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L. CILBKKT OUI'UCH, Editor and Profrittor. OFKICK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte St. Nataau, N. P., liahamas 'PHONE aw. p. o. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Mon.lay, Wednesday ami Fiiday— ungie copy JJ I uewlay, an-i I hursduy—sin K le Copy i.l -Saturday-single copy ... i Id Weekly *, M "" ,h| y i s. 6,1 U *,T ,y 4 S6d all leailv... ... .._ Q, >dv ''.' 19, I I'AYAHLK IN ADVANCK iei line for uiwpient iuwrtioiit, Ailveilisenients umlaj eivbl line* 4-.. Arabella Rogers, David Ro.'le, Thaddeus Forbes, Rosa Newbold, Jistelle Sweeting. o. 15. o. 2793Gbe tribune Tue.divy. Aujiisl 8. 1916 We lean that the Ruin Cay and Watlings mail schooner '-Nellie Leonora" is ashore at the South East point of Kuril Cay. It appears that she left Watlings for Rum Cay about eight days ago, and through some mistake in navigation missed the chan nel leading to Rum Cay,and ran on to the reef during the night. —:o: — C rgo shipped per S.S. "Monterey", bound for New York, August 3, 1916; 367 bales of Sponges, 92 biles refuse sponges, 10034 bales sisal, 11 cases turtle shell, 54 bis. conch shells, 2 cases marine curios, 30020 rases canned pineapples, Go empty steel barrels, 4 bales bark, 1 motor boat, 20 tons lignumvitae, 7 pkgs sundries. The S.S. "Monlerey"arrived in New York at noon on Sunday. Entertainment by 2nd Bahamas Girl Guides £20. o. o Collection at service for Contingent at Ebenezef Church 5. 1 >. o. Red Cross box collected by Theophilus Mangos, Sponger, Nassau 1. 4. 3. MANQHOVE CAY, ANOROS Contributors: —Mangrove Cay School, A friend, (Continued from 4th page. As for ourselves, I frankly admit that we were caught unprepared, except on the water; this apart from the fact that a democracy is nil war time invariably at a dis%  advantage wilhan autocracy. But despite of tluse drawbacks what have we dime during the lust 24 months? Thanks in great measure to the late f.arl Kitchener we have raised a Volunteer Army of 5,000,000 men fully tiain ed, clothed, accoutred and equipped. We have supplied our Allies with enormous quantities of clothing, arms, and ammunition; we have provided (hern with much of the meat consumed by their Armies on the western and southern fronts; we have ended over 4,000 munition factories, exclusive of hi fenals, which give employment to 3] million hands including 600,000 women, with there suit that we can now afford to fire more shells per diem than ihe Germans; and we have very neatly completed making a sufficiency of bigger and better guns and quick Biers than the enemy posses notwithstanding his four decades of preparation. At the commencement of the war we had very lew aero planes, today wc have nearly as many as the Teutons, and our airmen both in skill and daring are second to none. In the matter of fi nance we haveappn printed over £2850 000,000 for war purposes, and we have advanced OVer/Vwo, 000,000 sterling to our Allies I contend that our difficulties have been incomparatively greater than those of anv nation, and that anv unpre judioed person will admit that in as much as we have been able to obtain such CO lossal results in two rears, we arc not, when we bestir ourselves, one whit behind the Teuton wither in organi zation or in efficiency. Our Allies have again and again testified to the industrial effi cacy of Great Britain, and they have not hesitated to gratefully acknowledge the extraordinary figh ingquali ties of all His Majesty's For ces and the extreme v lour of our soldiers and sailois. I havepurposely refrained fioin referring till now to the doughty deeds of our silent Navy which remains supreme The control of the Seas was bequeathed to us by theGreat Nelson,Hood,and others, and the Nelson touch' lives today and permeates every one of Mis Majesty's Ships as I publicly predicted it would on the last anniversary of Trafalgar-whileJellicoeand Realty and dozens of others .ne names to be conjured with. We know to o T cost that we suffered in the first in stance from unprepnrcdness on land, lack o! soldiers, lack of arms and ammunition, and inferiority of guns. We re ali/ed too late that much precious blood had been spilt owing to our neglect and supineness in the past, and we s >rrowfully shed lo\ ing and sympathetic tears over the hundreds and thou sandsof our nearest and dear est who unflinchingly paid the supreme sacrifice owing to our having very few ex plosive shells on the Out break of ilOStilitit s and our conse cj 1 ient inability toclear away the barbed wire entangle men Is in front of the enemy's trenches. This however is not the lime to repine, and our original shortcomings in this respeel have now been reme lied. It is howei r our para mount duty to see that l|n se lives that have b'cn offered evil lingly both bv land and by water for the Great Cause haw not been given in vain. It is the bnunden and sacred duly of earh one <>f Mis Majesty's sub jer's in tin's Hall and throughnut the Bahamas to redouble lu's eff.rts to win that light for her.lom and that victory for civilization fir which ninnv multitudes of our f>ri ...ive inready hud down their lives aid without v\ hicli our \rij exist ence in the future would he one •of simple tyranny and chstxi lism. Let us adopt the ad\ ire of tlie young Australian \\ hoon Iproceeding to ihe front said '"Dont grieve, Mother, il I laII, but send four ollieis to take my place". ^ 1 „ rv *jp-1 u.i\ IIVI rdiawn the piciuie I will read an extract from an ap peal made 011 the 20th September, 1914, b) 1 lie Geiman Humanily League to the 'civ ilittd world It concludes as follows; —"No matter how Ions the campaign ai d the sacnlires it max email, w •" know thai the true ami lasting, interests < f the toilers and wngeearneis in Gi r many can Old) beseived l>> lie victories ol Ihe Allied inn i< s. The Kaiser luivine deceived and ruined inu< cent B< Ig'um, is now despoiling ai d dr< nclui g France with lln hi*" 'I 1 I lus victin s. It must theref01 e be plain toall honest men, iihoul diMinriii n of race, 01 I i< ed, 01 party, that there can be no settlement of the existing conditions, no lasting peace 01 si 1 utitj for the rights of man, no proleclion of d< mo crai v fr< 111 I ngandage and death, until the Imperial cl< mination of Prussia with Germany is crushed, disarn rd.and swept away lor e\er. 'linn and then only, H ill Bavaria. W urlli mherg, Saxon) and Hanovei le rescue d and I'oh lid Id ( rated fiom the giip ol a monarch, who b) Ins o ndlirt had f< r • feited the allegiance of his suh jects. and bj lus boastful rii h a nee of international treaties and conventions has emhnifcd upon a career of 1 rirm unparall eh d in aucii m 1 1 modi rn times". It is ihe I'utj of the Allies In redress. Bn f..r a| 1 s ible, the wrom. s thai have IIP< 11 commit ted, alllioupli sun e nl i| ('i I regret to -av can 1 MM be ade quntely mm pi nsali d even when peace an iv s. W Idle w e pray for an honourable pence it should he reniend en d thai at presi ni we and tie Prussians hold d lairetricallv o| pi •!• views on this suhjiet, -%J^t' I an early and premature pea is one that we si ould hitieily rue later. The enemy w iv]i to imp' >e ( n peace dm to Geiman si>premacy and it goes without saying th;t ll: it type fpiaco



