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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1916, L. (Mt.BKUT DUl'UCH, Editor and Proprietor omoK Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sis '•-"". A'. /'., [Uhamas HHONBSj* p. o. BOX IBS Germans high seas ileet met'not uncommon of people PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, We.liievify ami PrlrfM— KCgSfl %  • •;.v ... riMtday.airl hmrsila> *i.i K |, Saturday -tuiftfe ... Weeklv M'.nllily ... ... \\\ „ Quarterly HaifYea VCMV I.I %  |d 6d I*. • %  AVAKLIO IN ADV'AMOK AilvartiMiiii K.".M <,„ ,,eiice ,, e line i "' %  •UIINC-U • three pence ,..-. hi.e Inriecoud imwrti.m ; .,,.,i,,„ e| line for MihHiamil iiweri -. A'lveilisciiienn un.I'M .i In llie ,.. TOfe (Xvioune Srvu,i ln v Juno 3. 1916 Preliminary reports of what seems to have been a really important NAVAL. ENOA il MENT.will be found in today's cables. From the scanty detail! to hand we gather that the scouts of the fleet, cruisers and destroyers—encountered and engaged an enemy Ileet. The b.ntle does noi seem to have lasted long, ah the main Ileet did not arrive on the scene before the lighting was over, and the enemy's ships, —what was left of' them %  ', safely backin port. Our loss-' es were heavy; but the report demonstrates very clear! v that the losses of the enemy were far more serious. We await further details with great interest. a superior British fleet on the night of May jist and were engaged in battle throughout the night. Six capital British ships were sunk and several torpedo boats and battle ships were damaged. The British battleship Warspite and the battle cruisers Queen Mary, Indefatigable, two ar moured cruisers and one small cruiser were sunk. I lie German losses includ ed the cruisers Weisbaden and I'ommern sunk and some torpedo boats missing. London:—The admiralty admits the loss of ships claimed in German state ment but claims large Ger man losses. London.—The fighting a round Verdun continues Heavv in fan try attacks during the night were ii*|)iilsed The French claim giins South of Carrette Wood. The principal righting occurred between Thiaumunt Farm and Vaux. Radiograms 3rd June, 1916. London, 2nd. Governor, Bahamas. Official News:—On the afternoon of May 31st there was a naval engagement oil Jutland. The brunt of the fighting fell on the battle cruiser Ileet with some cruisers and light cruisers supported by four battle ships. The losses were heavy. The enemy aided by low visibility avoided action and returned to port after the main fleet reached the scene. The Battle cruisers Queen Mary, Indefatigable, Invincible and the cruisers Defense and Black Prince were sunk.| The Warrior w is disabled and abandoned. The destrovers Tippcrary, Turbulent, Fortune, Sparrowhawk and Ardent were lost. Six others are not accounted for. No British battleships or light cruisers were sunk. The enemvs losses were serious. At least one battle cruiser was destroyed, one severely damaged and one battleship reported sunk by our destroyers during the night attack. Two light cruisers were disabled and probably sunk. The number of enemy des troyers disposed of cannot be ascertained but must be large. London June 3rd. < i ivernor, Bahamas. Official News. --Further reports of the naval battle showthat British losses in destroyers totalled eight. One enemy dreadnought was blown up by British destroyers. Another be lieved to have been sunk l>\ ue. lire. One German battle cruiser was blown up, another heavily engaged was seen dis abled and stopping, a third was seriously damaged. One German light cruiser ami six destroyers were sunk and H least two light cruisers were seen disabled. Repeated hits were observed 0(1 three other German battleships. A German ubmariue was sunk. ed) .*AR LAW. —:o: — The Bill to provide for the Co ituiion ftf a Volunteer Force was thrown out by the legislature on T h u r s d a \ thinking otherwise as is evidenced by the fact that the sisal is sometimes sprinkled with water while beiug packed, because it is too dry! The margin of profit is too small to admit of our merchants" purchasing water, so they have to carefully examine every bale, and so those people who dampen their sisal instead of gaining weight, often have to suffer the loss of a few pounds instead. Mr. A. L. Ilenhurn of 8 Niilc Rocks, Grand Bahama, is leav ing here to day for Ins home per Mail Sen. Hazel Dell. —.0: — The Editor of "The Tribune" His Excellency the Governor has appointed the following gentlemen to be Justices of the Peace for the Bahama Islands with effect from the 3rd June: II. A. Brook Esq I S. O. Edward George. Esq. David Patron, Esq Ernest S. McGregor, Rsq. T K. D BRACE, Actg. Colonial Secretary. — :o: — Dear Tribune, One welcomes with regret the occurrences of such incidents as that reported to have taken place on Empire Sunday when the Girl Guides of one denomination (there may be those who take exception to the word) after hospitably entertaining the Girl Guides of other denom mations at an Empire service in one of their churches were commanded by their superiors, to insult those who had been their guests by announcing that they would not contaminate themselves bypartaking of a return of sucfi spiritual hospitality. It was only a charity entertainment, it would seem, at which the snobs played equality for an hour or so with their contemptible infetiors and no manifestation of a spirit of 66 MEN Office of Recruiting Committee, Nassau, 3rd June, 1916. ARE required for the drafts for the Bahamas Contingent Unit to the end of the pieseut month. Recruits will, on enlistment, be paid two shillings (2/ a day and will be supplied with uniform. further information as regards duration of seivice, se paration allowance, pension &c, will be gladly given hv the Commandant at his office at the barracks on any da) between the hours of 9 and 3 o'clock. The schooner "Zdlars" has again left Jamaica for Nassau and will in all probability he leaving f.>i Jamaica befoie the end of the present mouth. The Recruiting Committee In pe that sufficient men will come forward to make up the number reciuired as above stated. R. II. C CRAWFORD, Chairman, Recruiting Committee. One can be certain that at Trinity Wesleyan church, no matter who was conducting the service, there was not any possibility of the Guides re ceiving whether from preach members of that communion and an impetus to the Em pire's consolidation bv everv member of the Empire and section of its communities valuing themselves and being er, audience, or fellow guides, valued, not by their uniusti such instruction in baseness liable assumption of excel and such taint of spiritual lence but by worth, fame and contamination as were im motive and efficiency ofser parted by the contemptible vice. self righteous ecclesiasticism I Let 11s pray, if we have of the morning. (heart left for prayer, that the I used the word welcomes other sections of the follow at the beginning o! my letter ers of the stainless One may and did so advisedly because he preserved from such dis I think it a good thing to I Rusting selfishness, intolera know where we are. The ble bigotry, and unworthy Episcopal church talks of'want of patriotism. union with other denomina I I hanking you for the space tions, parades its desire for afforded union, has done so in • little community even, I night. Dr. Johnson pointed amit y r tolerance of their out the advantages of thel e xecrab,es P mtl, ,a ndsocia] measure, and the opportunity it afforded us of linking up with other parts of the Empire, but his eloquence was of no avail, the bill was "dead and damned", as the majority of the II..use had already'made up their minds| ? in(1 patriotism. to vote against it. We hope Hie devilish inferiority. At the end of one short hour their seeming unity fell to pieces, and the splintered bits cut deep into the hearts of thef victims of ecclesiastical deception and all sympathisers with honour (Signed) \R LAW that their action was wise and statesmanlike, but can not help regret 1 ing that their decision did not favour the bill. —:o: — Large quantities of Sisal are being shipped by the Out Islands to Nassau. Although the price has dropped a little, sisal is a "good proposition" as it is always sure to find a market, and is not likely to fall much lower in price. A correspondent in these CO lumns recently pointed out the ad van 4 a}, proving clea most reliabl the most p dustrits. could on the wisdc cleaning Sisal befl meanness of the proceeding is manifest when we bear in mind that the arrangements lor the day had been completed on the uaderstandingthat the whole bodv of Guides would attend a representative church of one denomination in the morning and a representative church of another denomina tion in the evening. What treatment would such mean trickery receive in the most decadent society of worldly degenerates? Can the Church of Christ sink so far below the world's standards of honour without being regarded as in this one istance it deserves to be re arded as a congregation <>f evils, and if the world ges of the Church's gener esty hv its honesty in well known instances iis. which is quite an one wonder that brands the church with the well de such this but what that desire amounts to we have the interpretation of in the incident of Sunday: last. Has the Episcopal: church any desire for the'Dear Sir, well-being of any other de I ["here have been two com munica tions in your paper re Yours truly GRIEVED. — :o: — June. 3, 1916, To the Editoi of the TRIBUNE >fh vpoente. nomination of the Church of Christ? Sunday's uncODSCl ous act of self revelation is answer sufficient to all think ing people. Sunday's blunder is only a symptom of a deep seated disease from which the An glican church is sick unto death. When a man, because of a supposedly unbroken continuity of physical con tact extending from the apostles to his little sell claims the title of priest and for that reason arrogates to himself the powers of a superGod, irrespective of his pos session of the most ordinal \ human qualities not to say Christian virtues, it is natu ral to expect that his dupelike himself will be grovell ingly mean and even his saintly women may be ex pected to be false to their better selves, their common humanity and their country, in the name of religion. Such lamentable happen ingsas that of Empire Sun dav hasten the inevitable dav when as has already happen ed in our owri and other portions of the Empire our united Empire will insist on removing the last legal claim of a moiety of the people of England to call themselves in any justifiable sens'the \n glican Church and the re suit will be a fuller freedom religious and political for the o lative to the attendance of Anglicans at non Anglic;,, 1 places of worship. I do not propose to answer eilhpr, for I consider them both Unreasonableand uni haritable from the Anglican standpoint. II we are sincere, we must have the <• mage of our 1 onvictions. and so I would ask your correspondents to o I Vt us the credit of acting up" to our principles. 1, I would invite von to read the prefaces to (|, e |'. (U ,|of Commoo Prayer and its Ordinal. 2, To examine the A postles Creed, Nicene Creed and Anthanasian Cre< d 3, To read theclausein the Litany concerning ";il| f,.,| s ,. doctrine, heresy and schism/" 4, To consult the Ordinal in which everv Priesi promises"lo drive awayand banish allerronoousand strange do,trine contrary to COD'S Word ,, To remind you that Anglican Priests may not lake erv, m part in non Anglican ces. 6, that Non-Anglican Mir isters may not officiate Anglican Churches. 7. Tl.at the Anglican Church has its Calendar and that it does not contain "Empi re Sunday." National occasions are duly noted and assimil ated into the Churches teach 11 t



