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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916. L. GTLBKKT DDPUOB, Editor and Proprietor. OFFICK Corner Shirley & Chn.rl.Mte Sla Nassau, N. P., Baka~i. PHONK MO. I'. O. IX IBS. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, WadMvJeJ *IK*. Ft*J* Tunday, and 1 huneUy—Mgttaopy i.i afcttmtav I i.i Wtckfe Monthly . is. M uarlerly ... ... 4 %  %  alfYearlv... .;<. Yearly ids 8 I'AVAHI.K IN 40VANCK Mvi-rn-i —> 1S i*nce ,-er ime brtotinMrti :i; trine* peace iN>| jent insert: A(1verli*iiients un.ler eiuhl lines 4s. Zbc tribune Saturday. August 2b. 1916 NOTICE—Wkm Cnittp&niimi > Artkli .red with : %  : %  .. %  ttr'i name %  initials, or with a pseud nvm. or art %  MMrftei 'V. mmi.iii,-j:,'J,' :/:,• fcdji r M>! Ml Hrcssari'/v 6t *.'J :.. t. > tarn irA tM mode oj expression Insu.h instance*, or in the tarnf"Letters to the (Utter,** insertion only means that the matter or point of view ..idtred of sufficient imttrttt and fa porttuttx to tmnrmsu fmbUt iti n. It will interest our readers especially those who have contributed so generously to the Wed Cross—to know that Lady AJlardyce and His Excellency the Governor have been appointed to be Lady of Grace and Knight of Grace respectively of the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, with the sanction and approval of His Majesty, who is the Sovereign Head and Patron of that Order. We are sure that it must be a source of gratification to His Excellency and Lady Allardyce at this juncture, while the world War is being waged, to have their able, vigorous and valuable services to this grand cause recognized in this way, To them this must come as a double recognition, fust of wh.it they have toiled to achieve here in the last 12 mos. towards helping to relieve the sufferings of those who are fighting our battles, and second, of the loyal and patriotic support of Bahamians and others. It is gratifying to learn that Lady Allardyce, after many years of valuable work for the order in Australia, Fiji and the Falklands, was in 1911 elected an Ilonorarv Associate, and that while in the latter two Colonies ^ir William supported hai in the many Red Cross activities with which she w-as connected. The "Tribune" tenders its sincere congratulations to their Excellencies on this well-merited honour. There are signs in Germany that the Government is Strug gling against the Jingo spirit which forced on the War. Early this year, the fncraters were in the ascendant and the men at the head of af fairs were not denying the statements of these hot heads that indemnities would be exacted and territory annex ,.,1 by Germany at the end of the war. It would seem, how ever that the Government is taking steps to counteract the efforts of these silly ex tremists. Here are a fewex11 acts from Government semi-official Organs which intended to be counterblasts to the vapourings of the frenized Jingoes and which show a wish on the part of the Powers that be i to prepare the minds of the people for the dark days that are steadily coming. The "Berliner Tageblatt" says that even Bernhardi had warned Germany against annexations in Europe. Another paper speaks of its being an illusion to suppose that a submarine ileet could be built that would be strong enough to create "What is required, a revolutionary change in the military situation." The "Weser Zeitung" says: "The position is grave. The enemy is everywhere pressing us hard. . Every where hinderings and ham perings, accumulating pro vocal ions of t bean xiousques tion : How is it all to e d?'' Now it must be borne in mind that alongside of these gloomy statements there are others intended to keep up the heart of the German people. At the time there must be good reasons why the Kaiser and his advisers should both permit and inspire such ut terances. The truth seems to be that Germany is now fighting for a draw, and is preparing to face that pros pect. But the allies are fight ing for victory in order to dictate terms that will draw the teeth of Germany as n mil tary Power. These Govern ment admissions that all is not well with our foe are a a great encouragement to us. Evidently we are getting on in this grim business —:o: — We have received a number of communications with regard to our recent articles on theSisd industry. None of them dis agree 111 any essential detail with our conclusions; all concur with our statement that some drastic reforms are necessary if this industry is to take its piace among the most important of this Colony's sources of income. Space does not permit of our publishing all the suggestions which our correspondents have made but we reproduce a few of the leading ideas in the hope that SOMEHOW they m..\ have a good effect. One suggestion is that the fibre should he classified or graded according; to quality, and this suggestion is so obviously just, that comment is hardly necessary. As tilings are there is a sort of classification by which Sisal is called either No one or No. two, but this is only a haphazard arrangement dependent on the caprice or honesty of individual buyers. The present system, however, is palpably vicious, as the honest grower who takes pains to ship nothing but clean and dry Sisal gets unreal encouragement ,-isn reward for his trouble This evil, in common with a host of oth ers which could he enumerated, can only he remedied by concert ed action on the part of the bay ers. or, better still, by the in %¡ ointment of B responsible and independent body to deal with the situation. As to the former we ronfeM that we see hut little hope of amelioration. The at titude of the merchant is one of childish Suspicion and mistrust. Prices ares-ill forced up to %  point that is simply ruinous. why, it is hard to tell. The in evitable result of this unhealthy competition is that the industry must suffer. It is sufficiently patent to any impartial observer that Sisal at twenty six shillings and tenpence per hundred can not pay. How is it being done? Certainly not by honest means. Can it be that there is in some instances a wholesale system of cheating? We HAVE been told that this is the case, but we don't want to believe that it can be true. — :o:— Private Alexander, Butler one of our fighting boys, says some interesting things in a letter to Mr. A. W. Stuart of this city. We will quote some extracts for the benefit of our readers:—"I just arrived in England a few weeks ago. After I left Jamaica 1 went to Halifax 1 got frostbite and it made me sick and I am just able to write you now T hough 1 have been sick, I am still trying to do my duty bravely which is what I left borne for. 1 am trying to fear God, and I am going to honour the King. I hope if I don't die in this war I will be able to see you all one day to come. Tell E for me a soldier's life in the British Army is the sweet est life to live." Children of the Empire Fund for maimed andblind Soldiers and Sailors. We have been requested by the Private Secretary to ac knowledge tlie following sums which have been received by His Excellency on account of the above Fund.— Previously acknow fedged ;T ,,D I The inhabitants of the lower EWgue, bleu thera, per Mr D. O. Johnson 14 5 The schoolcnildren at 8 Mile Rock,Grand Ba liama, pel Mr W. B. Cooper 13 2 Proceeds of an enter tainment at Harbour Island organized by Mr. Wallace Thompson 12 o o £129 8 8 DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE RED CROSS GUILDFrom the special jury in the Eibel case— Christadoulakis vs. Christofilis, in the Supreme Court of the Bahama Islands, August 8lh to I Gill, 1916 £ I. 24th August 1916. The Editor of the 'Tribune" Sir: May I take the liberty of acknowledging through your columns, the receipt of further contributions to the Wed 5S C^dJYI^D 5HYOT. h. C. Christie 1 Cheer and blithe the airs, but chill, The city of the silent dead, When half in frolic, half in dread, We mounted to the sacred hill Like children swinging hand in hand. We loved as man and woman will; Ah what had been had we not found This sober, consecrated ground Where every voice but God's was still ? II 0 bitter hours of thought to us While roses burned to ashes grev While tongues were tied and dared not sav, Loves falsehoods trite and hazardous. Ah did the dead hearts understand That our hearts too had died ? did they .Mourn with us in our long despair, When burying those corpses there We sorrowfully turned away. Guides;Miss s. E. Thompson; King Edward Y1I and Queen Alexandra Chapter I.O.D.E. —Mrs. N. J. French, Miss Lillian Sutton ; Dr. R. F. W. MacN. IIIK-S; Mr. Robert Minns, Exunia. Thanking you for your co-operation, I have the honour to be, Your obedient servant, DR. WALTER HESS, Local Secretary, Emigration figures for the month ol July, 1916. Outwards Males Q9 Females 83 Total 1H2 Inwards 19G 101 297 INTERINSULAR MAILS To be despatched per sell. "Columbia" forlnagua.Long Cay, Acklins Island, Rum Cay; Clarence Town, Deadman's Cay 'Long Island); The Bight, Arthur's Town (San Salvador) will be made up and (losed on Thursday next, the ijth inst, at I'I a.m. The S.S. "Esperanza" tailed from New York at 1 p.m. on Thursday the 34th with 18 pas sengers and 25 packages for Nassau. SHIPPING The S.S. "Guanlanimo" arrived from Mew York on Wednesday morning the 23rd with a general cargo. from Cuba. She had a lively passage, especially during the night of Thursday. She came in ballast, and will lay up over the hurricane months. Services will be held in the Seventh Day Adventist chapel on East Sim Icy St. Sunday evening at 7.30 August 27, to which all are cordially invited. Subject—"The Anarchist of Law and Society", GOSPEL HALL Dodeswell Siieet. On Sunday evening Mr. H C. Christie will pi each. Subject : "The anger of King Uzziah" or 'the course of tho Church from the Reformation to the Coming Apostacy as shewn from the 26th Chap, of II Chronicles. ST JOHNS CATHEDRALMeeting at, Rev. G. A. Thompson, S.T.I) Minister. Tomorrow, inspiring services, n ,,. „,. -Christ's command to the accused woman". 