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r.. GTLBRBT DUI'UCII, Editor and I'roprittor. omoK Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte Sla Dmmm, X. /'., Hahamas I'HONK L'liO P. O. l.iOX lS. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, \VeJne)ay ami Friday sicgiecopji J,I T'-'^lay, and rburaday—aingle copy rd Saturday— single copy i 1 Weekly Jd Monthly ,.. £j terly IS, I | Ymtly... Pearly is. I'AYAKLK IN ADV'ANCK tdvertiaing Rates:— Six pence par line rfirst insertion: three pence pet line and iroartion aini one %  > i line lor sutisqiieiit iruwrtiniH. Advertisements under eialit line Zhe tribune Thursday. June 22. 1916 One of the most remarkable features of the wai is tlie wonderful elasticity of British finance. We reproduce elsewhere two extracts from the "Spectator" which illustrate this fact. The war is costing over four and a half millions daily, and Great Bri t.''in is finding tltc money without undue strain. Mr Asquith gave a very in ti resting analysis of the way the money is being spent, not the least significant fact being the iaige amounts we are advancing to our Allies. While we recognise the fact that this is no time to raise the Fiscal issue, which, by the way, should never have been allowed to become a "party" question; we cannot refrain from pointing out that these stupendous sums are being raised by a country which has unwaveringly stood by a pol icy of free imports for the last eighty years. ^ From what Mr Austin Chamberlain says in the ex tract we produce, it seems that he is impressed by the stability of British finance, and that the fact that "no other country could raise so' much by taxation" is likely to modify his pre-war views on economics. It seems extremely likely that the fiscal question will be settled or shall we say has been settlod? and that the policy in future will be one of give and take. Free Traders will ham lo discriminate, by consenting to tax imports from the na lions who have abused their privileges, while those who favour the taxation of imports having realised that freedom of trade is sound in principle, will be more inclined to work towards a wider area of free dom from restrictions on trad ing, an area which shall in elude our Allies and the British Empire as a whole. :o: — On Tuesday afternoon Lady Allardyve accompanied j bv Mis. Dr. Johnson paid a visit tu ilir brain h of the Ma hamian Red Cross Guild con nected with Zion Baptist Church. 'I he school ni was taste fully decorated for theoccas ion by Mr Clavelle, who was accorded a heai ty and unan imons vote of thanks for his Iservio s. After a brief prayer, follow ed by the singing of the "Rus sian Hymn" Mrs Nabbie pn behalf of the Guild, lead an add ess of welcome to l.adv \ 1 la rdyce after which Rev, II F. Da u gave a In ief reporl of the Society's work. Lady Allardyce followed with a bright addn s S pat k< d with sound advice and enc\ urage innit. Thi speech was delivered qu'iieexiempove was character i-tir of Lady Allardyce, and breathed the intense enthusiasm and eneigv which she throws into this work That this enthusiasm and energy contagious wos evidenced by the breathless interest with which her remarks were fol lowed and we are sure that there will be an added stim ulus to this great work as a direct result of her persuasive eloquence. Mrs Forsyth thanked Lady Allardyce for her visit in a few well chosen sentences, Rfld after the singing of the National Anthem, th< Pastor pronounced the benediction thus terminating a memor able gathering. The tein sch. Benjamin Russell ai i ivc d tod a) from Baltimore w'n% a cargo of empty cans and coal !'< r the J. S. Johnson Co. HON. HSUSE OF ASSEMBLY Monday evening June 19, 1910 BRESEM I he I lonourable t he Spe i Ist-i, I lonoorubles Dr. (i II Johnson, J. R. C. Young, Messrs, Geo. Weech, R. W. I'uitle, T. Toote, Geo. Coll I Augustus I oole, K/eki.l Bain, \V. P. Adder ley, I). Sweeting, J. I. B. Williams, I W. Young,C I'.. Al bury, R. W.S.iwver, W. K. Moore, I fG. Mr ice, A.K.Solomon. Afti i ihe usiii i i eremon), Mi. I.is. h. M. Williams, the newlj eli 'tid na mbei for the district of Long Cay, Crook ed Island and Vklins, ti N .|, his seat in the 1 louse. On motion of Mr. Turtle, a select Commit lee was app inted to consider the pet i tion of Mis. k. A I hompsim pi a\ ing loi a pension or gra tuity. ()n riiol ion of I >r. Sweet ing ihe rep<'it ol tIn si '• i t C< in mil ti e a| i' l ed on ilie voti of Inden.nily loi £\ 17. 12. o for the payment ol subsl itu U s dm ing the illness of 1 )r. J. J. ( | i!nier was ndopti I The Mill b) Mr. W. .C B. Johnsi. Swee'ingfoi a second read ing of the follow ing Vole of indemnity, was read a se< nnd and third time and passe,] Res< lived, that this House will indemnify t he Receivei ( i eneral and Treasuiei in pay ingout of the PublicTreasury by warrant in the usual man tier to the Governor'in Conn i M the sum of £ 1 17 l 2R. od.' being the amount paid to 1 >t* J Maiid Albuij foi peifoimiti the (lulu &f ol |\'t si Ami Sur geoil al tie! ahani.i*; (it lieral Hospital durwig 11 e ill ness of Dr. J. J. Culniei un til the arrival of Dr. Walter II. ss. Suspension of Rule 15 and the thud u ading ol the above Vote of Indemnity. I he House (1 join n< d 10 \fi 11 cI.