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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916, L. OILBKKT DUPUCH, Editor und Proprietor. OKKICK: Corner Shirley & Ch&rlolle Sta VttMM, N. />.-, Rnhamas •FIIOXK XM. P. O. BOX l:t. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Mumlav. We.lnes.lav and Friday— tingle ( %  •><<. %  ... )r second insertion ; auo oriei>e:im peline (ot suhsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight Lines i~. ttbe tribune S.\i virdrv v, June 17, 1916 The Belgian Relief meeting which was held in St. Andrews 11.ill on Thursday night, all hough by no means so well attended ns ii should have been, was thoroughly representative in character. It is 15 g rat if) ing to leai n that subscriptions to thefund already amount t<> over £260, and as His Excellency the Governor is interesting himself in the movement, we can safely predict a substantial addition to that amount, and that right soon. His Excellency certainly has .1 persuasive manner, which is very effective in opening reluctant pockets. In another column we publish the speech His excellency delivered at the meeting on Thursday night. We have been requi sti d by the Appeal Committi e oi the Bahamas Belgian Ri Fund to acknowledge with sincere thanks the following contributions which were made at the Meeting held in St. Andrew's Hall on the 15th inst. His Excellency the Governor ami La dy Allardycc £"52 10 o A Friend 50 0 o The St. Andrew Soc ietj 26 5 o Mr. and Mis. Jas. P. Sands 25 o o The Speaker and Mrs. Haroouit Malcolm to 10 Mr. I R. C. Youug s s Mr. W. Miller Mr. L. G. Brica Mr. T. S Hilton Mr, Jas. M Rae Mr. Kenneth S tlomon 5 Mr. Cyril F. Solomon .< The Chief Justice & Mrs. Tudor The Attorney Gene ral and Mrs. Dur rant The Lord Rithop of Nassau The Rev. C. Dudley Lampen Mr and Mr*. John H. Brown Men of Young & Sons Sponging Fleet Mr. C. O. Anderson Mr. W. A. Mather Mr. E. A. Roberts Tliff Rev. S. J. Bennett 5 Mr and Mrs. Frank Menendei 1 1 0 Mr. and Mrs E. R. Paahlty 500 Mr. A. I). Sherwood Smith 1 1 o II A. H 220 n o o 3 3 21 00 12 12 1000 o o 550 5 0 n 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 5 0 1 0 O £266 -io o Subscription lists have been placed at the Bank of Nassau and the Royal Bank of Canada or donations can be sent direct to the Honorary Treasurer Mr. L. G. Brice. —.0: — We are pleased to learn that, despite the rain, the entertainment given by the Eastern Vic toria School proved a success. The sum of £5 11 6 was rea lized. So as to accommodate those who were unable to attend yes terday, Mr. Thompson is repeating the entertainment, by spe cial request, on Friday next 23rd inst., under the patronage of His Honour The Chief Jus tice and Mrs. Tudor. —:o: — The Lighting of the North West passage so as to make it navigable for traffic at night, is an object of ihe utmost import%  to this Colony, and Mr. Chi istie's letter in the "Guar %  Ii.01*' of the 14111 inst., is entirely in agreement with our own views OJI the subject. Hitherto the cost and care of beacons have been a great objection to their use. Aside from the ex tense of erection and fuel there was the constant .UN ntion the light needed to preserve its usefulness. Now, this main objection has been removed, the beacons burn one year without attention. That is to say, after election the bat s with which tllfl wires are charged keep the light going fur one whole year. The only expenditure of any consequence is for tinbeacon its* If and this, it is asserted, is but |6oO orj £130. Whether the lighting of the passage will improve our' tourist tiade is a matter for argument, but it it is certain that we can expect no traffic from that quarter so long as it is as dang, mils as it is at present, and £340 is not a sum that is likely to bring this colony to a financial crisis. We have a Development Board and we do think that it is quite within the province of that institution to take this matter in to consideration and determine whether the scheme is practical Of not. —:o: — Daughters of The E-noire RED CROSS GUILD £• 4 o Collected by Mis. Kendrick, Hope Town Abaco, The Ward Line S. S. "Cama guay" arrived in New York yesterday afternoon. — :o: — Copy of the Address which the G >vei n ir gave on Thurs day niglit.it the Meeting ar ranged bySt. Andrew'sJ Son ety in aid of funds for the Belgians : Mr. Chairman, Members of the St, Andrew Society, Ladies and Gentlemen, I have undertaken to say something t his evening about Belgium and the Belgian!, and although I am confident that no words of mine can adequately convey to you what Belgium has suffered since she was ruthlessly invaded by the Germans in August, 1914, 1 propose to viu^ga^i^"' ticatmfl ^ been im led %  nllaut iml Upafl |''.ill %  ^M E are sym aw; otherj neutrl 66 MEN Reichstag on the 4th of August, 1914 the Imperial Chancellor, von Bethmann-Hollweg, admitted that Germany had violated her treaty ob ligations. These are his words: "Gentlemen, we are now in a state of necessity, and necessity knows no laiv Our troops have occupied Luxemburg, and perhaps are. ahead) on Belgian soil. Gentlemen, that is contrary to the dictates of international law. It is true that the Ffench Government has declared at Brussels that Fran e is willing to respect the neutrality of Belgium as long as her opponent respects it. We knew, howev r, that France stood ready for the invasion. France could wait, but we could not wait. A French movement upon our Hank upon the lower Rhine might have been disastrous. So we were compelled to override the just protest of the Luxemburg and Belgian Governments. The wrong—I speak openly—that we are committing we • ill endeavour to make good as soon as our military goal has been reached. Anybody who is threatened, and is fighting for his highest possessions can have only one thoughthow he is to hack his way through !" It seems hardly necessary for me to remark that fiance did not stand ready for the invasion of Germany, that no nation had threatened Ger, j .. n „_„.,,• %  1 of war must be dictated to jec the many, and that Germany s... „,.. ',, .-" %  • „„ u„ the woikl. obtained. action in commencing the u war,and invading Belgium,] 'They call us barbarians. was a most infamous and Oflice of Recruiting Committee, Nassau, 3rd June, 1916. ARE required for the drafts lor the Bahamas Contingent Unit to the end of the present month. Recruits will, on enlistment, he paid two shillings faday and will besupplied with uniform. Further information as regards duration of servh e, see paration allowance, pension &C, will be gladly Riven by the Commandant at his oflice at the barracks on auj daj between the hours of 9 and 3 o'clock. The schooner "Zellars" has again left Jamaica for Nassau and will in all probability be leaving for Jamaica before the, end of the present month. The Recruiting Committee hopa that sufficient men will come forward to make up the number required as above stated. R. 11. C. CRAWFORD, Chairman, Recruiting Committee. Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund Under the auspices of THE ST. ANDREW SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS Patron His Excellency Sir William L. Allarch i e, K C. M. G G< I < 110 Appeal Committee Chairman : The Honourable Jan rs P. Sands, M. 1. C. S. I lilion, Esquire. 1'iitchard, Esquire Honourable llarcourt Malcolm, K C. H mourahle J. R. C. Young, M E. C. H .nourable William Miller, M. L. C. J. M. Rae, Esquire. 0. 1 A. Kenneth Solomon. M. H. A Esqu n Honorary Treasurer L G lirice, M. H, A Esquire, II %  tlary Cj n 1 f". Solonion, | '.squire. wai cannol be premeditated crime. On this subject Maxmilian Harden, one of the most influential German journalists says: — 'Let us drop our miserable attempts to excuse Germany's action. Not against our will and as a nation' taken by surprise did we hurl ourselves into this gigantic venture. We willed it. We had to will it. We do not stand before the judgment s at of Europe. Weacknowl edgeno such jurisdiction. Our might shall create a new law in Europe. It is Germany that strikes. When she has con quered new domains for her genius then the priesthoods of all the gods will praise the God of war.' Later Major-General von Disfurth i 1 an article which he sent to the Hamburger Nachrichten wrote as follows '—'No object whatever •is served by taking any 'notice of the accusations of (barbarity levelled against •Germany by foreign critics. %  Frankly, we are and must •be barbarians, if by these .we understand those who • wage war relentlessly and do the uttermost degree. We •owe no explanation to any •one. There is nothing for • us to justify and nothing to •explain away. Every-act of • whatever nature committed .by our troops for the pur • pose of discouraging, defeat g. and destroying our ene ies is a brave act and a •Hood deed, and is fully justi ed. Germany stands as the erne arbiter of her own hods, which in the time •What of it? We scorn them f P"j on the above, 'and their abuse. For my "l'"' 1 .' ""' General Stall of /part I hope that in this war "" German Army has pre,we have merited the title l'"' 1 <" permit every spe. .of barbarians. Let neutral CIM of violence and villany. .peoples and our enemies 'i" s wns s ubsequently prov ( <-ease their empty chattel, ed by what ocaired-after the .which may well be compar l "' llc f u '< d a n ,ed to the twitter of birds. s J rf,, w the spirit of the ruling Let them cease their talk of c J as l n Germinv to which the Cathedral at Rheims and ' German people have com 'of all the churches and all ""'tied their destiny. Che Del 'thecastles in Fiance which *'"•> newspaper,'ThePeople' 'have shared its fate. These ill* organ of the Labourpar 'things de not interest us. tv w rijing shortly after the 'Our troops must achieve outbreak of hosttliti#s, cor•victory. Wht else mat recl 'y. guaged what was j n • ters?'" s! ;'"*. for '" urging the pro ,, r 1 c, IT P' C '" •*&"* Iheii lianas [n 1002 the General Staff t M M ;i;... r „ • • military service It is said of the German Army pub lished a Manual entitled, 'The Laws of War on Land,' Go, then sons of the work and regit. 