7.30 ,,. m >\ vertical gospel call". Good music. Extra chairs. The public Cordiall) invited. are The motor vessel "Frances E" arrived from Miami, Fla. on Wednesday afternoon the 23rd with a cargo of ice and shingles and the following pas sengers: — Messrs Lewis A. Mowe, Geo; a m rumors of wars." Cross Stamp Fund, from the| Pratt, Geo. I >< \ M I icr, Thomas,' r ,,m,,K, l,s ,,la, ,,,e Lord's com Gi Nassau Aug. a^th 1916 Editor of the'I nbune Sir, Kindly allow me spare in your valuable columns, to note A feu words relative to the present struggle. What is the danger of w iir p 1 supjx.se that more than half the i % %  pie that talk about war have not Hie smallest idea what it is. In a sentence of brevity it may be reckoned up to be' the union and essence of horrors atrocities, crinies.and sufferings' of which humankind on the face of this globe is capable. Dear readers, this is one of those wars that are spoken "fin the Bible. •'Thereshall |, r wars following: — Yaletta, Malta—Dr. John T. kuther, D.M.O., Hon. T. Vella, Mr. Vincent Lahra, Anonymous, Lyceum Troop Boy Scouts, Miss Good hue, Mrs. Reid, Rev. Can. Arph. Manduca, Mr. John Saliha, Mrs. Levy Greek, Miss OlgS Triolo, Miss Kaine, Mr.Garabott, MissWyat; Dominica — Miss Celia G. Johnson ; Bulawavo, Rhodesia—Miss H. W. Garbutt; Swoa, Figi—Miss M. C. Anderson ; | he HibisU8 Patrol 1st Bahama Girl eenslade, Basil Greenslade, Alfred Ferguson, Jos. Fergu son, Eugene Dorsett, Amos Dean, Israel Ronaby, Theo phi lug Howe, Joseph Brown, Bruce N itnge, H el it on Nottage, Thomas Malone, Walter Fin lev. Joseph Thompson ; Mesdmnes Clo tilda Devalier, Florence John son, Zelonica Tvnes; Misses Selvina Bethel, H. Bethel, Ellen Johnson. The schooner "Winifred M." arrived here yesterday morning mg is drawing nigh. I he close of this tremendous ItrUKRle, shall suieb be the rise or fall of one of the European Kingdoms. Germany, that brutish nation, will either be weakened or ameliorated. Thanks for space, Mr. Editor, Yours Tnilv. CIIAS. H, THOMPSON'. British Foreman Composi tor. "Three more of my men have enlisted this morning" Editor: "Ah A wave of patriotism, I suppose." Foreman Compositor: V i



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* The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916. "Well Perhaps that's the way to put it, hut ihey say they would rather be shot than set any more of your opy!"— Passing Show. 0 Telegrams Boston:—The North German Lloyd liner Wi I If had refugee here since the outbreak of war slipped out of harbour today presumably for New London Connecticut where the submarine Bremen is expected to ar rive. New York:—The heads of the railroads are willing to accept President Wilsons proposed eight hour day for employes and in return ask assurance that prompt measures he taken to have the Inter slate Commerce Commission authorize an in crease in rates A permanent commission is to handle all labour difficulties. August 36th, I916 Washington:— Continued quiet along the Mexican coast has reduced the necessity of keep ingastrong naval force there. Washington: — Navy depart ment official reports pays tri bute to the lire and engine room crews of the destroyer Terry who braved death to save the ship when it hit a reef on the Doinin icaucnast several months ago. The Terry is now ashore in shoal waters hut will be raised and taken to Norfolk. New London, Conn:—The German steamer which left Bos toil vesterdav via Cape Cad Canal arrived here today and tied up at the pier of the Last ern forwarding Company, agent for the German merchant sub marine line. London'—Although the Germans made heavv attack North of the Sommthe French clung to MaurepasVillage which they took yesterday. The Germans are said to have lost heavily. Intimation of extension of the French offensive for thirty miles South of the Somme appear borne out by the announcement of heavy bombardments in that sector. Petrograd:—The Russians re earned their advance along the Turkish front. New York:—On the most act ive trading since the outbreak of the war cotton todav record ed an advance of two dollars a bale. • New York:—A New York City news association cities a British merchant marine officer as authority for the statement that the submarine Riemen was captured by the British and 33 of her crew made prisoners. The officer reached here today Me declared that the Bremen WasCAUlght in Dover Straits by a steel net on August 2nd. Two of the crew lost their lives. The Bremen, while enmeshed in their net, was sighted by the British boat which first tried to remove the Bremen from the net, and then took off her men. The officer declares that the Brit si 1 have remained silent be '•ause another submarine, the American, is on the way over and they want to net her too. 26th August, 1916, London, 24: —The British and French have made substantial tains on the Somme front ac cording to Paris reports. Mature pas has fallen to the French who have pushed forward more than 200 yards beyond the town on B front of a mile and a quarter. The capture of Muurepas leaves Clery almost surrounded and brings the French directly in front of the important rail road town of Combles. Thiepval is about the same po sitiou as Clery and the Allied front as described now resem hies the teeth of a great saw be tween which the Germans are tenaciously holding the ruins of several villages. Despatches from the Somme front indicate that the French are preparing to extend their offensive for a distance of 30 milesSouth of the present battle line. They are reported to have opened a tremendous canonad mg from Fstrees to Latsigny and the bombardment is said to have reached an unprecedented intensity the last two days. No change is reported from the Fast but the Russiansoffen sive in Armenia apparently is assuming powerful proportions. Petrograd reports the re occu pation of the important Arman ian town of Mush arid the cap ture of 2jio prisonersat Nachta The situation on the Saloniki front remains obscure but appar ently there has been no impor tant changes since the Allied flanks were forced back by the Bulgarians at the opening of the offensive. There have been no further reports as to the a ttitutle of Rou mania and main interest iscentered now on Greece. Athens despatches report Greek volunteers rushing to Seres to take up arms against the Bulgarians. Conflicting report? are being received os to whether or not the Greeks and Bulgarians actually have clashed. Reports to the Greek cap ital state that fighting has been going on at Sent for days. I'he Italians who are pushing 1 heir offensive on the extreme North of theAustroItalian line claim the captu e of several Austrian posit ions. There has been an increase in artillery activity along the Isonzo but no infantry ac tions have been reported. London, 24.— British troops have advanced 300 yards South of Thiepval captured German trenches 400 yards in length and many prisoners. Official statement issued )y the war office tonight reads :— South of Thiepval his afternoon we made a fin ther advance of 300 yards capturing an enemy trench 400 yards in length, many prisoners are being taken in this sector. Yesterday 62 including two officers were passed back. These are in addition to 164 already reported today. A further number was taken, thf exact number not yet being ascer tained. A hostile bombing attack against our new tren Hies North of Bazentin le Pe tit was easily repulsed last night. There has been con siderable hostile shelling this evening along our front mainly in reply to our bom bardment. THE GOSPEL I Corinthians XV, [.—"Brethren, I declare unto you the gospel which 1 preached unto you, which also ye have received, and wherein ye stand." I. The epistle for this week explains a word which is in common use, but which is often misunderstood. What do we mean by The Gospel ? 1. It may mean the written accounts of the life of Christ, which are named nlier four men now known as the four Fvan gelists; thus we have the Gos pel according to St. Matthew, St. Mark, St. Luke and St. John. 2. But it is clear that St. Paul is not speaking of those written accounts when he tells tlie Christians of Corinth that he declares to them the Gospel, for he proceeds to explain what he means bv that word. We find at once that he bases his gospel on the Death and Resurrection of Christ, and es pecially on His Resurrection. First he tells them that it was The Clui t who died and no mere man. Secondly he states the Christian doctrine that the death of Christ was no ordinary death but "for our sins" as the Old Testament scriptures had foretold. But most important of all was His rising from the dead, says the Apostle. Indeed he stakes the whole of his reli gious faith and of Christianity on this, and he proceeds to five proofs to these Corinthian Christians which remind us that Our Lord's Resurrection is not only a subject to be brought to mind at Faster but the very foundation of all that can be called "The Gospel". II. Let us therefore consider, in the second place, the proofs which St. Paul here gives. He selects certain witnesses of that great event and to them he ap peals: "He teas seen of Cephas" (i. e. Peter) "then of the twelve. After that He was seen of above five hundred brethren at once; of whom the greater part remain unto this present, but some are fallen asleep. After that He wot seen of James; then of all the Apostles" It is plain that St. Paul is referring his readers to living witnesses, to some who could at that very time be interview ed, and who would be able to bear testimony to the Btupen dous Miracles of their Lord's victory over death. He selects St. Peter as the leading Apos tie, who had sinned deeply and had been forgiven much, lie refers also to his brother Apostles, and to St. James, the Louis Brother, who became the first Bishop of Jerusalem. And le even refers to the 500 breth ren to whom, as St. Matthew tells us, the risen Lend appeared in Galilee. Some of them, indeed, had "fallen asleep" in sure and certain hope, through Christ, of the resurrection to eternal life. III. But St. Paul makeB one FOR SALE O NE Gentleman's English Bicycle in First Class Condition. Apply to AUDLEV KELLY. NOTICE T HE PUBLIC is hereby notified that Mr. Stephen Cobbam is no longer a colimportant addition to the list lecting Agent of the "Miami OPENING NOTICE T HE Cosmopolitan High School will open Mon day Sept. 4th with Prof. C. G. IIowe/1 successor to Prof. G. G. Coffin in charge. Pat ronage solicited. f witnesses. He says "last of all He ivas seen of me a/so,