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is one which we could neither tolerate nor accept, Germany lias fust of all got to be defeated, and in achieving this result the banks of the Rhine in Germany will have to witness-although in no spirit of revenge—a similar desolation to that caused by the Teuton^along the banks ol the Meilfc and the Moselle. It is only in this wav that' they can have brought home to them the iniquity of their crimes. Later, in conjunction with our gallant Allies, we will dictate such terms of peace ;is will adequately safeguard and vindicate the liberties of the civilized world. The following is His Excel lency's reply to the volt of thanks, and address to officers, N. C. O's, and men of the Ba ham as I) raft : Mr. Chairman, Mr. Johnson, Ladies and Gentlemen. I am highly sensible of the generous manner ill which you have received myAdress, and am grateful to all present for the way in which you have responded to my Appeal The Resolutions you have p tssed are worthy of the MI emn and momentous Anniv ersary, and add another page to the many already record ed of Bahamian loyalty and patriotism. At the end of June I received a cable from Lord I.ansdowne, the President of the British Red Cross Society which I will read "His Excellency (lie Governor, Nassau, I I have the honour to inform ypu that the British Red Cross Society and the order f f St John are once more proposing to appeal through out the Empire by street and other collections upon "Our j AJV" which has been fixed for the igth October. The money received will be de voted entirely to our wound ed soldiers and sailors from home and overseas at tbe various seats of war. The CCived last year from all parts of the Kings Dominion encourages us to hope that the constantly increasing demands fur our help may be met by a corresponding increase of generosity throughout the Empire. We shall he truly grateful to you if you will assist our work by organizing tin appeal and send ini the proceeds to us for our sick and wounded ;it the front. I shall be greatly obliged if you will kindly communicate the contents of this cablegram tO your Ministers and recommend the proposal to their favourable considerate n. Tlmr Majesties the King and Queen and tier Majesty Queen Alexandria are giving US their generous patronage, and I trust that you will also see your way to help us in the same splendid manner as you did last year, and that we may have the invaluable assis tance also of Lady Allardyce. (signed) LANSDOWNE. President, British Red Cross Society". The most appropriate form in which to deal with lliis Appeal can be decided bier. As you will recollect, the Col onists, in reply to a somewhat similar telegram which was re i coed last year, made a munificent contribution of £3600 in October last for the purchase of four motor ambulances. In thai connection I am glad to he able Ui tell you that Sir Robert Hud son, the Chairman of the Fi nance Committee of the British Red Cress and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, wrote to me on the 24th May and said, "the cars are all at the front doing most excellent service notwithstanding the heav\ work to which they are put. Not one of them is or has been put out of action up to the present moment. We are prohibited by the military authorities fiom giving particulars at to where the cars are working, nor will they allow us to inform you as to the number of wounded carried, or as to the points to which the wounded are con veyed But I can give you the general assurance that you and vour subscribers would he well satisfied with the service which tlie cars are rendering if w could tell the complete story of generous response thflt we re their usefulness. I should like once more to be allowed to saj how greatly we appreciate the help which is rendered to us by the people of the Bahamas." Notwithstanding the -res trictions imposed by the W'ai Ollice you will, I think, agree with nit that the letter sufiici ently indicates that our cars are doing exactly what we intended them to do, and that we have every reason to be satisfied with the work they are performing. I When I received that lettei, as also Lord Landsdwne's tele gram, it occurred to me that with the development of the war and the large increase of our armies, and therefore the still greater need for more mo tor ambulances in the immed iate future, all those who so generously helped last year would probabl) be glad to have the opportunity of again sub scribing later in October next to the relief of our wounded, while at the same time testify ing their admiration of the extreme bravery, unflinching courage, and unswerving de votion to duty of our soldiers and sailors to whom we all owe so much. And now I should like tc say n word or two to our Bahamian sol diers wlni nr*about to leave us fur Jamaica en route to the front. You Officers, non commissioned Offireis and men have voluntarily Come forward loaid your King and >our Country in this great struggle ol which we commemorate today the second anniversary. I need hardly tell you, for it goes without saying, that each one of you is worthy of our admiration, and not only of those who arc: present heie to-day, but of every loyal and right thinking person from one end of the Bahamas to the otl'.er. You are going to fight our battles, and do vour best to maintain all that we hold dearest. But believe me, over and above this, you yourselves have something far better and stronger to support yon, and that is the knowledge that in putting on the King's uniform you are doing your duty. Each one of you has made up his mind that both Freedom and Liberty are at stake, that the Old Union Jack that stands for both is challenged, tha, our national existence i. throitened, that all we cher ish most is in the balance, and therefore as loyal and patriotic sons of His Majesty's Dominions Beyond tbe Seas you have decided to take up arms for what is just and right, and if needful, give your life in keeping our Flag flying and all that it stands for. I can imagine nothing more meritorious, nothing liner. 'Thrice is he aimed that hath Ins quarrel just.' I repeat today what I said to the other Contingents prior to departure. "Boys, we are proud of you. We have no qualms in placing the honour of our Colony in \our safe keeping. We wish you God speed. The flags across tbe Hall give the signal. "Carry on.'' Boys, Carry on, Carry on to Victory. hear God, but nothing else in the worM." (Prolonged Applause.) Telegrams 8th August, 1916. London, 71I1. Governor, Bahamas. Official News, August 7th: — Australian, Kent, Surrey and Sussex troops durinit the week advanced Wet find North of 1'izierts 0113. CHI yaids fiont enptunng the enemysn.ain second line system, Stve ral hundred prisoners weie taken, At Verdun the French captured and hold Tlnamout VVoik and a ereaierpart of the village of Pleury Many counlei-attacks here and in the So.nine region were repulsed the enemy sustaining heavy losses Turks, VSl i ma ted at 14.000 strong attai 'kedoui position near the Suez canal, and weie defeated wilbvery heavy losses. They weie pursued over 18 miles. Over 3100 unwound ed prisoners were Captured, The geueial commanding highly com mends the conduct of AuMralim and New Zealand territorial troops South of Miody the Russian* have occupied the right hank of the Sereih River capturing over oO prisoners and numerous nin chine guns. There is heavy fighting on the River Ftokhod. In Asia Minor the Russian ad VS0C8 continues. General Smuts reports further progress. fSignedJ BONAR \..\W. Advertise in The Tribune.