• \ 1 \ eiiuiL; IK M at 8 o'clock. :o: — NOTICE:— The Telegraph 1 f fice will be open loim 8J 30 until 10 a.m. Friday, June 23rd. Thinking about SWeetS? or cool drinks? ihen think of BLACK, he can satisfy you. NO WONDER I \ \. w 1 f< mnd himself for .1 "Jerk wa'ex" town "f the ; ( %  • luhmil i" the ministi tint '. tl c h cal barber. Me lie was 1 1 I-n 1 ked, indled W h< n the ] \' forker 1 at up a d u il "Civ* 11 ;i drink f w let "Y 1 f.niit. I I. 1 he I .irl'i 1. (ib* IUHL' the m. HI'S distress) 'I V.. "No,' 1 wa& I hi "I 1 JM*' : nt •• nnmlli v. ill li.".|^~ a •1 -. 'Ill I l>'s war I ki 1 %  %  %  very tantalii I :i l'i Rrt if il Ihr SI Radiograms 22lid June 1910. Paris: I here wen no infant 1 v act ions ol note all ing 1 he VeirUin front. llombardmentH cont innat VflUX, I e \l o r t Homme and 1 lounumont. Athens: — Kmg Constanlin is eon sidei ing a 1 hang* 1 f cabinet as a reSuttof the Allies b|o( |


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offensive were defeated and the enemy is in retreat. Washington: — "Carranza soldiers capl ured an .\iiierican trooper but he was release after General Pershing threatened to attack. Washington: — Officials await Carranzas reply to the latest note. In the meantime war preparations continue. Perching and Fontton are making every effort to be ready for any amergency. A figlit is reported in which a number of American cavalymen were killed. —:o: — In the I louse of Commons on Tuesday Mr. Asquith moved the eleventh Vote ot Credit for the war. He asked for £"300,000,000, which will last till the begin ning of August at the estimated rata of expenditure for the past fifty days higher—at £4,830,000 The principal items in the bill at Army, Navy, and munitions £\ I 1, • > ',o()i>; loans to Allies and U rninione, jf74.jno.ooo; fo id supplies, transport,^.,,£'17 coo.OOO, The growth of expend iture is noticeable in the loans 1 1 Allies and others. Colonel Churchill reviewed our resorces Mh men. I If pointed out five Tinain reservoirs. First, there was the margin of men at the front (off! ers, servants, for example) who never came under f 1 r*. If \V5 had five million men under arms, the forces of the enemy with which we came actually in tocontact probably amounted to onlv five hundred thousand men. The second reservoir is the Armv at home, which he thought was too large; the third, the Eastern Armies; the fourth, Africa, and fifth, Asia Every man in uniform should he submitted tons severe a scrutiny as a civilian suffered. His advice to the War Office was: "Physician, comb thyself!" — :o: — In the House of Commons on Thursday week Mr. Cham berlain gave strong and val liable support to the Finan ce rtill. No other country, he said, was meeting so large a proportion of war expend! ture by taxation. It was now evident that we could bear trfjf great strain as long as %  4 might be necessary to win the 1 war. While we weie raising £300, OOO, ->00 by additional taxation, was raising only £"25, 000, 00. As for our future fiscal policy, it would be in vain to look on the pages of Hansard for enlighten menl, agri ( iiient would be p tsible among schools of thought which had widely differed in the past, but v\ ho were reaching common ground by various routes. Apa t from Mr.Chamber! in's most sensible speech, the de bate was interesting for Mr McKenna'fi emphatic refusal to reconsidei the proposal to introduce premium bonds. I he working (lasses were already investing as nun h as could be expected of tlieni, and in cl i iy case the Govei nnieiii declined to encourage the gambling spirit. Dealing with other points, Mi. Mc Kenna admitted that tin 1 \ cess Profits Tax could not be further increased. Fie intend ed to introduce modified ti< ins of the new Income Tax in Committee soas to adjust the proportion between eain ed and unearned incomes. —:o:— CORN FOR AMMUNITION It's an ill wind that dosen'nl blow the farmers some good. he armi of Europe look to tlieni for a great deal of then supplies; I he soldiers are fed and clothed with products of the farm, an 1 now are looking to the farmers for part of their ammunition. Cottonseed oil is used to manufacture glycei ine. which goes into manufactureif nitroglycerine, and thus i elpsto put the priceofseed to an un usual figure. About 3,000,009 bales ofcot ton have been used in a year in the Manufacture of expires ives Not content wil b that, starch an alchohol aie being used in composition "f high power explosives The different indusl ries in this country have more than doubled their consumpt ion of corn on this nc< OOnl A barrel of pork, a cask of alcohol, a side of beef or a consign mpnt of explosives may not look much alike, yet in a Heat Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Be Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up. after Kirkman's Soap orax 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House measure they are com 1 nlra tions of < otton, meal and coin. A soldier is clothed w itll cotton. His occasional bath is with cotton oil soap. His beef, pork, butter, eggs and O aide: sed milk repress nl corn cott< \v, when he helps to fue a shell he is still using com and cotton His life is sustained, and that of hisen einy taken; by the use of the same products of the farm.