1 your names as recruits. We vuill rather occupy, but it will, and must, in like manner seek to destroy the total intellectual and material resources of the hit ter. Humanitarian claims Such as protection of men Far be it from me i 0 with to hurt anyone'ssusceptibili ties, or needlessly harrow any one'sferitngsJam-compeUed to state that it isonlybyfac to war, nay more, that the only true humanity very often lies in a ruthless appli cation of them. What is per missible includes eve.y means of war without which theob place. The invasion of peaceable and totally unprepared Belgium, and the gallant but un availing attempt—as was ap parent later-of its small & ill-equipped army to defend 1 Al MTh



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• The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916, ^ and protect the country, was followed up by the bombard merit of unfortified towns, the issuing of the most harfass iog and outrageousProclama tions, and tlie levying ol en ormous indemnities notwith Standing the provisions of the Hague Convention <>l 1907 to the contrary. For 111 stance on 17 August, 1914, the Burgomaster of Hassch was I 'Hid by the German Military Authorities to publish a barbarous notice containing this sentence:—'In the case "I Civilians shooting on the German army, a third (Tl the ill.lie population will be shot. OnAugust 22nd Gen era I Von liulow commanding the Second (ierman Army pro claimed In the Communal Authoritii • at Leige that it was with Ins 'consent' thai 1 he whole l< >wn 1 f Andeiines had been 'Burnt down and about too pi i|jle shut.' In 1 he matter of indi mnit ies, l'uus srls was assessed -'it £8,1 00, e at £ 2,000,000; 1 he pnn uii-r ol Brabant at £ 1'S, ()n the 271U of \u.: 1-1 Lieut. (iencral Vi n Nie l>er. i < .1 i•iici i" the BurgoMI isd r I \ 1 t're, ICIIIIIKIC I him 1 ha' ii WII had n 'I paid 111 ii posed up HI it :.\ (leneil V>n I'm It i\V, and added," I lie low II of Wavre will be mi nt is not made when due; without distinct ion "l |" rsons, lire in nori il with the guilty." I .MI i acre was worse 1 t hiii this. At rocil ies limit ted upon Jefe'i ci less .and unoffending civilians, Lou vain and 1 ilhercil irs v sacked, and n 1 imen mid 1 liil dp n were binbarously out raged and murdered 1 ni lias men h to turn over the pages 1' the evidence laid before C immjtteeof vh cli Lord Pa \ MI Mian on the Alleged < lei Mian \lrocil ies to 1 with the most distres sing md sh M king disclotil res on \> ige, The f. il lowing spei 1 mens of what I ; to: •--' )n page 10 a Hid 1 states, "!n the Hue S01 nfie In 'I ,i\ the Allies. As it is, some r, 500,000 Bel gin ms are on the verge of starvation in their own country and receive only one meal a day. while the number of those in destitute circumstances in Belgium, mostly women and children, exceeds ',.000/100 Can you possibly imagine a more monstrous, barbaric, or detestable state of things than that for which German aggrandize men! is responsible ? Hen in this Colony we are prosperous, and were it not for the newspapi rs I doubt whether weshould know thai the] Empire was in the throes of n life and death struggle. On we realize aright the revolting horrors I haveallud* ed to, or the miseries wfiich we have esc ipi d, or what il in* ans to be starving ? It has been said that we are a stolid, a stupid, and an ill inform d nation; and it is possible Hint we niav be a peace loving p 'pie f' Hid of our homes and out libei t ies, and nol anxious to fighl tor fighting's sake, and we m i) perhaps be RIQW in grasping the right thing to do, but I i bum for us in all sincerity that as a nation we trj I 'plav t he 1 m •'. arfd we want to do the rigltl thin md having come to the conclu sion wh it we rriighl to and having seen where our duty lies we en leavour to truly an I conscientiously form it at whatever cost. Should there be one thing more than another that is likely to arouse us and quicken us in doing it at thisjuncture it is to learn of theatro cities that have been com mitted upon women and children in Belgium and the state into which the country has been brought under Ger man rule. For this Germany stands condemned by the judgment of the civilized world. In the case of our Belgian Allies, who, remember, have lost practically everything except their honour—which remains unsullied -and who, in doing so much for the Al lied cause, in Buffi 11 Ig SO much, and in sacrificing so much havecoveredthemseH • and their country with im perishable glory, our course is perfectly plain. Every man in Nassau who is worthy of the name of Britisher, when appealed to as we have been appealed to by theLord May or of London, and knowing the farts, will I am sure l< 1 I. not only a hatred, horror,and loathing of these iniquit crimes that have 1 ,11 pi 1 petrated in Belgium, but that 1 it is his duty and his privi alike to make -on al sacrifice to aid thi sestarv iii!. r and sorely persecuted but heroic people. Assurance Association, Ltd. ^SHS* ImpcrialWest Indian ed in dense formation the Italian positions en the Asutfo Plateau but were repulsed with I heavy losi s ol dp"k ,~ u c • i place after ihe announcement of barter or Incorporation, duly their nominotion, o: RELIGIOUS SERVICES SUNDAY, I8TH JUNE. There "ill be set \ ices in ihe nth Day Ad\ entisl 1 Impel on East Shirley Street, on Sun certified and authenticated, of the Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, Ltd., has been deposited for record in the office of the Registrar of Records, and that ihe said Association has established an office for the transaction of busiday night at seven thirty o'clock riess, at No. 264 Bay Street, in the City of Nassau, in the Island of New Providence. Radiograms June |6, [Qll London, \y —Tim let n *" 1 man merchantmen which v 0 mine, from the North com IJ an auxilary cruiser and some torpedi • boats and armi m represented. June 171I1, 1 Petrograd: I he lust 1 1I1 in lined ( a ternowitz drit inn Ihe civil population before them. The ('/. ir hi pursuing fie re Ireoling \n %  %  -i I ve\ in ground 1 i|nM\ I nndon: Figh 1 ing nn the \\'.-~t ( .in fi'-ni continueii (ierman it) n V*ei lun, l hi lumonl 1' 11 n :m I ( l allette Win its lire re pulsed with lie ivv losses, I he 1 r hi i| lure I 1 I !ermnn tienell on the F.asii ol I e M >rl Hnni li 1 hey Ii linsl 1 ttneks, Peti 1 despitcJj tin Iga 1 us.' 1 w i did large 1 I irn ps from S-df i iki In %  < 1 th R imani ision June 18th; to which all are in viled. Subjeot: \rmagi ddon" continued. ST. JOHNS CA 1 HI DR\I.. MI / Rev. (i A. riiom| >n, S.T.D. Vlinisti r Prearhinp 11 a in. and ~. 511 11 in I tea" '1 Hi Mini nings will look after Ihe affairs of the Chun.-h while the pastor June 13II1 1916, is making a tour of the Cat Is land district. W. ARMBKISTER. .1 S. W'AI.I II;, MES, inut I 1 %  wi / si p ige) Imperial West Indian Assurance Association, Ltd. c od and iron miues in the West ph 'Man district, and that there NOTICE TO SHARE-H0LDER8. 1 a c>uple of thousand of his I — fellow-citixens in Berlin, mostl) "TPHI'Fii men! on poor folk not calculated to make I IheCapital Stock oft trouble For the p ice 01 the \ lion is di and f the a my. In able al theOflite. order that tl lacing ,,,,,,, Xl i te 1 th %  ; II I I \ % %  • • I WOI li t he y an tei 1 itives of tha i m, acy ng to Signoi C it ta Re %  ts current in Gei man) tell of a nhmber of Italian :. %  im 'Ts being einphned in the Zepi ps at Fi ii li ii lisha Fen nt fabulous but so 1 losely vvat 1 I I heir position hit li* diffei eni from im prisonment. Signor Cattaneo i!s 1 I icl in I thatsomi Italians 1 it to Switzei 'and to U \\K HOLMES, I lune 1 :lh 1 F. A. Garner ">! Weal Be.) St, Ret E llL-l: I I .1 I ned Pears, I' and lie -s.1 111 \ St. < hai II ian workers, especiallj ,,_,,, 1 Pearl Ta 1 l '" ' '''' Wh. 1 ii 0. Milk ly urj ul.Refer.11 u lothe |i; . illls tment ice .rded In Italians |l|ow c | n in (ierman). the Si lo quotes ^ Signor Cattaneo as 1 II Also in Si ick "Immediate I) afl 1 II 1 ,, [l:i p f n, lzi | \„,. cl iratiori nl war on Austria ve c .,,„, ,. .. subjected to ferocious lay the 1 ins limi' thei r at ivil ies tl 1 rep li' 11 • rraitors, if we a 1 e su w e nhall ma ke v mi pnvfor \ ou treachery.'At fi'sl •li ved S\ rup, 1 la mm d),' it< rs Cam 1 C II). tins. Cl % %  Cm rnnts, I lam burg" 1 I 'i' Vluslard, I • .11, < Hive Oil, 1 H Potti d \l HI" Pi i 1 1 11 L 11 %  1 e Marn lade, >he\ believea ,, ul , s ,,,, , that WH hiii a I the Austrian ai my would roul the Italian I md march | and p a Milan. I hej [ our ai \|.,, mv ns a mass of u.idis. iplii Tobaco soldiers armd with broi in .. ,i I | sticks, ami alw lys pul '" High) ___^______________________ by the mere e ol an \11sl1 ian 'KM' -'TIICII,' hut now they art rather surprised at the. progress of the war and at the ii bravery of our Alpini whom tin \' 1 all 'vei \' devils In Berlin the authoiIties havi al' lowed two litth Italian 1 estau rants to remain op< n, and there our compktroiti gather and are A able to '.rive von' to th"ir patri ** otic sentimt^^^^^^^^ limes, Doat Forget' thai WM. HILTON 260 Bay St. has I [Nl VSS< )U MI.XT of white suinmi 1 ods 1111 lade INCLUDING Will. • \l.ddv" cloth at 1/per \ aid. Phone 201. WANTED A BRIGH I' BOY to take \\'i -t'in Distrii t Papers I, must live in tin District Apply to TRIBUNE OFFICE \L A TBD ]