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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916. ( • j IN 2 PIECE and UNION SUITS TK MAKK Sold by W. Hilton 260 Bay St. %  ra^M y-aJJMSgm T Keeping Guard HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these preserving the balance of trade. TH SHOE^ on guard, and in i >i te of the advanng price of leather ami the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 2io cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan K ^oV KNQWLES With these reinforcements he Rig Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man kets abroad. G. T. KNOWLES, Prop. Big 4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) Heat —Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House OO /rf? For lh Hl *h Ord Solid Silvtr 22/6 WRIST WATCH. S5.SO CUARAN11 -TEED ^ftV*^.^ \^F Suitable 5 YEARS. ^^kmWtlaW Climates. QO C or M.50 ii a UM Price for this Sup *'— erkr Solid B Iver WKi.,1 WATCH. Hr.titn UoTi'rniueni Siami-vd. Hi^h-iin . %  13 JI.WEL Mwlsa L<-ver Movement accurately timed itn.i ndju-t.-pt"' l lHl1 "' "* aervioe.... and 1* lab!* W ft I ST WATCH now on n .in .rki-i in ihfl urtoa. \\c havino haaltaMon In Kti rwii -hmi.-ii FIVI£ YKARS'BINUING u'J ARANTLE 1 > t 1 >< * roa svgeJnel ail defeats In material and wofkiyawattlp. Ella bow HI 1 durable, of HIMKI iiP|it-nraiit*t>, a reliable tiineaVepeT< lets olaar ilhil and %  ?•)] tin n and darau iiroof t'a*e. Each one u rarefuhy i n. : : ,r (,n ni „\ piaraniaaa 1 the urebaavr In good ranuln superior i>lg>klu strap with Solid Silver Buckle. bj Ratal I rtl -. and t ateJo m In Knfland for MM |$7>M| ami frequently W 1 I Lot* watafa at noli n Low price because, owlnti to oar large ssJee, *< %  are able to %  %  faroarablo eontraota with the manufaelurars.aod ** we worltoa aver) uaall uia>xiu reap lha U n lit itiiv nil Mi.. WRIST WATCH, examineIt oareiuny, 1 not parfectl) %  atlafte 1 in ev~ry 1 r.n return 11t<> us at oar expanea, ana 1s.-.n %  wo rtf-hc it. c will return v*ur money in fall, Inelndlnn pntuw ehnrk'i-h i.iii • 1 W> n i ,.. niiintN-i•,( iheee • rn soldiers on active eervtoe who have ( %  in.111 iii-m in In thoronghly aatlafactory. Illua buim liadiva' illgh&li Price 22 6 "r •*..<. Watch in Solid Nickel dust and da n • :< %  -i. .1 Hlili ~ni erlurqn illtj 7JEWEL Swiss Levar Movement, iraaraniei d to glv* satis 1 i ' w.irr ,1 il -.I for K; V K Vi itrs. i • t Quality nUjekui strap. Uaul la* out*, Price It 1 Luminous Dial. TtBMOan be keen on darkest bight, Uoarantaad eatiefactory,!ii O111 i-xim. POST Ad' niiiin7d. if. r'iri'i d> J. 0 Kiv.i. Rend POST CARD for Catalogue rl W Ciuuki 1 rer PlatedOoode, Fountain Panej Qoodi 1 U .. etc, Fl wtil pnly roat von %  Penny ami mai iave yog 1 incla We guarantee the itiir delivery of all our (foods ilurlnu' IIMW vu-no-ln !.%  11 at in t'-1 M-.II. we underi ktu< rcplactHim a KUEKOI t'H \];<,i Writeourliink I % %  I • n nee. Bankers: LondonClti and M1.1I toil |: u. r r.'-l.. tx I'orn --ir.'.". Ur.t.w .1 l PpADQ I TH i** 1 1 \ Watch Manufacturers rt-AIXJ L,1U. V i-if, ; and J*well*rP. 210 BRIHTO! RRinOE. BW 8TOL. rn.r 5\RROW COLLAR All Arrow collars are made of fabrics bleached and shrunk in our own plants. They always fit and sit correctly and are the most durable. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, PEAEOCr & CO.. Inc. MAKERS. TROY, N. Y. U.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. Notice A LL persons having claims against the Estate of the lnte lone Ci. M;iura of long Cay, Fortune Island, ;u v re* quested to render the same duly ;ittested, and tliose indebted thereto to make payment to KENNETH SOLMON, Attorney for B, F. Maura, Administratrix. 21st August. 1916. -.DRINK-Welch's Grape juice. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. i Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 6d. 4s. 6d. per doe. BLACK'S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel-Colonial. Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at iiS-> per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—5 31*x "Primes" Cypress at 3.2s. per 1000. This grade oanies our Stt me guarantee as the Bests." Any defective shingles can be returned. Also cheaper grade in stock April bth.1916 C. C SAUNDBRS. JOHN BUTLER OfTice : 367 Bay St., East 'Phone 245 Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Re?.l Estate Aent EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Eark, Cotton and Woods AGENT \N0RWCiX UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich Phone P14 East Bay St. ICE T HE Bahamas Timber Co. begs to draw attention of the public to the fact that they are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City flours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Chas. E. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spirit s %  SBBBBBB^BB^BBBB^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBI8BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBa Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund Under the auspices of THE ST. ANDRKW SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS Patron Mis Excellency Sir William L. Allerdyce, K. C. M. Q.,Governor Appeal Committee Chairman The Honourable James P. Sands, M. K. C Honourable Hatourt Malcolm, K. C. T. S. Hilton, Ks.niire Honourable J. R. C. Vouug, M. E. C. Honourable William Miller, M. L. C. J. M. Rae, Esquire. O. F. Pritclmrd, Etquira A. Kenneth Solomon, M. 11. A Esquire. Honorary Treasurer L. G. Brice, M H, A Esquire, Honorary Secretary Cyril l\ Solomon, Esquire. 4 4



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V "News For Everybody" VvillUm Rildlinn lvjrr.ro in vib m&Histri listing bound toawenr to the Dojmoi nl no Master. Vol. XIII. No. 242 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. AUGUST 26. 1916 Price. THREE CENTS France After the War. Past History Indicates That a Commercial and Industrial Resurrection Will Speedily Follow the Great War. (Fro a the New York Journal cf Commerce and Commercial Bulletin.) There is much discussion of the probable after results of the present European war and especially itseifecisupon interim tional trade. Opinion! vary from the extremes ul optimism to pessimism and, as usually is the case, the truth will be found somewhere bet ween them. One, phase of the question, and a phase that is often overlooked, in the discussion, is the probable rapidity with which the warring nations will recover in an economic sense. This is most important, lor the foreign com-i mere* of each nation will in the long run depend in great part upon its attainment of a sound internal economic condition. Fortunately, we have good illustrations from the past hisI torv of France which indicate what the problem course of event! will be in that country,' Twice within the past centUiyl has France been considered ex'I hausted beyond immediate rej pair, and each time event! have belied contemporary opinion. The first experience followed | the Napoleonic wars. After, being overthrown by the "Great Coalition" of the European powers in 1814, Krance accepted a fairly just treaty of peace: and settled down for a few months under restored Bourbon rule. Napoleon returned from Elba in March, 1815, and the "Hundred Days" followed, which resulted in the llattle of Waterloo. Napoleon was sent to St. Helena and the leading powers of Europe — Austria, England, Prussia and Russia— determined to punish France for this recent uprising and so to weaken her that there would be no further danger from her for years to come. They forced upon her the acceptance of the Second Treaty of Paris, according to which her territory was reduced with a loss of 500,000 inhabitants. A war indemnity of 700,000,000 bancs was laid upon her and eighteen French"! or tresses* ere garrison ed by 150,000 allied tioopssup ported at French expense for n minimum of three years or a maximum of five. It isestima ted that the total cost to France of the episode of the "Hundred Days"was about $ 1,200,000,000 in the money of today. This was in addition to the burdens that had followed from over twentv years of revolutionary and Napoleonic warfare. To the surprise of Europe, the French people assumed the high taxes, re established the nation al credit and paid off the war indemnity so rapidly that the allied troops were entirely withdraws by the close of the year 1818. Simultaneously with this, I'ranee resumed her position and influence as one of the dominant powers of Europe. The second experience, and a Somewhat parallel one, resulted from the French downfall and disgrace in the Franco Prussian War, and the Civil War of the Commune which followed it in 1871. Kraitce seemed crushed and humiliated almost beyond repair, but to make her downfall doubly sure Bismarck imposed upon her the terrible treaty of Frankfort. Alsace and Lorraine must be ceded, a !? 