— Wall Street Journal. A CURIOUS DEVELOPMENT Why (iermany, numerical ly weaker than her enemies, should assume the of fen siveat all and accept the odds thai lie against that part of modern waiefare, in a theatre where those odds would be their highest and the total cost heart breaking— that is the most important question. Time to Germany undoubted ly is more precious than ma terial Time is more than pre cious. It is vital. To gain time, she went through Belgium. The longer, harder u'ay lay past Verdun. Well, the short and easy way was no thoroughfare to Paris, and here the Germans are, after eighteen months of precious time laps* d, 1 Btt< 1 Verdun, I he Sew York Tiii NOTICE. I 0 AI i. WHOM i r M \Y c D IS I RIC I Grand Off of Disti ict No. 3 of Bahamas of the G ii A I of Ii. and S. of 1 0\ e | Cbai it v an' as follow S : Jas \. Knowles, D.G W| Ernest A. Liglii bo urn, G. S. Win. Shepherd, D D.M F. Anderson, ( \ (i. Inspi or. The above are tin ortl) a thoii/ed offici i--. Attested. A. 1 JOHNSON, G. W. S. Per, J. \i. KNOW LES '(i. W.D.S Just Arrived| Enamel Beds, and Spring\ Fancy Goods, and Notionl Shoes. E. C. Griffh Bay St. and Victoria A\



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(Continued from 1st page) Ket it at the cost (if 3110,090 <>i 400,000 casualties, they will have acquired nothing but a few square milts ol French ter ritory and such moral values 81 the possession thereof mm give t lie ni. If tlie whole world which sympathizes with the Allied cause could he as calm not as the men who are about Verdun but as Paris is, as Paris has been since the In si terrific drive was halted, the < ierman cam M itself would h>se practi cally -ill its imp irtaiu e, since it is a ITN > ral before ii is a miti tar) venture. Despite the liea\ > casualties the French are view ing the Verdun campaign with confidence and with satisfac tion; so far what has bappi 1 was exactly what they expe. ti rj would happen when their high command finally decided to hold and not to eva< uate V< • dun, yielding to the appeal of the politicians ICE T HE Bahamas Timber Co J begs to draw attention I of the public to the fact that they are now selling Ice at their Lumber Office on East St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dont Forget that WM. HILTON 260 Bay St. has A FINK ASSORTMENT of white summer goods for ladies, INCLUDING White "Middy" cloth at 1/per yard. Phone 201. W. A. MATHER UNPERTAKEP D ESIRKS to inform his friends and the Public that fre has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisness of an undertaker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrulTed to his care with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronaae Get roy Prices first Hnd provgthes* that are the very lowest for the clas* fir*t work. :ARROW COLLAR All Arrow collars are made of fabrics bleached and shrunk in our own plants. They always fit and sit correctly and are the most durable. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, IT i£Oi r & CO.. Inc. MAKERS, TROT, N. Y. U.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. F. A. Garner 52 Weal B&v Si. Received per lust Steamer. E nglish Breakfast Tea, Can iied Pears, Pea< hi s and Com, Supreme Salmon \ ., At sorted Candies, St. Charles' Milk, Listerated Chewing (ium, Peail Tapioca, Cinnamon, Whole Ginger, Sago, Milk Bis cuits, Peru Mixed 3iscuits, Marshmallow Cakes, and (.in ger Snaps. Also in Stock Raking Powder, Brazil Nuts, Corned and Roast Beef, Cane Syrup, Clams (canned), Oysters, Canned Cherries, Cocoa, J lb. I tins, Cloves, Currants, Ham burger Steak, Dry Mustard, • Fruit Puddine, Olive Oil, Oys ters, Olives, Potted Meats, Poultry Dressing, Cayenne and Black Pepper, Sardines, Toma to Ketchup, Orange Marmalade, Guava Jellv, Bread and Pastry. Also Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobacco and Matches. 66 MEN Office ol Ri cruitini! CommiUi 1 NaSSail, .I'd June, M)i6. ARE required for the drafts for the Bahamas Contingent Unit to the end ol the present month |ji .-mils <\ ill, on enlistment, be paid two shillings (2;, da> and will be supplied with uniform. Further information at regards duration of service, see paration Allowance, pension &c will be gladly givi n I j the Commandant at his office at 'lie Barracks on any day between the hours ol 9 and 3 o'clock'. The schooner "Zellars" has nj.ain left Jamaica for N issau and will in all probability be leaving f"r Jamaica before ihe end of the present month. The Recruiting Committee hope that sufficient men v\ ill Come forward to make up the number r< quin d as above stated. R, II. C CRAWFORD, Chairman, Recruiting Committee. THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer, SUNLIGHT SOAB is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented housewives who would not be without it. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-merited reputation, it is absolutely pure,and will not harm the most delicate fabric. A piece ol Sunlight S ap used in your next wash will convince vou of its excellence. ;S iZHEKZdTS^.'S Advertise in The Tribune Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 81 x pet 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—3 36s. "Primes'* Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our same guarantee as the Bests." Any defective shingles cm be returned. Also cheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 .C SAUNDKUS. 1.



