Waters." Good Music. 1 he I 'ublic are cordially inviti d. Ask any business man vou know what be thinks about insurance. Nine times out of t' n he will tell you thai he carries a policy with some good company and intends to get more. I here is a tea son for this. You can get fen s few cents per week H policy with your Home Company that protects you w hi If you live and provides foi bin ial with money left for the fa mi, lv. The Impei ial West Indian Assurance Association was organized for youi hem lit. Telegrams 8th Si pleuiber, iqib. London, Oth: — While t heir compatriots were busy Wed* nesday North of the Si unnie warding off Gei man c< mnler attack or engaged in anillery duels the rreni I south of the river dn ve their men fui ther into the German lines



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>% The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9, 1216. i o uc iiau at all Grocers C. L. LofthOUSe-^ompany's Agent ig heavj cdS uallies on ilicin, ui cording to fell ograd. On Uie Macedonian front inly bombardments are in progress. In Albania the Italian ad for notewoithy gaini in Ognott inflicti stubborn 11*;||ting ovei a fiont oi [our miles between \ ei uiandovillers and Chilly. I'ue CJ -nil in-. Inive Deeii irced t> give up the u<>i I i em (> n tion of Vermaiidovillers while the I'reuch have vance has been stopped, says o cupi :d i ,n' uiii s kins of the Berlin, and Hie i uetonic Ali,nl \ \ junction town of lies have recaptured allposi Chan I nes and thrown their jtions taken from them recent forces along the lailwny run 1\ Eas't ol Avtona. ningfrwrnCliaulnesstoUoye.i Washington, 6: -In their Between Chaulnes audChil journey from Norfolk to |y to the north, the operations Philadelphia the interned of the French, with Barleux German ships Prinz Eitel and ul.imately Peronne as Friederich and Kronprinz their objective, met with sue I Wilhelm will be conveyed by cess American warships. The es S Kasl of Belloysynterre furjeort will serve the doubte put tl.er German trenches were'pose of guarding against at captured and most of thevil temps at escape and protect lages fell into French hands, ing the German boats Iron. Paris says that the number attack by Allies warships, as of prisoners taken apparently jit will be necessary for the -nvas large. Berlin admits the squadron to pass outside the loss of Clery which lies a short I three mile limit. Northwest of Perograd say that the Russians have taken the offetisive ovi i the entire Dobi udja front, at tacking the invading Lhilga ; nans and 'HI mans from the | Danube to the Black Sea. An undated Bulgarian re pori says that Bulgarian and German forces captured the f irtified town of D*bric, 50 miles Southeast of Burn rest md three towns on the Rou 111,1.linn Black Sea coast, n ai the Bulgarian frontier. Sofia concedes that the Rou' mani ins occupied an important Bulgarian town on the Danube. Reports from Petrograd in.In.lie that 1 lie Russians have i*mharked on an important enterprise on the northern end of their front, crossing the Dvina and engaging in sustained fighting with the Germans. Below l.emberg there is further retreat of theAustroGerman forces to the western bank of the I.ipa. The British steamships Stathay and Heathdene, the Ellerman Liner Tagus and the Norweigaian steamer Hisvuiso have been sunk. New York: —There was 15 deaths and 4 new casesof in fan tile paralysis during the past 24 hours. distance ronne. In Galicia, on the front of /.Iota Lipa and : o;— qth September, IQI6 London : —German troops Dneister' 8 00 ,ll(> Somme front last LET THE KAISER. ANSWER.. The brighter day was sot lopg in coming. Within •* few years the United States ofSouth Africa rose out of the ashes of the war, and it comprises practically all the vast territory soutli of tlie Limpopo River Today the Boer republics are nut of existence, but in their places has risen the Boer nation. The British government gave 1 he confederated colonies a Par liament and a liberal constitu tion. The Boers are in the majority throughout the country, and consequently they make the country's laws. Louis Botha and Jan Smuts are the leading Boers, and con sequent ly these two men, who wept as they signed away the independence of their countries fourteen years ago, are the greatest men in Soutli Africa, the one a civil and the other u military dictator. One has gone beyond the borders of his country and has added to the British Rmpire that vast territorv formerly known IS German Southwest Africa. Smuts has gone afield and is about to pre sent to his sovereign another huge, territory, German Last Africa. Then these brothers in politicsstatesmanship and arms may feel warranted in turning their eyes toward Berlin and to wonder what are the thoughts of that same Prussian Kaiser who virtually promised Kruger almost a score of years ago to he his roval protector—and The Summer Sale then broke ids pledge. .—_ a ,l\t T* 1. f of White Goods at Zachary Taylor's in Market S is on again next week. Read his advertisement in last weeks papeps and Don't Miss the great bargains. —•'New York Herald" Continued from !•! page. Rivers, the Russians have driven the I uetons from for tified [i iti< ms and have taken 4500 pris


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*. The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9,1916. T Keeping Guard HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these preserving the balance of trade. -THI SHOE £1 STORE is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 3io cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan % K N KNPWLES Si With these reinforcements he Big Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man kets abroad. G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) WONDERFUL •olid Gold Bmfa>ty Pm Brooch** ••t with Pino Paarla 3 /_eHi Paar. Ml Rarely I'll brooch on lh market. Kach brooch In a pretty relral lined caae suitable for presentation. Six pattern* aa eliown: Swallow.Uuttertlv. Creacenl. Horieahoa. rown and Shamrock. fcat'h 3,. IOTJ\ Three for....8 S <2.l>. 8lxfor....lB/B IfYlSi FMTAOI .raad.l UM.I.h Kaapl^ foraan |,|,|,, ONK llrooeh 4d. INe) (> Reliable Sold by W. Hilton 260 Bay St. ARROW COLLAR Made of a fine white Moire Madras—an attractive novelty that is in good form. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, PEABODY & CO.. Inc. MAKERS. TROY. N. Y. U.. 8. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Aferw. Heat—Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. fop 3d. At The New York House J. C. Coakley's Flake Tobacco. This Tobacco made express lyfor J. C. Coakley Long leaf, Fine flavor and aroma. Keeps hard and firm. Made to catch the trade of those who know what good tobacco is and have got tired of some of the old brands that have gone bad. Give it a trial and you will enjoy smoking like you used to. Prices 6£d. per flake—3 dozen flakes at bd. per flake. Satisfaction guaranteed oi money refunded. Just a hint— "The Allies" id. Cigars are the best ever, and still at the front and good to the end. J. C. COAKI.EY, 304 Bay St. is one of the most destructive of animals, and is a source of much danger to life. SUNLIGHT SOAP preserves and lengthens the life of your clothes, but it is a source of destruction to all dirt and uncleanliness. The amount of destruction wrought by a tiger in a single night, cannot be compared to the amount of destruction wrought by inferior soap in a single wash-day. SUNLIGHT SOAP is an absolutely pure Soap, that saves your clothes, iime, money, and labour. TRY IT. < 4m DRINK-. Welch'sGrape juice. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. i Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. i Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doe. A BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colonial. Phone 214 East Bay St. Chas. E. Bethel 1 Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spiri t s JOHN BUTLER Office : 367 Bay St.. East 'Phone 245 Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Real £state Agent &f EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods AGENT ICE "TPHE Bahamas Timber Co. begs to draw attention of the public to the fact that they are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. NORWCIH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich Shingles. JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cyprrsi at 181 V per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—5 j6x Primes Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our *me guarantee as I be Bests. Any defective shingles can be returned. Also cheaper grade in stock April 6th. .916 C. C SAUNDERS. k