1,000,000,000 indemnity paid 111 three \ears and a German "army of occupation" must be supported at the epxense of the French people until the pa\ment of the indemnity wascompleted. This army mustered 500,000soldiers, with 150,000 horses. The ces sion of Alsace and Lorraine meant a loss of about 1,600,000 inhabitants to France and in ad dition her population had been decreased by about 500,000 on account of the war. "As in 1815, so 1871, France went to work to redeem herself" sa\s Prof. Charles D. Hazen of John Hopkins University. In September, 1873, the final in stalment was met, and the last German soldier left France. The French soil was freed nearly six months earlier than was provi drd by the treaty. This rapid liquidation of the indemnity had been effected by two sue cessful loans contracted by the Government, one in 1871 for over 2,000,000,0(10 francs, the other in 1872 for nearly 3,500, 000,000 francs. The former was oversubscribed two and a half times; the latter over fourteen times. This amazing success bore striking evidence to the wealth of the countrv ". What France has accomplished twice I elore when defeated she can accomplish again when vctorious. Today the nation is united as never before and intensely loyal to its Government. In 1815 and in 1871 the Government previously established was overthrown and an entirely new one put in its place. These new governments, whether Bour bon Or republican, originated in violence and weie bitterly opposed by large sections of the people*. Business and trade had been demoralized by civil contention, larjje sections of the country had been fought over in extensive military campaigns and Paris had been captured— GOOD THOUGHTS FOR £VIL TIMES The man of life upright, Whose guiltless heart is free From all dishonest deeds, Or thought of vanity ; 1 he man whose silent days In harmless joys are spent, Whom hopes cannot delude Nor sorrow discontent ; That man needs neither tower Nor armour for defence, Nor secret vaults to fly From thunder's violence : He only can behold With uuaffrighted eyes The horrors < >ow? His wisdom heavenly things; Good thoughts bis only friend His wealth a well spent g'e, The earth his sober inn And quiet pilgrimage. CAMPION. and 1871 some sections of the city damaged or destroyed. To day France has a Government more efficient than any since the time of Napoleon 1. Her spiritual and patriotic resurrection during the two fiery years since August 1, 1914, has been the wonder of the world. There is no more solid and conservative people on earth than the French peasantry and the bourgeoisie or middle class is largely of the same character. Countrary to popular judgment, especially in America, Paris is no longer France nor is its volatile population typical of the French people. Great experience lately has been gainedand organization perfected which have increased by thousands of per cent the production of munitions and other materials for use in war. This same experi ence and orpanization will serve for manufacturers and trade in time of peace. The thrifty French people may be expected again to do their work as in the past, and a commercial and industrial res urrection doubltess will speedily follow this war, which will match in its results the spiritual, and patriotic experieneealready noted. Also the close knowledge and acquaintance between the allied nations during the time of war will lead to closer business relations in time of peace. W. A. SMITH" Comer Parliament and Shirley Sts. Solicits orders for PLUMBING, ELECTRIC INSTALLMENT, REPAIRING PUMPS. ETC. Terms reasonable. Orders can be left or 'phoned at TRIBUNE OFFICE. No economic warfare against Germany along the lines at present planned will be needed, nor will it be tolerated by an enlightened public opinion. MEN of the Bahamas The Recruiting Office at the Barracks is again open j for Recruits for Drafts for the Bahamas Contingent. IMF C. CRAWFORD, Chairman Recruiting Com Is Your Baby rf. Delicate? UM\IT ami Child. / .'. fitm WHS "• lit Alimburji' Foodl. W HAT a marked difference there is between the fretful, puny, ailing infant, and the child whose face always bears the smile and look of perfect health and con. ten.menf^TOthers should early realize that much dci>ciids on How Baby is Fed, The right food given at the proper age moans rest and comfort lor the mother and a sound healthy constitution for her little one in after years. If, for any reason, Baby cannot be given the natural food, do not select a substitute merely because it is cheap in price. Adopt what experience has proved to be the Simplest and Most Successful Method of Infant Feeding, i>„ The 'Allenburys' Foods. These Foods provide a Pure, Complete and Progressive Dietary specially adapted to each itage of a child's development They are not expensive to buy when judged by the uniform good results which follow their use; this is the true standard of comparison. The'Allenburys'Foodsare used and recommended by members of the Medical and Nursing Professions throughout the world. The Foods that contain all the essential elements to promote brain and body development. I lUenbitf ijS' The 'Allenburya' Foods arc made under special processes by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand. P" Wrltm lortrmm book "Infant rrmdlim mnJ MmnmgementS' 64 panes) of valemblm Information for every mother. MILK FOOD No. 1. From Birth to 3 months. MILK KM):, No. 2. 6 months. From 3 to From MALTED FOOD No. S. 6 months upwards. RUSKS (Malted). From 10 months. THE •ALLENBDIYV FEEOEB Simplest, Safest, and Best. Allen (i Hanburys Ltd. LONDON. ENGLAND. ESTABLISHED 300 YEARS. A.D. 1716. A.D. 1910. / J


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02677
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, August 26, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
V
"News For Everybody"
VvillUm Rildlinn lvjrr.ro in vib m&Histri
listing bound toawenr to the Dojmoi nl no Master.
Vol. XIII. No. 242
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. AUGUST 26. 1916
Price. THREE CENTS
France After the War.
Past History Indicates That a Commercial and Industrial Resurrection Will
Speedily Follow the Great War.
(Fro a the New York Journal cf Commerce and Commercial Bulletin.)
There is much discussion of
the probable after results of the
present European war and es-
pecially itseifecisupon interim
tional trade. Opinion! vary from
the extremes ul optimism to
pessimism and, as usually is the
case, the truth will be found
somewhere bet ween them. One,
phase of the question, and a
phase that is often overlooked,
in the discussion, is the probable
rapidity with which the war-
ring nations will recover in an
economic sense. This is most
important, lor the foreign com-i
mere* of each nation will in the
long run depend in great part
upon its attainment of a sound
internal economic condition.
Fortunately, we have good
illustrations from the past his- I
torv of France which indicate
what the problem course of
event! will be in that country,'
Twice within the past centUiyl
has France been considered ex'I
hausted beyond immediate re- j
pair, and each time event! have ,
belied contemporary opinion.
The first experience followed |
the Napoleonic wars. After,
being overthrown by the "Great
Coalition" of the European
powers in 1814, Krance accept-
ed a fairly just treaty of peace:
and settled down for a few
months under restored Bourbon
rule. Napoleon returned from
Elba in March, 1815, and the
"Hundred Days" followed,
which resulted in the llattle of
Waterloo. Napoleon was sent
to St. Helena and the leading
powers of Europe Austria,
England, Prussia and Russia
determined to punish France for
this recent uprising and so to
weaken her that there would be
no further danger from her for
years to come.
They forced upon her the ac-
ceptance of the Second Treaty
of Paris, according to which her
territory was reduced with a loss
of 500,000 inhabitants. A war
indemnity of 700,000,000 bancs
was laid upon her and eighteen
French"! or tresses* ere garrison
ed by 150,000 allied tioopssup
ported at French expense for n
minimum of three years or a
maximum of five. It isestima
ted that the total cost to France
of the episode of the "Hundred
Days"was about $ 1,200,000,000
in the money of today. This
was in addition to the burdens
that had followed from over
twentv years of revolutionary
and Napoleonic warfare. To
the surprise of Europe, the
French people assumed the high
taxes, re established the nation
al credit and paid off the war
indemnity so rapidly that the
allied troops were entirely
withdraws by the close of the
year 1818. Simultaneously with
this, I'ranee resumed her posi-
tion and influence as one of the
dominant powers of Europe.
The second experience, and a
Somewhat parallel one, resulted
from the French downfall and
disgrace in the Franco Prussian
War, and the Civil War of the
Commune which followed it in
1871. Kraitce seemed crushed
and humiliated almost beyond
repair, but to make her downfall
doubly sure Bismarck imposed
upon her the terrible treaty of
Frankfort. Alsace and Lorraine
must be ceded, a !? 1,000,000,000
indemnity paid 111 three \ears
and a German "army of occu-
pation" must be supported at
the epxense of the French peo-
ple until the pa\ment of the
indemnity wascompleted. This
army mustered 500,000soldiers,
with 150,000 horses. The ces
sion of Alsace and Lorraine
meant a loss of about 1,600,000
inhabitants to France and in ad
dition her population had been
decreased by about 500,000 on
account of the war.