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—' I %  r NMIIIVI-. mlilii ins lurnre it. verb* m&Hlatrl Rniciu bound loiweitr in (tie ()<>amii I no Master. %  — VOL. XIII. NA'.BRU N. P.. Ba.hB.mae. THURSDAY June. 22 1916 At Verdun. T HE problem of Verdun reinaim precise!) what it was at ilie close of the second week of the great (ierman di ive, which began on February 21. By that tune it had entirely ceased to be a battle to pi< i< 1 the Frtncfi line, because time had beeu allowed the French t> bring up reserves and to pre* pare lines behind the threaten edp nils As to the other question, that of the possession of the town itself, lhi never had any importance. After the first great thrust by the Germans was 4sY..!ted the battle became one "purely and simply for moral values. If to morrow or Di x:t month the French should draw their lines back behind the Me use from St. Mihiel to Ver French must make tbeii last stand tn hold the city. PoSSCS sion 'd those lulls is vnluabU to the French because it pei mils them ti> delivei a flanking fire upon the Germans attacking 1 IOSS the river. Hut the vie 111 Paris has been from tin out set that these hills would be "sold to the Germans" l"i a 1 • %  st in casualties. Ii is essential to remenila 1 in thinking "I Verdun that it is just a sectoi 111 tbe battb from which goes from the sea to the Jura, that no great alvani can be obtain) d by eithei side unless the line is pier ed ai some point, and that then is no possibility how of piercing the French line about Verdun because behind the present from tiie French have prepared other dun. the general situation stronger lines, would remain exactly what it The Germans are attacking w is when the trench war be-jat Verdun beca us*, owing to the gan -two lines of trenches, fact that the railroads are cut would face each other fiom Switaerland to the sea. Hut if the Germans should b) shell fire, it is the most diffi cult part of the westi rn front to munition They believe that d take possession of the ashes of they succeed in taking Verdun the town of Verdun the French and the German people, the world in general, would recognize that the battle for moral values had been won by the the Germans, and the victory on the field, which was incon* %  iderable, might be translated in the press and the policies of the belligerent nations into something considerable and material. So far the Germans have made no real progress since the French people will he thoroughly dishearten* d nnd ready to listen to peace talk. They believe the Germ; 11 pen pie will be heartened b) fl vie tor) which will quite naturally be magnified to the utn nst But it is well tobeai in mind that if the German attack at Verdun ever becomes t" 1 threatening the French and the British all along the western front can begin either n general or a limited offensive of their March in the taking of Verdun, own, and that there will be an Dead Man's Hill and Hill 304, which have figured so much in thfcJispatches, are several miles •f north of the line on which the immediate demand made upon Germany to find reserves to meet this The same is true fof the Russians, now that the weathei conditions permit ope rations We have all been looking at Verdun so intently for many months th it it has come to have an exaggerated value for usand iis fate seems lo have an importance which is altogether illusniy. It is well to recall that it was the Fieri* It ho circled to Stand on their present lines Bud m>l t>> draw back three or four uiiles more Jto a position ll HI the} could hold with far lets difficulty. Il is well to bear in mind, ton, that the French high com nd n asoos that the defi 1 of 11npresent lines is inflicting tn 11 eudous losses on the (iei 1 „rIn -1 s disproportionate to the Ft ench and disproportionate hi iinv military advantage that is no t v to be gained. A tually the situation at Verdun is hat u was in the middle ol March, save that on the v\ est bank of the river the Ger mans have progressed about half a mile Dearer tbe main I 1. in h position, v\ hich is seve 1 il 11,iles back of l'ead Man's Hill There has been no import ant change, no change at all on the east bank of the Meuse, except as the French have taken and lost Douaumont, and the only result has been that a very large number of French and German troops, certainly more German than French, have been put out "f the line by death, capture or disability. The Germans believe French numbers are failing and French endurance approaching a term. In this they are utterly wrong, as the words of Poincare and Viviani indicate. They believe that France, under this terific attack, will lose heart, and of this there is not the smallest evidence. They must continue the attack because their failure up to the present moment has depressed their own people, heartened the French and had a verv unfavourable %  fleet u] i. tral opinion \\ hen the German iillaHi Con,, • loUS tin '' '" an Allied offensive onwine sa to, in v hich tb.chiel buid will be borne by the Until 1 I itniish failuie to a< t fa. 111H due I" unuadine! but to obedience Hi th 1 „f the French Gem lal M ; 'j win. h 1al '%  in '"Il up n M British foi assistance wl • 1 '| it <'li < ine of tin main obj 1 is tbe German campnig" is |, e Allies to attack 1 ton '... s re n id) n %  %  'I all fronts. When such BII .'I lack 1m.oh' the German w lose ..Il the advantages of it tenor lino and be unable movi tioops from east to wei and west i" east as the dangij thread ns At V rdun the trem h ai fighting a methodical, careful utterh deliberate battle, wja the purpow i" i"' 1 "' ; ''."I losses as possible cost 1 "I |ieve ll at then reserves an, those of their allies greatly e< jceed the German reserves SH that the Germans me wastinl L | a rge fraction ol the mar* powei left to them on a costi and emptj effoit. Two months ago deneral Joffre told a visitor that thl lone fear that the French nigl command then had waslest thi Germans should abandon thl Verdun attack and term.nail huge and sterile sacrifices il men and ill munitions Hi hope, frankly expressed, waj that tbev would continue. In three months the German haveadvanced about fourmilfj practicalh the whole advand was made in tbe fust fortnigh Their losses have beencolofSa they have so far won nothinl of value; there is as yet not til smallest prospect that they f a | {Continued on 4th page.'


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02627
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, June 22, 1916
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
' I
r
NmIIivi-. mlilii ins lurnre it. verb* m&Hlatrl
Rniciu bound loiweitr in (tie ()<>amii I no Master.

VOL. XIII.
Na'.bru N. P.. Ba.hB.mae. THURSDAY June. 22 1916
At Verdun.
THE problem of Verdun re-
inaim precise!) what it
was at ilie close of the second
week of the great (ierman di ive,
which began on February 21.
By that tune it had entirely
ceased to be a battle to pi< i<1
the Frtncfi line, because time
had beeu allowed the French t>
bring up reserves and to pre*
pare lines behind the threaten
edp nils
As to the other question, that
of the possession of the town
itself, lhi never had any im-
portance. After the first great
thrust by the Germans was
4sY..!ted the battle became one
"purely and simply for moral
values. If to morrow or Di x:t
month the French should draw
their lines back behind the
Me use from St. Mihiel to Ver
French must make tbeii last
stand tn hold the city. PoSSCS
sion 'd those lulls is vnluabU to
the French because it pei mils
them ti> delivei a flanking fire
upon the Germans attacking
1 ioss the river. Hut the vie
111 Paris has been from tin out
set that these hills would be
"sold to the Germans" l"i a
1 st in casualties.