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*v (Continued ftorn 1st page) ways disparaging tlieir own nation and the effoits she has made and is making in the cause of humanity. Some of these persons are so half hearted so questionably loyal, and so absurdly presumptuous as in an indirect sort of way to attempt to apologize when our Country meets with reverses, while in sinuatiugly explaining how the Teutons would have avoided such mistakes. 1 can truthfully assure you, Ladies and Gentle man, that the Germans have made quite as many blunders! and failures as we have not only ; in the field but elsewhere, and | very much more serious ones notwithstanding all their years' <>[ military training, while their inferior diplomacy and lack of: knowledge of human nature are universally admitted. After two generations of careful prepara | tion and intrigue they have failed to take Paris, even after m iking a shortcut through Bel gium contrary to their Treaty obligations; they have been un able to reach Calais; they are further today from overpowering Russia than they were twelve months ago when they took Warsaw; the monies lavished in secretly fermentingenn spiracies and sedition in India, Egypt, and South Africa have come to naught; the insunec tion which they helped to insti gate and encourage in Ireland was easily subdued; while their efforts to get the Mahommedan world to proclaim a Holy War against the British Raj have signally failed. Assured I) we have made mis i calculations and mistakes our selves but fortunately, as al ready stated, our enemies have made many more. It is well to bear in mind the dictum of the Great Nap ileon who said that in war those who make the fewest mistakes win. Now the Germans thought it wet going to be a short war and that in a month or two France would be crushed; they believed that Russia would then be humbled and sue for peace; tliev consider ed that they had sufficiency of ammunition which proved to be a fallacy; they were satisfied that they could be easily self supporting if needful in the matter of food; they never dreamt that the wholesale price of the second qualify of beef would rise in Berlin, according to the Vossische Zeitung, from 80 marks per cut in April, 1915, to 245 marks in Aprd, 10,16; nor that the German Empire could suffer from a scarcity ofsuce es sentials as fat and oils; they counted on the support of Italy; they Miscalculated the resist a nee that would be offered by Belgium; they lost the battle of Vpres through inability to rec ognize the stiength of the trench defensive of tlieir oppo nents; they were satisfied that; Verdun would fall in a week or twotoday is the 166th of the attack—; they failed to recog ni/.e how enormously they weakened theii linrsb) the in vasion of Russia and iheexten sion of their front, and how eg regiously the) erred by not stopping and entrenching them selvs ('ii the Vistula; the) hoped by victory to condone their violation of Belgian neutrality aid. in some way, to thereby justify tlieir odtragi I in Belgium France, Servia, and Poland, as also their bombard ment of Cathedrals, tin ir wilful destruction of the unique and wonderful architectural trea sures of past centuries, their razing of unfortified towns, tlieir shelling of unprotected ci ties, tlieir killing of defenceless women and children by the lor pedoing of passenger steamers. They c< Mainly never conceived it possible that within a month or two of the beginning of the war there would not he a Ger man ship upon the High Seas. In these and many other ways they made irreparable miscal dilations and blunders, while tli'ir crowning mistake of all has been that they have no per verted the truth that they have driven the conscience of the world to be the Ally of the Allies. ("Continued on inside) THE VOGUE The Linen Store. Beginning' Monday 7th August EMBROIDERY SALE Embroideries and Insertions tosuit every kind of material. At Wholesale Pin e*. Advertise in The Tribune. HeatEat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund Under the auspii es of THE ST. ANDREW SOCIETY Of nil. BAHAMAS Patrdn His Excellency Sir William L. Allardyre, K C. M. G.Governorj Appeal Committee Chairman The Honourable James P, Sands, M K C. Honourable llaicoiirt Malcolm. K. C. I S Hilton, Ksquire. Honourable J R. C Young, M. E C. () K I'litchard, Esquirel Honourable William Miller, \1. I.. C. A. Kenneth Solomon, \l.| J. M. line, Esquire. II. \ Esquire. Honorary Treasurer Honorary Secretary L. G. lirice, M. II, A Ksquire, C>ri! !•'. Solomon, lisquiieJ Phone 214 East Bay St Chas. E. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines & Spirits!