"As in 1815, so 1871, France
went to work to redeem herself"
sa\s Prof. Charles D. Hazen of
John Hopkins University. In
September, 1873, the final in
stalment was met, and the last
German soldier left France. The
French soil was freed nearly six
months earlier than was provi
drd by the treaty. This rapid
liquidation of the indemnity
had been effected by two sue
cessful loans contracted by the
Government, one in 1871 for
over 2,000,000,0(10 francs, the
other in 1872 for nearly 3,500,
000,000 francs. The former was
oversubscribed two and a half
times; the latter over fourteen
times. This amazing success
bore striking evidence to the
wealth of the countrv ".
What France has accomplish-
ed twice I elore when defeated
she can accomplish again when
vctorious. Today the nation
is united as never before and in-
tensely loyal to its Government.
In 1815 and in 1871 the Gov-
ernment previously established
was overthrown and an entirely
new one put in its place. These
new governments, whether Bour
bon Or republican, originated in
violence and weie bitterly op-
posed by large sections of the
people*. Business and trade had
been demoralized by civil con-
tention, larjje sections of the
country had been fought over in
extensive military campaigns
and Paris had been captured
Good Thoughts for
vil Times
The man of life upright,
Whose guiltless heart is free
From all dishonest deeds,
Or thought of vanity ;
1 he man whose silent days
In harmless joys are spent,
Whom hopes cannot delude
Nor sorrow discontent ;
That man needs neither tower
Nor armour for defence,
Nor secret vaults to fly
From thunder's violence :
He only can behold
With uuaffrighted eyes
The horrors And terrors of the skies
Thus, scorning all fhe cares
That fate or fortune brings,
H e makes the heaven his l>< >ow?
His wisdom heavenly things;
Good thoughts bis only friend
His wealth a well spent
g'e,
The earth his sober inn
And quiet pilgrimage.
Campion.
and 1871 some sections of the
city damaged or destroyed.
To day France has a Govern-
ment more efficient than any
since the time of Napoleon 1.
Her spiritual and patriotic res-
urrection during the two fiery
years since August 1, 1914, has
been the wonder of the world.
There is no more solid and con-
servative people on earth than
the French peasantry and the
bourgeoisie or middle class is
largely of the same character.
Countrary to popular judgment,
especially in America, Paris is
no longer France nor is its vol-
atile population typical of the
French people. Great exper-
ience lately has been gainedand
organization perfected which
have increased by thousands of
per cent the production of mu-
nitions and other materials for
use in war. This same experi
ence and orpanization will
serve for manufacturers and
trade in time of peace.
The thrifty French people
may be expected again to do
their work as in the past, and a
commercial and industrial res
urrection doubltess will speedi-
ly follow this war, which will
match in its results the spiritual,
and patriotic experieneealready
noted. Also the close knowledge
and acquaintance between the
allied nations during the time
of war will lead to closer busi-
ness relations in time of peace.
W. A. SMITH"
Comer Parliament and
Shirley Sts.
Solicits orders for
PLUMBING, ELECTRIC
INSTALLMENT, REPAIR-
ING PUMPS. Etc.
Terms reasonable.
Orders can be left or 'phoned
at
TRIBUNE OFFICE.
No economic warfare against
Germany along the lines at
present planned will be need-
ed, nor will it be tolerated by
an enlightened public opinion.
MEN
of the Bahamas
The Recruiting Office at
the Barracks is again open j
for Recruits for Drafts for the
Bahamas Contingent.
IMF C. CRAWFORD,
Chairman Recruiting Com
Is Your
Baby rf.
Delicate?
Um\it ami Child.
/ ..'. fitm WHS " lit Alimburji' Foodl.
WHAT a marked difference there is
between the fretful, puny, ailing infant,
and the child whose face always bears
the smile and look of perfect health and con-
. ten.menf^TOthers should early realize that much
dci>ciids on How Baby is Fed, The right food
given at the proper age moans rest and comfort
lor the mother and a sound healthy constitution
for her little one in after years. If, for any
reason, Baby cannot be given the natural food,
do not select a substitute merely because it is
cheap in price. Adopt what experience has
proved to be the Simplest and Most Successful
Method of Infant Feeding, i> The 'Allenburys'
Foods. These Foods provide a Pure, Complete and
Progressive Dietary specially adapted to each
itage of a child's development They are not
expensive to buy when judged by the uniform good
results which follow their use; this is the true
standard of comparison. The'Allenburys'Foodsare
used and recommended by members of the Medical
and Nursing Professions throughout the world.
The Foods that contain all the essential elements
to promote brain and body development.
I
lUenbitf
ijS'
The 'Allenburya' Foods arc made under special processes
by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand.
P" Wrltm lortrmm book "Infant rrmdlim mnJ MmnmgementS'
64 panes) of valemblm Information for every mother.
MILK FOOD No. 1. From Birth to
3 months.
MILK KM):, No. 2.
6 months.
From 3 to
From
MALTED FOOD No. S.
6 months upwards.
RUSKS (Malted). From 10 months.
THE ALLENBDIYV FEEOEB
Simplest, Safest, and Best.
Allen (i Hanburys Ltd.
LONDON. ENGLAND.
ESTABLISHED 300 YEARS.
A.D. 1716. A.D. 1910.
/
J


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916.
L. GTLBKKT DDPUOB,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFFICK
Corner Shirley & Chn.rl.Mte Sla
Nassau, N. P., Baka~i.
PHONK MO. I'. O. IX IBS.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, WadMvJeJ *ik*. Ft*J* -
Tunday, and 1 huneUyMgttaopy i.i
afcttmtav I i.i
Wtckfe
Monthly is. M
uarlerly ... ... 4- .
alfYearlv... .;<.
Yearly ids
8
I'AVAHI.K IN 40VANCK
Mvi-rn-i >1S i*nce ,-er ime
brtotinMrti :i; trine* peace i fcf I : sad 'ne
Uue lot ~ui>n>| jent insert:
A(1verli*iiients un.ler eiuhl lines 4s.
Zbc tribune
Saturday. August 2b. 1916
NOTICEWkm Cnittp&niimi >
Artkli .red with :: .. ttr'i name
initials, or with a pseud nvm. or art
MMrftei 'V. mmi.iii,-j:,'J,' :/:, fcdji r m>!
Ml Hrcssari'/v 6t *.'J :.. t<- m j,'.,rm. Hi
triti the views Imtmi fv/->. > tarn irA tM
mode oj expression Insu.h instance*, or in
the tarnf"Letters to the (Utter,** insertion
only means that the matter or point of view
..idtred of sufficient imttrttt and fa
porttuttx to tmnrmsu fmbUt iti n.
It will interest our readers
especially those who have
contributed so generously to
the Wed Crossto know that
Lady AJlardyce and His Ex-
cellency the Governor have
been appointed to be Lady
of Grace and Knight of Grace
respectively of the Order of
the Hospital of St. John of
Jerusalem in England, with
the sanction and approval of
His Majesty, who is the Sov-
ereign Head and Patron of
that Order.
We are sure that it must
be a source of gratification
to His Excellency and Lady
Allardyce at this juncture,
while the world War is be-
ing waged, to have their able,
vigorous and valuable ser-
vices to this grand cause re-
cognized in this way, To
them this must come as a
double recognition, fust of
wh.it they have toiled to
achieve here in the last 12
mos. towards helping to re-
lieve the sufferings of those
who are fighting our battles,
and second, of the loyal and
patriotic support of Baha-
mians and others.
It is gratifying to learn
that Lady Allardyce, after
many years of valuable work
for the order in Australia,
Fiji and the Falklands, was
in 1911 elected an Ilonorarv
Associate, and that while
in the latter two Colonies
^ir William supported hai in
the many Red Cross activi-
ties with which she w-as con-
nected.
The "Tribune" tenders its
sincere congratulations to
their Excellencies on this
well-merited honour.
There are signs in Germany
that the Government is Strug
gling against the Jingo spirit
which forced on the War.
Early this year, the fncraters
were in the ascendant and
the men at the head of af
fairs were not denying the
statements of these hot heads
that indemnities would be
exacted and territory annex
,.,1 by Germany at the end of
the war. It would seem, how
ever that the Government is
taking steps to counteract
the efforts of these silly ex
tremists. Here are a fewex-
11 acts from Government
semi-official Organs which
intended to be counter-
blasts to the vapourings of
the frenized Jingoes and
which show a wish on the
part of the Powers that be
i to prepare the minds of the
people for the dark days that
are steadily coming. The
"Berliner Tageblatt" says
that even Bernhardi had
warned Germany against an-
nexations in Europe. An-
other paper speaks of its be-
ing an illusion to suppose
that a submarine ileet could
be built that would be strong
enough to create "What is
required, a revolutionary
change in the military situa-
tion." The "Weser Zeitung"
says: "The position is grave.
The enemy is everywhere
pressing us hard. . Every
where hinderings and ham
perings, accumulating pro
vocal ions of t bean xiousques
tion : How is it all to e d?''
Now it must be borne in
mind that alongside of these
gloomy statements there are
others intended to keep up the
heart of the German people.