Ii is essential to remenila 1 in
thinking "I Verdun that it is
just a sectoi 111 tbe battb from
which goes from the sea to the
Jura, that no great alvani
can be obtain) d by eithei side
unless the line is pier ed ai
some point, and that then is
no possibility how of piercing
the French line about Verdun
because behind the present from
tiie French have prepared other
dun. the general situation stronger lines,
would remain exactly what it The Germans are attacking
w is when the trench war be-jat Verdun beca us*, owing to the
gan -two lines of trenches, fact that the railroads are cut
would face each other fiom
Switaerland to the sea.
Hut if the Germans should
b) shell fire, it is the most diffi
cult part of the westi rn front to
munition They believe that d
take possession of the ashes of they succeed in taking Verdun
the town of Verdun the French
and the German people, the
world in general, would recog-
nize that the battle for moral
values had been won by the
the Germans, and the victory
on the field, which was incon*
iderable, might be translated
in the press and the policies of
the belligerent nations into
something considerable and
material.
So far the Germans have
made no real progress since
the French people will he
thoroughly dishearten* d nnd
ready to listen to peace talk.
They believe the Germ; 11 pen
pie will be heartened b) fl vie
tor) which will quite naturally
be magnified to the utn nst
But it is well tobeai in mind
that if the German attack at
Verdun ever becomes t" 1
threatening the French and the
British all along the western
front can begin either n general
or a limited offensive of their
March in the taking of Verdun, own, and that there will be an
Dead Man's Hill and Hill 304,
which have figured so much in
thfcJispatches, are several miles
f north of the line on which the
immediate demand made upon
Germany to find reserves to
meet this The same is true fof
the Russians, now that the
weathei conditions permit op-
e rations
We have all been looking at
Verdun so intently for many
months th it it has come to have
an exaggerated value for usand
iis fate seems lo have an im-
portance which is altogether
illusniy. It is well to recall that
it was the Fieri* It ho circled
to Stand on their present lines
Bud m>l t>> draw back three or
four uiiles more Jto a position
ll hi the} could hold with far
lets difficulty.
Il is well to bear in mind,
ton, that the French high com
nd n asoos that the defi 1
of 11n- present lines is inflicting
tn 11 eudous losses on the (iei
1 r- In -1 s disproportionate to
the Ft ench and disproportionate
hi iinv military advantage that
is no tv to be gained.
A tually the situation at Ver-
dun is hat u was in the mid-
dle ol March, save that on the
v\ est bank of the river the Ger
mans have progressed about
half a mile Dearer tbe main
I 1. in h position, v\ hich is seve
1 il 11,iles back of l'ead Man's
Hill There has been no import
ant change, no change at all on
the east bank of the Meuse, ex-
cept as the French have taken
and lost Douaumont, and the
only result has been that a very
large number of French and
German troops, certainly more
German than French, have been
put out "f the line by death,
capture or disability.
The Germans believe French
numbers are failing and French
endurance approaching a term.
In this they are utterly wrong,
as the words of Poincare and
Viviani indicate. They believe
that France, under this terific
attack, will lose heart, and of
this there is not the smallest
evidence. They must continue
the attack because their failure
up to the present moment has
depressed their own people,
heartened the French and had
a verv unfavourable fleet u]
i. tral opinion
\\ hen the German iillaHi
Con,, loUS tin '' '"
an Allied offensive onwine sa
to, in v hich tb.- chiel buid
will be borne by the Until
1 I itniish failuie to a< t
fa. 1- 11H due I" unuadine!
but to obedience Hi th 1
f the French Gem lal M;'j
win. h 1- al '- in '"Il upn M
British foi assistance wl 1 '|
it <'li
< ine of tin main obj 1 is
tbe German campnig" is
|,e Allies to attack 1
ton '... s re n id) n '" 'I
all fronts. When such bii .'I
lack 1- m.oh' the German w
lose ..Il the advantages of it
tenor lino and be unable
movi tioops from east to wei
and west i" east as the dangij
thread ns
At V rdun the trem h ai
fighting a methodical, careful
utterh deliberate battle, wja
the purpow i" i"'1"' ;" ''."I
losses as possible cost 1 "-
I |ieve ll at then reserves an,
those of their allies greatly e<
jceed the German reserves sh
that the Germans me wastinl
L |arge fraction ol the mar*
powei left to them on a costi
and emptj effoit.
Two months ago deneral
Joffre told a visitor that thl
lone fear that the French nigl
command then had waslest thi
Germans should abandon thl
Verdun attack and term.nail
huge and sterile sacrifices il
men and ill munitions Hi
hope, frankly expressed, waj
that tbev would continue.
In three months the German
haveadvanced about fourmilfj
practicalh the whole advand
was made in tbe fust fortnigh
Their losses have beencolofSa
they have so far won nothinl
of value; there is as yet not til
smallest prospect that theyfa|
{Continued on 4th page.'


r.. GTLBRBT DUI'UCII,
Editor and I'roprittor.
omoK
Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte Sla
Dmmm, X. /'., Hahamas
I'HONK L'liO P. O. l.iOX lS.
PUBLISHED DAILY
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I'AYAKLK IN ADV'ANCK
tdvertiaing Rates: Six pence par line
' rfirst insertion: three pence pet line
and iroartion aini one > i
line lor sutisqiieiit iruwrtiniH.
Advertisements under eialit line .
Zhe tribune
Thursday. June 22. 1916
One of the most remark-
able features of the wai is tlie
wonderful elasticity of Bri-
tish finance. We reproduce
elsewhere two extracts from
the "Spectator" which illu-
strate this fact. The war is
costing over four and a half
millions daily, and Great Bri
t.''in is finding tltc money
without undue strain.