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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1916, Jt % ing ol the season, e.g. as on Sunday last. 6, I'm: Above show to what Anglic msare committed Hm before concluding, 1 would ,;•.. your i oi respondents wlie liter the facts staled in theii communications can be sub' sianilated? II iviug enquired into (tie matter, this is how affairs staud; — The Anglican Girl Guides were told what were their obligations ;is Anglicans and re minded of the principles ol the Church to which they be luugedaud 11 was left to their CO.s'SCII&NCES as to what course they would follow. riiere were no I'll UK A I'Sas to what would happen if they did not act upon the precepts given. limpire Day is*a glorious institution, but it would be a great pity if "Empire Sunday" Was to mar that for whic i EUPlKE l>AY stands Let the Church and the Dc nominations have their seve ril commemmorations ol the, day. I do n"t wisli to disregard the ion-. :ie iti ius scruples o| those who do not ace pi the tenets of the Anglican Church, nor do 1 except that they will agree with oui for mu Varies, Mil ask i^ fair play and thai there may be neu tral toleration and that each should respect each others principles. Yours faithfully PRO ECCLESIA ET PATRIA. \ meeting lor the Keel Cross was held <>n Empire Day in the "'.Gospel Mission" when the children <->f Hope Town snug and ii hed patriotic pieces be hue the Commissioner and most of i he leading people of the Set tl-ment. The men were asked l<> make walking sticks for the wmi uled soldiers and ihe child i en leaditv agreed to cut up paper and cloth for filling cushions fol the hospitals, etc. The Comniissionei gavel %  < ipeeCh and ihe enj<\ sil I" e\ eu irtg ended with the sn-uimj of the National Anthem A codec lion of One l'ound nnd sis -apence Cross. was taken for the Ued THANKSGIVING SERVICE of the 1.0. of G. S. &D.of S. Thanksgiving Day the 28th iost., was observed by the following Lodges in the City:— Hope of Bahamas No. 1. I.ilv ol Bahamas No. 2.star of Hope No. 3 Star of East No, 4. Star of Bethlehem Juvenile Class N. I. by holding a Religious service in the G. S Hall (Nassau Court). The service was conducted by the Rev. Brother A. C. Svm mett R. W. G. T. His text w is taken froma.Cron Icles 7th. Chapter and latter part of the 12th. verse: I have heard thy prayer, and have chosen this place to Myself for an house of sacrifice." The sermon was very ap propiate. The lesson was read bv Brother N. A. White K. W. P. G. C. Luke 10,25 37. The Hall was filled to its capacity with members and i friends of the Order. Among the latter were: 'Messrs Samuel II Tinker and Wilton Butler, M. of G W. (). ol o r. The music w is given by M >,ss Herbert Roberts, M thur Diggia', I''red Taylor, Mugene Roberts and Richard K'i i.vh's, members' of the Police Constahu! iry Band, was higlv appreciated. At th 'clos • of the meeting till National \11tl1e1n was sung. (God save she King). Nassau, N. P.. June itt. 1916. DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE RED CROSS FUND ( ', inp 1 Mission I lope Town Empire Dav collection, £\ 06 RF.DCROSs MEETING AT HOPE TOWN \ ISA CO. W. KENDRICK, Hope Town, Abaco. Green Turtle C iy, May 26th iqiG, To Editor ol 11 ibui'.e. Sir, Will you kindly allow me space 111 \ouf valuable columns to tell how we cele brated and enj >yed "Empire Day." At 7.jo AM ihe s I100J children were taken in school and marched at 7.50, to Public >quare with cornet playing and pupils singing "Hall a million men are wanted." I'here in conjunction with the Boy Seoul*, at 8 o'clock while the Bags were hoisted bjth Oil public and School stalTs they were saluted|by singing I* lag of Ihi tain, The National Anthem, k'ule Britania, Red White & Blue ere, were sung and both Scouts and pupils were inarched around the town With band playing. At .5P.M. both Scouts and pupils were again assembled and Dearly every inhabitant. Mr. II. (i Higgsour teacher gave a very impressive and instructive lecture 011 "The Union and Titles of our King." The Commissioner L. II. McKinney then gave a few appropriate remarks, and read a story of a Russian reservist hero, which touched the hearts of all. In fact the assembly was so moved that a subscription list was secretly started to aid the Boys Scouts and before being opened two hours the sutnjol £"140 was raised. The National Arfthem was again sung. Three cheers each for King and Empire were called for by the Commissioner and was heartily responded to by all. All expressed their satisfaction .".ml were pleased. Tinrest of the evening was given to enjoyment. Yours sincerely. GILBERT G. MONCIIR. Monitor. leatrice Johnson, Rebecca Johnson and Manna Clarke — I )istui bingthe peace by loud t-houting and quarrelling in sight and hearing of persons in Augusta St.— The charge against Beatrice was dismissed. Rebecca and Mnnna each lined 14s. In default of payment each to be imprisoned for the space of 10 (lavs. William Owens—U sing language in public St. to wards \.nna Scavel'.a tending to a breach of the peace — Dismissed. lilancHe Johnson —Breach Compulsory Education Act — Fined 2s. Alfred Scavella—Do. is Rosa Saunders—Do.— By COnsenl of Defendant, the (ii irdian, the boy was ordered to re -eive 4 trokes of the I amarind rod to be administered bv a Constable above t lie rank of [11 ivale. :o: WELL CURED! A d 1 "tor met a man and said: I ><> VOU teineiiibei Jinks'" "YeS,"' answered the in in; "I remember .lines very well." "I cured him," said the doctor. "You (aired him?" .. isped the man. "Why, Jinks is dead!" "Ah," said the doctor, "but he died cured monl, 11r.11 Vaux, and north of Le Moii Itomme. It is also worthy of note that all of these attacks gained ground, ihe gain extending over a mile of froot. In fact, the Klin winch the French recorded having made last week was the greatest gain that hat heen made since the salient at Hethincourt wai snuffed out. It is merely an indication of what the French might do if ihey considered ihe sacrifice of men worthwhile. But they do not seem sufficiently worHed about the outcome of Verdun to l>r forced intoao attack where a great sacrifice would be mvolv ed. The French offensive occupied all of one week. I'he Germans were either testing 01 bringing up ammunition for a new assault, be cause they attempted nothing. The new assault broke out early in the past and equaled, if it did not sur pass in intensity ( the fiercest fight spect to numbers. In fact, the) knout it almost certainly. I lie Germans have published man) casualty lists in which the nuni bers of dead, wounded, and ling appear. From this the proportions can be readily fig ured The French know how mainprisoners are in the hands "f tie Allies. The rest is easy. The) know also their own num hers and those of their allies, and from this knowledge appre ciate much more deeply than is the case with a neutral whose only figures are estimates what losses mean to Germany's cause. The whole thing is an excellent indication that there is %  strong probability of truth in the claim so often made by military critics in this country, that German numbers are truly fading and that the Verdun „,„,,,.,, ^ t ^ seen ,„ |le fighting vns inaugurated to Verdun sector. It was directed at take advantage of the time atIbut one point, Hill 304, thtdomi. which these numbers were at Inat ing point of the Goose Crest on their maximum. As time pass-It he west side of the river. The —:o: — POLICE COURT NEWS. 22. Timothy Bain—Found drunk in Meeting St.—Fined a j. Harold Higgs -One llartman Gibson maliciously did wound -Sentenced to receive I2 8trok< s of thTamarind rod to be administered bv a COn! 