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i Nulllvi. fetldlctus |virr In verb* mannirl Hfin,. bound to •wear to the I)n|tnai ol no Master. VOL. XIII. N8.S.RU N. P.. BhMiwi, TUESDAY August 8. I 1 )I6 No. 22b , ,. . ... ,, ibeen many W E have Lrr-.a pleasure in publishing in this issue tne collected by sp< nli which His EX< elh ncy the Gevernor delivered al St. Andrew's Hall on Friday. We have already express ed our ip,>r %  *_• i itiorj of it-; intrinsic m scit. I'hose who are d iwnhearted wi.lfiod well-grounded encouragement in it and we have the idea that those whoare well-informed will in -.-I with some information which 11; %  -cl escaped their notice. Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen, As you are aware I have again been invited by the Executive of the Bahamas War Relief Fund t) summon a Pub lie Meeting on this the Second Anniversary of the Declaration of war against Germany foi the purpose of reiterating and reg islei ing in conjunction with the Dominions Overseas and all the Coloniesand Protectorates the solemn vow we took just a yenr ago. i e., to recoid our tion, but we have sent two oth er larger Contingents to the Front, the expenses of which have been defrayed from public funds, and the Legislature has likewise decided to maintain these Contingents at a standard Strength of 200 men which briefly means that the Colony is pledged to send a similar number of nun annually until the termination of hostilities In addition to men, £1,313 have been collected by public subscription for the despatch ol and expenses incidental to the y m rtly with and fullest sup Firsl Contingent, as also^600 port to the Mother Und in hei f fa *, o| .,„„ Mc)t((r nflexibledeterminationtoconAmb ulances; the Bahamas tinue the present ttruggle for Brai c h of the British Red Css '• niamtenance oilLiberty and li;is rc imtl ( ,/;,,„„„ ,„ cash to Just.ce until it 18 brought to lll( „ li(t S ocie(v, has spent/>., locally on material and has a act terms of this Resolution will very shortly be submitted to you. I trust I shall not be considered presumptuous if I briefly allude to what our actual support has amounted to .during the last twelve months ns distinct from our moral sympathy. It should be clearly understood that the monetary and other contributions I am about to mention are in addition to the handsome donations stated in my Appeal of last year. h the Aggregate the sum total *s not of course great, but we are nei liter a large nor a rich Colony We have not only made good the Resolution which waipasj ed at our Meeting of last year to raise and despatch a small Contingent by public subscripsmall balance in hand in addition to tending away over 10,• 000 articles; the Daughters of the Empire have sent £56 in cash and some 8,500 articles, exclusive of fruit and preserves, 10 various relief organizations and the League of the Cross of Geneva lias remitted £aoQ in cash to the British Red Cross and 3.700 articles. The above Is exclusive of Pie clothes made For and the gifts given to the Three Contingents which in eluded a lar^e consignme.it of tobacco from the War Relief Association of Virginia Final |y, ns the result of the Public Meeting held some six weeks a go a sum of £47 haf been subscribed for the Belgium Relief Fund. There have also lesser amounts' oili'-i societii s for the relief of those who, have suffered and are suffering 1 as a consequence of the war, among winch ma) be included £8$ contributed towards the Children of the Empire Fund foi maimed and blind soldiers and s.lilois. I gladly avail mv self of '.Ins oppoi tiiuity to publicly and gratefully acknow |< dge all such aid. Many of the gifts were more than generous! considering the circumstances of the donors. As you will recollect Great Bl it.iin did her utmost in the first .instance to pievent the outbreak of war, and it was only when we wire compelled t. deride between keeping and breaking our solemn obligations between maintaining the cause of Civilization and liberty and the right of the small nations to live, or allowing them to be trampled underfoot, that the Fmpire drew its sword from its scabbard. It seems hardly necessary to remind you that the Mother Land's absolute unpreparedness for any such contingency as our being involved in an European war disproves the absurd Teuton allegations that have been made from time to time that ('neat Britain was responsible for and brought about tbe simple. Had we, in [914,had the soldiers a.id muni lions we now have the conflict would have been decided long a.o. If there is one thing that has been more clearly demon strated than another since the outbreak of hosililies it is the inability of tbe inspired German press to speak the truth, a mat ter which I will refer to later Germany's official press propa ganda on which she has spent millions of pounds for the pur pose of influencing neutrals has surprised every nation except her own, but the greatest sur prise of all has yet to come, and that will be when the people ol tbe German Empire awake to find thin their rulers have intentionally and purpusely 11 y stilied and misled them, BI d grossly misrepresented tne truth. It will not be sufficient then, in condonation ol such an ofl1, |„ ati d offence to explain, as in the case of their losses in tbe Naval defeat oil Jutland, that 'fi.r military reasons' the facts were purposed) withheld. There are already signs of Austro Teuton dissensions and dis agreements. During the last two years the area of hostilities has become greatly enlarged, while trust worthy computations made as to tha'lo s of Lie and damage done to property are absolutelystaggering. Millions of lives have been Sacrificed, literally 'rivers of blood' have Boa d, and tin ie aie many millions of mothers and children, sweet hearts and wives, whose lives a\e been blighted, and w ho, to their dying day, will curse the Teuton originators of this wicked and diabolical Anna geddon for which the lust of jiower and ambition bas made them directly responsible. A great deal lias been said and written from time to time on the subject of German organization, German efficient y, and German foresight, and Teuton methods have been held up to us as examples of what we ought to do. Although abhorring tbe man-killing devices of the Hun, bis poison* us gases, his liquid fne Ac, &C, and while in no way wishing to belittle or decry either his organisation, efficiency, or his industrial system when put to a proper use, I must confess I become a little weary at times of those countrymen of ours who seem to take a pleasure in al(Conr/nued on 4f/i page)


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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02662
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, August 08, 1916
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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Full Text
i
Nulllvi. fetldlctus |virr In verb* mannirl
Hfin,. bound to wear to the I)n|tnai ol no Master.
VOL. XIII.
N8.S.RU N. P.. BhMiwi, TUESDAY August 8. I1)I6
No. 22b
, ,. ... ,, ibeen many
WE have Lrr-.a pleasure in publishing in this issue tne collected by
sp< nli which His Ex< elh ncy the Gevernor delivered
al St. Andrew's Hall on Friday. We have already express
ed our ip,>r *_ i itiorj of it-; intrinsic m scit. I'hose who are
d iwnhearted wi.lfiod well-grounded encouragement in it
and we have the idea that those whoare well-informed will
in -.-I with some information which 11;-cl escaped their
notice.