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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916, DRINK-. Welch's Grape juice. PRICES 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. \ Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. | Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. T BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colonial. Heat Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up. after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House LOGWOOD SISAL R.J. BOWE Commission Merchant. (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Logwood sold al 2) p. e. according lo qunntity Sisal sold at \\ p. c. Recording lo quantity 1'ionipt and careful attention given to all consignments Offices:—53a Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Neai City Nfarket. STOCK PRODUCE ARROW COLLAR If you will give these collars a trial and keep traqk of their many trips to the laundry you will soon appreciate their worth. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUBTT, PEABODY & CO., -Inc. MAKERS, TROT, N. Y. L'., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE I III-.IV<> Agent. WONDERFUL VALUE. 3'Solid Gold Safety Pin Brooch** N-t with Fine Poarls (74 Cents) EACH. Bvtry Brooch full) ex* A.nntd : -; the ip an n In 1 %  %  I TI ; at, Horseshoe. Flower 111 I Sll % %  3 %  i for....16 I I .. N 1 • al mntrM '•1 (laai 1 t >IIC) lid I.-JP) MX fin Bend HOST CARD for Catalogue of j.-wellery, ry, Foun. ;. 1 \ I 1 • t Goods, ftc. It i I'. Tiny and mai nve you Wr I!II irantee (ha safe delivery of nil our rfooiis J rig thswsr |1 v.< nnil.Tiskii" r| Is 1 I! I <>i CHARG1 v fr ];. fen nee. Bank-re: I ondi at It) ai d Mi.t %  %  FEARS LTD. (*:';'. > """"Snl.V.rl"' 0 238 HK1ST0L BRIDGE. BRISTOL, Ing. Shingl J UST received from Jacksonville 5 per 1000. No better grade than "Prims*" Cypress at 33s. per 1 1 same guarantee as the o* 1 Any defective shingles cart Also cheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 NOTICE. To AI.I. WHOM I r MAY CONCERN D ISTRIC I Grand Officers of Disi, id No. 3 of the l.nhamas of the (i. ti. A. P. of B. and S. of Love and Chai it y are as follow: .las \ Knowles, D.G.W.S. Ei ii' •! \. Lightbourn, 1). G s. W a. 9h< pherd, I>. D.M. I'. Andcison, G.G, Inspector. Tire above are the only au> thorizi il officers. Attested. A. |. JOHNSON) (1. G. W S. Per, .1 14. KNOWLES 'G.G. W D.S For Sale W HITE enameled bed, silk floss mattres! Wheelei and VYilson sew ing machine, go< d 1 ondil ion £10 o Fib and W01.1 r£g 12x12 £% p Typew i iter, I uderwoqd No |, neai ly new £a 15 o Japam ssj mat c)x 1 37 a 5^ ?e Set of dishes, d, G C 01 1 IN, 71 Shirley Si City Keeping Guard \\A\\: arc responsibilities that every patrioticcitizeu must bear in tins season of national peril, ollni than lighting for the Bag. Not the leas.t of these pi r\ ing the l> dance of trade THE SHOE H STORE on a lit! sue, 210 hall guard, and in spite of the advancing price


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LATEST RADIOGRAMS .Nulllua BLddiclua furore) in verb* ma.ulotrl Balng bound lo iw*a,r to iha Dogm&i of no Master. Vol. XIII. No. ISO NASSAU. N. P., BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JUNE 17. 1916 Price. THREE CENTS Russia's Prisoners Crowded In Camps. tt J -i •v.* Conformation of the gruesome stories legardiog ,he iille^ctl abuse and general ma I treat men I of Teuton prisoners of war con lined in Russian prison ramps, winch have been circulated by < iernian agents in neutral conn"ries, is lacking in • report made by a representative of the American Government <>f his inspection of tl.e camps in Rus si in Tuikestan, according to excerpts from ihis document printed in the Beiliner Tageb lull "f Api il 2'>. The American agent dues complain of overcrowding, lac* nf sufficient luodical personnel, and a shortage of mt at B lid clothing for some of the prisoners. rCmpliasis is laid on the un healthful ( diniate of Turkestan in the report which is (pioted as follows by the Tageblatl : Between Nov. 21 and Dec. 7, i'ii 5, I visited the camps at Paschkent, Troitzkoje, Djizak, Samarkand, Kagnn, (New Bok> liara.) Merw, Askabad, Ak Pep* insk, and Kras'novdsk. On Nov. 1 i, 1915, there were, according lo the official report, 83,435 Austrian and 3,813German prisoners interned in the entire province <>f Turkestan. I have been informed that some 50, 000 have recently been tiansferred t" European Russia — to itevel, Kharkof, l'.l,:ttci inoslaf, Pern, and along 'lie Don—to work in fa tones, mines and tarms or to be employed in the reclamation of land along the river banks. "It is necessary to beaquaint ed with the climate and the country in order to form a correct judgment of till condition and treatment of the piisoners of war in Turkestaid A vast, sandy desert, broken up by only a few hills, .111 1 traversed by but a few watercourses, extends from [aschkent west toKrasno yndsk and south to the borders of Afghanistan and Persia. The climate is extraordinarily dry. The Sum ners are long, the Winters short, and the tempera lure, in the shade, ranges from a maximum of 40 above zero, Reaumur, (12s degrees, Fahrenheit,) in Summer, toajniinimum of 16 below zero, Kepumur, (4 degrees below, I'ahre'nheit,) in Winter. In order to show how 1 mg 'the Summer lasts there, I wish to say that at the time of niv visit at the camp the tern perature in the. shade at noon ranged bom 1, to 20 degrees above zero Reaumur. These sharp extremes of heat and cold, together with dampness that has its origin in a great .deal of stagnant water, make the. climate unhealthful Malaria was extremely pre VS. lent in all the places that I vi sited, with the exception o Askabad, and Krasnovndsk From a hygienic standpoint the' barracks were generally overcrowded. Only at Merw, Kagan, Askabad, and Krasnovodsk where comparatively few pri soners were interned, did they have more than the space abso lutely necessary for sleeping. However, there weie more pri soneri expected at these places. In the camps at Taschkent. Troitzkoje,Samarkand, and Ak Tepinik, where the great ma jority of the prisoners inspected were sheltered, each man had about two feet of space for sleeping at night. This condi tion is only serious, however, [during the short Winter, when doors and windows must be 1 kept closed and when foul air doubtless fill the rooms. "1 he principle diseases found among the prisoners in Turk estan, in the approximate order of their frequency, are 1, mala j ria, (which is said to be partic ularly virulent there:) 2, enteri tis; 3, nephritis; 4, dysentery; 5, gastric fever; 6,scurvy; 7, septic typhus; 8, diphtherias 9, scarlet fever; 10, smallpox. "The four diseases-last men tioned have only appeared in isolated cases AnothcJ seiious circumstance is the shortage of I doctors and attendants in the j hospitals. A Russian physician told me that in theory one doctor was assigned to every fifty patients in a hospital, but that in reality each doctor had to ; treat about a hundred patients and each attendant had to care for more than a hundred. At the time of my visit to the camp at Samarkand there were 706 prisoners in the hospital, with only four Austrian and two Russian doctors tocare for them There also seems to be a scarci ty of medical supplies. "The*situation of the prisoners depends materially on the personality of the commander. In the camps at Troitzkoje and Samarkand there was a gieat deal of discontent among the %  prisoners, and many complaints were heard. It appeared to me that in both camps the officials [were very severe and took but I little interest in the welfare of I the prisoners. At Djizak and : Krasnovodsk, on the other hand, J the conditions were, with fewexceptions, quite satisfactory, thanks to the personality of the commander. "But in general it must be admitted that the conditions in Turkestair are not good. Apart from the unhealthful climate, 'the prisoners receive too little I meat and overcrowding of the Iberrackl is the order of the day, all of which, taken together, is doubtless the cause of the great number of cases of illness and death. Furthermore, there are not enough doctors there, sufli cient clothing is lacking, and the working prisoners are not paid enough. These are the principle inconveniences." SERBIA'S MINERAL WEALTH. How carefully the Bulgarian and Teuton authorities now in control of Serbia are weighing the mineral resources of King Peter's kingdom, evidently with a view of using the little country as a source of supply for the Central Powers and also esti mating Its value