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* 46 News FOP Everybody • Vulllvin rtddlclua |urre in verb* mtvulatri Holnw bound to iwr to the I)o|mmnlo Master. Vol. XIIL No. 256 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER-9.191b Price. THREE CENTS Jan Smuts, Boar Lawyer, Is Britain's Military Star. Gener.il Who Is Wresting Away Prussia's Last Colony Once Fought Against England, but He Finds Whist More Exciting Than Killing Perfect Strangers. "Jan Christian Smuts will yet play a ^ieat part in South Alri ca. II-; is one of the cleverest lawyers in the countiy and a man of vesatile attainments be sides. He is personally a very simple man, and to meet him one would not suspect that he possesses so firm a will and so determined a character. Al though scarcely thirty years of age and Without the slightest previous experience of military affairs, he developed in the la ter phases of the war into a most brilliant general." "Fifteen years ago "Oom„ Paul Kruger wrote this prophecy and character sketch of the oner British General, who, as indicated in last week's war despatches, is momentarily expected to ^ive the final thrust g to that heroic part of the Kaiser's trrnv which for two years has been fighting in the swamps and forests of German East Africa to retain possession of the last of the Prussian colonies. Neutral Americans will find it difficult to award the honors of the Campaign when perhaps B few days lipnce, the cables may bring the news that Smuts' army has battered down the last remnant of the Teutonic force and has accepted the surrender of the Prussian General, who has been besieged in nn equato rial jungle for twenty-five months. To Smuts the lawyer will no the credit of adding to the British domain an empire four times as large as the State of New York. He will he acclaimed as one of the greatest generals of the war,and already inEngland the demand has been made that he shall he sent to the front in France, where his sur passing military qualities may be utilized in driving the Teu tonic hordes back beyond the Rhine. To the Prussian who has been defending German East Africa with a stubbornness which has drawn the admira tionof liis foes will go the credit of a campaign unlike any re corded in military annals. To defend a young raw, unproduc tiv* colony thousands of miles distant from the motherland with only a handful of whites to train and lead an army of savages who only recently were in rebellion and reduced to the extremity of depending npon the ammunition, guns and sup plies from the encircling enemy —to maintain a campaign un der such adverse conditions for such a length of time will bring to even the conquered General iliat universal admiration which noes always to the valorous lighter. A NEAR-AMERICAN. If General bniuts were to be observed in the streets of New York he might be indicated asa typical American. There is nothing British about him ex cept his nationality, and that WHS forced upon him after he had warred against it for al most four years. He is a Boer whose ancestors, Germans, went to South Africa to escape reli gious persecution in Europe at the time the Kuguenols swarm td to America. The British newspapers like to call him an Afrikander —a man born in South Africa of British parents — but he calls himself a Boer and he is proud of the name. He came near calling himself American, for when the 3oer British war was Hearing the end he serioush debated the project of coming to the Unitnd States and becoming a citizen of this country for which he frequently expressed to me his profound admiration. Smuts is not quite forty five years old and, with possible ex ccption of Louis Botha, the South African Premier, and his co worker, in peace, war and politics, he is the biggest man in public life on the continent of Africa. Since he rose to po litical power he has done some things which indicate he iseven a bigger man than any of the statesman in the British Isles. South Alrican admires say Asquith and Lloyd George are not in the same class with the lawyer whom Kruger picked to be a great man. "Remember the crowd I. W. W. leaders that came to South Africa several years ago to call a universal strike ?" these Cape Town admirers will ask you. "Well, they were on the point of succeeding in tying up every mine, railway and industry in the country when Smuts got busy, grasped every one of the British agitators by the scruff of the neck, hurled them on board a homebound steamship and told them never to return. There was a terrible outcry ahout the highhanded methods; all Eng land was in a ferment, but Smuts did not care. He prevent ed the strike. FARMER. LAWYER. POLITICIAN. Smuts was born on a farm in the Transvaal, ten years after his father had assisted in trouncing the British at Majuba Hill. He was antiBritish then, and remained so for ten years more. Then he went to England for a university education in law. He returned pro-British, but did not practice it very long because he began the practice of law as some Ameiican have been known to do, by going into politics. In those days, which was about the time Dr. Jameson made his unsuccessful run across the border for the purpose of annexing the Boer republics to the British Empire, it did not pay a politician in the Transvaal to be very proBritish, so Smuts went out and shot a couple of Jameson's men and became anti British again. Then he becameKruger's State's Attorney, which corresponds to our Secretary of State, and in that position he was able to tell the British statesman what he thought of them, except that he put his sentiments into diplom atic language. His Utters to London were splendid in senti ment and most distressing in results, for they brought on the war of 1899 1902. Note writing at an end, Smuts went into the campaign as a private and ended as a general and one of the peace commit sioners. I was with his commando for weeks and I learned to know him as the best whist player in the army He was a good fighter, too, but he prefer red whist because he thought it was more exciting than killiag perfect strangers. The old Boers thought be was very wicked because he played cards, and once, when I tried to make a snapshot photograph of him as he was sitting on the ground playing a four handed game, he thrust his cards behind him, sprang to his feet and cried in wild aiarm:— "For heaven's sake, don't do that; a photograph like that would convince the whole country thnt I was in league with the devil, and I should never be able to run for office again.'" MOMENTOUS ELOQUENCE. It was as one of the Boer peace commissioners, who met General Kitchener and Sir Alfred Milner, the British commissioners, that Smuts rose to the rank of statesmen. Thecommis sioners had been unable to agree and the Boers returned to the convention of the national del estates to obtain new instruc tions whether they should Continued on 3rd page. Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, L IU I TE D. Authorized Capital £5,000 LOW RATES FOR WEEKLY SIK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS and LIFE INSURANCE Prompt and Satisfactory Adjustments of Claims. HOME OFFICE: — 264 Day Street, Nassau. Are you Worried about Baby ? H OW to feed Baby is often a great worry to mothers who are unable to nurse their babies themselves. Ordinary cow's milkhowever prepared at home—is not a suitable %  ubstitute for the mother's milk. It is acid in reaction, contains harmful germs and forms dense curds in the stomach that cannot be digested. Decide to use the 'Allenburys' Foode which are the only series of Foods scientifically Adapted to the growing requirements of the child. You will be delighted when you see how well your baby thrives on this Method of Infant Feeding. The 'Allenburys' Foods are free from all dangerous organisms; they are portable, being in powder form and packed in sealed tins. The Milk Foods Nos. 1. and 2 require the addition of hot water only to prepare them for use. A PURE. COMPLETE AND PROGRESSIVE DIETARY. MHcnburgsFcods MILK FOOD No. t. MILK FOOD No. 2. MALTED FOOD No. S. from birtb to 3 months From S to 7 months From 7 mouths upwards Unsolicited Testimony. 'Hsr LIU Ss.sd •• Iht -Allenburys' Feoos." Dssr <*, Barb* lot. Will vou kindly send mc a copy of your ptmphlet on Infant Feeding and Management. My baby at six weeks of age as very ill, being nable to digest the cow's milk. 1 tried many artificial foods with'* t success, and always contidt-r hrr life aavivl by 'he 'Allenbu ty Fuoo. Shr i >w nn f th fin st Chil usu ol bcr age I know and ii Mill led < v il on your I "d. Faithfully yours, h. I. Walton. "The Finest laky la Iht lalaaa." Gent'emea. Trinidad. I send vou beresrilh photos of our baby Frank sr'.o is nearly 16 monthi old, snd is onof t'ie tinrt r'-il rrn, and hsi never been ill though wc live in a TCIJ yihesiiny .'i HI psrhf na l b n o*t u nhea lt hy in ihe nl n wl. Uur hide boy, owing lo his Dfcilhet t serious illness, was fed on your Milk and Mailed Fixids until he was a year old. He began with Milk Foo No. i and finished with the Mailed Fond Whenhj • astii monhsold ht was the finest b by in ihe liland and w • glied 2jt i V I sand phoiosofhun %  Idiffercol agesand I ihinktohi lilyoty >ui fo 'Is. that I bare written >ou this and recujiiiieiid tln-m to ill of our friends and acquaintances. Yours truly, Thimas I'o ter. Th 'AllenBury*' Foods ara made under special process** by machinery, and art entirely untouched by hand. %  aV~ sVrffe for fro* book "Infant Feaeffno • %  at Maiiaeamont" 64 pagia of valuable Informal/on far every mafhar. Allen & Hanburys Ltd.. London. England. • had 300 Years. F.slahli: All 1013 The Tribune for Modern Printing V


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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02689
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, September 09, 1916
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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*
46
News Fop Everybody

Vulllvin rtddlclua |urre in verb* mtvulatri
Holnw bound to iwr to the I)o|mmnlo Master.
Vol. XIIL No. 256
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER-9.191b
Price. THREE CENTS
Jan Smuts, Boar Lawyer,
Is Britain's Military Star.
Gener.il Who Is Wresting Away Prussia's Last Colony Once Fought Against England,
but He Finds Whist More Exciting Than Killing Perfect Strangers.
"Jan Christian Smuts will yet
play a ^ieat part in South Alri
ca. II-; is one of the cleverest
lawyers in the countiy and a
man of vesatile attainments be
sides. He is personally a very
simple man, and to meet him
one would not suspect that he
possesses so firm a will and so
determined a character. Al
though scarcely thirty years of
age and Without the slightest
previous experience of military
affairs, he developed in the la
ter phases of the war into a
most brilliant general."
"Fifteen years ago "Oom
Paul Kruger wrote this prophe-
cy and character sketch of the
oner British General, who, as
indicated in last week's war
despatches, is momentarily ex-
pected to ^ive the final thrust
g to that heroic part of the Kai-
ser's trrnv which for two years
has been fighting in the swamps
and forests of German East Af-
rica to retain possession of the
last of the Prussian colonies.
Neutral Americans will find
it difficult to award the honors
of the Campaign when perhaps
B few days lipnce, the cables
may bring the news that Smuts'
army has battered down the last
remnant of the Teutonic force
and has accepted the surrender
of the Prussian General, who
has been besieged in nn equato
rial jungle for twenty-five
months. To Smuts the lawyer
will no the credit of adding to
the British domain an empire
four times as large as the State
of New York. He will he ac-
claimed as one of the greatest
generals of the war,and already
inEngland the demand has been
made that he shall he sent to the
front in France, where his sur
passing military qualities may
be utilized in driving the Teu
tonic hordes back beyond the
Rhine. To the Prussian who
has been defending German
East Africa with a stubbornness
which has drawn the admira
tionof liis foes will go the credit
of a campaign unlike any re
corded in military annals. To
defend a young raw, unproduc
tiv* colony thousands of miles
distant from the motherland
with only a handful of whites
to train and lead an army of
savages who only recently were
in rebellion and reduced to the
extremity of depending npon
the ammunition, guns and sup
plies from the encircling enemy
to maintain a campaign un
der such adverse conditions for
such a length of time will bring
to even the conquered General
iliat universal admiration which
noes always to the valorous
lighter.
A NEAR-AMERICAN.
If General bniuts were to be
observed in the streets of New
York he might be indicated asa
typical American. There is
nothing British about him ex
cept his nationality, and that
whs forced upon him after he
had warred against it for al
most four years. He is a Boer
whose ancestors, Germans, went
to South Africa to escape reli
gious persecution in Europe at
the time the Kuguenols swarm
td to America. The British
newspapers like to call him an
Afrikander a man born in
South Africa of British parents
but he calls himself a Boer
and he is proud of the name.
He came near calling himself
American, for when the 3oer
British war was Hearing the end
he serioush debated the project
of coming to the Unitnd States
and becoming a citizen of this
country for which he frequently
expressed to me his profound
admiration.
Smuts is not quite forty five
years old and, with possible ex
ccption of Louis Botha, the
South African Premier, and
his co worker, in peace, war and
politics, he is the biggest man
in public life on the continent
of Africa. Since he rose to po
litical power he has done some
things which indicate he iseven
a bigger man than any of the
statesman in the British Isles.
South Alrican admires say As-
quith and Lloyd George are not
in the same class with the law-
yer whom Kruger picked to be
a great man.
"Remember the crowd I. W.
W. leaders that came to South
Africa several years ago to call
a universal strike ?" these Cape
Town admirers will ask you.
"Well, they were on the point
of succeeding in tying up every
mine, railway and industry in
the country when Smuts got
busy, grasped every one of the
British agitators by the scruff of
the neck, hurled them on board
a homebound steamship and
told them never to return. There
was a terrible outcry ahout the
highhanded methods; all Eng
land was in a ferment, but
Smuts did not care. He prevent
ed the strike.-'
FARMER. LAWYER. POLITI-
CIAN.
Smuts was born on a farm in
the Transvaal, ten years after
his father had assisted in trounc-
ing the British at Majuba Hill.
He was anti- British then, and
remained so for ten years more.
Then he went to England for a
university education in law.
He returned pro-British, but
did not practice it very long
because he began the practice of
law as some Ameiican
have been known to do, by go-
ing into politics. In those days,
which was about the time Dr.