Mr. Chairman, Ladies and
Gentlemen,
As you are aware I have
again been invited by the Ex-
ecutive of the Bahamas War
Relief Fund t) summon a Pub
lie Meeting on this the Second
Anniversary of the Declaration
of war against Germany foi the
purpose of reiterating and reg
islei ing in conjunction with the
Dominions Overseas and all
the Coloniesand Protectorates
the solemn vow we took just
a yenr ago. i e., to recoid our
tion, but we have sent two oth
er larger Contingents to the
Front, the expenses of which
have been defrayed from public
funds, and the Legislature has
likewise decided to maintain
these Contingents at a standard
Strength of 200 men which
briefly means that the Colony
is pledged to send a similar
number of nun annually until
the termination of hostilities
In addition to men, 1,313 have
been collected by public sub-
scription for the despatch ol
and expenses incidental to the
ymrtly with and fullest sup Firsl Contingent, as also^600
port to the Mother Und in hei f fa *, o| ., Mc)t((r
nflexibledeterminationtocon- Ambulances; the Bahamas
tinue the present ttruggle for Brai,ch of the British Red Css
' niamtenance oilLiberty and li;is rc.imtl,(,/;,, , cash to
Just.ce until it 18 brought to lll( li(t Socie(v, has spent/>.,
locally on material and has a
act terms of this Resolution
will very shortly be submitted
to you.
I trust I shall not be consider-
ed presumptuous if I briefly al-
lude to what our actual support
has amounted to .during the
last twelve months ns distinct
from our moral sympathy. It
should be clearly understood
that the monetary and other
contributions I am about to
mention are in addition to the
handsome donations stated in
my Appeal of last year. h the
Aggregate the sum total *s not
of course great, but we are nei
liter a large nor a rich Colony
We have not only made good
the Resolution which waipasj
ed at our Meeting of last year
to raise and despatch a small
Contingent by public subscrip-
small balance in hand in addi-
tion to tending away over 10,
000 articles; the Daughters of
the Empire have sent 56 in
cash and some 8,500 articles,
exclusive of fruit and preserves,
10 various relief organizations
and the League of the Cross of
Geneva lias remitted aoQ in
cash to the British Red Cross
and 3.700 articles. The above Is
exclusive of Pie clothes made
For and the gifts given to the
Three Contingents which in
eluded a lar^e consignme.it of
tobacco from the War Relief
Association of Virginia Final
|y, ns the result of the Public
Meeting held some six weeks
ago a sum of 47 haf been
subscribed for the Belgium
Relief Fund. There have also
lesser amounts'
oili'-i societii s
for the relief of those who,
have suffered and are suffering1
as a consequence of the war,
among winch ma) be included
8$ contributed towards the
Children of the Empire Fund
foi maimed and blind soldiers
and s.lilois. I gladly avail mv
self of '.Ins oppoi tiiuity to pub-
licly and gratefully acknow
|< dge all such aid. Many of the
gifts were more than generous!
considering the circumstances
of the donors.
As you will recollect Great
Bl it.iin did her utmost in the
first .instance to pievent the
outbreak of war, and it was
only when we wire compelled
t. deride between keeping and
breaking our solemn obligations
between maintaining the cause
of Civilization and liberty and
the right of the small nations to
live, or allowing them to be
trampled underfoot, that the
Fmpire drew its sword from its
scabbard.
It seems hardly necessary to
remind you that the Mother
Land's absolute unprepared-
ness for any such contingency
as our being involved in an
European war disproves the
absurd Teuton allegations that
have been made from time to
time that ('neat Britain was
responsible for and brought
about tbe simple. Had we, in
[914,had the soldiers a.id muni
lions we now have the conflict
would have been decided long
a.o. If there is one thing that
has been more clearly demon
strated than another since the
outbreak of hosililies it is the
inability of tbe inspired German
press to speak the truth, a mat
ter which I will refer to later
Germany's official press propa
ganda on which she has spent
millions of pounds for the pur
pose of influencing neutrals has
surprised every nation except
her own, but the greatest sur
prise of all has yet to come, and
that will be when the people
ol tbe German Empire awake
to find thin their rulers have
intentionally and purpusely 11 y
stilied and misled them, bi d
grossly misrepresented tne truth.
It will not be sufficient then, in
condonation ol such an ofl-
1, | ati d offence to explain, as
in the case of their losses in tbe
Naval defeat oil Jutland, that
'fi.r military reasons' the facts
were purposed) withheld. There
are already signs of Austro
Teuton dissensions and dis
agreements.
During the last two years the
area of hostilities has become
greatly enlarged, while trust
worthy computations made as
to tha'lo s of Lie and damage
done to property are absolutely-
staggering. Millions of lives
have been Sacrificed, literally
'rivers of blood' have Boa d,
and tin ie aie many millions of
mothers and children, sweet
hearts and wives, whose lives
! a\e been blighted, and w ho,
to their dying day, will curse
the Teuton originators of this
wicked and diabolical Anna
geddon for which the lust of
jiower and ambition bas made
them directly responsible.
A great deal lias been said
and written from time to time
on the subject of German or-
ganization, German efficient y,
and German foresight, and Teu-
ton methods have been held up
to us as examples of what we
ought to do. Although abhor-
ring tbe man-killing devices of
the Hun, bis poison* us gases,
his liquid fne Ac, &C, and
while in no way wishing to
belittle or decry either his or-
ganisation, efficiency, or his in-
dustrial system when put to a
proper use, I must confess I be-
come a little weary at times of
those countrymen of ours who
seem to take a pleasure in al-
(Conr/nued on 4f/i page)


L. CILBKKT OUI'UCH,
Editor and Profrittor.
OFKICK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte St.
Nataau, N. P., liahamas
'PHONE aw. p. o. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Mon.lay, Wednesday ami Fiiday
ungie copy ......... jj
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I
I'AYAHLK IN ADVANCK
i for first iiiseitioii; three pence i>ei line
for line foi >uiwpient iuwrtioiit,
Ailveilisenients umlaj eivbl line* 4-..
Arabella Rogers, David
Ro.'le, Thaddeus Forbes,
Rosa Newbold, Jistelle
Sweeting. o. 15. o.
27- 9- 3-
Gbe tribune
Tue.divy. Aujiisl 8. 1916
We lean that the Ruin Cay
and Watlings mail schoon-
er '-Nellie Leonora" is ashore
at the South East point of
Kuril Cay. It appears that
she left Watlings for Rum
Cay about eight days ago,
and through some mistake in
navigation missed the chan
nel leading to Rum Cay,and
ran on to the reef during the
night.