as a pawn in the diplomatio game that will precede the signing of a treaty of peace that will end the world war, is shown by the following report sent out from Dresden by the German-Bulgarian AfSOCia tion and printed in the Berliner Vorwarts of April 19: "The Bulgarians have already made a careful investigation of Old Serbian territory in search of available minerals. "They found great coal de posits between the Mlawa and the Pek, southeast of Porarewa. On the Parian is situated the town of Dobra, where theieisa mine that produces some 25,000 to 30,000 tons of coal annually. Another mine, situated along the Mirotsch mountain south from Tekia, has a coal field some thirty kilometers long, as has already been verified by Seibian engineers. At Zaitschar a coal mine has been wcrk ed for twenty five \eais It is connected by rail with the city of Radujevac on the Danube, where a briquette factory is op erated. This mine turns on' from 30,000 to 40,000 tons of coal a year. There are othei mines at Rtani, which is con nected by a mine railway with ZaitSChar. In Tzidille in the valley of tlie Morava some coal has been found, although onlv in small quantities. On the oilier hand, the coal field of Ma la Raon Peka is estimated lo cover throe kilometers and to contain 5,000,000 tons. I he mine at Sonieh, twenty-two kilometers from the BelgradeSofia Railway, produces at pres. ent 130,000 tons of coal a year. The coal field of Alcxinetz, south from the Morava, is esti mated to cover six kilometers. A branch road, six kilometers in length, connects it with the main line. "But coal is not the onlv pro duct of the ground. Serbia is especially rich in copper. The mine at Bor has alreadv made a name for itself. It is under Bulgarian management, and turns out from 20 to 22 grains of pure gold together with every ton of copper. The Kula Duk len mine embraces about 1,600 000 tons 7 percent, pure copp> 1, and the mine at Maidan Pek produced (1870 1003J, 15,000 tons, from which v r taken ^y 350 tons of pure c ,u bs 1 iken to ward a in ire t'i r>>ugli exploits tion of the treasures of Serbian soil by the Unlg irians, esp icialy when the legal situ ition shall have been cleared up by the conclusion of peace. Thed.tt .1, which are taken from the • >lli cial paper, Echo de Biflgarie, are limited almost exclusively to the eastern part of Old Set bia. It is not impossible that the west also contains all kinds of ore beds." ITALIANS THRIVE IN GERMANY. Despite the 'popuhir inilig nation against Italy existing in Germany because of the former's withdrawal from the Triple Alliance and her joining the Allies in the w 11 upon Austria, the <1 un in industrialists are willing enough to have Italian subjects reman iiiGerinauy and d %  > |i 111 of t ie woi k formerly pei 1 irme I b .• 11 >rmans now at 1 ie ii 1 it, ice irding to an inter view with Ivttore Cattaneo, a native of Milan, recently return ed to his home city after having lived seve iteen years in Berlin, printed in the Secolo. Siguoi Cattaneo St id that there were 20,000 Italians working in the {Continued OH .ird page.) Are you Worried about Baby ? H OW to feed Baby is often a great worry to mothers who are unable to nurse their babies themselves. Ordinary cow's milkhowever prepared at homo—is not a suitable •ubstitute for the mother's milk. It is acid in reaction, contains harmful germs and forms dense curds in the stomach that cannot be digested. Decide to use the 'Allenburys' Foods which are the only series of Foods scientifically adapted to the growing requirements of the child. You will be delighted when you nee how well your baby thrives on this Method of Infant Feeding. The 'Allenburys' Foods are free from all dangerous organisms; they are portable, being in powder form and packed in sealed tine. The Millc Foods Nos. 1. and 2 require the addition of hot water only to prepare them for use. A PURE. COMPLETE AND PROGRESSIVE DIETARY. MllenbimjsFtads MILK FOOD No. I. MILK FOOD No. 2. MALTED FOOD No. 3. From birth lo 3 inoothe From 3 to 7 mouths From 7 months upward! Unmollclled Temllmony. "Her LIU San. by lee •Alleeeerye' r••••." Dear Sin. Baibadoe. Will you kindly send me a copy ol your pamphlet on Infant Feeding and Management. My baby at in weeka ol age ai •try III, being i.nable to digett the cow't milk. I mulmanjf artificial fo ode without MBCfee. att j alwaya co nnd.r hi I Ie 1..V.-I hy_ he'.VIri .'ii F.-..I SI. i< now on I th %  l chiUlteo other age! know and u nll led clueh\_onxour "dFaithfully youra. K. C. Waltoa. "The Flaeal laky la the lelaaaV Gent'rmea. Trinidad. 1 tend jou herewith photoa of our baby Frank w <> nearly 16 montha old, and U on. of i i ren, in I ha nerer been ill, thoughwehte in"aVery_unhei noil unhealthy i" lh' M"l. "" % % %  : >" '" ' I ; : '" nv.ihei > aeriouViIlneta, • % %  fed on your Milk and Mi ie.1 Fonda until he wai a year old. He began wiih Milk loo: No. i and finlahed with the Malted Fond. Wh-nh tit rppnihtoid he waathe flneat b by in ihe Itland nl wei I j.i I %  1 tend pholotofhim atililTerent agraand I ihinnto hi hly ol your foode, thai 1 haee written vou tbit and recommend tnern lo %  n or our %  njoaala ~ eaai i ttlaitTaa Youit truly, Th mat Po ler. M MTIL A TBD are made under apecial prcceaaaa a entirely untouched by hand. • booh -Intmnl Fv. ,mm 1 64 pages or valueSlo •or mvmrv another. .Ltd.. London. England. d 200 Yetfl


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02623
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, June 17, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02623

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Full Text
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
*
.Nulllua BLddiclua furore) in verb* ma.ulotrl
Balng bound lo iw*a,r to iha Dogm&i of no Master.
Vol. XIII. No. ISO
NASSAU. N. P., BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JUNE 17. 1916
Price. THREE CENTS
Russia's Prisoners Crowded In Camps.
tt J-i
v.*
Conformation of the gruesome
stories legardiog ,he iille^ctl
abuse and general ma I treat men I
of Teuton prisoners of war con
lined in Russian prison ramps,
winch have been circulated by
< iernian agents in neutral conn-
"ries, is lacking in report
made by a representative of the
American Government <>f his
inspection of tl.e camps in Rus
si in Tuikestan, according to
excerpts from ihis document
printed in the Beiliner Tageb
lull "f Api il 2'>.
The American agent dues
complain of overcrowding, lac*
nf sufficient luodical personnel,
and a shortage of mt at B lid
clothing for some of the prison-
ers. rCmpliasis is laid on the un
healthful (diniate of Turkestan
in the report which is (pioted
as follows by the Tageblatl :
Between Nov. 21 and Dec. 7,
i'ii 5, I visited the camps at
Paschkent, Troitzkoje, Djizak,
Samarkand, Kagnn, (New Bok>
liara.) Merw, Askabad, Ak Pep*
insk, and Kras'novdsk. On Nov.
1 i, 1915, there were, according
lo the official report, 83,435
Austrian and 3,813German pri-
soners interned in the entire
province <>f Turkestan. I have
been informed that some 50,
000 have recently been tians-
ferred t" European Russia to
itevel, Kharkof, l'.l,:ttci inoslaf,
Pern, and along 'lie Donto
work in fa tones, mines and
tarms or to be employed in the
reclamation of land along the
river banks.
"It is necessary to beaquaint
ed with the climate and the
country in order to form a cor-
rect judgment of till condition
and treatment of the piisoners
of war in Turkestaid A vast,
sandy desert, broken up by only
a few hills, .111 1 traversed by
but a few watercourses, extends
from [aschkent west toKrasno
yndsk and south to the borders
of Afghanistan and Persia. The
climate is extraordinarily dry.
The Sum ners are long, the
Winters short, and the tempera
lure, in the shade, ranges from
a maximum of 40 above zero,
Reaumur, (12s degrees, Fahren-
heit,) in Summer, toajniinimum
of 16 below zero, Kepumur, (4
degrees below, I'ahre'nheit,) in
Winter. In order to show how
1 mg 'the Summer lasts there, I
wish to say that at the time of
niv visit at the camp the tern
perature in the. shade at noon
ranged bom 1, to 20 degrees
above zero Reaumur.
These sharp extremes of heat
and cold, together with damp-
ness that has its origin in a
great .deal of stagnant water,
make the.climate unhealthful
Malaria was extremely pre VS.
lent in all the places that I vi
sited, with the exception o
Askabad, and Krasnovndsk
From a hygienic standpoint the'
barracks were generally over-
crowded. Only at Merw, Ka-
gan, Askabad, and Krasnovodsk
where comparatively few pri
soners were interned, did they
have more than the space abso
lutely necessary for sleeping.
However, there weie more pri
soneri expected at these places.
In the camps at Taschkent.
Troitzkoje,Samarkand, and Ak
Tepinik, where the great ma
jority of the prisoners inspected
were sheltered, each man had
about two feet of space for
sleeping at night. This condi
tion is only serious, however,
[during the short Winter, when
doors and windows must be
1 kept closed and when foul air
doubtless fill the rooms.
"1 he principle diseases found
among the prisoners in Turk
estan, in the approximate order
of their frequency, are 1, mala
j ria, (which is said to be partic
' ularly virulent there:) 2, enteri
tis; 3, nephritis; 4, dysentery; 5,
gastric fever; 6,scurvy; 7, septic
typhus; 8, diphtherias 9, scarlet
fever; 10, smallpox.