Jameson made his unsuccessful
run across the border for the
purpose of annexing the Boer
republics to the British Empire,
it did not pay a politician in
the Transvaal to be very pro-
British, so Smuts went out and
shot a couple of Jameson's men
and became anti British again.
Then he becameKruger's State's
Attorney, which corresponds to
our Secretary of State, and in
that position he was able to tell
the British statesman what he
thought of them, except that he
put his sentiments into diplom
atic language. His Utters to
London were splendid in senti
ment and most distressing in
results, for they brought on the
war of 1899 1902.
Note writing at an end, Smuts
went into the campaign as a
private and ended as a general
and one of the peace commit
sioners. I was with his com-
mando for weeks and I learned
to know him as the best whist
player in the army He was a
good fighter, too, but he prefer
red whist because he thought it
was more exciting than killiag
perfect strangers. The old Boers
thought be was very wicked be-
cause he played cards, and once,
when I tried to make a snapshot
photograph of him as he was
sitting on the ground playing a
four handed game, he thrust his
cards behind him, sprang to his
feet and cried in wild aiarm:
"For heaven's sake, don't do
that; a photograph like that
would convince the whole coun-
try thnt I was in league with
the devil, and I should never be
able to run for office again.'"
MOMENTOUS ELOQUENCE.
It was as one of the Boer
peace commissioners, who met
General Kitchener and Sir Al-
fred Milner, the British commis-
sioners, that Smuts rose to the
rank of statesmen. Thecommis
sioners had been unable to agree
and the Boers returned to the
convention of the national del
estates to obtain new instruc
tions whether they should
Continued on 3rd page.
Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association,
L IU I TE D.
Authorized Capital 5,000
-------------LOW RATES FOR-----------
WEEKLY SIK & ACCIDENT BENEFITS
and LIFE INSURANCE
Prompt and Satisfactory Adjustments of Claims.
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Are you Worried about Baby ?
HOW to feed Baby is often a great worry to
mothers who are unable to nurse their
babies themselves. Ordinary cow's milk-
however prepared at homeis not a suitable
ubstitute for the mother's milk. It is acid in
reaction, contains harmful germs and forms
dense curds in the stomach that cannot be
digested. Decide to use the 'Allenburys' Foode
which are the only series of Foods scientifically
Adapted to the growing requirements of the
child. You will be delighted when you see
how well your baby thrives on this Method of
Infant Feeding. The 'Allenburys' Foods are free
from all dangerous organisms; they are portable,
being in powder form and packed in sealed tins.
The Milk Foods Nos. 1. and 2 require the addition
of hot water only to prepare them for use.
A PURE. COMPLETE AND PROGRESSIVE DIETARY.
MHcnburgsFcods
MILK FOOD No. t. MILK FOOD No. 2. MALTED FOOD No. S.
from birtb to 3 months From S to 7 months From 7 mouths upwards
Unsolicited Testimony.
'Hsr LIU Ss.sd Iht -Allenburys' Feoos."
Dssr <*, Barb* lot.
Will vou kindly send mc a copy of your ptmphlet on Infant
Feeding and Management. My baby at six weeks of age as
very ill, being nable to digest the cow's milk. 1 tried many
artificial foods with'* t success, and always contidt-r hrr life
aavivl by 'he 'Allenbuty Fuoo. Shr i >w nn f th fin st
Chil usu ol bcr age I know and ii Mill led < v il on your I "d.
Faithfully yours, h. I. Walton.
"The Finest laky la Iht lalaaa."
Gent'emea. Trinidad.
I send vou beresrilh photos of our baby Frank sr'.o is nearly
16 monthi old, snd is on- of t'ie tinrt r'-il rrn, and hsi never
been ill though wc live in a tcij yihesiiny .'i hi. psrhfna lb*
n o*t unhealthy in ihe nl nwl. Uur hide boy, owing lo his
Dfcilhet t serious illness, was fed on your Milk and Mailed Fixids
until he was a year old. He began with Milk Foo No. i and
finished with the Mailed Fond Whenhj astii monhsold ht
was the finest b by in ihe liland and w glied 2jt i V I sand
phoiosofhun Idiffercol agesand I ihinktohi lilyoty >ui fo 'Is.
that I bare written >ou this and recujiiiieiid tln-m to ill of our
friends and acquaintances. Yours truly, Thimas I'o ter.
Th 'AllenBury*' Foods ara made under special process**
by machinery, and art entirely untouched by hand.
aV~ sVrffe for fro* book "Infant Feaeffno
at Maiiaeamont" 64 pagia of valuable
Informal/on far every mafhar.
Allen & Hanburys Ltd.. London. England.
had 300 Years.
F.slahli:
All 1013
The Tribune
for Modern Printing
V


The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9, 1916.
L. OILBKKT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFKICK:
Carnar Shirley & Charlotte St
Satsau, N. P., Bahamm
HHONK IBS. p. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Nlon.tay, WeJnesiiay and Fiiclay
str-gle copy ...... ... l,|
TatMiay, an-! Thursdaylingl* oopy i i
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WatWa ............ 5,1
Monthly ............is. 6.1
Buarterly..........4s. fxl
alfYcailv...... gt,
fpiirlv ...... I8s
We are asked to announce
that the new Ice Plant of Mr.
H. H. M. Johnson is making
ice for the first time today.
The Annual Festival of the
Combined Churches, St. James'
and Charity Tabernacle, Free
town, will be held on Tuesday
next the 12th inst. Don't for
et!
I'AYAHI.I. IN \l>VANCi.
\terrtiMiii> Rota M ounce per line
b MM inwrtian; three peaea si line
fctt ?coinl insertion ; aiKlMn) 1 1
the for suhtqnent imerti 1 >
Advertisements under eight line* 4s.
NOTIi' I When Cert -. , r
Article* ate signed with IJ
or initials, "r \vil/i i t r art
marked "Communicated, the bdil t rnrntt
not ntcetearily be he'd It b* in agreement
u ilk the 1: ti then in / ilk the
moil* Install 11, or in
tke cast of "Letter* to tke Editor," in
meant th tent intertti and im-
portance to warrant tublii 1(1 n.