:o:
C rgo shipped per S.S.
"Monterey", bound for New
York, August 3, 1916;
367 bales of Sponges, 92
biles refuse sponges, 10034
bales sisal, 11 cases turtle
shell, 54 bis. conch shells, 2
cases marine curios, 30020
rases canned pineapples, Go
empty steel barrels, 4 bales
bark, 1 motor boat, 20 tons
lignumvitae, 7 pkgs sundries.
The S.S. "Monlerey"arrived
in New York at noon on
Sunday.
Entertainment by 2nd Ba-
hamas Girl Guides 20. o. o
Collection at ser-
vice for Contingent
at Ebenezef Church 5. 1 >. o.
Red Cross box col-
lected by Theophi-
lus Mangos, Sponger,
Nassau 1. 4. 3.
MANQHOVE CAY, ANOROS
Contributors: Mangrove
Cay School, A friend,
(Continued from 4th page.
As for ourselves, I frankly
admit that we were caught
unprepared, except on the
water; this apart from the
fact that a democracy is nil
war time invariably at a dis-
advantage wilhan autocracy.
But despite of tluse draw-
backs what have we dime
during the lust 24 months?
Thanks in great measure to
the late f.arl Kitchener we
have raised a Volunteer Army
of 5,000,000 men fully tiain
ed, clothed, accoutred and
equipped. We have supplied
our Allies with enormous
quantities of clothing, arms,
and ammunition; we have
provided (hern with much of
the meat consumed by their
Armies on the western and
southern fronts; we have
ended over 4,000 munition
factories, exclusive of hi fen-
als, which give employment
to 3] million hands including
600,000 women, with there
suit that we can now afford
to fire more shells per diem
than ihe Germans; and we
have very neatly completed
making a sufficiency of big-
ger and better guns and
quick Biers than the enemy
posses notwithstanding his
four decades of preparation.
At the commencement of the
war we had very lew aero
planes, today wc have nearly
as many as the Teutons, and
our airmen both in skill and
daring are second to none.
In the matter of finance we
haveappn printed over 2850
000,000 for war purposes, and
we have advanced OVer/Vwo,
000,000 sterling to our Allies
I contend that our difficulties
have been incomparatively
greater than those of anv
nation, and that anv unpre
judioed person will admit
that in as much as we have
been able to obtain such CO
lossal results in two rears,
we arc not, when we bestir
ourselves, one whit behind
the Teuton wither in organi
zation or in efficiency. Our
Allies have again and again
testified to the industrial effi
cacy of Great Britain, and
they have not hesitated to
gratefully acknowledge the
extraordinary figh ingquali
ties of all His Majesty's For
ces and the extreme v lour of
our soldiers and sailois. I
havepurposely refrained fioin
referring till now to the
doughty deeds of our silent
Navy which remains supreme
The control of the Seas was
bequeathed to us by theGreat
Nelson,Hood,and others,and
the Nelson touch' lives today
and permeates every one of
Mis Majesty's Ships as I
publicly predicted it would
on the last anniversary of
Trafalgar- -whileJellicoeand
Realty and dozens of others
.ne names to be conjured
with.
We know to o t cost that
we suffered in the first in
stance from unprepnrcdness
on land, lack o! soldiers, lack
of arms and ammunition, and
inferiority of guns. We re
ali/ed too late that much
precious blood had been
spilt owing to our neglect
and supineness in the past,
and we s >rrowfully shed lo\
ing and sympathetic tears
over the hundreds and thou
sandsof our nearest and dear
est who unflinchingly paid
the supreme sacrifice owing
to our having very few ex
plosive shells on the Out break
of ilOStilitit s and our conse
cj 1 ient inability toclear away
the barbed wire entangle
men Is in front of the enemy's
trenches. This however is not
the lime to repine, and our
original shortcomings in this
respeel have now been reme
lied. It is howei r our para
mount duty to see that l|n se
lives that have b'cn offered evil
lingly both bv land and by
water for the Great Cause haw
not been given in vain. It is the
bnunden and sacred duly of earh
one <>f Mis Majesty's sub
jer's in tin's Hall and through-
nut the Bahamas to redouble
lu's eff.rts to win that light for
her.lom and that victory for
civilization fir which ninnv
multitudes of our f>ri ...ive in-
ready hud down their lives aid
without v\ hicli our \rij exist
ence in the future would he one
of simple tyranny and chstxi
lism. Let us adopt the ad\ ire
of tlie young Australian \\ hoon
Iproceeding to ihe front said
'"Dont grieve, Mother, il I laII,
but send four ollieis to take my
place". ^
1 rv *jp-1
u.i\ iivi rdiawn the piciuie I
will read an extract from an ap
peal made 011 the 20th Septem-
ber, 1914, b) 1 lie Geiman Hu-
manily League to the 'civ ilittd
world It concludes as follows;
"No matter how Ions the
campaign ai d the sacnlires it
max email, w " know thai the
true ami lasting, interests < f the
toilers and wngeearneis in Gi r
many can Old) beseived l>> lie
victories ol Ihe Allied inn i< s.
The Kaiser luivine deceived and
ruined inu< cent B< Ig'um, is now
despoiling ai d dr< nclui g France
with lln hi*" 'I 1 I lus victin s.
It must theref01 e be plain toall
honest men, iihoul diMinriii n
of race, 01 I i< ed, 01 party, that
there can be no settlement of the
existing conditions, no lasting
peace 01 si 1 utitj for the rights
of man, no proleclion of d< mo
crai v fr< 111 I ngandage and
death, until the Imperial cl< mi-
nation of Prussia with Germany
is crushed, disarn rd.and swept
away lor e\er. 'linn and then
only, h ill Bavaria. W urlli m-
herg, Saxon) and Hanovei le
rescue d and I'oh lid Id ( rated
fiom the giip ol a monarch,
who b) Ins o ndlirt had f< r
feited the allegiance of his suh
jects. and bj lus boastful rii h
a nee of international treaties
and conventions has emhnifcd
upon a career of 1 rirm unparall
eh d in aucii m 1 1 modi rn
times".