"The four diseases-last men
tioned have only appeared in
isolated cases AnothcJ seiious
circumstance is the shortage of
I doctors and attendants in the
j hospitals. A Russian physician
' told me that in theory one doc-
tor was assigned to every fifty
patients in a hospital, but that
in reality each doctor had to
; treat about a hundred patients
and each attendant had to care
for more than a hundred. At
the time of my visit to the camp
at Samarkand there were 706
prisoners in the hospital, with
only four Austrian and two
Russian doctors tocare for them
There also seems to be a scarci
ty of medical supplies.
"The*situation of the prison-
ers depends materially on the
personality of the commander.
In the camps at Troitzkoje and
Samarkand there was a gieat
deal of discontent among the
' prisoners, and many complaints
were heard. It appeared to me
, that in both camps the officials
[were very severe and took but
I little interest in the welfare of
I the prisoners. At Djizak and
: Krasnovodsk, on the other hand,
J the conditions were, with few-
exceptions, quite satisfactory,
thanks to the personality of the
commander.
"But in general it must be ad-
mitted that the conditions in
Turkestair are not good. Apart
, from the unhealthful climate,
'the prisoners receive too little
I meat and overcrowding of the
Iberrackl is the order of the day,
all of which, taken together, is
doubtless the cause of the great
number of cases of illness and
death. Furthermore, there are
not enough doctors there, sufli
cient clothing is lacking, and
the working prisoners are not
paid enough. These are the
principle inconveniences."
SERBIA'S MINERAL WEALTH.
How carefully the Bulgarian
and Teuton authorities now in
control of Serbia are weighing
the mineral resources of King
Peter's kingdom, evidently with
a view of using the little coun-
try as a source of supply for the
Central Powers and also esti
mating Its value as a pawn in
the diplomatio game that will
precede the signing of a treaty
of peace that will end the world
war, is shown by the following
report sent out from Dresden by
the German-Bulgarian AfSOCia
tion and printed in the Berliner
Vorwarts of April 19:
"The Bulgarians have already
made a careful investigation of
Old Serbian territory in search
of available minerals.
"They found great coal de
posits between the Mlawa and
the Pek, southeast of Porarewa.
On the Parian is situated the
town of Dobra, where theieisa
mine that produces some 25,000
to 30,000 tons of coal annually.
Another mine, situated along
the Mirotsch mountain south
from Tekia, has a coal field
some thirty kilometers long, as
has already been verified by
Seibian engineers. At Zaits-
char a coal mine has been wcrk
ed for twenty five \eais It is
connected by rail with the city
of Radujevac on the Danube,
where a briquette factory is op
erated. This mine turns on'
from 30,000 to 40,000 tons of
coal a year. There are othei
mines at Rtani, which is con
nected by a mine railway with
ZaitSChar. In Tzidille in the
valley of tlie Morava some coal
has been found, although onlv
in small quantities. On the
oilier hand, the coal field of Ma
la Raon Peka is estimated lo
cover throe kilometers and to
contain 5,000,000 tons. I he
mine at Sonieh, twenty-two
kilometers from the Belgrade-
Sofia Railway, produces at pres.
ent 130,000 tons of coal a year.
The coal field of Alcxinetz,
south from the Morava, is esti
mated to cover six kilometers.
A branch road, six kilometers
in length, connects it with the
main line.
"But coal is not the onlv pro
duct of the ground. Serbia is
especially rich in copper. The
mine at Bor has alreadv made
a name for itself. It is under
Bulgarian management, and
turns out from 20 to 22 grains
of pure gold together with every
ton of copper. The Kula Duk
len mine embraces about 1,600
000 tons 7 percent, pure copp> 1,
and the mine at Maidan Pek
produced (1870 1003J, 15,000
tons, from which v r* taken ^y
350 tons of pure c , grams of pure silver. In Studj
na, south of Nish, copper is also
found. Iron is found in the
mountains of Kapaonik and is
not rare in other parts of Old
Serbia. In the sixteenth century
the mines of Vrania and V'lassi
na were well known, but now
all operations there have ceased.
"While thus far the S -ciete
Anonyme de Dobra and the
Societe In lustnelle Serbe du
lunik li ive be m the 0 ily ones
c irrying on co il mining in a
rational way, it is expected 11 iw
that steps will so >u bs 1 iken to
ward a in ire t'i r>>ugli exploits
tion of the treasures of Serbian
soil by the Unlg irians, esp icialy
when the legal situ ition shall
have been cleared up by the
conclusion of peace. Thed.tt.1,
which are taken from the >lli
cial paper, Echo de Biflgarie,
are limited almost exclusively
to the eastern part of Old Set
bia. It is not impossible that
the west also contains all kinds
of ore beds."
ITALIANS THRIVE IN
GERMANY.
Despite the 'popuhir inilig
nation against Italy existing in
Germany because of the former's
withdrawal from the Triple
Alliance and her joining the
Allies in the w 11 upon Austria,
the <1 un in industrialists are
willing enough to have Italian
subjects reman iiiGerinauy and
d> |i 111 of t ie woi k formerly
pei 1 irme I b . 11 >rmans now at
1 ie ii 1 it, ice irding to an inter
view with Ivttore Cattaneo, a
native of Milan, recently return
ed to his home city after having
lived seve iteen years in Berlin,
printed in the Secolo. Siguoi
Cattaneo St id that there were
20,000 Italians working in the
{Continued OH .ird page.)
Are you Worried about Baby ?
HOW to feed Baby is often a great worry to
mothers who are unable to nurse their
babies themselves. Ordinary cow's milk-
however prepared at homois not a suitable
ubstitute for the mother's milk. It is acid in
reaction, contains harmful germs and forms
dense curds in the stomach that cannot be
digested. Decide to use the 'Allenburys' Foods
which are the only series of Foods scientifically
adapted to the growing requirements of the
child. You will be delighted when you nee
how well your baby thrives on this Method of
Infant Feeding. The 'Allenburys' Foods are free
from all dangerous organisms; they are portable,
being in powder form and packed in sealed tine.
The Millc Foods Nos. 1. and 2 require the addition
of hot water only to prepare them for use.
A PURE. COMPLETE AND PROGRESSIVE DIETARY.
MllenbimjsFtads
MILK FOOD No. I. MILK FOOD No. 2. MALTED FOOD No. 3.
From birth lo 3 inoothe From 3 to 7 mouths From 7 months upward!
Unmollclled Temllmony.
"Her LIU San. by lee Alleeeerye' r."
Dear Sin. Baibadoe.
Will you kindly send me a copy ol your pamphlet on Infant
Feeding and Management. My baby at in weeka ol age ai
try III, being i.nable to digett the cow't milk. I mulmanjf
artificial foode without MBCfee. attj alwaya connd.r hi I Ie
1..V.-I hy_ he'.VIr-i.'ii F.-..I SI. i< now on I th '" l
chiUlteo other age! know and unll led clueh\_onxour "d-
Faithfully youra. K. C. Waltoa.
"The Flaeal laky la the lelaaaV
Gent'rmea. Trinidad.
1 tend jou herewith photoa of our baby Frank w <> nearly
16 montha old, and U on. of i i ren, in I ha nerer
been ill, thoughwehte in"aVery_unhei
noil unhealthy i" lh' M"l. "" ' :>" '".....' I ; :'"
nv.ihei > aeriouViIlneta, fed on your Milk and Mi ie.1 Fonda
until he wai a year old. He began wiih Milk loo: No. i and
finlahed with the Malted Fond. Wh-nh.....tit rppnihtoid he
waathe flneat b by in ihe Itland nl wei I j.i I 1 tend
pholotofhim atililTerent agraand I ihinnto hi hly ol your foode,
thai 1 haee written vou tbit and recommend tnern lo n or our
njoaala ~ eaai i ttlaitTaa Youit truly, Th mat Po ler.
M MTIL A TBD
are made under apecial prcceaaaa
a entirely untouched by hand.
booh -Intmnl Fv. ,mm
1 64 pages or valueSlo
or mvmrv another.
.Ltd.. London. England.
d 200 Yetfl


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916,
L. OILBKKT DUPUCH,
Editor und Proprietor.
OKKICK:
Corner Shirley & Ch&rlolle Sta
VttMM, N. />.-, Rnhamas
FIIOXK XM. P. O. BOX l:t.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Mumlav. We.lnes.lav and Friday
tingle ( ><<. ...... ... ) Tuesil.iv. and I liurs.l.iv tingle Cnpjf ill
aaturd.iv -aingla copy ill
Weekly ............ 5.I
! M11111V ..........!-. I
tiailcily...... .. <-. '
41 Yearly........ .. 9s.
aily ............18s
I'AYAHLK IN ADVANCK
Advertising Ratei mx nence per line
for first insertion; three |ence i";i line
h>r second insertion ; auo oriei>e:im pe-
line (ot suhsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight Lines i~.
ttbe tribune
S.\i virdrv v, June 17, 1916
The Belgian Relief meet-
ing which was held in St.
Andrews 11.ill on Thursday
night, all hough by no means
so well attended ns ii should
have been, was thoroughly
representative in character.
It is 15 g rat if) ing to leai n
that subscriptions to thefund
already amount t<> over
260, and as His Excellency
the Governor is interesting
himself in the movement, we
can safely predict a substan-
tial addition to that amount,
and that right soon. His
Excellency certainly has .1
persuasive manner, which is
very effective in opening re-
luctant pockets.
In another column we pub-
lish the speech His excellen-
cy delivered at the meeting
on Thursday night.