Zbe Gnomic
Sim vir l.\ \ September 9.1916
We are anxious to draw
careiul attention to the com-
munication in this issue con-
cerning the effort tins Colony
is to make in October 00 be-
half of our wounded and sick
soldiers. We wish we could
more forcibly express our
deep sense of the ever in-
creasing need there is for our
gifts to this grand cause. The
fury of the strife is reaching
its height and our men an
being killed and battered in
ever growing numbers. Many
of us clench our teeth and
long for the chance to take
our place beside our dsvoted
and dauntless soldiers. But if
that be denied us, we can
with unutterable compassion
make it our work to find
means to relieve the pain anil
help on the recovery of those
who are maimed and suffer-
ing. God bless them We
have never had liner men. We
believe it will even be found
that the average of our war-
riors is higher than at any
other time. And let it never
for one instant be thought
that the fighting can end be-
fore the brutal German na-
tion has been beaten to its
knees. Germany is now fight-
ing for a diaw. I his would
leave her free to start another
war later on. We are DOW, at
frightful cost, beginning to
grind the cruel heart out of
her. We must go on relent-
lessly at this terrible task till
she in bitter tears repents and
cries for mercy. At first many
people doubted the truth of
statements concerning Ger-
man atrocities. But not only
have these statements been
more than verified. Other
things have kept on happen-
ing which show the desperate
brutality of our foe and which
places him outside the pale
of civilized peoples. Wesim
plv must crush this robbei
nation whose spoils drip
with the blood of uncounted
victims. We make this early
appeal in order that it may
catch the eye of the many
thoughtful readers of this
journal on the out islands.
With all the earnestness at
our command we lay this ur
gent matter Ifefore them.
"OUK DAY"
THURSDAY, OCTOBER
19th, 1916
As this latter sustestion more
immediately affects the Out Is
lands, it is proposed that own
ers and captains of vessels pro
ceeding to Nassau be requested
to convey and deliver such ar
tides freight free as their con
tribution.
His Excellency the Governor
has promised to send a circular
to the Commissioners of the
Out Islands inviting their co
operation and suppoit in the
above proposals, and business
houses in Nassau arecommuni
eating to the same effect with
their agents in the different out
lying districts.
W. C. 15. JOHNSON.
President, Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce
IN consequence of a meeting
of the members of the Cham
bbr ot Commerce with His lix
CBLLBNCT mi: GOVBRHOB which
was held on Monday, the 4th
inst., at Government House,
when Lord Lansdowne's tele
gram to the Governor on the
subject of "Out Hay" was care
fully considered, it was decided
ular meetini' of the
cout.t of the above Fund:
Previously acknow
ledged 131 12 4J
Rock Sound School
per Mi W.I'. Roberts 10 o
Green Turtle Cay
School per Mr H. G.
Higgs 10 8i
Appeal From Lord
Lansdowno to His
Exceliency the
Governor.
I have the honour to in-
form you that the British Red
Cioss Society and the Order
St. John aie oiue more
proposing toappeal through-
out the Empire by street and
other collections upon "Our
at a regular meeting 0
Chamber of Commerce held on
the 7th instant that the appeal
which appears below, and Day" which has been fixed
winch is in somewhat similar for the 19th October. The
terms to that which His Lord money received will be de-
ship addressed about a year ago voted entirely to our wound-
to the people of the British Em
pire through the Governors of
the Colonies and I'retectorates
he given whole hearted support
and that every effort be made
ed soldiers and sailors from
home and overseas'at the
various seats of war. The
generous response that we re-
.ceived lastyear from all parts
through the Chamber to make -,
< o (.hAPnimu of the king s Dominions cu-
rt response vorthyol the LyOlorn <>
It is an appeal on behalf of courages us to hope that the
our sick and wounded, those constantly increasing de
who have been fighting our bat mands for our help may be
ties at the Front, and, coming met by a correspond
as it does very near to each one ing increase of generosity
ol US, ought to receive our deep throughout the Umpire. We
rst sympathy and support. |s|,all |Je trulv grateful to'you
With greater activity in the if vou win ;iSsist (Uir work
held, such as our operations on by organising an appeal and
the>ommeandatbalomk,.the ^^ |fc s """^^^^^.^Zd for Our Sick and wounded at
to be verv material lv increase it
the casualty list of officers and >? .,. .
men for the month of August I shall be greatly obliged
alone amounted to very neatly if you will kindly commuiii
130,000. icate the contents of this ca
Oo "Our Day," 1915, the Ba lb leg ram to your Ministers
hanias contributed no less a and recommend the proposal
sum than 2,650 for motor am to their fovourable consider
bulancesas well as providing ation.
155 for general Red Cross Their Majesties the King
purposes. Although, in view of and Queen and her Majesty
the very many charitable de Queen Alexandra are giving
mands which have since been us their generout patronage,
made on the coinnuinitv, it , r ,, .
would be unreasonable to ex ;""1 << that you Will also
pect a similar liberal cootribu e your way to help us m
tion this year, the Chamber of the same splendid maum-i as
Commerce is anxious to assist you did last year, and that
His Excellency in obtaining a we may have the invaluable
result which will reflect credit assistance also of Ladv Al
Nassau, N. P.,
September 9, 1916.
The Editor of The Tribune.
Sir.
May I take the liberty of ack-
nowledging through your col-
umns the receipt of further
contributions of stamps to the
Red Cross Stamp Fund, from
the following:
Lady Allardyce, Miss K. Al-
lardvce, 300 stamps; Gordon
Chapter I. O. 1). L: -Mrs. Tu-
dor, 140 stamps; Misses Mat
thews, Miss A. M. Hay, Miss H.
Twyoam, Miss Defries; Miss
['. M. Halanen, Miss Meade Mc
Donald, Mrs. S. V. S. Albury,
IOO stamps ; Miss Kathleen Al
bury, 100 stamps ; Mrs Brooks
over 1000 stamps ; The Misses
Knight, New York City ; K. E.
and O. A. chapter l.'O. D. E.
408 stamps; Mrs Along, Trin
idad; The Lady Supci mtendent;
LaunCeSton, Tasmania ; Miss
Garden,Grenadaj Miss Sarah
Jessamy, Tobago; Miss Ada
Tricher, Trinidad, iooostamps
Miss Sophy bethel, Lotus Pat
rol. 1st Bahama ("nil Guides,
3700 stamps; Hibiscus Patrol
1st Bahama Girl Guides, 2100
stamps;3ndBHriama Girl Guides
1600 stamps; Mr. C. O.Anderson,
1 1st Babamma Wolf Cubs, 300
1 stamps; gth Bahama Scouts -
! The Current, 1000 stamps ; Mr.
J. S. Hall, 587 stamps; Mr,
Robert F. Abraham. Grenada :
Mr. S. V, S Albury, 100 stamps;
Mr. Harold Albury, loostamps;
Mr. Alan Stewart, Mr Jack
Culmer, Imperial West Indian
Assurance Association.
Thanking you for your co
operation,
I have the honour to be
Your obedient servant
DR. WALTER HESS,
Local Secretary.
will tell youlots of us eat
si avengeisand don't know it.
"Over the hill" the people
raise pigs in abundance and
they allow them to go all
about without being penned
up a day. They eat every
thing that they happen to run
up against, viz: d' ad chick
ens, snakes, cats, and dozens
of other things. Imagine a
pig eating something of the
sort and killed the next day
for use on your table !
By the way, is it lawful for
owners of such animals to
allow them to run about this
way, I sincerely hope that
somebody will see to it and
save the health of the com
munity.
Thanking you for space
I reside,
OVER THE HILL.