Mr Asquith gave a very in
ti resting analysis of the way
the money is being spent, not
the least significant fact be-
ing the iaige amounts we are
advancing to our Allies.
While we recognise the fact
that this is no time to raise
the Fiscal issue, which, by the
way, should never have been
allowed to become a "party"
question; we cannot refrain
from pointing out that these
stupendous sums are being
raised by a country which has
unwaveringly stood by a pol
icy of free imports for the
last eighty years.
^ From what Mr Austin
Chamberlain says in the ex
tract we produce, it seems
that he is impressed by the
stability of British finance,
and that the fact that "no
other country could raise so'
much by taxation" is likely
to modify his pre-war views
on economics. It seems ex-
tremely likely that the fiscal
question will be settled or
shall we say has been settlod?
and that the policy in future
will be one of give and take.
Free Traders will ham lo
discriminate, by consenting
to tax imports from the na
lions who have abused their
privileges, while those who
favour the taxation of imports
having realised that freedom
of trade is sound in principle,
will be more inclined to work
towards a wider area of free
dom from restrictions on trad
ing, an area which shall in
elude our Allies and the Bri-
tish Empire as a whole.
:o:
On Tuesday afternoon
Lady Allardyve accompanied
j bv Mis. Dr. Johnson paid a
visit tu ilir brain h of the Ma
hamian Red Cross Guild con
nected with Zion Baptist
Church.
'I he school.....ni was taste
fully decorated for theoccas
ion by Mr Clavelle, who was
accorded a heai ty and unan
imons vote of thanks for his
Iservio s.
After a brief prayer, follow
ed by the singing of the "Rus
sian Hymn" Mrs Nabbie pn
behalf of the Guild, lead an
add ess of welcome to l.adv
\ 1 la rdyce after which Rev, II
F. Da u gave a In ief reporl
of the Society's work. Lady
Allardyce followed with a
bright addn sS pat k< d with
sound advice and enc\ urage
innit.
Thi speech was delivered
qu'iieexiempove was character
i-tir of Lady Allardyce, and
breathed the intense enthus-
iasm and eneigv which she
throws into this work That
this enthusiasm and energy
contagious wos evidenced by
the breathless interest with
which her remarks were fol
lowed and we are sure that
there will be an added stim
ulus to this great work as a
direct result of her persuasive
eloquence.
Mrs Forsyth thanked Lady
Allardyce for her visit in a
few well chosen sentences,
Rfld after the singing of the
National Anthem, th< Pastor
pronounced the benediction
thus terminating a memor
able gathering.
The tein sch. Benjamin
Russell ai i ivc d tod a) from
Baltimore w'n% a cargo of
empty cans and coal !'< r the
J. S. Johnson Co.
Hon. Hsuse of assembly
Monday evening June 19, 1910
Bresem I he I lonourable
t he Spe i Ist-i, I lonoorubles
Dr. (i II Johnson, J. R. C.
Young, Messrs, Geo. Weech,
R. W. I'uitle, T. Toote, Geo.
Coll I Augustus I oole,
K/eki.l Bain, \V. P. Adder ley,
I). Sweeting, J. I. B. Wil-
liams, I W. Young,C I'.. Al
bury, R. W.S.iwver, W. K.
Moore, I fG. Mr ice, A.K.Sol-
omon.
Afti i ihe usiii i i eremon),
Mi.I.is. h. M. Williams, the
newlj eli 'tid na mbei for the
district of Long Cay, Crook
ed Island and Vklins, ti N .|,
his seat in the 1 louse.
On motion of Mr. Turtle,
a select Commit lee was ap-
p inted to consider the pet i
tion of Mis. k. A I hompsim
pi a\ ing loi a pension or gra
tuity.
()n riiol ion of I >r. Sweet ing
ihe rep<'it ol tIn si ' i t C< in
mil ti e a| i'.....led on ilie voti
of Inden.nily loi \ 17. 12. o
for the payment ol subsl itu
U s dm ing the illness of 1 )r.
J. J. (-|i!nier was ndopti I
The Mill b) Mr. W. .C B.
Johns able the "Nassau Gas and
he Co. I.id." to establish.
Const ni' I, opera14 and main
lain a gfis and i< e plant in
the Island of \< W i \oVuleiire
and to grant certa in facilil ies
in Conner! ion 11 i rewith, "
m ad ;i seci nid i one. | he
Ilouse then resolved it sell
into a Committee of the
whole House on the Bill,
several amendments being
made.
The resolul ion bv I >i.
Swee'ingfoi a second read
ing of the follow ing Vole of
indemnity, was read a se< nnd
and third time and passe,]
Res< lived, that this House
will indemnify t he Receivei
(ieneral and Treasuiei in pay
ingout of the PublicTreasury
by warrant in the usual man
tier to the Governor'in Conn
i M the sum of 1 17 l 2R. od.'
being the amount paid to 1 >t*
J Maiid Albuij foi peifoimiti
the (lulu ? ol |\'t si Ami Sur
geoil al tie! ahani.i*; (it lie-
ral Hospital durwig 11 e ill
ness of Dr. J. J. Culniei un
til the arrival of Dr. Walter
II. ss.
Suspension of Rule 15 and
the thud u ading ol the
above Vote of Indemnity.
I he House (1 join n< d 10
\fi 11 cI. \ 1 \ eiiuiL; IK M at 8
o'clock.
- :o:
Notice:The Telegraph 1 f
fice will be open loim 8j
30 until 10 a.m. Friday,
June 23rd.