We have been requi sti d
by the Appeal Committi e oi
the Bahamas Belgian Ri
Fund to acknowledge with
sincere thanks the following
contributions which were
made at the Meeting held in
St. Andrew's Hall on the 15th
inst.
His Excellency the
Governor ami La
dy Allardycc "52 10 o
A Friend 50 0 o
The St. Andrew So-
c ietj 26 5 o
Mr. and Mis. Jas. P.
Sands 25 o o
The Speaker and Mrs.
Haroouit Malcolm to 10
Mr. I R. C. Youug s s
Mr. W. Miller
Mr. L. G. Brica
Mr. T. S Hilton
Mr, Jas. M Rae
Mr. Kenneth S tlomon 5
Mr. Cyril F. Solomon .<
The Chief Justice &
Mrs. Tudor
The Attorney Gene
ral and Mrs. Dur
rant
The Lord Rithop of
Nassau
The Rev. C. Dudley
Lampen
Mr and Mr*. John
H. Brown
Men of Young & Sons
Sponging Fleet
Mr. C. O. Anderson
Mr. W. A. Mather
Mr. E. A. Roberts
Tliff Rev. S. J. Bennett 5
Mr and Mrs. Frank
Menendei 1 1 0
Mr. and Mrs E. R.
Paahlty 500
Mr. A. I). Sherwood
Smith 1 1 o
II A. H 220
n
o
o
3
3
21 00
12 12
1000
o o
550
5 0 n
2 2 0
1 1 0
0 5 0
1 0 O
266 -io o
Subscription lists have been
placed at the Bank of Nassau
and the Royal Bank of Canada
or donations can be sent direct
to the Honorary Treasurer Mr.
L. G. Brice.
.0:
We are pleased to learn that,
despite the rain, the entertain-
ment given by the Eastern Vic
toria School proved a success.
The sum of 5 11 6 was rea
lized.
So as to accommodate those
who were unable to attend yes
terday, Mr. Thompson is repeat-
ing the entertainment, by spe
cial request, on Friday next
23rd inst., under the patronage
of His Honour The Chief Jus
tice and Mrs. Tudor.
:o:
The Lighting of the North
West passage so as to make it
navigable for traffic at night, is
an object of ihe utmost import-
to this Colony, and Mr.
Chi istie's letter in the "Guar
Ii.01*' of the 14111 inst., is en-
tirely in agreement with our
own views oji the subject.
Hitherto the cost and care of
beacons have been a great ob-
jection to their use. Aside
from the ex tense of erection
and fuel there was the constant
.UN ntion the light needed to
preserve its usefulness. Now,
this main objection has been
removed, the beacons burn one
year without attention. That
is to say, after election the bat
s with which tllfl wires are
charged keep the light going
fur one whole year. The only
expenditure of any consequence
is for tin- beacon its* If and this,
it is asserted, is but |6oO orj
130. Whether the lighting of
the passage will improve our'
tourist tiade is a matter for ar-
gument, but it it is certain that
we can expect no traffic from
that quarter so long as it is as
dang, mils as it is at present,
and 340 is not a sum that is
likely to bring this colony to a
financial crisis. We have a
Development Board and we do
think that it is quite with-
in the province of that insti-
tution to take this matter in
to consideration and determine
whether the scheme is practical
Of not.
:o:
Daughters of The E-noire
RED CROSS GUILD
4 o
Collected by Mis. Kendrick,
Hope Town Abaco,
The Ward Line S. S. "Cama
guay" arrived in New York
yesterday afternoon.
:o:
Copy of the Address which
the G >vei n ir gave on Thurs
day niglit.it the Meeting ar
ranged bySt. Andrew'sJ Son
ety in aid of funds for the
Belgians :
Mr. Chairman, Members of
the St, Andrew Society, La-
dies and Gentlemen,
I have undertaken to say
something t his evening about
Belgium and the Belgian!,
and although I am confident
that no words of mine can
adequately convey to you
what Belgium has suffered
since she was ruthlessly in-
vaded by the Germans in
August, 1914, 1 propose to
viu^ga^i^"'
ticatmfl ^ been
im led nllaut
iml Upafl |''.ill
^M E are
sym
aw;
otherj
neutrl
66 MEN
Reichstag on the 4th of Au-
gust, 1914 the Imperial Chan-
cellor, von Bethmann-Holl-
weg, admitted that Germany
had violated her treaty ob
ligations. These are his
words: "Gentlemen, we are
now in a state of necessity,
and necessity knows no laiv !
Our troops have occupied
Luxemburg, and perhaps are.
ahead) on Belgian soil.
Gentlemen, that is contrary
to the dictates of interna-
tional law. It is true that
the Ffench Government has
declared at Brussels that
Fran e is willing to respect
the neutrality of Belgium as
long as her opponent respects
it. We knew, howev r, that
France stood ready for the
invasion. France could wait,
but we could not wait. A
French movement upon our
Hank upon the lower Rhine
might have been disastrous.
So we were compelled to
override the just protest of
the Luxemburg and Belgian
Governments. The wrongI
speak openlythat we are
committing we ill endea-
vour to make good as soon
as our military goal has been
reached. Anybody who is
threatened, and is fighting
for his highest possessions
can have only one thought-
how he is to hack his way
through !"
It seems hardly necessary
for me to remark that fiance
did not stand ready for the
invasion of Germany, that no
nation had threatened Ger- ,
j .. n _.,, 1 of war must be dictated to jec the
many, and that Germany s... ,.., ',,
.-" u the woikl. obtained.
action in commencing the u
war,and invading Belgium,] 'They call us barbarians.
was a most infamous and
Oflice of Recruiting Committee,
Nassau, 3rd June, 1916.
ARE required for the drafts lor the
Bahamas Contingent Unit to the
end of the present month.
Recruits will, on enlistment, he paid two shillings fa-
day and will besupplied with uniform.
Further information as regards duration of servh e, see
paration allowance, pension &C, will be gladly Riven by the
Commandant at his oflice at the barracks on auj daj between
the hours of 9 and 3 o'clock.
The schooner "Zellars" has again left Jamaica for
Nassau and will in all probability be leaving for Jamaica before
the, end of the present month. The Recruiting Committee hopa
that sufficient men will come forward to make up the number
required as above stated.
R. 11. C. CRAWFORD,
Chairman, Recruiting Committee.
Bahamas Belgian Relief Fund
Under the auspices of
THE ST. ANDREW SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS
Patron
His Excellency Sir William L. Allarch i e, K C. M. G G< I < 110
Appeal Committee
Chairman : The Honourable Jan rs P. Sands, M. 1. C.
S. I lilion, Esquire.
1'iitchard, Esquire
Honourable llarcourt Malcolm, K C.
H mourahle J. R. C. Young, M E. C.
H .nourable William Miller, M. L. C.
J. M. Rae, Esquire.
0. 1
A. Kenneth Solomon. M.
H. A Esqu n
Honorary Treasurer
L G lirice, M. H, A Esquire,
II tlary
Cj n1 f". Solonion, |
'.squire.
wai cannol be
premeditated crime. On this
subject Maxmilian Harden,
one of the most influential
German journalists says:
'Let us drop our miserable
attempts to excuse Ger-
many's action. Not against ,
our will and as a nation'
taken by surprise did we hurl
ourselves into this gigantic
venture. We willed it. We
had to will it. We do not
stand before the judgment
s at of Europe. Weacknowl
edgeno such jurisdiction. Our
might shall create a new law
in Europe. It is Germany that
strikes. When she has con
quered new domains for her
genius then the priesthoods
of all the gods will praise the
God of war.'
Later Major-General von
Disfurth i 1 an article which
he sent to the Hamburger
Nachrichten wrote as follows
''No object whatever
is served by taking any
'notice of the accusations of
(barbarity levelled against
Germany by foreign critics.
Frankly, we are and must
be barbarians, if by these
.we understand those who
wage war relentlessly and
do the uttermost degree. We
owe no explanation to any
one. There is nothing for
us to justify and nothing to
explain away. Every-act of
whatever nature committed
.by our troops for the pur
pose of discouraging, defeat
g. and destroying our ene
ies is a brave act and a
Hood deed, and is fully justi
ed. Germany stands as the
erne arbiter of her own
hods, which in the time
What of it? We scorn them f P"j on the above,
'and their abuse. For my "l'"'1.' ""' General Stall of
/part I hope that in this war "" German Army has pre-
,we have merited the title l'"'1. <" permit every spe.
.of barbarians. Let neutral cim of violence and villany.
.peoples and our enemies 'i"s wnssubsequently prov
(<-ease their empty chattel, ed by what ocaired-after the
.which may well be compar "l" "' llc "f u'" '< d a n
,ed to the twitter of birds. sJrf,,w the spirit of the ruling
Let them cease their talk of cJas*ln Germinv to which
the Cathedral at Rheims and ' German people have com
'of all the churches and all ""'tied their destiny. Che Del
'thecastles in Fiance which *'"> newspaper,'ThePeople'
'have shared its fate. These ill* organ of the Labourpar
'things de not interest us. tv wrijing shortly after the
'Our troops must achieve outbreak of hosttliti#s, cor-
victory. Wht else mat recl'y. guaged what was jn
ters?'" s!;'"*. for '" urging the pro
, ,, r 1 c, it P'C '" *&"* Iheii lianas
[n 1002 the General Staff tM .M;i;...r .
military service It is said
of the German Army pub
lished a Manual entitled,
'The Laws of War on Land,'
Go, then sons of the work
and regit. 1 your names
as recruits. We vuill rather
occupy, but it will, and must,
in like manner seek to destroy
the total intellectual and
material resources of the hit
ter. Humanitarian claims -
Such as protection of men
Far be it from me i0 with
to hurt anyone'ssusceptibili
ties, or needlessly harrow any
one'sferitngsJam-compeUed
to state that it isonlybyfac
to war, nay more, that the
only true humanity very
often lies in a ruthless appli
cation of them. What is per
missible includes eve.y means
of war without which theob
place.