'able above the rank of pn\ Miriam BtlOB \ssaulting and beating one Ellen Bri< e —Sentenced to 14 days imprisonment. (Continued from 1st page) out of a position, there r,u\ he no doubt that the French could have held the Germans back in the advanced line for week*. Thenis no other deduction of which the situation is Capable than that the object ol the Fr< nch is purely and simply to make the Germans pay the highest possible price for every thing Ihey take. If this is not BO, the %  reach would seem to be conducting their operations about Verdun without rhyme, reason, or plan. Such an as sumption is, of course, ridicu lous. Consider, in this light, the French defense since the begin niug. Except for the fust two da)S of the attack, the Fre.ich have retired, if at all, very Slowlv, or have been content to remain entirely on the defen sive. I'here has hern a complete absence of counterattacks, ex Cepl at such limes and in such localities as distinctly menaced some important position I In y have never made any consistent effort to regain Ihe ground which they had lost. Invariab lv their retirement has heen slow, careful, and deliberate, with a stubborn resistance at chosen points Counterattai ks have heen made at Avocourt to regain the redoubt aear the southern edge of the woods; at Vaux, when a further success would threaten the plateau on which the old fort is situated; at Douaumont, when the pla lean of that name was threaten cd ; at Le Moil I lommC and at Hill 304, because of the impor tanee of those positions to the maintenance of the line's con tinuity. In each case the coun teraltacks were successful, b were not pushed beyond th point where the French had ; tained the particular object hand. \nd \ si there hrs bee stant superiority in No other deduction than that the 1 simply one of They know with fa the German situati es, and the Germans are no nearer their goal, the entire conception of the battle of Verdun seems to have been a ter rible blunder on the part of the German higher command. N T ot neonweeks must elapse before we can tell whether this is real lv true. One more point before I take up the week's operations in detail It is apparent that the reports issued from Germany are not as trustworthy as those which were given out a year ago. There have heen several examples bf this in the last fewweeks, one of which have In nch held ihe summit and all of the northern slopes down lu the font. The Germans, giving up the effort to tone the fall ;>f this post tion by driving in between it and I e Mat I lorn me and flanking the French out directed their attack headlong against the slopes. Seven different assaults were made on tins position during the week. They have been successful in a certain measure, m that they have trained ground. The Germans claim in have reached the summit, %  In view of the "errors' 1 not! d above 1 n the German claims, ii is ex reniely doubtful. Mi re truthful, probably, is the French adn.ission which allows Germany .1 Mietch of trenches on the uoribern and commented upon in former renortheastern slopes of the hill. views, 1U way of illustration, I will mention several of the mote important errors that have come to mv attention : Early in the fighting Beilin announced that the Plateau of Douaumont was in German ( me thing in connection w ith tins latest phase of the attack is worth watching, and thai is the unusually narrow front •< lei ted by the Germans for lhair thrust, I low many men took part in the attack is not definitely stated, but it seems lh.it at hast three division'., hands. It has never been held about 60,000 men were engaged, bv the Germans since the battle j The entire front of operations was began. Somewhat later a report was issued that the village and fort of Vaux had been taken. The Germans were for a short time in possession of the village, but they have never yet reached the plateau of the fort. Early in April Berlin announ ced 'he caoture of Le Mort in t over a UIIIP and .1 half And yet the gain was insign ficant, — The New York Times. ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL. Meeting St. The Rev. G. A. Thompson, S. T. I). Pastor. Tomorrow 11 a 111. Sermon by Rev. /.. Cam Horn me. There has been pub I bridge. 3.30 p.m. Ordination of lished in an American magazine Consecration. 730 p.m. Sermon an article written bv a German, by Local preacher Hart of Old who tells how the Germans Might, Cat Isld. Good music; captured this hill and the ad extra sea's. The Public are 1 or vantage it will be in future! operations. I e Mort Horn me ballv in\ ited ilia is still where it was on Feb. 21 —in French han Is, Services in Seventh I >av Ad ventist chapel on Bast Shirley Unofficially, or. to be more Street at 7.30 o'clock Sunday correct, semi officially, it is stated that behind die lines in the Verdun area 100,000 < ler mans are confronted bv So 1.000 French. This statement is BO ridiculous as to nerd no com ment. The Cologne Gazette annight June ph. to which all are invited. Subject,—"Is This Ihe bast Generation That Will Live on Earth ?" Patriotic Concert. ,C 1 IMS I STING ol some of the meed in the latter part of \^ most famous Canadian March that the French paper]Songs etc., will be given in 5. Ilomme Fnchaine had been AGNKS' School-room on Tues suppressed for announcing the day evening, 13th June. fall of Verdun, which for poii-i rhe Police band will be in I tical reasons the French desir attendance. ed to conceal. Mocommentil Proceeds in aid of Rahamas necessarv on this kind of busi Red Cross Fund. ness. Each must draw Ins own Doors open at 7.30 p.m..com conclusion. The indications nU n ce at 8 1 5 p.m. are that something is wrong in Tickets is. and is. 6. Ihr ralaia^BsAetwecn the Ger CUITION: — Please secure vour authorities and bine. \t least nts food for tickets in Rood time so that vour SSa1 may be reserved. \ DESTOUP Managen mt el \mara ————————-———^—— Srtance thai "T"*HIS is to inform my Patrons it anv refer 1 nc thai I have opened my Public how lyto d< id the Public in General openec Mack Smith Shop, and am now V



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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1 W •DRINK-. Welch's Grape juice. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. \ finis, 9d. 8s. 6d. pei do*. \ Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. h BLACK'S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen On. Hotel Colonial. Heat -Eat It's Great Royal Scarlet Beef Stew 6d. per tin For Washing up, after Kirkman's Borax Soap 12oz. for 3d. At The New York House LOGWOOD SISAL R.J. BOWE Commission Merchant (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Logwood sold al a| p. c. according to quantity Sisal sold .it i} p. e. according to quantity Prompt and careful attention given to all consignments Offices:—5J2 Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Near City Market. STOCK PRODUCE Shingl lUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Bi per 1000. No better grade than these <>fl iBaillfi" Cypress at 3JS. per 1000. Thisi "Elgin >> an, ARROW COLLAR Made of a fine white Moire Madras—an attractive novelty that is in good form. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT. PHABODY & CO.. lac. MAKEKS. TROY. N. Y. U.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE. Exclusive Agent. An //* For th '" H| lt h Grade Sol"' "-Hr ZZ/b WRIST WATCH, GUA on c or $5.30 is .1 t-uw PHM for ihi* Sup A — erl< r Solid Silvor WRIsf WAiCl. Br tith (1 ivernment Btamped II | JEWEL ->. Lorai M 1 ea 1 accurate!) : In TMMtlOlia. \\.I approved t<> Km 111 tin KAI (sfactloii I.) Mvere V luoiir iiwii M> ik IK pi Hi a it i.tir w ibr wAic.i Ul rk*i T .-Ml til r JVE YEARS' BIDIN0 UUARANIKL %  protect yoa stainm 1 1 il< (.-, rial and work 111*11 -hit I" I I) >th ft. rang and iiui od appearanoe, 1 u-hahltttmektH wr, 1 l r in good runiiin. 1 with Solid Silver BUCK la. I U Kngland tud fi iquenlly TH i-i-. uy -. 1. IBIS watch nt Mich a Low I'rlre %  favourable oontraota with the nuiwha orh on a v.-ry ima 1 iminfin of p.oiit. our %  reap the In in lii lluv WrtlST WATCH refu >. 1 n, and re turn 1 our .> %  H %  number ol 1 fonnd Oi* in t 1 tlifa 'toi f. Illu1 It %  -<• 22 6or Jl. N itch In Solid Nickel il >l an id. p I Ti""v7JEWKL in 1 fully war ran ltd for FiVK Years. iiutliy pigskin strap, iienta' itae only. 1401 txtl I u"iin o ui Dial. Time can In anen 00 darkest tory,4> #1 taji axtra, PO&TAG 1 inplreld. (lc). r< lid. ilra. US.l ONIAL (uiiMillcitedi rervivrd from 1 1 Ki: 1.. 1 'i Chew l Feb I urch teed mvwaU'li from vn, N hie nlxty rears igo and tmve always found it 10ban teener during the whole of the sixty years thai I have caroled It. -1 • d I. r Kixo. =end P'ST CARD for Catalogue of Walohaa, Kmintaln %  Lrtfcl*-*. 1 inej Good ic.esc ft I von 11 1'i-nny ait<' ni'v aavt fOU Pounds. We guarantee (he ssva dltvrrv of all our sjoods ourinu thi* Wr sh u in) -li. w.undii %  < i 1 1., < n %  %  %  %  forlU'fn-nce. Bankers: Iondn <'it* an %  itid lUn k. It... iHTorn % % %  •. % %  P.. •*•,.! 1 FEARS LTD. () w •a"^ r S!SKS, m, 810 RRIRTOL RRIDOK. BR STOL. Int. T Keeping Guard HERB are responsibilities thatevery patriotic citizen must bear in this season ol national peril, othei than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these is preserving the balance of tradi -THESHOE 14 STORE on guard, and in spile of the advatu ng price of leather ana the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing tlie largest order of iis history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan i With these reinforcements he Big Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices oil its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar kets abroad. G. T. KNOWLES, rop. Big4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) H. T. LiRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE: VVet Side Big Sponge Exchange Nassau, N. P. Bahamas. AGENT HORSES >] B SHEEP CATTLE sfljr POULTRY SPONQE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products BATHTUBS v+"** S J % % % %  • '**'• %  and Bath Room Fixtures Cleaned .-" srin Half • \ the 7<--' '-* % -W^^A Ok iase D, rt To the free and independent elector of the district 0/ Long Cay, Crooked Island, and Acklifts. Gentlemen: — Through the death of the Hon. H. F. Armbrister you will soon be called upon to elect another represents tiv for your district. Because of the ties and associations that bind me towards the people I beg to pfferas a candidate, should be.so honoured as to be re turned asyour representative, shall always'do m v best to ^ily fill the position, ever, for the people. .E. II WILLIAMS. use in Large Sitysr Can \£ith Full Dinttion* .SWmimVK* -<. To bo had at all Grocers C. L. LofthOUSe-Company's Agent i*ar.v; LOGWOOD T HE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what ever the market price is H. J. CLARIDGE Bast U-y St, Nassau The Tribune, for Modern Printing



PAGE 1