It is ihe I'utj of the Allies In
redress. Bn f..r a- | 1 s ible, the
wrom. s thai have Iip< 11 commit
ted, alllioupli sun e nl i| ('i I
regret to -av can 1 mm be ade
quntely mm pi nsali d even
when peace an iv s. W Idle w e
pray for an honourable pence it
should he reniend en d thai at
presi ni we and tie Prussians
hold d lairetricallv o| pi !
views on this suhjiet, -%J^t' I
an early and premature pea
is one that we si ould hitieily
rue later.
The enemy w iv]i to imp' >e
(n peace dm to Geiman si>-
premacy and it goes without
saying th;t ll: it type fpiaco


is one which we could neither
tolerate nor accept, Germany
lias fust of all got to be de-
feated, and in achieving this
result the banks of the Rhine
in Germany will have to
witness-although in no spirit
of revengea similar desola-
tion to that caused by the
Teuton^along the banks ol
the Meilfc and the Moselle.
It is only in this wav that'
they can have brought home
to them the iniquity of their
crimes. Later, in conjunction
with our gallant Allies, we
will dictate such terms of
peace ;is will adequately
safeguard and vindicate the
liberties of the civilized
world.
The following is His Excel
lency's reply to the volt of
thanks, and address to officers,
N. C. O's, and men of the Ba
ham as I) raft :
Mr. Chairman, Mr. Johnson,
Ladies and Gentlemen.
I am highly sensible of the
generous manner ill which
you have received myAdress,
and am grateful to all pre-
sent for the way in which you
have responded to my Appeal
The Resolutions you have
p tssed are worthy of the mI
emn and momentous Anniv
ersary, and add another page
to the many already record
ed of Bahamian loyalty and
patriotism.
At the end of June I receiv-
ed a cable from Lord I.ans-
downe, the President of the
British Red Cross Society
which I will read
"His Excellency
(lie Governor,
Nassau,
I I have the honour to inform
ypu that the British Red
Cross Society and the order
ff St John are once more
proposing to appeal through
out the Empire by street and
other collections upon "Our
jAJV" which has been fixed
for the igth October. The
money received will be de
voted entirely to our wound
ed soldiers and sailors from
home and overseas at tbe
various seats of war. The
CCived last year from all
parts of the Kings Dominion
encourages us to hope that
the constantly increasing
demands fur our help may
be met by a corresponding
increase of generosity
throughout the Empire. We
shall he truly grateful to you
if you will assist our work by
organizing tin appeal and send
ini the proceeds to us for our
sick and wounded ;it the front.
I shall be greatly obliged if
you will kindly communicate
the contents of this cablegram
tO your Ministers and recom-
mend the proposal to their
favourable considerate n.
Tlmr Majesties the King
and Queen and tier Majesty
Queen Alexandria are giving
US their generous patronage,
and I trust that you will also
see your way to help us in
the same splendid manner as
you did last year, and that we
may have the invaluable assis
tance also of Lady Allardyce.
(signed) LANSDOWNE.
President, British
Red Cross Society".
The most appropriate form in
which to deal with lliis Appeal
can be decided bier.
As you will recollect, the Col
onists, in reply to a somewhat
similar telegram which was re
i coed last year, made a muni-
ficent contribution of 3600 in
October last for the purchase of
four motor ambulances. In thai
connection I am glad to he able
Ui tell you that Sir Robert Hud
son, the Chairman of the Fi
nance Committee of the British
Red Cress and the Order of St.
John of Jerusalem, wrote to
me on the 24th May and said,
"the cars are all at the front
doing most excellent service
notwithstanding the heav\ work
to which they are put. Not one
of them is or has been put out
of action up to the present
moment. We are prohibited
by the military authorities fiom
giving particulars at to where
the cars are working, nor will
they allow us to inform you as
to the number of wounded car-
ried, or as to the points to
which the wounded are con
veyed But I can give you the
general assurance that you and
vour subscribers would he well
satisfied with the service which
tlie cars are rendering if w
could tell the complete story of
generous response thflt we re their usefulness. I should like
once more to be allowed to saj
how greatly we appreciate
the help which is rendered to us
by the people of the Bahamas."
Notwithstanding the -res
trictions imposed by the W'ai
Ollice you will, I think, agree
with nit that the letter sufiici
ently indicates that our cars are
doing exactly what we intended
them to do, and that we have
every reason to be satisfied with
the work they are performing.
I When I received that lettei, as
also Lord Landsdwne's tele
gram, it occurred to me that
with the development of the
war and the large increase of
our armies, and therefore the
still greater need for more mo
tor ambulances in the immed
iate future, all those who so
generously helped last year
would probabl) be glad to have
the opportunity of again sub
scribing later in October next
to the relief of our wounded,
while at the same time testify
ing their admiration of the
extreme bravery, unflinching
courage, and unswerving de
votion to duty of our soldiers
and sailors to whom we all
owe so much.
And now I should like tc say n
word or two to our Bahamian sol
diers wlni nr*about to leave us fur
Jamaica en route to the front. You
Officers, non commissioned Offireis
and men have voluntarily Come
forward loaid your King and >our
Country in this great struggle ol
which we commemorate today the
second anniversary.
I need hardly tell you, for
it goes without saying, that
each one of you is worthy of
our admiration, and not only
of those who arc: present heie
to-day, but of every loyal
and right thinking person
from one end of the Bahamas
to the otl'.er. You are going
to fight our battles, and do
vour best to maintain all that
we hold dearest. But believe
me, over and above this, you
yourselves have something
far better and stronger to
support yon, and that is the
knowledge that in putting
on the King's uniform you
are doing your duty. Each
one of you has made up his
mind that both Freedom and
Liberty are at stake, that the
Old Union Jack that stands
for both is challenged, tha,
our national existence i.
throitened, that all we cher
ish most is in the balance,
and therefore as loyal and
patriotic sons of His Majes-
ty's Dominions Beyond tbe
Seas you have decided to take
up arms for what is just and
right, and if needful, give
your life in keeping our Flag
flying and all that it stands
for. I can imagine nothing
more meritorious, nothing
liner. 'Thrice is he aimed
that hath Ins quarrel just.'