The invasion of peaceable
and totally unprepared Bel-
gium, and the gallant but un
availing attemptas was ap
parent later-of its small &
ill-equipped army to defend


1 Al MTh



The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916,
^
*
and protect the country, was
followed up by the bombard
merit of unfortified towns, the
issuing of the most harfass
iog and outrageousProclama
tions, and tlie levying ol en
ormous indemnities notwith
Standing the provisions of
the Hague Convention <>l
1907 to the contrary. For 111
stance on 17 August, 1914,
the Burgomaster of Hassch
was I 'Hid by the German
Military Authorities to pub-
lish a barbarous notice con-
taining this sentence:'In
the case "I Civilians shooting
on the German army, a third
(Tl the ill.lie population will
be shot. OnAugust 22nd Gen
era I Von liulow commanding
the Second (ierman Army pro
claimed In the Communal
Authoritii at Leige that it
was with Ins 'consent' thai
1 he whole l< >wn 1 f Andeiines
had been 'Burnt down and
about too pi i|jle shut.' In 1 he
matter of indi mnit ies, l'uus
srls was assessed -'it 8,1 00,
! e at 2,000,000; 1 he
pnn uii-r ol Brabant at 1'S,
. ()n the 271U of \u-
.: 1-1 Lieut. (iencral Vi n Nie
l>er. i < .1 iiici i" the Burgo-
mi isd r I \ 1 t're, iciiiiikIc I
him 1 ha' ii wii had n 'I paid
111 ii posed
up hi it :.\ (leneil V>n I'm
It i\V, and added," I lie low II of
Wavre will be destroyed if the pa> mi nt is
not made when due; without
distinct ion "l |" rsons, lire in
nori il with the guilty."
I'.mi i acre was worse 1
t hiii this. At rocil ies
limit ted upon Jefe'i ci less
.and unoffending civilians,
Lou vain and 1 ilhercil irs v
sacked, and n 1 imen mid 1 liil
dp n were binbarously out
raged and murdered 1 ni lias
men h to turn over the pages
1' the evidence laid before
C immjtteeof vh cli Lord
Pa \ mi Mian on the
Alleged < lei Mian \lrocil ies to
1 with the most distres
sing md sh m king disclo-
til res on \> ige, The f. il
lowing spei 1 mens of what I
; to: --' )n page 10 a Hid
1 states, "!n the
Hue S01 n- fie In 'I ,i b 1 w civilians b"i nughl ml of
their hous -. n4togelher 32
were kille I li men lm
Mie Ii itelj ''it' r 1lie men had
Ii (! killed I saw the ( '< rmans
going into ihe houses in the
Place and bringing nul the
w en and girls, About 30
broughl out, '! hey
were marched Hose to Ih*
corpses. Each of them was
held by the arms They
iiied lo gel away. I hey
were made 10 lie on tables
which had hce'11 brought into
thp squ Aboul 15 of
1 hem were I hen violated
(Further details are too hor-
rible for me to ad aloud to
this meeting
I) 11 page -h n B< Iginn re
fugee gives 1 he followingde
scription of what look place
nt Ldyvenier, "As I looked
into the kitchen I saw the
1 i rm ins seise the b iby out
,,f the arms of the f irmer's
wife. There were three Ger
mi in soldiers one offii it and
two priv ites. The t w 1 pi i
vates held the bnbv and the
officer took dul hi I find
cut the baby's head off The
hf*nd fell on the floor and the
soldiers kicked the bod) of
the child into a corner and
kicked the head alter it." 1
must refrain from giving you
the details of what then hap
pened, but the witness like
wise stated,"After the woman
had been violated by the
th woman's breasts."
I have made but two ex-
tracts, from 175 pages of
printed matter on this same
subject. From one end to
the other of this Report it
' 01 isists.of ever accumulating
and revolting horrors and
atrocities* In the remaining
poriion of that official pub
Mention covering over one
hundred pages, and the
whole of which can be pur
'hased for a few pence, it is
apparent on the testimony of
British Offi ei Bi itish sol
diers, and Belgian soldiers,
that on many occasions Hel
ginn men. women, and child
len were marched in front of
and used .'is a screen to Ger-
man troops thus preventing
the Allies from firing on them
There is likewise tncontra
vertible evidence to show-that
thrGerm-'nis killed nndniaini
ed the wounded Belgian and
British soldiers.
I trust I have said enough
to bring home to the most
unimaginative person in this
hall this evening some 1 I the
sufferings of the Belgians and
ihe intolerable peis< cuti< ins
to which they have hi en Sub
j< cted. But, to (low n all, il
is well known that tin Bel-
gian people who would nol
aid the Germansagainsl Ihi ir
own fellowconntrvnn 11 and
the Allies would u nd' nib ted IJ
have been mode to starve
this -js in strict accordant e
with approved Teuton in,-t
hods of 'frightfulness' had
it not been for the f. md sup-
plied by the |
I'niu d States of Amei ica ,\w>\
the Allies. As it is, some r,
500,000 Bel gin ms are on the
verge of starvation in their
own country and receive only
one meal a day. while the
number of those in destitute
circumstances in Belgium,
mostly women and children,
exceeds ',.000/100 Can you
possibly imagine a more mon-
strous, barbaric, or detestable
state of things than that for
which German aggrandize
men! is responsible ? Hen
in this Colony we are pros-
perous, and were it not for
the newspapi rs I doubt whe-
ther weshould know thai the]
Empire was in the throes of
n life and death struggle.
On we realize aright the re-
volting horrors I haveallud*
ed to, or the miseries wfiich
we have esc ipi d, or what il
in* ans to be starving ?
It has been said that we
are a stolid, a stupid, and an
ill inform d nation; and it is
possible Hint we niav be a
peace loving p 'pie f' Hid of
our homes and out libei t ies,
and nol anxious to fighl tor
fighting's sake, and we m i)
perhaps be rIqw in grasping
the right thing to do, but I
i bum for us in all sincerity
that as a nation we trj I
'plav t he 1 m '. arfd we want
to do the rigltl thin md
having come to the conclu
sion wh it we rriighl to
and having seen where our
duty lies we en leavour to
truly an I conscientiously
form it at whatever cost.
Should there be one thing
more than another that is
likely to arouse us and quick-
en us in doing it at thisjunc-
ture it is to learn of theatro
cities that have been com
mitted upon women and
children in Belgium and the
state into which the country
has been brought under Ger
man rule. For this Germany
stands condemned by the
judgment of the civilized
world.
In the case of our Belgian
Allies, who, remember, have
lost practically everything
except their honourwhich
remains unsullied -and who,
in doing so much for the Al
lied cause, in Buffi 11 Ig SO
much, and in sacrificing so
much havecoveredthemseH
and their country with im
perishable glory, our course
is perfectly plain. Every man
in Nassau who is worthy of
the name of Britisher, when
appealed to as we have been
appealed to by theLord May
or of London, and knowing
the farts, will I am sure l< 1 I.
not only a hatred, horror,and
loathing of these iniquit
crimes that have 1 ,11 pi 1
petrated in Belgium, but that1
it is his duty and his privi
alike to make -on
al sacrifice to aid thi sestarv
iii!.r and sorely persecuted but
heroic people.
Assurance
Association, Ltd.
^SHS* ImpcrialWest Indian
ed in dense formation the Italian
positions en the Asutfo Plateau
but were repulsed with I
heavy losi s ol dp Irft before ihe Italian trenches. '
nURSUANT to the provisions
Si. I."hi- "1 1 and Ma ! of Act 54 Victoria Chapter
shall were nominated tonight for 3, Public Notice is hereby given
'taweiidtncyandi 01 lidency. that a Certified Copy of the
A frenzied dem insiralmn ti>"k ,~u c i
place after ihe announcement of barter or Incorporation, duly
their nominotion,
o:
Religious Services
sunday, i8th june.
There "ill be set \ ices in ihe
nth Day Ad\ entisl 1 Impel
on East Shirley Street, on Sun
certified and authenticated, of
the Imperial West Indian As-
surance Association, Ltd., has
been deposited for record in
the office of the Registrar of
Records, and that ihe said As-
sociation has established an of-
fice for the transaction of busi-
day night at seven thirty o'clock riess, at No. 264 Bay Street, in
the City of Nassau, in the
Island of New Providence.
.
Radiograms
June |6, [Qll
London, \y Tim let n *" 1
man merchantmen which v
0 mine, from the North com
ij an auxilary cruiser and
some torpedi boats and armi traw lers werealtacked earl) this
morning lo a squadron ol Russ
ian d trovers toi pedo boats
marines near the S
coast'
The German con1
rers< d and the hick haul |
fled toward the
ported tliiit some- ol tlie ve-
wcre sunk.