LATEST RADIOGRAMS v fthtttw Nulllua tddliiui lurir. in verb* mrvwietrl Balrtg bound to ewee.r to lhe> Dogma.* ol no NuMr. Vol. XIII. No. I6S NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JUNE V 1916 Prico. THREE CENTS Why Germans Have Persisted In Verdun Battle. T ill', world IS at• loss 1" tin'] a IhoioughU satislactoiy iraM>n for llie persistence of tlie Germans ill forcing llie fighting about Verdun. !• the world it lias seemed as if the Gei mans had heen ileleated in this battle lODfj ago. Two months have passed since a (jerinan gain of any impoi tance has bitn chronicled In that time there have been many heavv attacks, prepared by artillery fire and de-livered by infantry in their final stage, but all .have shattered themselves against the wall of the franch defense. The Ger man losses have continued to be heavy, indisputably heavier than those of the French, yet the attacks continue. It is no wonder that the neutral world looks on in amazement and asks why. There are undoubtedly political reasons What these might be were mentioned in the first of these reviews deal ing with the German offensive. It is needless to repeat them, but it might be said that the most potent seems to be the ne cessity at home for a justification of the military existenceof the Crown Prince, augmenled now by %  justification for the many thousands of German lives he has sacrificed in the Verdun fighting HadtheGer mans, in accordance with their original hopes and expectations, taken Verdun in the first two weeks of the fighting and thrown the French back to the Meuse Kiver from the Argonne to the Vosges Mountains, they would have accomplished some thing that might well be cal culated to have revived the waning belief in the irresistatle power of the German Army. It would have echoed throughout the world, both neutral and bel ligerent, where the ancient glamour which surrounds the ide-t of the French fortress still exists. It would have been a se rious blow to the French, not onlv in their pridf, which isde servedly great, but in actual loss of men and material. The crossing of a river like the Meuse, with the attendant congestion of bridges and road wavs. subject alwavs to the fire of the German artillery, would have cost the French heavily. Hut the oroblem during ihe first two weeks was a simple < %  • ^.O^S%  ev-T <• By a Military Expert. theie is the belief that the\ have successfully lesisitd the leinlic battering of the very best that Germany had to produce for a period >f at least two months without wavering. All the elan, the high morale is now with the French This is an impor taut element in considering the military fitness ol any army, just as it is in any walk o( life. We can do and generally do those things which we believe we can do. If anything happens to shake that belief, our efficien cy dissipates in the degree that our confidence is lost. Again, there is the question of shell. No commercial or manufacturing people in the world today, no matter how well organized or how efficient they may be, can manufacture shell at the rate they are consumedin a modern battle. It is estimated, for example, that two batteries of French 75 mili meter guns can use up in one day the output of 5,000 men for a week At no battle or series of battles yet fought has artillery been used so lavishly as in the battle of Verdun The de pletion of shell, therefore, is a serious matter to any side con templating an offensive this year. This is said to be one of the German objects in project, ing and in prolonging this bat tie. If so, the chances are that they have so far been successful. It will be most unexpected and surprising if the French are found to have enough shell to launch an attack this year of any great extent. They had na turally a great reserve when the battle started and are manu facturing at tha estimated rate of about 250,000 a day of all j calibres. But in two days ; fighting in Loos and in tht j Champagne they used upnearly 12,000,000. How many they have used since Feb. 21 no one j knows, or could even approxiI mate. The Germans, too, will I be handicapped for the same 1 reason It is' probable that their reserve supply, in spite of all the offensive work they have done, was greater than was that of the French. Rut their ex penditure particularly of heavy shell, has been much more lav ish. The French apparently have not used as great a portion of heavy shell, in this battle as j the Germans have, principally for the reason that there has been no such necessity. The Germans have had to pound to pieces and ruin intrenrhments, 1 the French have had to disable men. The Germans, problem was to make every shelter held by the French a shelter no longer by blasting it; the French problem was to put out of ac tion as many as possible of the men who were coming forward. The former requires heavy ar tillery, the latter quick bring light artillery and machine guns. To return to the military rea sons why the German attack is still continuing alter what seems to have been already a defeat, we must look at Verdun in its relation to the entire line from N leu port to the Swiss frontier. Suppose the French were to launch a successful of fensive from Verdun, what would then be the German sit uation ? The battle line from Nieuport to Verdun is a huge semicircle, an enormous salient, the apex ol which, if we may speak of any geometrical figure so rounded as having an apex, is at Soissans. Looking at the battle li/ie in this light, ltt u s jsee what Verdun does. In the first place it thr atens OIIP of the great arteries on which the Germans place a g.eat deal of dependence—the line through Metz. More par ticularly 111 its relation to the salient, it threatens the line through Luxemburg. If the Fiench were to start an often si\e along the chord connect ing Verdun with Nieuport, the first thing that would happen in the event of a success would be the cutting of the German line of communications, and the consequent retirement of a great part of their western front This is so obvious a clanger that it needs no dilation. .4 glance at the map will show the whole thing. For this reason the existence of the Verdun sali ent, with the French holding the eastern bank of the river, is a threat which the Germans cannot ignore. If the Verdun area could be taken and the French line forced to move back from the Argonne to St. Mihiel — an unqualified possibility if Verdun falls— theGermans pnai tion would be very much bet tered. The French could hard Iv attack from this quarter at all, owing to the difficulty of crossing such a srteam as the Meuse, where they would be under the concentrated fire of German artillery skillfully post ed on the heights of the opposit bank By the rapture of the pa the Germans would pai trol of the entire rive At C/77L A TED would make a French offensive not only from Verdun but from any point along the river an improbable occurence. There is here, then, a reason why the Germans place, orsecm to place such a high value on the Verdun area. There is also an ap. parent though not an evident reason whv the French are will ing to make such an effort to hold it. Hut there is more to it than this—the character of the French defense, in their plan of battle. The combined English and French armies oil the Continent greatly outnumber those of the Germans. This, of course, is generally admitted. The French therefore, are able, should they see fit. to concentrate a much greater force in the Verdun a tea than the Germans can confront them with. Therefore, if the French had any idea of using Verdun as a point from which to launch an offensive later on, their fight would have been an entirely different one. They would never have permitted the Germans to drive them back from the outlying positions, had they been willing to sacrifice the men to hold their ground. The strength of the modern de fensive is admitted. The sirpe riority in numbers cannot be denied. The French artillery is equal, and. if we consider the light field artillery, superior to that of the Germans. In quality their individual soldiers are just as good, even if they can not be driven like the Germans. By counterattacking them from the very beginning, wherever they were thrown temporarily (Continued on 4th fagt.) A O attempt to provide a correct system for the progressive feeding of Infants was ever successfully carried out until the 'Allcnburys' series of Infants* Foods were introduced. So successful have the'Allcnburys' Foods Nos. I, 2 and 3 proved, that whenever a child is denied the privilege of the mother's milk they are Indispensable, Gratifying evidence of their remarkable value in the feeding of infants from birth is constantly coming to hand. The following is a copy of one of many such voluntary letters received from Medical MeO, Nurses and Parents resident in nearly all parts of the world. A pg WRITES; "I am pleased to say I have used your Foods I Z and 1 for IB* leal twenty year* and have found none better. The most delicate baby ever born I nursed and reared on the Foods until he was 3 years old, and now he Is 18 YEARS, and a strong healthy boy nearly 6 feet high and as rosy as an apple. You can make whatever use you like or this as I should like your Foo

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02611
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, June 03, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
v
fthtttw
Nulllua tddliiui lurir. in verb* mrvwietrl
Balrtg bound to ewee.r to lhe> Dogma.* ol no NuMr.
Vol. XIII. No. I6S
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JUNE V 1916
Prico. THREE CENTS
Why Germans Have Persisted
In Verdun Battle.
Till', world IS at loss 1" tin']
a IhoioughU satislactoiy
iraM>n for llie persistence of tlie
Germans ill forcing llie fighting
about Verdun. ! the world
it lias seemed as if the Gei mans
had heen ileleated in this battle
lODfj ago. Two months have
passed since a (jerinan gain of
any impoi tance has bitn chron-
icled In that time there have
been many heavv attacks, pre-
pared by artillery fire and de--
livered by infantry in their final
stage, but all .have shattered
themselves against the wall of
the franch defense. The Ger
man losses have continued to be
heavy, indisputably heavier
than those of the French, yet
the attacks continue. It is no
wonder that the neutral world
looks on in amazement and asks
why.
There are undoubtedly poli-
tical reasons What these
might be were mentioned in
the first of these reviews deal
ing with the German offensive.
It is needless to repeat them,
but it might be said that the
most potent seems to be the ne
cessity at home for a justifica-
tion of the military existenceof
the Crown Prince, augmenled
now by justification for the
many thousands of German
lives he has sacrificed in the
Verdun fighting HadtheGer
mans, in accordance with their
original hopes and expectations,
taken Verdun in the first two
weeks of the fighting and
thrown the French back to the
Meuse Kiver from the Argonne
to the Vosges Mountains, they
would have accomplished some
thing that might well be cal
culated to have revived the
waning belief in the irresistatle
power of the German Army. It
would have echoed throughout
the world, both neutral and bel
ligerent, where the ancient
glamour which surrounds the
ide-t of the French fortress still
exists. It would have been a se
rious blow to the French, not
onlv in their pridf, which isde
servedly great, but in actual
loss of men and material.