I repeat today what I said to
the other Contingents prior
to departure. "Boys, we are
proud of you. We have no
qualms in placing the honour
of our Colony in \our safe
keeping. We wish you God
speed. The flags across tbe
Hall give the signal. "Carry
on.'' Boys, Carry on, Carry
on to Victory. hear God,
but nothing else in the
worM."
(Prolonged Applause.)
Telegrams
8th August, 1916.
London, 71I1.
Governor, Bahamas.
Official News, August 7th: Aus-
tralian, Kent, Surrey and Sussex
troops durinit the week advanced
Wet find North of 1'izierts 0113.
Chi yaids fiont enptunng the ene-
mysn.ain second line system, Stve
ral hundred prisoners weie taken,
At Verdun the French captured
and hold Tlnamout VVoik and a
ereaierpart of the village of Pleury
Many counlei-attacks here and in
the So.nine region were repulsed
the enemy sustaining heavy losses
Turks, VSl i ma ted at 14.000 strong
attai 'kedoui position near the Suez
canal, and weie defeated wilbvery
heavy losses. They weie pursued
over 18 miles. Over 3100 unwound
ed prisoners were Captured, The
geueial commanding highly com
mends the conduct of AuMralim
and New Zealand territorial troops
South of Miody the Russian*
have occupied the right hank of
the Sereih River capturing over
oO prisoners and numerous nin
chine guns. There is heavy fighting
on the River Ftokhod.
In Asia Minor the Russian ad
VS0C8 continues.
General Smuts reports further
progress.
fSignedJ
BONAR \..\W.
Advertise in
The Tribune.


*v
(Continued ftorn 1st page)
ways disparaging tlieir own
nation and the effoits she
has made and is making in the
cause of humanity. Some of
these persons are so half hearted
so questionably loyal, and so
absurdly presumptuous as in an
indirect sort of way to attempt
to apologize when our Country
meets with reverses, while in
sinuatiugly explaining how the
Teutons would have avoided
such mistakes. 1 can truthfully
assure you, Ladies and Gentle
man, that the Germans have
made quite as many blunders!
and failures as we have not only ;
in the field but elsewhere, and |
very much more serious ones
notwithstanding all their years'
<>[ military training, while their
inferior diplomacy and lack of:
knowledge of human nature are '
universally admitted. After two '
generations of careful prepara |
tion and intrigue they have
failed to take Paris, even after
m iking a shortcut through Bel
gium contrary to their Treaty
obligations; they have been un
able to reach Calais; they are
further today from overpower-
ing Russia than they were
twelve months ago when they
took Warsaw; the monies lav-
ished in secretly fermentingenn
spiracies and sedition in India,
Egypt, and South Africa have
come to naught; the insunec
tion which they helped to insti
gate and encourage in Ireland
was easily subdued; while their
efforts to get the Mahommedan
world to proclaim a Holy War
against the British Raj have
signally failed.
Assured I) we have made mis i
calculations and mistakes our
selves but fortunately, as al
ready stated, our enemies have
made many more. It is well to
bear in mind the dictum of the
Great Nap ileon who said that '
in war those who make the
fewest mistakes win. Now the
Germans thought it wet going
to be a short war and that in
a month or two France would
be crushed; they believed that
Russia would then be humbled
and sue for peace; tliev consider
ed that they had sufficiency of
ammunition which proved to be
a fallacy; they were satisfied
that they could be easily self
supporting if needful in the
matter of food; they never
dreamt that the wholesale price
of the second qualify of beef
would rise in Berlin, according
to the Vossische Zeitung, from
80 marks per cut in April, 1915,
to 245 marks in Aprd, 10,16; nor
that the German Empire could
suffer from a scarcity ofsuce es
sentials as fat and oils; they
counted on the support of Italy;
they Miscalculated the resist
a nee that would be offered by
Belgium; they lost the battle of
Vpres through inability to rec
ognize the stiength of the
trench defensive of tlieir oppo
nents; they were satisfied that;
Verdun would fall in a week or
two- today is the 166th of the
attack; they failed to recog
ni/.e how enormously they
weakened theii linrsb) the in
vasion of Russia and iheexten
sion of their front, and how eg
regiously the) erred by not
stopping and entrenching them
selvs ('ii the Vistula; the)
hoped by victory to condone
their violation of Belgian
neutrality aid. in some way, to
thereby justify tlieir odtragi I in
Belgium France, Servia, and
Poland, as also their bombard
ment of Cathedrals, tin ir wilful
destruction of the unique and
wonderful architectural trea
sures of past centuries, their
razing of unfortified towns,
tlieir shelling of unprotected ci
ties, tlieir killing of defenceless
women and children by the lor
pedoing of passenger steamers.
They c< Mainly never conceived
it possible that within a month
or two of the beginning of the
war there would not he a Ger
man ship upon the High Seas.
In these and many other ways
they made irreparable miscal
dilations and blunders, while
tli'--ir crowning mistake of all
has been that they have no per
verted the truth that they have
driven the conscience of the
world to be the Ally of the
Allies.
("Continued on inside)
THE VOGUE
The Linen Store.
Beginning' Monday 7th
August
Embroidery Sale
Embroideries and Insertions
tosuit every kind of material.
At Wholesale Pin e*.
Advertise in
The Tribune.
Heat- Eat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew *
6d. per tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund
Under the auspii es of
THE ST. ANDREW SOCIETY Of nil. BAHAMAS
Patrdn
His Excellency Sir William L. Allardyre, K C. M. G.Governorj
Appeal Committee
Chairman The Honourable James P, Sands, M K C.
Honourable llaicoiirt Malcolm. K. C. I S Hilton, Ksquire.
Honourable J R. C Young, M. E C. () K I'litchard, Esquirel
Honourable William Miller, \1. I.. C. A. Kenneth Solomon, \l.|
J. M. line, Esquire. II. \ Esquire.
Honorary Treasurer Honorary Secretary
L. G. lirice, M. II, A Ksquire, C>ri! !'. Solomon, lisquiieJ
Phone 214
East Bay St
Chas. E. Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines & !
Spirits!


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