Copenhagen, 13 : Desci
the Baltic fight the Iige 1 '\ u
heder says that the \iu-
squadron won an im pot tan I
\ ictoi y. The Russians had si x
destroyers and seven subm irin i
and were going a I such Sp
that the Germans were taken
completely by sui | n 1-" and only
fired one shot then made for
in utmost haste.
New York,: -Men and women
of Great Britain and Cana 11
joined in services at Triint\
Church todav in memory ol
late Lord Kitchener, the Pil
ftt'ttns S iciety, Daughters of the
British Empire, Can idianS icie-
ty and other asi iatii>m
represented.
June 171I1, 1
Petrograd: I he lust 1
1I1 in lined (aternowitz drit inn Ihe
civil population before them. The
('/. ir hi pursuing fie re
Ireoling \n -i I ve\ in
ground 1 i|nM\.
I nndon: Figh 1 ing nn the
\\'.-~t(.in fi'-ni continueii (ierman
it) n V*ei lun, l hi lumonl
1' 11 n :m I (lallette Win its lire re
pulsed with lie ivv losses, I he
1 r hi i| lure I 1 I !ermnn tienell
on the F.asii ol I e M >rl
Hnni li 1 hey Ii linsl
1 ttneks,
Peti 1 despitcJj
tin Iga 1 us.' 1 w i did
large 1 I irn ps from S-dfi
iki In < 1 th R imani
ision
June 18th; to which all are in
viled. Subjeot: \rmagi ddon"
continued.
St. Johns Ca 1 hi dr\i..
Mi /
Rev. (i A. riiom| >n, S.T.D.
Vlinisti r Prearhinp 11 a in.
and ~. 511 11 in I tea"'1 Hi Mini
nings will look after Ihe affairs
of the Chun.-h while the pastor June 13II1 1916,
is making a tour of the Cat Is
land district.
. W. Armbkister.
.1 S. W'ai.i ii;,
MES,
* inut I 1 wi / si p ige)
Imperial West Indian
Assurance
Association, Ltd.
c od and iron miues in the West
ph 'Man district, and that there NOTICE TO SHARE-H0LDER8.
1 a c>uple of thousand of his I
fellow-citixens in Berlin, mostl) "TPHI'- Fii men! on
poor folk not calculated to make I IheCapital Stock oft
trouble For the p ice 01 the \ lion is di and
f the a my. In able al theOflite.
order that tl lacing ,,,,,,, Xl,
i te 1 th ;
II I I \ I WOI li
t he y an tei !
1 itives of tha i m, acy
ng to Signoi C it ta
Re ", ts current in Gei man)
tell of a nhmber of Italian
:. im 'Ts being einphned in the
Zepi ps at Fi ii li ii lisha
Fen nt fabulous but so
1 losely vvat 1 I I heir
position hit li* diffei eni from im
prisonment. Signor Cattaneo
i!s 1 I icl in I thatsomi Italians
1 it to Switzei 'and to

U \\K HOLMES,
I
lune 1 :lh 1
F. A. Garner
">! Weal Be.) St,
Ret
EllL-l: I I .1 I
ned Pears, I' and
lie -s.1 111 \ ,
St. < hai
II ian workers, especiallj ,,_,,,
1"! Pearl Ta 1 l
','" '''' Wh. 1 ii 0. Milk
ly urj ul.Refer.11 u lothe |i;. illls
tment ice .rded In Italians .|l|ow c _|n
in (ierman). the Si lo quotes ^
Signor Cattaneo as 1 II Also in Si ick
"Immediate I) afl 1 II 1 ,, [l:i pf n, lzi| \,.
cl iratiori nl war on Austria ve c .,,, ,. .. ,
subjected to ferocious
lay the
1 ins limi' thei r at ivil ies
tl 1 rep li' 11......
rraitors, if we a 1 e su
w e nhall ma ke v mi pnvfor \ ou
treachery.'At fi'sl
li ved
S\ rup, 1 la mm d),' it< rs
Cam 1 C II).
tins. Cl Cm rnnts, I lam
burg" 1 I 'i' Vluslard,
I .11, < Hive Oil, '
1 H Potti d \l '
HI" Pi i 1
1 11 l 11 1 e Marn lade,
>he\ believea ,, ul,,s ,,,, ,
that WH hiii a I the
Austrian ai my would roul the
Italian I md march | and pa
Milan. I hej [ our ai \|.,,
mv ns a mass of u.idis. iplii Tobaco
soldiers arm- d with broi in .. ,i I |
sticks, ami alw lys pul '" High) ___^______________________
by the mere e ol an
\11sl1 ian 'Km' -'tIicIi,' hut now
they art rather surprised at the.
progress of the war and at the
ii bravery of our Alpini
whom tin \' 1 all 'vei \' devils In
Berlin the authoiIties havi al'
lowed two litth Italian 1 estau
rants to remain op< n, and there
our compktroiti gather and are A
able to '.rive von' to th"ir patri **
otic sentimt^^^^^^^^
limes,
Doat Forget'
thai
WM. HILTON
260 Bay St.
has
I [Nl VSS< )U MI.XT
of white suinmi 1 ods
1111 lade
INCLUDING
Will. \l.ddv" cloth at 1/-
per \ aid.
Phone 201.
WANTED
ABRIGH I' BOY to take
\\'i -t'in Distrii t Papers
I, must live in tin District
Apply to
TRIBUNE OFFICE
\L A TBD
]


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday June 17, 1916,
DRINK-.
Welch's Grape juice.
PRICES
2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
\ Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
| Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.
T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
Heat Eat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. per tin
For Washing up. after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
LOGWOOD
SISAL
R.J. BOWE
Commission Merchant.
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Logwood sold al 2) p. e. according lo qunntity
Sisal sold at \\ p. c. Recording lo quantity
1'ionipt and careful attention given to all consignments
Offices:53a Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Neai City Nfarket.
STOCK PRODUCE
ARROW
COLLAR
If you will give these
collars a trial and keep
traqk of their many
trips to the laundry you
will soon appreciate
their worth.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUBTT, PEABODY & CO., -Inc.
MAKERS, TROT, N. Y. L'., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
I Iii-.iv<> Agent.
WONDERFUL VALUE.
3'-
Solid Gold
Safety Pin
Brooch**
N-t with
Fine Poarls
(74 Cents)
EACH.
Bvtry Brooch
full) ex*
A.nntd
: -; the
ip an ; iris hit
1 i 1
.1
ro] lawn
any br
perfi otlj -uii
m
'
retail 1
1 i* Inolnd
I

kUI, last
:.-. roo
*
on tbt
1 >
n In 1


I ti ;
at, Horseshoe. Flower
111 I Sll .............3 -
i for....16 I
I .. N 1 al mntrM
'1 (laai
1 t >IIC) lid I.-JP)
MX fin
Bend HOST CARD for Catalogue of j.-wellery,
ry, Foun.
;. 1 \ I 1 t Goods, ftc. It
i I'. Tiny and mai nve you
Wr i!ii irantee (ha safe delivery of
nil our rfooiis J rig thswsr -
|1 v.< nnil.Tiski- i" r| Is
1 I! I <>i CHARG1 v
fr ];. fen nee. Bank-re: I ondi at It) ai d Mi.t

FEARS LTD. (*:';'. > """"Snl.V.rl"'0"
238 HK1ST0L BRIDGE. BRISTOL, Ing.
Shingl
JUST received from Jacksonville 5
per 1000. No better grade than
"Prims*" Cypress at 33s. per 1 1
same guarantee as the o* 1
Any defective shingles cart
Also cheaper grade in stock
April 6th. 1916
NOTICE.
To AI.I. WHOM I r MAY CONCERN
DISTRIC I Grand Officers
of Disi, id No. 3 of the
l.nhamas of the (i. ti. A. P.
of B. and S. of Love and
Chai ity are as follow- :
.las \ Knowles, D.G.W.S.
Ei ii' ! \. Lightbourn, 1).
G s.
W a. 9h< pherd, I>. D.M.
I'. Andcison, G.G, Inspect-
or.
Tire above are the only au>
thorizi il officers.
Attested. A. |. Johnson) (1.
G. W S.
Per, .1 14. Knowles 'G.G.
W D.S
For Sale
WHITE enameled bed,
silk floss mattres!
Wheelei and VYilson sew ing
machine, go< d 1 ondil ion
- 10 o
Fib and W01.1 rg 12x12
% p
, Typew i iter, I uderwoqd
No |, neai ly new a 15 o
Japam ssj mat c)x 1 37 a 5^
?e Set of dishes, d,
G C 01 1 in,
71 Shirley Si City
Keeping Guard
\\A\\: arc responsibilities that every patrioticcitizeu
must bear in tins season of national peril, ollni
than lighting for the Bag. Not the leas.t of these
pi r\ ing the l> dance of trade
THE
SHOE H STORE
on
a lit!
sue,
210
hall
guard, and in spite of the advancing price the in.-icase in the wages of the factor) workers, have
ceded in securing the largest ordei of its history
This week's consignment pei "Koto i 1" sum
iM-.s containing 6656 pairs of boot-, and s ies all,
marked with the Big Four's Slogan
With these reinforcements he Ilia Four w II he
able to keep the eneni) High Prices off its terrii Customers may rely on purchasing at the old pi ins m
spill oj Tariff rumours and rising quotat ons in the M u
kels aluoad.
G. T, KNOWLES, nop. Big- 4-,
B iv -1 Spun Rxi ban.
*
Sold by
W.'Hilton
260 Bay St.


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