SHIPPING
on the Colony, and suggest that
employers, while giving a per :
centage of their day's sales,
should invite each one of their
employes to set aside one day's
pay on "Our Day." Thursday,
'lie 19th October, in order that
it may be entirely devoted to,
our wounded soldiers and sai
Ion.
The Chamber will receive any
sums, however small, donated
for that purpose from private in
dividuals, artificers, ratpentets.
labourers, wharf hands and Oth
ers.
In the case of other iadividu
als, such as peasant proprietors,
small farmers and spout:'
who are unable to conveniently
set aside one day's earnings, the
following alternative is recom-
mended : namely, that contri
buttons in sisal, sponge, poa
toes, green truck, or any other
saleable commodity be substitu
ted in lieu of cash, and forward
ed as soon as possible to the
Chamber of Commerce, which
undertakes to dispose of it for
the benefit of our "Our Day."
laidvce.
Signed) LANSDOWNE,
President,
British Red Cross Society.
:o:
BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD
St. Agnes Sunday School
Gregory Town Lieu
thera 14 o
:o:
Daughters of the
Empire Red Cross
Guild-
Collected by Mrs. Km
drick, Hope Town Abaco
4 0
:o:
Children of the
Empire Fund for
maimed and blind
Soldiers and
Sailors
We have been requested bv
the Private Secretary to ac-
knowledge the following
sums which have been receiv-
ed by His Excellency on ac
Mr. and Mis. Theodore
Hany Payne -the newly
weds-- leavt s today for a
short trip to iovernors Har-
bour, hlcuthcin.
(Communicated)
Cricket-
A return Cricket Mati h
was played on the Eastern
Parade yesterday afternoon,
between tb *M. David'sCric
ketClub,and theSt.Andrew's
Cricket Club which resulted
in a victory tor the latter by
15 runs. The top score of 11
runs was mad-' l>\ Lionel
Lunn. Splendid bowling was
done by C Sweeting. The
playing of both Cluds was
remarkably good, but the
bowling Of St. Andrew's was
too much for the St. David's
Team. The follow ing is the
scores for both innings, St.
David's 35 runs, Si .\ idrewV
5-
9th September, iojf>.
EditOl of "I he Tribune"
Dear Sir:
Kindlv allow me to
give the public a little in
formation through your col
uinns :
It is certainly a good thing
that we don't know what we
eat most of the t ime. It is a
miracle just how we manage
to live under it. Just imagine
eating a scavenger! Well, 1
The S. S. "Monterey" left
New York at 4 p.m. on Thins-
day, the 7th, with 23 pass- ti-
gers and 30 packages for
Nassau.
'The Motor vessel "Panama"
left Miami, T la. yesterday
nun ing for Nassau.
'The motor vessel "Frances
E." arrived from Miami, Fla.
mi Saturday afternoon, the
! 2nd, with a cargo of it e and
shingles and the following 17
passengi is;
Messrs. George C. Roberts,
Thomas Cleaie, Gustavus
Cleare, Thaddeus Nixon,
VinnieHiggs,MyrtlandKemp
Chas. Bleby, James H. Peet,
Alonzo Gt 1 ft 111, AIIkd Scott,
iH. M. Hare, Wm. E. Sands,
.1. R. Knowles, II. S. Bragg, W
:T.l\. Trapp; ttfesdaaies Sarah
Davis, Lydia Miller.
The S. S. "'Antilla'" arrivi d
from New York on Wednes-
day morning, the 6th, w ith
a general 1 argo.
ST. JOHNS CATHEDRAL
Meeting Street.
R( \. (1. A. Thompson, S.T.
I). Minister. Inspiring si t
vices tomorrow. 11 a.m. "t n
seen Environment" 7.30p.m.
Tne troubling of Si loams
Waters." Good Music. 1 he
I 'ublic are cordially inviti d.
Ask any business man vou
know what be thinks about
insurance. Nine times out of
t' n he will tell you thai he
carries a policy with some
good company and intends to
get more. I here is a tea son
for this. You can get fen s
few cents per week h policy
with your Home Company
that protects you w hi If you
live and provides foi bin ial
with money left for the fa mi,
lv. The Impei ial West Indian
Assurance Association was
organized for youi hem lit.
Telegrams
8th Si pleuiber, iqib.
London, Oth: While t heir
compatriots were busy Wed*
nesday North of the Si unnie
warding off Gei man c< mnler
attack or engaged in anil-
lery duels the rreni I south
of the river dn ve their men
fui ther into the German lines


>%
The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9, 1216.
i o uc iiau at all Grocers
C. L. LofthOUSe-^ompany's Agent
ig heavj cdS
uallies on ilicin, ui cording to
fell ograd.
On Uie Macedonian front
inly bombardments are in
progress.
In Albania the Italian ad
for notewoithy gaini in Ognott inflicti
stubborn 11*;||ting ovei a fiont
oi [our miles between \ ei
uiandovillers and Chilly.
I'ue Cj -nil in-. Inive Deeii
! irced t> give up the u<>i I i
em (> n tion of Vermaiidovill-
ers while the I'reuch have vance has been stopped, says
o cupi :d i ,n' uiiiskins of the Berlin, and Hie i uetonic Al-
i,nl \ \ junction town of lies have recaptured allposi
Chan I nes and thrown their jtions taken from them recent
forces along the lailwny run 1\ Eas't ol Avtona.
ningfrwrnCliaulnesstoUoye.i Washington, 6: -In their
Between Chaulnes audChil journey from Norfolk to
|y to the north, the operations Philadelphia the interned
of the French, with Barleux German ships Prinz Eitel
and ul.imately Peronne as Friederich and Kronprinz
their objective, met with sue I Wilhelm will be conveyed by
cess American warships. The es
S Kasl of Belloysynterre furjeort will serve the doubte put
tl.er German trenches were'pose of guarding against at
captured and most of thevil temps at escape and protect
lages fell into French hands, ing the German boats Iron.
Paris says that the number attack by Allies warships, as
of prisoners taken apparently jit will be necessary for the
-nvas large. Berlin admits the squadron to pass outside the
loss of Clery which lies a short I three mile limit.
Northwest of Pe-
rograd say that the Russians
have taken the offetisive ovi i
the entire Dobi udja front, at
tacking the invading Lhilga
; nans and 'hi mans from the
| Danube to the Black Sea.
An undated Bulgarian re
! pori says that Bulgarian and
German forces captured the
f irtified town of D*bric, 50
miles Southeast of Burn rest
md three towns on the Rou
111,1.linn Black Sea coast, n ai
the Bulgarian frontier.
Sofia concedes that the Rou-
' mani ins occupied an import-
ant Bulgarian town on the
Danube.
Reports from Petrograd in-
.In.lie that 1 lie Russians have
i*mharked on an important
enterprise on the northern
end of their front, crossing
the Dvina and engaging in
sustained fighting with the
Germans.
Below l.emberg there is
further retreat of theAustro-
German forces to the western
bank of the I.ipa.