At the time there must be
good reasons why the Kaiser
and his advisers should both
permit and inspire such ut
terances. The truth seems to
be that Germany is now
fighting for a draw, and is
preparing to face that pros
pect. But the allies are fight
ing for victory in order to
dictate terms that will draw
the teeth of Germany as n mil
tary Power. These Govern
ment admissions that all
is not well with our foe are a
a great encouragement to us.
Evidently we are getting on
in this grim business !
:o:
We have received a number
of communications with regard
to our recent articles on theSi-
sd industry. None of them dis
agree 111 any essential detail
with our conclusions; all concur
with our statement that some
drastic reforms are necessary if
this industry is to take its piace
among the most important of
this Colony's sources of income.
Space does not permit of our
publishing all the suggestions
which our correspondents have
made but we reproduce a few
of the leading ideas in the hope
that SOMEHOW they m..\
have a good effect.
One suggestion is that the
fibre should he classified or
graded according; to quality,
and this suggestion is so obvi-
ously just, that comment is
hardly necessary. As tilings are
there is a sort of classification
by which Sisal is called either
No one or No. two, but this is
only a haphazard arrangement
dependent on the caprice or
honesty of individual buyers.
The present system, however, is
palpably vicious, as the honest
grower who takes pains to ship
nothing but clean and dry Sisal
gets unreal encouragement ,-isn
reward for his trouble This evil,
in common with a host of oth
ers which could he enumerated,
can only he remedied by concert
ed action on the part of the bay
ers. or, better still, by the in
?ointment of b responsible and
independent body to deal with
the situation. As to the former
we ronfeM that we see hut little
hope of amelioration. The at
titude of the merchant is one of
childish Suspicion and mistrust.
Prices ares-ill forced up to
point that is simply ruinous.
why, it is hard to tell. The in
evitable result of this unhealthy
competition is that the industry
must suffer. It is sufficiently
patent to any impartial observer
that Sisal at twenty six shillings
and tenpence per hundred can
not pay. How is it being done?
Certainly not by honest means.
Can it be that there is in some
instances a wholesale system of
cheating? We HAVE been told
that this is the case, but we
don't want to believe that it can
be true.
:o:
Private Alexander, Butler
one of our fighting boys, says
some interesting things in a
letter to Mr. A. W. Stuart of
this city. We will quote
some extracts for the benefit
of our readers:"I just ar-
rived in England a few weeks
ago. After I left Jamaica 1
went to Halifax 1 got frost-
bite and it made me sick and
I am just able to write you
now.....Though 1 have
been sick, I am still trying to
do my duty bravely which
is what I left borne for. 1 am
trying to fear God, and I am
going to honour the King. I
hope if I don't die in this
war I will be able to see you
all one day to come. Tell
E-------for me a soldier's life in
the British Army is the sweet
est life to live."
Children of the Empire Fund
for maimed andblind
Soldiers and Sailors.
We have been requested by
the Private Secretary to ac
knowledge tlie following sums
which have been received by
His Excellency on account of
the above Fund.
Previously acknow
fedged ;T,,D I
The inhabitants of
the lower EWgue, bleu
thera, per Mr D. O.
Johnson 14 5
The schoolcnildren at
8 Mile Rock,Grand Ba
liama, pel Mr W. B.
Cooper 13 2
Proceeds of an enter
tainment at Harbour
Island organized by Mr.
Wallace Thompson 12 o o
129 8 8
Daughters of the
Empire Red Cross
Guild-
From the special jury in
the Eibel case Christadou-
lakis vs. Christofilis, in the
Supreme Court of the Baha-
ma Islands, August 8lh to
I Gill, 1916........ I.
24th August 1916.
The Editor of the 'Tribune"
Sir:
May I take the liberty of
acknowledging through your
columns, the receipt of fur-
ther contributions to the Wed
5S C^dJYI^D 5HYOT.
h. C. Christie
1
Cheer and blithe the airs, but chill,
The city of the silent dead,
When half in frolic, half in dread,
We mounted to the sacred hill
Like children swinging hand in hand.
We loved as man and woman will;
Ah what had been had we not found
This sober, consecrated ground
Where every voice but God's was still ?
II
0 bitter hours of thought to us
While roses burned to ashes grev
While tongues were tied and dared not sav,
Loves falsehoods trite and hazardous.
Ah did the dead hearts understand
That our hearts too had died ? did they
.Mourn with us in our long despair,
When burying those corpses there
We sorrowfully turned away.
Guides;Miss s. E. Thompson;
King Edward Y1I and Queen
Alexandra Chapter I.O.D.E.
Mrs. N. J. French, Miss
Lillian Sutton ; Dr. R. F.
W. MacN.iiik-s; Mr. Robert
Minns, Exunia.
Thanking you for your
co-operation,
I have the honour to be,
Your obedient servant,
DR. WALTER HESS,
Local Secretary,
Emigration figures for the
month ol July, 1916.
Outwards
Males Q9
Females 83
Total
1H2
Inwards
19G
101
297
Interinsular Mails
To be despatched per sell.
"Columbia" forlnagua.Long
Cay, Acklins Island, Rum
Cay; Clarence Town, Dead-
man's Cay 'Long Island);
The Bight, Arthur's Town
(San Salvador) will be made
up and (losed on Thursday
next, the ijth inst, at i'i
a.m.
The S.S. "Esperanza" tailed
from New York at 1 p.m. on
Thursday the 34th with 18 pas
sengers and 25 packages for
Nassau.
Shipping
The S.S. "Guanlanimo" ar-
rived from Mew York on Wed-
nesday morning the 23rd with
a general cargo.
from Cuba. She had a lively
passage, especially during the
night of Thursday. She came
in ballast, and will lay up over
the hurricane months.
Services will be held in the
Seventh Day Adventist chapel
on East Sim Icy St. Sunday
evening at 7.30 August 27, to
which all are cordially invited.
Subject"The Anarchist of
Law and Society",
Gospel Hall
Dodeswell Siieet.
On Sunday evening Mr. H C.
Christie will pi each. Subject :
"The anger of King Uzziah" or
'the course of tho Church from
the Reformation to the Coming
Apostacy as shewn from the
26th Chap, of II Chronicles.
St Johns Cathedral-
Meeting at,
Rev. G. A. Thompson, S.T.I)
Minister. Tomorrow, inspiring
services, n ,,. ,. -Christ's
command to the accused wo-
man". 7.30 ,,. m, >\ vertical
gospel call". Good music.
Extra chairs. The public
Cordiall) invited.
are
The motor vessel "Frances
E" arrived from Miami, Fla.
on Wednesday afternoon the
23rd with a cargo of ice and
shingles and the following pas
sengers:
Messrs Lewis A. Mowe, Geo;am' rumors of wars."
Cross Stamp Fund, from the| Pratt, Geo. I ><\m I icr, Thomas,'r,,m,,K,.l,s ,,la, ,,,e Lord's com
Gi
Nassau Aug. a^th 1916
Editor of the'I nbune
Sir,
Kindly allow me spare in
your valuable columns, to note
a feu words relative to the
present struggle.
What is the danger of wiir p 1
supjx.se that more than half the
i pie that talk about war have
not Hie smallest idea what it is.
In a sentence of brevity it
may be reckoned up to be' the
union and essence of horrors '
atrocities, crinies.and sufferings'
of which humankind on the face
of this globe is capable.
Dear readers, this is one of
those wars that are spoken "fin
the Bible. 'Thereshall |,r wars
following:
Yaletta, MaltaDr. John
T. kuther, D.M.O., Hon. T.
Vella, Mr. Vincent Lahra,
Anonymous, Lyceum Troop
Boy Scouts, Miss Good hue,
Mrs. Reid, Rev. Can. Arph.
Manduca, Mr. John Saliha,
Mrs. Levy Greek, Miss OlgS
Triolo, Miss Kaine, Mr.Gara-
bott, MissWyat; Dominica
Miss Celia G. Johnson ; Bula-
wavo, RhodesiaMiss H. W.
Garbutt; Swoa, FigiMiss
M. C. Anderson ; | he Hibis-
U8 Patrol 1st Bahama Girl
eenslade, Basil Greenslade,
Alfred Ferguson, Jos. Fergu
son, Eugene Dorsett, Amos
Dean, Israel Ronaby, Theo
phi lug Howe, Joseph Brown,
Bruce N itnge, H el it on
Nottage, Thomas Malone,
Walter Fin lev. Joseph
Thompson ; Mesdmnes Clo
tilda Devalier, Florence John
son, Zelonica Tvnes; Misses
Selvina Bethel, H. Bethel,
Ellen Johnson.
The schooner "Winifred M."
arrived here yesterday morning
mg is drawing nigh.
I he close of this tremendous
ItrUKRle, shall suieb be the rise
or fall of one of the European
Kingdoms. Germany, that bru-
tish nation, will either be weak-
ened or ameliorated.
Thanks for space, Mr. Editor,
Yours Tnilv.
CIIAS. H, THOMPSON'.
British Foreman Composi
tor. "Three more of my men
have enlisted this morning"
Editor: "Ah A wave of
patriotism, I suppose."
Foreman Compositor:
V
i
*


*
*
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916.