Thinking about SWeetS?
or cool drinks? ihen
think of BLACK, he can
satisfy you.
NO WONDER I
\ \. w 1 f< mnd himself for
.1 "Jerk wa'ex" town "f the
; ( luhmil i" the
ministi tint '. tl c h cal barber. Me
lie was 1 1 I-n 1 ked,
indled W h< n
the ] \' forker
1 at up a d u il
"Civ* 11 ;i drink f w let
"Y 1 f.niit. I I.
1 he I .irl'i 1. (ib* iuhl' the m.hi's distress) 'I
" V..
"No,'1 wa& I hi "I 1 JM*': nt
nnmlli v. ill li.".|^~ a
1 -.
'Ill I l>'s
war I ki 1 very tantalii
I :i l'i Rrt if
il Ihr SI
Radiograms
22lid June 1910.
Paris:
I here wen no infant 1 v act -
ions ol note all ing 1 he VeirUin
front. llombardmentH con-
t inn- at VflUX, I e \l o r t
Homme and 1 lounumont.
Athens:
Kmg Constanlin is eon
sidei ing a 1 hang* 1 f cabinet
as a reSuttof the Allies b|o( |<-
nde. Newspapers predicl Ihe
resignation of the cabinet
t< iday.
Pot rograd:
The advance of our aimies
' 1 nit inut s Noi theast yAI.tilsk
strong German attempts ^t


offensive were defeated and
the enemy is in retreat.
Washington:
"Carranza soldiers capl ured
an .\iiierican trooper but he
was release after General Per-
shing threatened to attack.
Washington:
Officials await Carranzas
reply to the latest note. In the
meantime war preparations
continue. Perching and Font-
ton are making every effort to
be ready for any amergency.
A figlit is reported in which
a number of American cavaly-
men were killed.
:o:
In the I louse of Commons on
Tuesday Mr. Asquith moved the
eleventh Vote ot Credit for the
war. He asked for "300,000,000,
which will last till the begin
ning of August at the estimated
rata of expenditure for the past
fifty days higherat 4,830,000
The principal items in the bill
at Army, Navy, and munitions
\ I 1, > ',o()i>; loans to Allies
and U rninione, jf74.jno.ooo;
fo id supplies, transport,^.,,'17
coo.OOO, The growth of expend
iture is noticeable in the loans
1 1 Allies and others. Colonel
Churchill reviewed our resorces
Mh men. I If pointed out five
Tinain reservoirs. First, there was
the margin of men at the front
' (off! ers, servants, for example)
who never came under f 1 r*. If
\V5 had five million men under
arms, the forces of the enemy
with which we came actually
in tocontact probably amounted
to onlv five hundred thousand
men. The second reservoir is the
Armv at home, which he thought
was too large; the third, the
Eastern Armies; the fourth,
Africa, and fifth, Asia Every
man in uniform should he sub-
mitted tons severe a scrutiny as
a civilian suffered. His advice
to the War Office was: "Physi-
cian, comb thyself!"
:o:
In the House of Commons
on Thursday week Mr. Cham
berlain gave strong and val
liable support to the Finan
ce rtill. No other country, he
said, was meeting so large a
proportion of war expend!
ture by taxation. It was now
evident that we could bear
trfjf great strain as long as
4 might be necessary to win the1'
war. While we weie raising
300, OOO, ->00 by additional
taxation, was raising only
"25, 000, 00. As for our fu-
ture fiscal policy, it would be
in vain to look on the pages
of Hansard for enlighten
menl, agri ( iiient would be
p tsible among schools of
thought which had widely
differed in the past, but v\ ho
were reaching common
ground by various routes.
Apa t from Mr.Chamber! in's
most sensible speech, the de
bate was interesting for Mr
McKenna'fi emphatic refusal
to reconsidei the proposal to
introduce premium bonds.
I he working (lasses were
already investing as nun h as
could be expected of tlieni,
and in cliiy case the Govei n-
nieiii declined to encourage
the gambling spirit. Dealing
with other points, Mi. Mc
Kenna admitted that tin 1 \
cess Profits Tax could not be
further increased. Fie intend
ed to introduce modified ti< ins
of the new Income Tax in
Committee soas to adjust
the proportion between eain
ed and unearned incomes.
:o:
CORN FOR AMMUNITION
It's an ill wind that dosen'nl
blow the farmers some good.
! he armi of Europe look to
tlieni for a great deal of then
supplies; I he soldiers are fed
and clothed with products of
the farm, an 1 now are look-
ing to the farmers for part of
their ammunition.
Cottonseed oil is used to
manufacture glycei ine. which
goes into manufactureif nit-
roglycerine, and thus i elpsto
put the priceofseed to an un
usual figure.
About 3,000,009 bales ofcot
ton have been used in a year
in the Manufacture of expires
ives Not content wil b that,
starch an alchohol aie being
used in composition "f high
power explosives
The different indusl ries in
this country have more than
doubled their consumpt ion of
corn on this nc< OOnl A bar-
rel of pork, a cask of alcohol,
a side of beef or a consign
mpnt of explosives may not
look much alike, yet in a
Heat Eat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Be
Stew
6d. per tin
For Washing up. after
Kirkman's
Soap
orax
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
measure they are com 1 nlra
tions of < otton, meal and
coin. A soldier is clothed
w itll cotton. His occasional
bath is with cotton oil soap.
His beef, pork, butter, eggs
and O aide: sed milk repress nl
corn cott< \v, when he helps to
fue a shell he is still using
com and cotton His life is
sustained, and that of hisen
einy taken; by the use of the
same products of the farm.
Wall Street Journal.