The British steamships
Stathay and Heathdene, the
Ellerman Liner Tagus and
the Norweigaian steamer
Hisvuiso have been sunk.
New York: There was 15
deaths and 4 new casesof in
fan tile paralysis during the
past 24 hours.
distance
ronne.
In Galicia, on the front of
/.Iota Lipa and
: o;
qth September, iqi6
London : German troops
Dneister'8'00* ,ll(> Somme front last
LET THE KAISER. ANSWER..
The brighter day was sot
lopg in coming. Within * few
years the United States ofSouth
Africa rose out of the ashes of
the war, and it comprises prac-
tically all the vast territory
soutli of tlie Limpopo River
Today the Boer republics are
nut of existence, but in their
places has risen the Boer nation.
The British government gave
1 he confederated colonies a Par
liament and a liberal constitu
tion. The Boers are in the ma-
jority throughout the country,
and consequently they make the
country's laws.
Louis Botha and Jan Smuts
are the leading Boers, and con
sequent ly these two men, who
wept as they signed away the
independence of their countries
fourteen years ago, are the
greatest men in Soutli Africa,
the one a civil and the other u
military dictator. One has
gone beyond the borders of his
country and has added to the
British Rmpire that vast terri-
torv formerly known IS German
Southwest Africa. Smuts has
gone afield and is about to pre
sent to his sovereign another
huge, territory, German Last
Africa. Then these brothers in
politicsstatesmanship and arms
may feel warranted in turning
their eyes toward Berlin and to
wonder what are the thoughts
of that same Prussian Kaiser
who virtually promised Kruger
almost a score of years ago to
he his roval protectorand
The Summer Sale then broke ids pledge.
._ a ,l\t T* 1. f
of White Goods at
Zachary Taylor's in
Market S is on again
next week. Read his
advertisement in last
weeks papeps and
Don't Miss the great
bargains.
'New York Herald"
Continued from !! page.
Rivers, the Russians have
driven the I uetons from for
tified [i iti< ms and have tak-
en 4500 pris 000 were Germans. Berlin con
cedes a t ictorj to the Rus-
sians in this region.
Violent fighti g continues
around Brzezany, Southeast
of Lemberg, but here Berlin
says the Russians have suffer
ed heavy losses and made no
advances.
Russian attacks near Zbo-
row Northern Galicia and
in Volhynia have also failed,
according to Berlin.
Fighting is still going on
in the Carpathians where the
Russians claim to have cap
tured additional heights.
In the Roumanian theatre
German and Bulgarian troops
are still engaged with the
Roumanians in the Dobrudja
region.
Berlin reports the capture
of Tutraka works together
with their armoured batteries
The Roumanians claim
that they have re-taken all
the Dobrudja frontier fls1 of
the'D mill": between Bulgaria
and Roumania.The towns of
IslaCX and Kalafat on the
Danube have been bombard
ed by the Teutons.
The Russians in Turkish
Armenia continue their pro
gress against the Turks near
in-ht in.id- repeated efforts
to take buck ground won bv
tin; French in their latest ad
vance South of the river.
I ho struggle between Berny
and Chaulnes was of unus
ual violence. The French
every* here held then ground
():i the Verdun Front the
Fn n< h troops were subjected
to counter attacks in captur
ed fust line German positions
over a front of nearly a mile
Northeast of Verdun which
the French took yesterday.
German efforts were unsuc
cessful.
Rriiish troops on the Somme
front were comparatively in
active. Further north near
Guinchy the British raided
German trenches and inflict
ed -<\ ere losses on the occu
punts.
The Bulgarian Statement
of September 4th regarding
Rou mania announces thede
feat of the Roumanians in
two engagements and success
ful Bulgarian advance along
Roumanian Black Sea terri
tory.
On the Italian front, in Su
gano Valley, there was heavy
fighting Wednesday night.
Austrian attacks on Italian
nositions at Civaron were de
feated.
A g;ret battle is imminent
in Southeastern Roumania.
Reports unofficially from Pet
surrender unconditionally 01
return to the field and re
new the war. For days the con-
vention was at loggerheads; the
delegates refused to assume the
responsibility of voting their
republics out of existence. At
length Smuts gained a hearing.
He told them the truth about
the situation, that it was mi
possible to light longer, that
they could expect no help from
Europe ther resistance meant useless
slaughter.
declared,
The Certainty of
Christ's Coming
Sermon for the thirteenth
Sunday after Trinity
St. Mark XIII, 31 Heaven
and earth shall pass away,
but My words shall nut pass
away.
In reading Saint Mark's Gos-
pel we notice that his report of
Our Lords words about lbs
second coming agree with the
account given at greater length
by St. Matthew. The subject
is of tremendous importance*
and Christians should think
about it not only in the solemn
season of Advent but at all
times.
I. Our Lord tells us that He
will'"come again with glory'.
This means that there will be
an awful majesty about Mis
Coming- St. Peter, in his sec-
ond Epistle (III, 10) says The
which we may read, that the
Lord's Coming is at hand. This
does not mean that we are to
make foolish predictions of the
date of our Lord's Advent, as
certain of the sects have done,
but Christ warns us to be al-
ways watching and waiting.
He'toldusof that the day and
hour Unoiceth ho man, and that
even He Himself, as man, was
ignorant of the date, because at
the Incarnation He took all our
human limitations.
4. None the less He declares
that His prediction will cer-
tainly come true. The text
makes two plain statements :
1. Heaven and earth shall
pass away,
2. My words shall not pass
away.
No doubt Christ foresaw the
unbelief and doubt of many
peisons. There were doubters
and scoffers in the days of the
Apostles themselves, as there
are also at the present time.
They still say "where is the
promise of His coming, for since
the fathers fell asleep, all things
continue as they were from the
beginning of the creation,'' But
our belief in the fulfilment of
these words of Christ rests up-
on our belief that He is the
eternal Son of God. He Him-
self resied His prophecy con-
cerning His future Coming on
His divinity, for when the High
Priest put Him on His oath, as
to whether He was indeed the
Son of God. He replied "Thou
hast said : . hereafter
shall ye see the Son of Man sit
ting on the right hand of power
and coining in the clouds of
heaven."
5. Our Lord tells us that at
His Coming He will reward
the righteous and punish the
wicked. When we say, in the
creed, that He will come "to
judge the quick and tha dead"
we mean that the actions and
lives of all men, living and de
parted, will be examined and
weighed by Christ who is both
Saviour and Judge.
6. How then can we best pre-
"Brethren," he declared, in
what IS regarded among South heavens shall pass away with a
All icans as one of the most elo
quent and certainly one of the
most mementOUS speeches ever
made in that country, "we have
vowed to stand fast to the bit-
ter end; let us be men, and ack-
nowledge that that end hasnow that Day?
great noise and the elements shall
melt until fervent heat, the earth
also auJ the works that are there
in shall be burned up. Could
words describe better the uni
versa I convulsion of nature at
come, and that it is more hitter
than ever we thought it could
he. For death itself would be
(wr< I com .10 (I with the step
which we must now take. But
let us bow before the will of
God.