The crossing of a river like
the Meuse, with the attendant
congestion of bridges and road
wavs. subject alwavs to the fire
of the German artillery, would
have cost the French heavily.
Hut the oroblem during ihe first
two weeks was a simple what It is now. In the first
place, 'he French have caught
their breath; the moral effect of
the retreat of the first few days
has been dissipated, and instead
i/SNSOva/S*".******** >< ^.O^S- ev-T <
By a Military Expert.
theie is the belief that the\ have
successfully lesisitd the leinlic
battering of the very best that
Germany had to produce for a
period >f at least two months
without wavering. All the elan,
the high morale is now with
the French This is an impor
taut element in considering the
military fitness ol any army,
just as it is in any walk o( life.
We can do and generally do
those things which we believe
we can do. If anything happens
to shake that belief, our efficien
cy dissipates in the degree that
our confidence is lost.
Again, there is the question
of shell. No commercial or
manufacturing people in the
world today, no matter how
well organized or how efficient
they may be, can manufacture
shell at the rate they are con-
sumed- in a modern battle. It is
estimated, for example, that
two batteries of French 75 mili
meter guns can use up in one
day the output of 5,000 men for
a week At no battle or series
of battles yet fought has artil-
lery been used so lavishly as in
the battle of Verdun The de
pletion of shell, therefore, is a
serious matter to any side con
templating an offensive this
year. This is said to be one of
the German objects in project,
ing and in prolonging this bat
tie. If so, the chances are that
they have so far been successful.
It will be most unexpected
and surprising if the French are
found to have enough shell to
launch an attack this year of
any great extent. They had na
turally a great reserve when the
battle started and are manu
facturing at tha estimated rate
of about 250,000 a day of all
j calibres. But in two days
; fighting in Loos and in tht
j Champagne they used upnearly
12,000,000. How many they
have used since Feb. 21 no one
j knows, or could even approxi-
I mate. The Germans, too, will
I be handicapped for the same
1 reason It is' probable that
' their reserve supply, in spite of
all the offensive work they have
done, was greater than was that
of the French. Rut their ex
penditure particularly of heavy
shell, has been much more lav
ish. The French apparently
have not used as great a portion
of heavy shell, in this battle as
j the Germans have, principally
for the reason that there has
been no such necessity. The
Germans have had to pound to
pieces and ruin intrenrhments,
1 the French have had to disable
men. The Germans, problem
was to make every shelter held
by the French a shelter no long-
er by blasting it; the French
problem was to put out of ac
tion as many as possible of the
men who were coming forward.
The former requires heavy ar
tillery, the latter quick bring
light artillery and machine guns.
To return to the military rea
sons why the German attack is
still continuing alter what
seems to have been already a
defeat, we must look at Verdun
in its relation to the entire line
from N leu port to the Swiss
frontier. Suppose the French
were to launch a successful of
fensive from Verdun, what
would then be the German sit
uation ? The battle line from
Nieuport to Verdun is a huge
semicircle, an enormous salient,
the apex ol which, if we may
speak of any geometrical figure
so rounded as having an apex,
is at Soissans. Looking at the
battle li/ie in this light, ltt us
jsee what Verdun does.
In the first place it thr atens
oiip of the great arteries on
which the Germans place a
g.eat deal of dependencethe
line through Metz. More par
ticularly 111 its relation to the
salient, it threatens the line
through Luxemburg. If the
Fiench were to start an often
si\e along the chord connect
ing Verdun with Nieuport, the
first thing that would happen
in the event of a success would
be the cutting of the German
line of communications, and the
consequent retirement of a great
part of their western front
This is so obvious a clanger that
it needs no dilation. .4 glance
at the map will show the
whole thing. For this reason
the existence of the Verdun sali
ent, with the French holding
the eastern bank of the river, is
a threat which the Germans
cannot ignore. If the Verdun
area could be taken and the
French line forced to move back
from the Argonne to St. Mihiel
an unqualified possibility if
Verdun falls theGermans pnai
tion would be very much bet
tered. The French could hard
Iv attack from this quarter at
all, owing to the difficulty of
crossing such a srteam as the
Meuse, where they would be
under the concentrated fire of
German artillery skillfully post
ed on the heights of the opposit
bank
By the rapture of the pa
the Germans would pai
trol of the entire rive
At C/77L A TED
would make a French offensive
not only from Verdun but from
any point along the river an
improbable occurence. There
is here, then, a reason why the
Germans place, orsecm to place
such a high value on the Ver-
dun area. There is also an ap.
parent though not an evident
reason whv the French are will
ing to make such an effort to
hold it. Hut there is more to it
than thisthe character of the
French defense, in their plan of
battle.
The combined English and
French armies oil the Continent
greatly outnumber those of the
Germans. This, of course, is
generally admitted. The French
therefore, are able, should they
see fit. to concentrate a much
greater force in the Verdun a tea
than the Germans can confront
them with. Therefore, if the
French had any idea of using
Verdun as a point from which
to launch an offensive later on,
their fight would have been an
entirely different one. They
would never have permitted the
Germans to drive them back
from the outlying positions, had
they been willing to sacrifice
the men to hold their ground.
The strength of the modern de
fensive is admitted. The sirpe
riority in numbers cannot be
denied. The French artillery
is equal, and. if we consider the
light field artillery, superior to
that of the Germans. In quality
their individual soldiers are
just as good, even if they can
not be driven like the Germans.
By counterattacking them from
the very beginning, wherever
they were thrown temporarily
(Continued on 4th fagt.)
A
O attempt to provide a
correct system for the
progressive feeding of
Infants was ever success-
fully carried out until the
'Allcnburys' series of Infants*
Foods were introduced. So
successful have the'Allcnburys'
Foods Nos. I, 2 and 3 proved,
that whenever a child is denied
the privilege of the mother's
milk they are Indispensable, Gratifying
evidence of their remarkable value in the
feeding of infants from birth is constantly
coming to hand. The following is a copy of
one of many such voluntary letters received
from Medical MeO, Nurses and Parents
resident in nearly all parts of the world.
A pg WRITES;
"I am pleased to say I have used your Foods I Z and 1 for IB*
leal twenty year* and have found none better. The
most delicate baby ever born I nursed and reared on the
Foods until he was 3 years old, and now he Is 18 YEARS, and
a strong healthy boy nearly 6 feet high and as rosy as an
apple. You can make whatever use you like or this as I
should like your Foo future, as Inslea'd of ranking fot alone they make
bone and muscle, which Is what children need."
(Signed* NURSE DAVIK.
The r'ctiel re,ul" ,,om "mtinua'ly .xt-ndlng use of the
Allenburys- Foods, prove beyond doubt that chiidr n thrive excep-
tionally well on them. Such children are healthy and well grown; the
fleih is firm, without excess ol fat and the formation oi bone it solid.
The Best Alternative to Human Milk.
Mot fee- ear CMi. a. s)i awa-iai.
MILK FOOD No. 1
I rora 3 to 6 mnntha.
MAITED FOOD No. 3
r mm 6 montha upward
_ Allenburys* Rusks (Malted).
[addition t" bahr'e dietary when 10 month" old and After.
.uryi' Foods are made under special processes
ery, and are entirely untouched by hand.
KraejaooSTlirenrFerrfrno mnd Mafiaa-afal.
I valuable Informal/on '.orrvcrv moln-r.
ianburys Ltd.. London, EnfmneL
Eatabashss) 200 Years. A.Q, ;Uli
r-


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1916,


L. (Mt.BKUT DUl'UCH,
Editor and Proprietor
omoK
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sis
'-"". A'. /'., [Uhamas
HHONBSj* p. o. BOX IBS
Germans high seas ileet met'not uncommon of people
PUBLISHED DAILY
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A'lveilisciiienn un.I'M .i In llie, ,..
TOfe (Xvioune
Srvu,i lnv. Juno 3. 1916
Preliminary reports of what
seems to have been a really
important Naval. Enoa il
MENT.will be found in today's
cables. From the scanty de-
tail! to hand we gather that
the scouts of the fleet, cruisers
and destroyersencountered
and engaged an enemy Ileet.
The b.ntle does noi seem to
have lasted long, ah the main
Ileet did not arrive on the
scene before the lighting was
over, and the enemy's ships,
what was left of' them ',
safely back- in port. Our loss-'
es were heavy; but the report
demonstrates very clear! v
that the losses of the enemy
were far more serious. We
await further details with
great interest.
a superior British fleet on the
night of May jist and were
engaged in battle throughout
the night. Six capital British
ships were sunk and several
torpedo boats and battle
ships were damaged. The
British battleship Warspite
and the battle cruisers Queen
Mary, Indefatigable, two ar
moured cruisers and one
small cruiser were sunk.
I lie German losses includ
ed the cruisers Weisbaden
and I'ommern sunk and some
torpedo boats missing.
London:The admiralty
admits the loss of ships
claimed in German state
ment but claims large Ger
man losses.