A CURIOUS DEVELOPMENT
Why (iermany, numerical
ly weaker than her ene-
mies, should assume the of fen
siveat all and accept the odds
thai lie against that part of
modern waiefare, in a theatre
where those odds would be
their highest and the total
cost heart breaking that is
the most important question.
Time to Germany undoubted
ly is more precious than ma
terial Time is more than pre
cious. It is vital. To gain
time, she went through Bel-
gium. The longer, harder u'ay
lay past Verdun. Well, the
short and easy way was no
thoroughfare to Paris, and
here the Germans are, after
eighteen months of precious
time laps* d, 1 Btt< 1
Verdun,
- I he Sew York Tiii
NOTICE.
I 0 ai i. whom i r M \Y c '
DIS I RIC I Grand Off
of Disti ict No. 3 of
Bahamas of the G ii A I
of Ii. and S. of 1.0\ e |
Cbai it v an' as follow S :
Jas \. Knowles, D.G W|
Ernest A. Liglii bo urn,
G. S.
Win. Shepherd, D D.M
F. Anderson, ( \ (i. Inspi
or.
The above are tin ortl) a
thoii/ed offici i--.
Attested. A. 1 Johnson,
G. W. S.
Per, J. \i. Know les '(i.
W.D.S
Just Arrived|
Enamel Beds,
and Spring\
Fancy Goods,
and Notionl
Shoes.
E. C. Griffh
Bay St. and Victoria A\


(Continued from 1st page)
Ket it at the cost (if 3110,090 <>i
400,000 casualties, they will
have acquired nothing but a
few square milts ol French ter
ritory and such moral values 81
the possession thereof mm give
t lie ni.
If tlie whole world which
sympathizes with the Allied
cause could he as calm not as
the men who are about Verdun
but as Paris is, as Paris has
been since the In si terrific drive
was halted, the < ierman cam
M itself would h>se practi
cally -ill its imp irtaiu e, since
it is a itn>ral before ii is a miti
tar) venture. Despite the liea\ >
casualties the French are view
ing the Verdun campaign with
confidence and with satisfac
tion; so far what has bappi 1
was exactly what they expe. ti rj
would happen when their high
command finally decided to
hold and not to eva< uate V<
dun, yielding to the appeal of
the politicians
ICE
THE Bahamas Timber Co J
begs to draw attention I
of the public to the fact that
they are now selling Ice at
their Lumber Office on East
St. City. Hours, 6 a.m. to
6 p.m.
Dont Forget
that
WM. HILTON
260 Bay St.
has
A FINK ASSORTMENT
of white summer goods
for ladies,
INCLUDING
White "Middy" cloth at 1/-
per yard.
Phone 201.
W. A. MATHER
UNPERTAKEP
DESIRKS to inform his friends
and the Public that fre has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisness of an un-
dertaker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrulTed to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronaae Get
roy Prices first Hnd provgthes* that
are the very lowest for the clas* fir*t
work.
:arrow
COLLAR
All Arrow collars are
made of fabrics bleached
and shrunk in our own
plants. They always
fit and sit correctly and
are the most durable.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, IT iOi r & CO.. Inc.
MAKERS, TROT, N. Y. U.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
F. A. Garner
52 Weal B&v Si.
Received per lust Steamer.
English Breakfast Tea, Can
iied Pears, Pea< hi s and
Com, Supreme Salmon \ ., At
sorted Candies, St. Charles'
Milk, Listerated Chewing (ium,
Peail Tapioca, Cinnamon,
Whole Ginger, Sago, Milk Bis
cuits, Peru Mixed 3iscuits,
Marshmallow Cakes, and (.in
ger Snaps.
Also in Stock
Raking Powder, Brazil Nuts,
Corned and Roast Beef, Cane
Syrup, Clams (canned), Oysters,
Canned Cherries, Cocoa, J lb. I
tins, Cloves, Currants, Ham !
burger Steak, Dry Mustard,
Fruit Puddine, Olive Oil, Oys
ters, Olives, Potted Meats,
Poultry Dressing, Cayenne and
Black Pepper, Sardines, Toma
to Ketchup, Orange Marmalade,
Guava Jellv, Bread and Pastry.
Also
Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobacco
and Matches.
66 MEN
Office ol Ri cruitini! CommiUi 1
NaSSail, .I'd June, M)i6.
ARE required for the drafts for the
Bahamas Contingent Unit to the
end ol the present month
|ji .-mils <\ ill, on enlistment, be paid two shillings (2-
;, da> and will be supplied with uniform.
Further information at regards duration of service, see
paration Allowance, pension &c will be gladly givi n I j the
Commandant at his office at 'lie Barracks on any day between
the hours ol 9 and 3 o'clock'.
The schooner "Zellars" has nj.ain left Jamaica for
N issau and will in all probability be leaving f"r Jamaica before
ihe end of the present month. The Recruiting Committee hope
that sufficient men v\ ill Come forward to make up the number
r< quin d as above stated.
R, II. C CRAWFORD,
Chairman, Recruiting Committee.
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, and it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer,
SUNLIGHT SOAB
is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented
housewives who would not
be without it. Sunlight
Soap enjoys a well-merited
reputation, it is absolutely
pure,and will not harm the
most delicate fabric. A piece
ol Sunlight S ap used in
your next wash will con-
vince vou of its excellence.
;S iZHEKZdTS^.'S
Advertise in
The Tribune
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 81 x
pet 1000. No better grade than these on the Market3 36s.
"Primes'* Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our
same guarantee as the Bests."
Any defective shingles cm be returned.
Also cheaper grade in stock
April 6th. 1916 .C SAUNDKUS.
1.


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