'The future is dark indeed,
but wewi'.lnot give up courage,
nor our hope and trust in God.
No one shall convince me that
this unparalelled sacrifice which
the African nation has laid
upon the altar of freedom will
be in vain. It has been a war
for freedom -not only for the
freedom of the Boers, but for the
freedom of all the nations of
South Africa. Us results we
leave in God's hands. Perhaps
it is His will to lead our nation
through defeat, through abase-
ment, ves, and even through the
valley Of the shadow of death
to the glorv of a nobler future
a. He shall semi His Angels
and gather togetlur His Elect
from the jour wind*. By these
words Our Lord indicates the
work of those spiritual beings
known as the angels. He men-
tions them several times in con
nection with His Second Com-
ing They will provide. He
says, for the safety of God's
people when judgment falls up-
on the earth; and He will do
nothing until the angels have
placed them beyond harm's
reach ; even as the flood came
not until Noah was safe in the
ark; and Sodom also was not
destroyed till Lot had reached
Zoar, saved by the hands of
Angels.
3. Our Lord warns us to read
the signs of the times in which
we live. Learn a parable oj the
&g tree. The budding of its
leaves shows that summer is
pare for Christ's coming
(a) Bv becoming members of
the Holy Church which He
founded for our salvation. This
took place at our baptism. Do
we value our baptismal posi-
tion ?
lb) By sacramental union
with Christ during this present
life. This is why lie gave us
Sacraments. In Holy Commu-
nion, especially, there is an ad-
vent of Christ, to those who
worthily receive Him, which
prepares them for His grand
and glorious final coming.
(c) By earnest prayer and
meditation on these things.
This is why we meet with our
brethren in public worship,
that we may encourage each
other to look for the Lord's ap-
pearing. Without this belref
the Church's services will have
no meaning.
(d) Bv reading the Bible, for
the Book of God is the record
of man who have "waited for
the Lord" ; and it is given to us
"that we through patience and
comfort of the Scriptures, might
have hope."
to tne glory 01 a noww iuiu imvw ""- *' .........
to the light'of a brighter day." [near, so there arc signs today
FOR SALE
"Peerless" 7 passenger
MOTOR CAR
A good investment for any
one who contemplates rent
ing fcai during the winter
months.
To be sold at a moderate
price.
Apply to
WALETR K. MOORE
.


*.
The Tbune, Nassau, Satuday September 9,1916.
T
Keeping Guard
HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these
preserving the balance of trade.
-THI
SHOE 1 STORE
is on guard, and in spite of the advanng price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
3io cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
%
K
N
KNPWLES
Si
With these reinforcements he Big Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man
kets abroad.
G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big- 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
WONDERFUL
olid Gold
Bmfa>ty Pm
Brooch**
t with
Pino Paarla
3 /_ /" BACH.
Bwry Brooch
ll c*rafully
aminad baton
leaving in.
work loop and
an paarla are
Garantaad to
acurely set.
Wa will replace
KaaioIl'Maa.ir
any braooh Dol
perfectly aatla-
raclory, or we
will prompt:*
refund your
money Inchul
11 .- '. 1. 1, 1 -!...-.
charsaa you
have paid, jn-
aa you wish
r.milrely Ihe
rlivai>eHi Paar.
Ml Rarely I'll
brooch on lh
market. Kach
brooch In a
pretty relral
lined caae suit-
able for presen-
tation. Six pat-
tern* aa eliown:
Swallow.Uuttertlv. Creacenl. Horieahoa. rown
and Shamrock. fcat'h.............. 3,. iotj\
Three for....8 S <2.l>. 8lxfor....lB/B IfYlSi
FMTAOI .raad.l UM.I.h Kaapl^ foraan |,|,|,,
ONK llrooeh 4d. INe) ( I.'v'oiL'lb *<"* Hd IJfcl
SIX llroocbea
-I d*C)
11 laiei
Sand POST CARD for Catalog, of Jeweller,
Wati-hi-a. (lock a. Ml far I'nte. Cutlery. Kouii
I ol et Article.. Fancy tiooda ,ic It
I) .i-o-t you a Penny and may ear. yon
tain 1
Pound.: We"rfua7rinVa7hrf,edallviry'o1f
all our foods luring the War BhOBld an) (Ooda
be lo.t iii trannli. we undertake to replace .him
abaolutaly HEK OF CHAHOB. Writ! our '"., .
forKelerence. Banker!: London City and Mid.
land llauk. Ltd.. is Corn Street. Hrmiii. Kng.
FEARS LTD.7(1*1) Wh0,3Sr,;11*P.""'
M BRISTOL BRIDOB. UnlBTOL, (,.
ULUI
"Elgin
>>
Reliable
Sold by
W. Hilton
260 Bay St.
Arrow
COLLAR
Made of a fine
white Moire
Madrasan at-
tractive novelty
that is in good
form.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, PEABODY & CO.. Inc.
MAKERS. TROY. N. Y. U.. 8. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Aferw.
HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. per tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. fop 3d.
At The New York House
J. C. Coakley's
Flake Tobacco.
This Tobacco made express
lyfor J. C. Coakley
Long leaf, Fine flavor and
aroma. Keeps hard and firm.
Made to catch the trade of
those who know what good
tobacco is and have got tired
of some of the old brands that
have gone bad.
Give it a trial and you will
enjoy smoking like you used
to.
Prices 6d. per flake3
dozen flakes at bd. per flake.
Satisfaction guaranteed oi
money refunded.
Just a hint"The Allies"
id. Cigars are the best ever,
and still at the front and good
to the end.
J. C. COAKI.EY,
304 Bay St.
is one of the most destructive of animals, and is
a source of much danger to life.
SUNLIGHT SOAP
preserves and lengthens the life of your clothes, but
it is a source of destruction to all dirt and unclean-
liness. The amount of destruction wrought by a tiger
in a single night, cannot
be compared to the amount
of destruction wrought by
inferior soap in a single
wash-day. Sunlight Soap
is an absolutely pure Soap,
that saves your clothes,
iime, money, and labour.
TRY IT.
<
4m
DRINK-.
Welch'sGrape juice.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
i Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
i Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doe.
A BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
Phone 214
East Bay St.
Chas. E. Bethel 1
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
_______Spirits
JOHN BUTLER
Office : 367 Bay St.. East 'Phone 245
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Real state Agent
?
EXPORTER
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
---------------------AGENT----------------------
ICE
"TPHE Bahamas Timber Co.
' begs to draw attention
of the public to the fact that
they are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.
NORWCIH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cyprrsi at 181
V per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market5 j6x
Primes Cypress at 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our
*me guarantee as I be Bests.
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Also cheaper grade in stock
April 6th. .916 C. C SAUNDERS.
k


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