London.The fighting a round
Verdun continues Heavv in
fan try attacks during the night
were ii*|)iilsed The French
claim giins South of Carrette
Wood. The principal righting
occurred between Thiaumunt
Farm and Vaux.
Radiograms
3rd June, 1916.
London, 2nd.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:On the
afternoon of May 31st there
was a naval engagement oil
Jutland. The brunt of the
fighting fell on the battle
cruiser Ileet with some
cruisers and light cruisers
supported by four battle
ships. The losses were
heavy.
The enemy aided by low
visibility avoided action and
returned to port after the
main fleet reached the scene.
The Battle cruisers Queen
Mary, Indefatigable, Invinci-
ble and the cruisers Defense
and Black Prince were sunk.|
The Warrior w is disabled
and abandoned. The des-
trovers Tippcrary, Turbulent,
Fortune, Sparrowhawk and
Ardent were lost. Six others
are not accounted for.
No British battleships or
light cruisers were sunk.
The enemvs losses were
serious. At least one battle
cruiser was destroyed, one
severely damaged and one
battleship reported sunk by
our destroyers during the
night attack. Two light
cruisers were disabled and
probably sunk.
The number of enemy des
troyers disposed of cannot be
ascertained but must be
large.
London June 3rd.
< i ivernor,
Bahamas.
Official News.- --Further re-
ports of the naval battle show-
that British losses in destroyers
totalled eight. One enemy
dreadnought was blown up by
British destroyers. Another be
lieved to have been sunk l>\
ue.lire. One German battle
cruiser was blown up, another
heavily engaged was seen dis
abled and stopping, a third
was seriously damaged.
One German light cruiser ami
six destroyers were sunk and h
least two light cruisers were
seen disabled. Repeated hits
were observed 0(1 three other
German battleships. A German
ubmariue was sunk.
ed)
.*AR LAW.
:o:
The Bill to provide for the
Co ituiion ftf a Volunteer
Force was thrown out by the
legislature on T h u r s d a \
thinking otherwise as is evi-
denced by the fact that the
sisal is sometimes sprinkled
with water while beiug pack-
ed, because it is too dry! The
margin of profit is too small
to admit of our merchants"
purchasing water, so they
have to carefully examine
every bale, and so those peo-
ple who dampen their sisal
instead of gaining weight,
often have to suffer the loss
of a few pounds instead.
Mr. A. L. Ilenhurn of 8 Niilc
Rocks, Grand Bahama, is leav
ing here to day for Ins home
per Mail Sen. Hazel Dell.
.0:
The Editor of "The Tribune"
His Excellency the Governor
has appointed the following
gentlemen to be Justices of the
Peace for the Bahama Islands
with effect from the 3rd June:
II. A. Brook Esq I S. O.
Edward George. Esq.
David Patron, Esq
Ernest S. McGregor, Rsq.
T K. D BRACE,
Actg. Colonial Secretary.
:o:
Dear Tribune,
One welcomes with regret
the occurrences of such inci-
dents as that reported to
have taken place on Empire
Sunday when the Girl Guides
of one denomination (there
may be those who take ex-
ception to the word) after
hospitably entertaining the
Girl Guides of other denom
mations at an Empire service
in one of their churches were
commanded by their superi-
ors, to insult those who had
been their guests by announ-
cing that they would not
contaminate themselves by-
partaking of a return of sucfi
spiritual hospitality. It was
only a charity entertainment,
it would seem, at which the
snobs played equality for an
hour or so with their con-
temptible infetiors and no
manifestation of a spirit of
66 MEN
Office of Recruiting Committee,
Nassau, 3rd June, 1916.
ARE required for the drafts for the
Bahamas Contingent Unit to the
end of the pieseut month.
Recruits will, on enlistment, be paid two shillings (2/ '
a day and will be supplied with uniform.
further information as regards duration of seivice, se
paration allowance, pension &c, will be gladly given hv the
Commandant at his office at the barracks on any da) between
the hours of 9 and 3 o'clock.
The schooner "Zdlars" has again left Jamaica for
Nassau and will in all probability he leaving f.>i Jamaica befoie
the end of the present mouth. The Recruiting Committee In pe
that sufficient men will come forward to make up the number
reciuired as above stated.
R. II. C CRAWFORD,
Chairman, Recruiting Committee.
One can be certain that at
Trinity Wesleyan church, no
matter who was conducting
the service, there was not any
possibility of the Guides re
ceiving whether from preach
members of that communion
and an impetus to the Em
pire's consolidation bv everv
member of the Empire and
section of its communities
valuing themselves and being
er, audience, or fellow guides, valued, not by their uniusti
such instruction in baseness liable assumption of excel
and such taint of spiritual lence but by worth, fame and
contamination as were im motive and efficiency ofser
parted by the contemptible vice.
self righteous ecclesiasticism I Let 11s pray, if we have
of the morning. (heart left for prayer, that the
I used the word welcomes other sections of the follow
at the beginning o! my letter ers of the stainless One may
and did so advisedly because he preserved from such dis
I think it a good thing to I Rusting selfishness, intolera
know where we are. The ble bigotry, and unworthy
Episcopal church talks of'want of patriotism.
union with other denomina I I hanking you for the space
tions, parades its desire for afforded
union, has done so in
little community even, I
night. Dr. Johnson pointed amity "r tolerance of their
out the advantages of thelexecrab,esPmtl,*,andsocia]
measure, and the opportuni-
ty it afforded us of linking
up with other parts of the
Empire, but his eloquence
was of no avail, the bill was
"dead and damned", as the
majority of the II..use had
already'made up their minds|?in(1 patriotism.
to vote against it. We hope Hie devilish
inferiority. At the end of
one short hour their seeming
unity fell to pieces, and the
splintered bits cut deep into
the hearts of thef victims of
ecclesiastical deception and
all sympathisers with honour
(Signed)
\R LAW
that their action was wise
and statesmanlike, but can
not help regret 1 ing that their
decision did not favour the
bill.
:o:
Large quantities of Sisal
are being shipped by the Out
Islands to Nassau.'Although
the price has dropped a little,
sisal is a "good proposition"
as it is always sure to find a
market, and is not likely to
fall much lower in price. A
correspondent in these CO
lumns recently pointed out
the ad van4 a},
proving clea
most reliabl
the most p
dustrits.
could on
the wisdc
cleaning
Sisal befl
meanness of
the proceeding is manifest
when we bear in mind that
the arrangements lor the day
had been completed on the
uaderstandingthat the whole
bodv of Guides would attend
a representative church of
one denomination in the
morning and a representative
church of another denomina
tion in the evening.
What treatment would
such mean trickery receive in
the most decadent society of
worldly degenerates?
Can the Church of Christ
sink so far below the world's
standards of honour without
being regarded as in this one
istance it deserves to be re
arded as a congregation <>f
evils, and if the world
ges of the Church's gener
esty hv its honesty in
well known instances
iis. which is quite
an one wonder that
brands the church
with the well de
such
this
but what that desire amounts
to we have the interpretation
of in the incident of Sunday:
last. Has the Episcopal:
church any desire for the'Dear Sir,
well-being of any other de I ["here have been two com
munications in your paper re
Yours truly
GRIEVED.
:o:
June. 3, 1916,
To the Editoi of the
TRIBUNE
>fh
vpoente.
nomination of the Church of
Christ? Sunday's uncODSCl
ous act of self revelation is
answer sufficient to all think
ing people.
Sunday's blunder is only a
symptom of a deep seated
disease from which the An
glican church is sick unto
death. When a man, because
of a supposedly unbroken
continuity of physical con
tact extending from the
apostles to his little sell
claims the title of priest and
for that reason arrogates to
himself the powers of a super-
God, irrespective of his pos
session of the most ordinal \
human qualities not to say
Christian virtues, it is natu
ral to expect that his dupe-
like himself will be grovell
ingly mean and even his
saintly women may be ex
pected to be false to their
better selves, their common
humanity and their country,
in the name of religion.
Such lamentable happen
ingsas that of Empire Sun
dav hasten the inevitable dav
when as has already happen
ed in our owri and other
portions of the Empire our
united Empire will insist on
removing the last legal claim
of a moiety of the people of
England to call themselves
in any justifiable sens'- the
\nglican Church and the re
suit will be a fuller freedom
religious and political for the
o
lative to the attendance of
Anglicans at non Anglic;,,1
places of worship. I do not
propose to answer eilhpr, for
I consider them both Unreas-
onableand uni haritable from
the Anglican standpoint.
II we are sincere, we must
have the < mage of our 1 on-
victions. and so I would ask
your correspondents to oIVt.
us the credit of acting up" to
our principles.
1, I would invite von to
read the prefaces to (|,e |'.(U,|-
of Commoo Prayer and its Or-
dinal.
2, To examine the A post-
les Creed, Nicene Creed and
Anthanasian Cre< d
3, To read theclausein the
Litany concerning ";il| f,.,|s,.
doctrine, heresy and schism/"
4, To consult the Ordinal
in which everv Priesi prom-
ises"lo drive awayand banish
allerronoousandstrange do,-
trine contrary to COD'S
Word
,, To remind you that An-
glican Priests may not
lake
erv,
m
part in non Anglican
ces.
6, that Non-Anglican Mir
isters may not officiate
Anglican Churches.
7. Tl.at the Anglican Church
has its Calendar and that it
does not contain "Empi re
Sunday." National occasions
are duly noted and assimil
ated into the Churches teach



11

t



The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1916,
Jt
?
ing ol the season, e.g. as on
Sunday last.