"Well Perhaps that's the
way to put it, hut ihey say
they would rather be shot
than set any more of your
- opy!" Passing Show.
0
Telegrams
Boston:The North German
Lloyd liner Wi I If had refugee
here since the outbreak of war
slipped out of harbour today
presumably for New London
Connecticut where the submar-
ine Bremen is expected to ar
rive.
New York:The heads of the
railroads are willing to accept
President Wilsons proposed
eight hour day for employes and
in return ask assurance that
prompt measures he taken to
have the Inter slate Commerce
Commission authorize an in
crease in rates A permanent
commission is to handle all la-
bour difficulties.
August 36th, I916
Washington: Continued
quiet along the Mexican coast
has reduced the necessity of keep
ingastrong naval force there.
Washington: Navy depart
ment official reports pays tri
bute to the lire and engine room
crews of the destroyer Terry who
braved death to save the ship
when it hit a reef on the Doinin
icaucnast several months ago.
The Terry is now ashore in
shoal waters hut will be raised
and taken to Norfolk.
New London, Conn:The
German steamer which left Bos
toil vesterdav via Cape Cad
Canal arrived here today and
tied up at the pier of the Last
ern forwarding Company, agent
for the German merchant sub
marine line.
London'Although the Ger-
mans made heavv attack North
of the Somm- the French clung
to MaurepasVillage which they
took yesterday. The Germans
are said to have lost heavily.
Intimation of extension of the
French offensive for thirty miles
South of the Somme appear
borne out by the announcement
of heavy bombardments in that
sector.
Petrograd:The Russians re
earned their advance along the
Turkish front.
New York:On the most act
ive trading since the outbreak
of the war cotton todav record
ed an advance of two dollars a
bale.
New York:A New York
City news association cities a
British merchant marine officer
as authority for the statement
that the submarine Riemen was
captured by the British and 33
of her crew made prisoners.
The officer reached here today
Me declared that the Bremen
WasCAUlght in Dover Straits by
a steel net on August 2nd. Two
of the crew lost their lives.
The Bremen, while enmeshed
in their net, was sighted by the
British boat which first tried to
remove the Bremen from the
net, and then took off her men.
The officer declares that the
Brit si 1 have remained silent be
'ause another submarine, the
American, is on the way over
and they want to net her too.
26th August, 1916,
London, 24: The British and
French have made substantial
tains on the Somme front ac
cording to Paris reports. Mature
pas has fallen to the French who
have pushed forward more than
200 yards beyond the town on
B front of a mile and a quarter.
The capture of Muurepas
leaves Clery almost surrounded
and brings the French directly
in front of the important rail
road town of Combles.
Thiepval is about the same po
sitiou as Clery and the Allied
front as described now resem
hies the teeth of a great saw be
tween which the Germans are
tenaciously holding the ruins of
several villages.
Despatches from the Somme
front indicate that the French
are preparing to extend their
offensive for a distance of 30
milesSouth of the present battle
line. They are reported to have
opened a tremendous canonad
mg from Fstrees to Latsigny
and the bombardment is said to
have reached an unprecedented
intensity the last two days.
No change is reported from
the Fast but the Russiansoffen
sive in Armenia apparently is
assuming powerful proportions.
Petrograd reports the re occu
pation of the important Arman
ian town of Mush arid the cap
ture of 2jio prisonersat Nachta
The situation on the Saloniki
front remains obscure but appar
ently there has been no impor
tant changes since the Allied
flanks were forced back by the
Bulgarians at the opening of
the offensive.
There have been no further
reports as to the a ttitutle of Rou
mania and main interest iscen-
tered now on Greece.
Athens despatches report
Greek volunteers rushing to
Seres to take up arms against
the Bulgarians.
Conflicting report? are being
received os to whether or not
the Greeks and Bulgarians act-
ually have clashed.
Reports to the Greek cap
ital state that fighting has
been going on at Sent for
days. I'he Italians who are
pushing 1 heir offensive on the
extreme North of theAustro-
Italian line claim the captu
e of several Austrian posit
ions.
There has been an increase
in artillery activity along the
Isonzo but no infantry ac
tions have been reported.
London, 24.British troops
have advanced 300 yards
South of Thiepval captured
German trenches 400 yards
in length and many prison-
ers. Official statement issued
)y the war office tonight
reads : South of Thiepval
his afternoon we made a
fin ther advance of 300 yards
capturing an enemy trench
400 yards in length, many
prisoners are being taken in
this sector. Yesterday 62 in-
cluding two officers were
passed back. These are in
addition to 164 already re-
ported today. A further num-
ber was taken, thf exact
number not yet being ascer
tained. A hostile bombing
attack against our new tren
Hies North of Bazentin le Pe
tit was easily repulsed last
night. There has been con
siderable hostile shelling this
evening along our front
mainly in reply to our bom
bardment.
THE GOSPEL
I Corinthians XV, [."Bre-
thren, I declare unto you the
gospel which 1 preached un-
to you, which also ye have
received, and wherein ye
stand."
I. The epistle for this week
explains a word which is in
common use, but which is often
misunderstood. What do we
mean by The Gospel ?
1. It may mean the written
accounts of the life of Christ,
which are named nlier four men
now known as the four Fvan
gelists; thus we have the Gos
pel according to St. Matthew,
St. Mark, St. Luke and St. John.
2. But it is clear that St.
Paul is not speaking of those
written accounts when he tells
tlie Christians of Corinth that
he declares to them the Gospel,
for he proceeds to explain what
he means bv that word. We
find at once that he bases
his gospel on the Death and
Resurrection of Christ, and es
pecially on His Resurrection.
First he tells them that it was
The Clui t who died and no
mere man. Secondly he states
the Christian doctrine that the
death of Christ was no ordinary
death but "for our sins" as the
Old Testament scriptures had
foretold. But most important
of all was His rising from the
dead, says the Apostle. Indeed
he stakes the whole of his reli
gious faith and of Christianity
on this, and he proceeds to five
proofs to these Corinthian
Christians which remind us that
Our Lord's Resurrection is not
only a subject to be brought to
mind at Faster but the very
foundation of all that can be
called "The Gospel".
II. Let us therefore consider,
in the second place, the proofs
which St. Paul here gives. He
selects certain witnesses of that
great event and to them he ap
peals: "He teas seen of Cephas"
(i. e. Peter) "then of the twelve.
After that He was seen of above
five hundred brethren at once; of
whom the greater part remain
unto this present, but some are
fallen asleep. After that He wot
seen of James; then of all the
Apostles"
It is plain that St. Paul is
referring his readers to living
witnesses, to some who could
at that very time be interview
ed, and who would be able to
bear testimony to the Btupen
dous Miracles of their Lord's
victory over death. He selects
St. Peter as the leading Apos
tie, who had sinned deeply and
had been forgiven much, lie
refers also to his brother Apos-
tles, and to St. James, the
Louis Brother, who became the
first Bishop of Jerusalem. And
le even refers to the 500 breth
ren to whom, as St. Matthew
tells us, the risen Lend appear-
ed in Galilee. Some of them,
indeed, had "fallen asleep" in
sure and certain hope, through
Christ, of the resurrection to
eternal life.
III. But St. Paul makeB one
FOR SALE
ONE Gentleman's English
Bicycle in First Class
Condition.
Apply to
AUDLEV KELLY.
NOTICE
THE PUBLIC is hereby no-
tified that Mr. Stephen
Cobbam is no longer a col-
important addition to the list lecting Agent of the "Miami
OPENING NOTICE
THE Cosmopolitan High
School will open Mon
day Sept. 4th with Prof. C.
G. IIowe/1 successor to Prof.
G. G. Coffin in charge. Pat
ronage solicited.
f witnesses. He says "last of
all He ivas seen of me a/so, one born out of due time." We
should hardly have considered
that St. Paul was a witness to
Christ's Resurrection, but he
insists that he is. Whether he
refers to the appearance of the
Risen Lord to him when 011 his
way to Damascus, or to one of
the visions of which he tells us,
we do not know, but he claimed
that he actually saw the risen
Christ.
We have in the Gospels at
least twelve recorded appear-
ances of Jesus Christ after the
wonderful event of Faster Day.
So that there can be no doubt
that the Resurrection is
ndustrial Mutual Benefit
*nd Savings Association."
SAMUEL H. TINKER,
Asst. Supt,
central lact of our religion anc
that the whole truth of that
which is called "The Gospel"
rests upon this fact. The Gos
pel therefore hat but little to
do with our peisonal feelings
or notions, it is just God's truth
concerning the Incarnation,
Death, Resurrection and Ascen
sion of our Lord, and the Re
surrection is the pivot on which
it all turns. Volatire, the fa-
mous French writer, who did
not himself believe in the
Christian religion, was once
asked if it would be possible to
found a new religion which
should be equally powerful in
touching men's hearts and in
affecting men's lives. He re
plied scornfully, 'Oh, the thing
is easy enough, my friend, you
have only to die and to rise
again and the thing will be ac-
complished."