6, I'm: Above show to what
Anglic msare committed Hm
before concluding, 1 would
,;.. your i oi respondents wlie
liter the facts staled in theii
communications can be sub'
sianilated? II iviug enquired
into (tie matter, this is how
affairs staud;
The Anglican Girl Guides
were told what were their ob-
ligations ;is Anglicans and re
minded of the principles ol
the Church to which they be
luugedaud 11 was left to their
CO.s'SCII&NCES as to what
course they would follow.
riiere were no I'll UK A I'Sas
to what would happen if they
did not act upon the precepts
given.
limpire Day is*a glorious
institution, but it would be
a great pity if "Empire Sun-
day" Was to mar that for
whic i EUPlKE l>AY stands
Let the Church and the Dc
nominations have their seve
ril commemmorations ol the,
day.
I do n"t wisli to disregard
the ion-. :ie iti ius scruples
o| those who do not ace pi
the tenets of the Anglican
Church, nor do 1 except that
they will agree with oui for
mu Varies, Mil ask i^ fair play
and thai there may be neu
tral toleration and that each
should respect each others
principles.
Yours faithfully
Pro Ecclesia et Patria.
\ meeting lor the Keel Cross
was held <>n Empire Day in
the "'.Gospel Mission" when the
children <->f Hope Town snug
and ii-. hed patriotic pieces be
hue the Commissioner and most
of i he leading people of the Set
tl-ment.
The men were asked l<> make
walking sticks for the wmi uled
soldiers and ihe child i en leaditv
agreed to cut up paper and
cloth for filling cushions fol
the hospitals, etc.
The Comniissionei gavel <
ipeeCh and ihe enj<\ sil I" e\ eu
irtg ended with the sn-uimj of
the National Anthem A codec
lion of One l'ound nnd sis
-a-
pence
Cross.
was taken for the Ued
THANKSGIVING SERVICE
. of the
1.0. of G. S. &D.of S.
Thanksgiving Day the 28th
iost., was observed by the
following Lodges in the
City:
Hope of Bahamas No. 1.
I.ilv ol Bahamas No. 2.star
of Hope No. 3 Star of East
No, 4. Star of Bethlehem Ju-
venile Class N. I. by holding
a Religious service in the G.
S Hall (Nassau Court).
The service was conducted
by the Rev. Brother A. C.
Svm mett R. W. G. T. His
text w is taken froma.Cron
Icles 7th. Chapter and latter
part of the 12th. verse: I have
heard thy prayer, and have
chosen this place to Myself
for an house of sacrifice."
The sermon was very ap
propiate. The lesson was read
bv Brother N. A. White K.
W. P. G. C. Luke 10,25 37.
The Hall was filled to its
capacity with members and i
friends of the Order. Among
the latter were: 'Messrs Sam-
uel II Tinker and Wilton
Butler, M. of G W. (). ol
o r.
The music w is given by
M >,ss Herbert Roberts, M
thur Diggia', I''red Taylor,
Mugene Roberts and Richard
K'i i.vh's, members' of the
Police Constahu! iry Band,
was higlv appreciated.
At th 'clos of the meeting
till National \11tl1e1n was
sung. (God save she King).
Nassau, N. P..
June itt. 1916.
DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE RED
CROSS FUND
( ', inp 1 Mission I lope Town
Empire Dav collection, \ 06
RF.DCROSs MEETING AT
HOPE TOWN \ ISA CO.
W. KENDRICK,
Hope Town,
Abaco.
Green Turtle C iy,
May 26th iqiG,
To Editor ol 11 ibui'.e.
Sir,
Will you kindly allow
me space 111 \ouf valuable
columns to tell how we cele
brated and enj >yed "Empire
Day." At 7.jo AM ihe
s I100J children were taken
in school and marched at
7.50, to Public >quare with
cornet playing and pupils
singing "Hall a million men
are wanted."
I'here in conjunction with
the Boy Seoul*, at 8 o'clock
while the Bags were
hoisted bjth Oil public and
School stalTs they were salut-
ed|by singing I* lag of Ihi
tain, The National Anthem,
k'ule Britania, Red White &
Blue ere, were sung and both
Scouts and pupils were
inarched around the town
With band playing.
At .5- P.M. both Scouts and
pupils were again assembled
and Dearly every inhabitant.
Mr. II. (i Higgsour teach-
er gave a very impressive and
instructive lecture 011 "The
Union and Titles of our
King."
The Commissioner L. II.
McKinney then gave a few
appropriate remarks, and
read a story of a Russian re-
servist hero, which touched
the hearts of all.
In fact the assembly was
so moved that a subscription
list was secretly started to
aid the Boys Scouts and be-
fore being opened two hours
the sutnjol "140 was raised.
The National Arfthem was
again sung.
Three cheers each for King
and Empire were called for
by the Commissioner and
was heartily responded to by
all.
All expressed their satis-
faction .".ml were pleased.
Tin- rest of the evening
was given to enjoyment.
Yours sincerely.
GILBERT G. MONCIIR.
Monitor.
leatrice Johnson, Re-
becca Johnson and Manna
Clarke I )istui bingthe peace
by loud t-houting and quar-
relling in sight and hearing
of persons in Augusta St.
The charge against Beatrice
was dismissed. Rebecca and
Mnnna each lined 14s. In de-
fault of payment each to be
imprisoned for the space of
10 (lavs.
William OwensU sing
language in public St. to
wards \.nna Scavel'.a tending
to a breach of the peace
Dismissed.
lilancHe Johnson Breach
Compulsory Education Act
Fined 2s.
Alfred ScavellaDo. is
Rosa SaundersDo. By
COnsenl of Defendant, the
(ii irdian, the boy was order-
ed to re -eive 4 trokes of the
I amarind rod to be admin-
istered bv a Constable above
t lie rank of [11 ivale.
:o:
WELL CURED!
A d 1 "tor met a man and
said: I ><> VOU teineiiibei
Jinks'" "YeS,"' answered the
in in; "I remember .lines very
well." "I cured him," said
the doctor. "You (aired him?"
.. isped the man. "Why,
Jinks is dead!" "Ah," said
the doctor, "but he died cur-
ed "
monl, 11r.11 Vaux, and north of Le
Moii Itomme. It is also worthy
of note that all of these attacks
gained ground, ihe gain extending
over a mile of froot. In fact, the
Klin winch the French recorded
having made last week was the
greatest gain that hat heen made
since the salient at Hethincourt
wai snuffed out. It is merely an
indication of what the French
might do if ihey considered ihe
sacrifice of men worthwhile. But
they do not seem sufficiently wor-
Hed about the outcome of Verdun
to l>r forced intoao attack where
a great sacrifice would be mvolv
ed.
The French offensive occupied
all of one week. I'he Germans
were either testing 01 bringing up
ammunition for a new assault, be
cause they attempted nothing. The
new assault broke out early in the
past and equaled, if it did not sur
pass in intensity( the fiercest fight
spect to numbers. In fact, the)
knout it almost certainly. I lie
Germans have published man)
casualty lists in which the nuni
bers of dead, wounded, and
ling appear. From this the
proportions can be readily fig
ured The French know how
main- prisoners are in the hands
"f tie Allies. The rest is easy.
The) know also their own num
hers and those of their allies,
and from this knowledge appre
ciate much more deeply than
is the case with a neutral whose
only figures are estimates what
losses mean to Germany's cause.
The whole thing is an excel-
lent indication that there is
strong probability of truth in
the claim so often made by
military critics in this country,
that German numbers are truly
fading and that the Verdun ,,,,.,, ^ t ^ seen , ,|le
fighting vns inaugurated to Verdun sector. It was directed at
take advantage of the time atIbut one point, Hill 304, thtdomi.
which these numbers were at Inat ing point of the Goose Crest on
their maximum. As time pass-It he west side of the river. The
:o:
POLICE COURT NEWS.
22. Timothy BainFound
drunk in Meeting St.Fined
a j. Harold Higgs -One
llartman Gibson maliciously
did wound -Sentenced to re-
ceive I2 8trok< s of th- Tama-
rind rod to be administered
bv a COn! 'able above the
rank of pn\
Miriam BtlOB \ssaulting
and beating one Ellen Bri< e
Sentenced to 14 days im-
prisonment.
(Continued from 1st page)
out of a position, there r,u\ he
no doubt that the French could
have held the Germans back in
the advanced line for week*.
Then- is no other deduction
of which the situation is Capable
than that the object ol the
Fr< nch is purely and simply to
make the Germans pay the
highest possible price for every
thing Ihey take. If this is not
bo, the ! reach would seem to
be conducting their operations
about Verdun without rhyme,
reason, or plan. Such an as
sumption is, of course, ridicu
lous.
Consider, in this light, the
French defense since the begin
niug. Except for the fust two
da)S of the attack, the Fre.ich
have retired, if at all, very
Slowlv, or have been content to
remain entirely on the defen
sive. I'here has hern a complete
absence of counterattacks, ex
Cepl at such limes and in such
localities as distinctly menaced
some important position I In y
have never made any consistent
effort to regain Ihe ground
which they had lost. Invariab
lv their retirement has heen
slow, careful, and deliberate,
with a stubborn resistance at
chosen points Counterattai ks
have heen made at Avocourt to
regain the redoubt aear the
southern edge of the woods; at
Vaux, when a further success
would threaten the plateau on
which the old fort is situated;
at Douaumont, when the pla
lean of that name was threaten
cd ; at Le Moil I lommC and at
Hill 304, because of the impor
tanee of those positions to the
maintenance of the line's con
tinuity. In each case the coun
teraltacks were successful, b
were not pushed beyond th
point where the French had ;
tained the particular object
hand.