Faith in a risen Saviour who
is alive for evermore, and who
will come again with glory, is
the centre of our Holy Religion
and the foundation of our sure
and certain hope of our resur-
rection to eternal life.
Th* "Best" Light.
A SOFT, luminous light,
which casts no shadow.
Brighter than electricity or
acetylene. Makes and burns
its own gas. Cost 2 cents a
week.
No dirt, smoke nor odor
Over 200 styles, ranging from
100 to 2000 candle power.
Absolutely guaranteed.
Write for illustrated cata-
thejlogne.
European Agency.
INDENTS promptly execut
ed at lowest cash prices for
all kinds of British and Con-
tinental goods, including
Rooks and Stationery,
Boots, Shoes ami Leather,
Chemicals and Druggist*' Sundries,
I'll 111:1. Rirthenware and Glassware,
Cycles, Motors and Accessories,
Drapery, Millinery and Piece Goods,
Fancy Goods and Perfumery,
Hardware, Machinery and Metals,
Jewellery, Plate and Watches,
Photographic and Optical floods
Provisions and Oilmen's Stores,
etc., etc.
Commission i\ p.c. to A p.c.
Trad* Disaunts allmitd.
Special Quotations on Dtmand.
Sample Casts from 10 upwards.
Consignments of Produce Sold on Ac-
count.
William Wilson & Sons
llstablished IS i ]
25 Abchorch Lane, London, EC
Cable Address ASSUAIRE, LOSlJUS
THE BEST LIGHT CO.
324 E. 5th St, Canton, 0.
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform his
friends and the Public
that he has just received a
complete outfit of facilities
for the business of an under
taker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals
that may be entrusted to his
care with system and des
pat.:h ; and respectfully soli
cits their patronage. Get my
price first and prove that
they are the very lowest for
first class work.
NOTICE
THIS is to inform my
Patrons and the Public,
that I have opened my
Public Black Smith Shop;
and am now ready to do
anything in the line fo Gene
ral repair or new work Horse-
shoeing a specialty, All work
done Mechanirallv
P. A. HUYLER
Fop Sale
Cottage on Mackay Street-
with six rooms, entirely new.
Free of all incumbrances.
For Particulars
Apply to
O. V. COOKK
17 Market St. City.
Advertise in
The Tribune.
Just Arrived
Enamel Beds,
and Springs,
Fancy Goods,
and Notions.
Shoes.
E. C. Griffin.
Bay St. and Victoria Ay*



The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday August 26,1916.

(

j
.
IN
2 PIECE
and
UNION
SUITS
TK MAKK
Sold by
W. Hilton
260 Bay St.
ra^M. y-aJJMSgm
T
Keeping Guard
HERE are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these
preserving the balance of trade.
TH
SHOE^
on guard, and in i >i te of the advanng price of leather
ami the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
2io cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
K
^oV
KNQWLES
*
With these reinforcements he Rig Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Man
kets abroad.
G. T. KNOWLES, Prop. Big 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
HeatEat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. per tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
OO /rf? For lh" Hl*h Ord Solid Silvtr
22/6 WRIST WATCH.
S5.SO
CUARAN- 11 --
TEED ^ftV*^.^ \^F Suitable
5 YEARS. ^^kmWtlaW Climates.
QO C or M.50 ii a um Price for this Sup
*' erkr Solid B Iver WKi.,1 WATCH.
Hr.titn UoTi'rniueni Siami-vd. Hi^h-iin . 13
JI.WEL Mwlsa L<-ver Movement accurately
timed itn.i ndju-t.- I 1 wed to 001 nun tatlafaetiori by severe tftti
n wi rk i. >pt"' l' lHl1"' "* aervioe-
.... and 1* lab!* W ft I ST WATCH now on n .-
in .rki-i in ihfl urtoa. \\c havi- no haaltaMon In
Kti rwii.....-hmi.-ii FIVI YKARS'BINUING
u'J ARANTLE 1 > t 1 >< * roa svgeJnel ail defeats
In material and wofkiyawattlp. Ella bow
hi 1 durable, of himkI iiP|it-nraiit*t>, a reliable
tiineaVepeT< lets olaar ilhil and ?)] tin n
and darau iiroof t'a*e. Each one u rarefuhy
i n. : :,r (,n ni\ piaraniaaa
1 the urebaavr In good ranuln
superior i>lg>klu strap with Solid Silver Buckle.
bj Ratal I rtl.....-. and t ateJo m
In Knfland for MM |$7>M| ami frequently
W 1 I Lot* watafa at noli n Low price
because, owlnti to oar large ssJee, *< are able to
faroarablo eontraota with the manufae-
lurars.aod ** we worltoa aver) uaall uia>xiu
- reap lha Un lit itiiv
nil Mi.. WRIST WATCH, examine- It oareiuny,
1 not parfectl) atlafte 1 in ev~ry
1 r.n return 11t<> us at oar expanea, ana
1- s.-.n wo rtf-hc it. c will return v*ur
money in fall, Inelndlnn pntuw ehnrk'i-h i.iii
1 W> n i ,.. niiintN-i- ,( iheee
rn soldiers on active eervtoe who have
( in.111 iii-m in In thoronghly aatlafactory. Illua
buim liadiva' illgh&li
Price 22 6 "r *..<.
Watch in Solid Nickel dust and da n
:< -i. .1 Hlili ~ni erlurqn illtj 7JEWEL
Swiss Levar Movement, iraaraniei d to glv* satis
. 1 i ' w.irr,1 il -.I for K; V K Vi itrs.
* i - t Quality nUjekui strap. Uaul la* out*,
Price It 1
Luminous Dial. TtBMOan be keen on darkest
bight, Uoarantaad eatiefactory,!- ii O111 i-xim.
POST Ad' niiiin- 7d. if- .
r'iri'i :: I0NIAL unaoliolted) reoelred from
Km., Chi n Ktoke, Brlit 1
1.1 11 1 purobaai d oil 11. 1
from i 11. n il ai 1 uaa bie ilxty
. 1 d and hare alwayt foand it 10 be ..
go 1 Um< konoer during the whole *f the
sixty yean that I have carried It.
|X1 :> d> J. 0 Kiv.i.
Rend POST CARD for Catalogue rl W
Ciuuki 1 rer PlatedOoode, Fountain
. Panej Qoodi 1 U .. etc, Fl
wtil pnly roat von Penny ami mai iave yog
1 incla We guarantee the itiir delivery of
all our (foods ilurlnu' iIm- W vu-no-ln
!.- 11 at in t'-1 m-.ii. we underi kt- u< rcplact- Hi- m
a KUEKOI t'H \];<,i Writeourliink
I I n nee. Bankers: LondonClti and M1.1-
I toil |: u.r r.'-l.. tx I'orn --ir.'.". Ur.t.w.1 l
PpADQ I TH i**1-1 \Watch Manufacturers
rt-AIXJ L,1U. V i-if, ; and J*well*rP.
210 BRIHTO! RRinOE. BW 8TOL. rn.r
5\RROW
COLLAR
All Arrow collars are
made of fabrics bleached
and shrunk in our own
plants. They always
fit and sit correctly and
are the most durable.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, PEAEOCr & CO.. Inc.
MAKERS. TROY, N. Y. U.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
Notice
ALL persons having claims
against the Estate of the
lnte lone Ci. M;iura of long
Cay, Fortune Island, ;uv. re*
quested to render the same
duly ;ittested, and tliose in-
debted thereto to make pay-
ment to
KENNETH SOLMON,
Attorney for
B, F. Maura, Administratrix.
21st August. 1916.
-.DRINK--
Welch's Grape juice.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
i Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 6d.
4s. 6d. per doe.
BLACK'S
222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel-Colonial.
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at iiS->
per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market5 31*x
"Primes" Cypress at 3.2s. per 1000. This grade oanies our
Sttme guarantee as the Bests."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Also cheaper grade in stock
April bth.1916 C. C SAUNDBRS.
JOHN BUTLER
OfTice : 367 Bay St., East
'Phone 245
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Re?.l Estate Aent
EXPORTER
Sisal, Sponges, Eark, Cotton and Woods
------------------------AGENT------------------------
\N0RWCiX UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
Phone P14
East Bay St.
ICE
THE Bahamas Timber Co.
begs to draw attention
of the public to the fact that
they are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City flours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.
Chas. E. Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
_______Spirits
'SBBBBBB^BB^BBBB^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBI8BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBa
Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund
Under the auspices of
THE ST. ANDRKW SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS
Patron
Mis Excellency Sir William L. Allerdyce, K. C. M. Q.,Governor
Appeal Committee
Chairman The Honourable James P. Sands, M. K. C
Honourable Hatourt Malcolm, K. C. T. S. Hilton, Ks.niire
Honourable J. R. C. Vouug, M. E. C.
Honourable William Miller, M. L. C.
J. M. Rae, Esquire.
O. F. Pritclmrd, Etquira
A. Kenneth Solomon, M.
11. A Esquire.
Honorary Treasurer
L. G. Brice, M H, A Esquire,
Honorary Secretary
Cyril l\ Solomon, Esquire.
4
4


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