\nd \ si there hrs bee
stant superiority in
No other deduction
than that the
1 simply one of
They know with fa
the German situati
es, and the Germans are no
nearer their goal, the entire
conception of the battle of Ver-
dun seems to have been a ter
rible blunder on the part of the
German higher command. NTot
neon- weeks must elapse before
we can tell whether this is real
lv true.
One more point before I take
up the week's operations in de-
tail It is apparent that the
reports issued from Germany
are not as trustworthy as those
which were given out a year
ago. There have heen several
examples bf this in the last few-
weeks, one of which have
In nch held ihe summit and all of
the northern slopes down lu the
font. The Germans, giving up the
effort to tone the fall ;>f this post
tion by driving in between it and
I e Mat I lorn me and flanking the
French out directed their attack
headlong against the slopes. Seven
different assaults were made on
tins position during the week.
They have been successful in a
certain measure, m that they have
trained ground. The Germans
claim in have reached the summit,
In view of the "errors'1 not! d above
1 n the German claims, ii is ex
reniely doubtful. Mi re truthful,
probably, is the French adn.ission
which allows Germany .1 Mietch
of trenches on the uoribern and
commented upon in former re- northeastern slopes of the hill.
views, 1U way of illustration,
I will mention several of the
mote important errors that have
come to mv attention :
Early in the fighting Beilin
announced that the Plateau of
Douaumont was in German
( me thing in connection w ith
tins latest phase of the attack is
worth watching, and thai is the
unusually narrow front < lei ted by
the Germans for lhair thrust, I low
many men took part in the attack
is not definitely stated, but it
seems lh.it at hast three division'.,
hands. It has never been held about 60,000 men were engaged,
bv the Germans since the battle j The entire front of operations was
began.
Somewhat later a report was
issued that the village and fort
of Vaux had been taken. The
Germans were for a short time
in possession of the village, but
they have never yet reached the
plateau of the fort.
Early in April Berlin announ
ced 'he caoture of Le Mort
in t over a uiiIp and .1 half And
yet the gain was insign ficant,
The New York Times.
St. John's CATHEDRAL.
Meeting St.
The Rev. G. A. Thompson,
S. T. I). Pastor. Tomorrow 11
a 111. Sermon by Rev. /.. Cam
Horn me. There has been pub I bridge. 3.30 p.m. Ordination of
lished in an American magazine Consecration. 730 p.m. Sermon
an article written bv a German, by Local preacher Hart of Old
who tells how the Germans Might, Cat Isld. Good music;
captured this hill and the ad extra sea's. The Public are 1 or
vantage it will be in future!
operations. I e Mort Horn me
ballv in\ ited
ilia
is still where it was on Feb. 21
in French han Is,
Services in Seventh I >av Ad
ventist chapel on Bast Shirley
Unofficially, or. to be more Street at 7.30 o'clock Sunday
correct, semi officially, it is
stated that behind die lines in
the Verdun area 100,000 < ler
mans are confronted bv So 1.000
French. This statement is BO
ridiculous as to nerd no com
ment.
The Cologne Gazette an-
night June ph. to which all are
invited. Subject,"Is This Ihe
bast Generation That Will
Live on Earth ?"
Patriotic Concert.
,C
1 IMS I STING ol some of the
meed in the latter part of \^ most famous Canadian
March that the French paper]Songs etc., will be given in 5.
Ilomme Fnchaine had been AGNKS' School-room on Tues
suppressed for announcing the day evening, 13th June.
fall of Verdun, which for poii-i rhe Police band will be in
I tical reasons the French desir attendance.
ed to conceal. Mocommentil Proceeds in aid of Rahamas
necessarv on this kind of busi Red Cross Fund.
ness. Each must draw Ins own Doors open at 7.30 p.m..com
conclusion. The indications nUnce at 8 1 5 p.m.
are that something is wrong in Tickets is. and is. 6.
Ihr ralaia^BsAetwecn the Ger Cuition: Please secure vour
authorities and
bine. \t least
nts food for
tickets in Rood time so that
vour SSa1 may be reserved.
\ DESTOUP
Managen
mt el \mara -^
Srtance thai "T"*HIS is to inform my Patrons
it anv refer 1 nc
thai I have opened my Public
how
lyto d<
id the Public in General
openec
Mack Smith Shop, and am now
V .


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday 3, 1
W
DRINK-.
Welch's Grape juice.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
\ finis, 9d.
8s. 6d. pei do*.
\ Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.
h BLACK'S
222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
On. Hotel Colonial.
Heat -Eat
It's Great
Royal Scarlet Beef
Stew
6d. per tin
For Washing up, after
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
12oz. for 3d.
At The New York House
LOGWOOD
SISAL
R.J. BOWE
Commission Merchant
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Logwood sold al a| p. c. according to quantity
Sisal sold .it i} p. e. according to quantity
Prompt and careful attention given to all consignments
Offices:5J2 Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Near City Market.
STOCK
PRODUCE
Shingl
lUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Bi
per 1000. No better grade than these <>fl
iBaillfi" Cypress at 3JS. per 1000. Thisi
"Elgin
>>
an,
ARROW
COLLAR
Made of a fine
white Moire
Madrasan at-
tractive novelty
that is in good
form.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT. PHABODY & CO.. lac.
MAKEKS. TROY. N. Y. U.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE.
Exclusive Agent.
An //* For th'" H|lth Grade Sol"' "-Hr
ZZ/b WRIST WATCH,
gua
on c or $5.30 is .1 t-uw PHM for ihi* Sup
A erl< r Solid Silvor WRIsf WAiCl.
Br tith (1 ivernment Btamped II |
JEWEL ->. Lorai m 1 ea 1 accurate!)
: In TMMtlOlia. \\.- I ap-
proved t<> Km 111 tin kai (sfactloii I.) Mvere V
luoiir iiwii m> ik Ik pi Hi a it i.tir
w ibr wAic.i
Ul rk*i T .-Ml til
r JVE YEARS' BIDIN0
uuaranikl !! protect yoa stainm 1 1 il< (.-,
rial and work 111*11-hit I" I I) >th ft. rang
and iiui od appearanoe, 1 u-hahlt-
ttmektH wr, 1
l
r in good runiiin.
1 with Solid Silver Buck la.
I U
Kngland tud fi iquenlly
th i-i-. uy -. 1. ibis watch nt Mich a Low I'rlre

favourable oontraota with the nuiwha
orh on a v.-ry ima 1 iminfin
of p.oiit. our reap the In in lii lluv
WrtlST WATCH refu >.
1
n, and
re turn 1 our
.>
H number ol
1 .
fonnd Oi* in t 1 tlifa 'toi f. Illu-
1 -
It -< 22 6or Jl.
N itch In Solid Nickel il >l an id. p
I Ti""v7JEWKL
in 1 fully war ran ltd for FiVK Years.
iiutliy pigskin strap, iienta' itae only.
14- 01 txtl
I u"iinoui Dial. Time can In anen 00 darkest
tory,4> #1 taji axtra,
PO&TAG 1 inplreld. (lc).
r< lid. ilra.
US.l ONIAL (uiiMillcitedi rervivrd from
1 1 Ki: 1.. 1 'i Chew l Feb
, I urch teed mvwaU'li
from vn, N hie nlxty
rears igo and tmve always found it 10ban
teener during the whole of the
sixty years thai I have caroled It.
-1 d I. r Kixo.
=end P'ST CARD for Catalogue of Walohaa,
Kmintaln
Lrtfcl*-*. 1 inej Good ic.esc ft
I von 11 1'i-nny ait<' ni'v aavt fOU
Pounds. We guarantee (he ssva dltvrrv of
all our sjoods ourinu thi* Wr sh u in)
-li. w.- undii '
< i 1 1., < n
forlU'f- n-nce. Bankers: Iondn <'it* an
itid lUnk. It... iHTorn -.. P..*,.! 1
FEARS LTD. ()wa"^rS!SKS,m,
810 RRIRTOL RRIDOK. BR STOL. Int.
T
Keeping Guard
HERB are responsibilities thatevery patriotic citizen
must bear in this season ol national peril, othei
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these is
preserving the balance of tradi
-THE-
SHOE 14 STORE
on guard, and in spile of the advatu ng price of leather
ana the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing tlie largest order of iis history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
i
With these reinforcements he Big Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices oil its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar
kets abroad.
G. T. KNOWLES, rop. Big- 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
H. T. LiRICE
Commission Merchant
OFFICE: VVet Side Big Sponge Exchange
Nassau, N. P. Bahamas.
AGENT
HORSES >] B SHEEP
CATTLE sfljr POULTRY
SPONQE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products
BATHTUBS
v+"** SJ*
_ * '**'
and Bath Room Fixtures '
Cleaned .-"
sr- in Half
\ the
7<--' '-
-*?--
W^^A
Ok
iase
D,rt
To the free and independent
elector of the district 0/ Long
Cay, Crooked Island, and Ack-
lifts.
Gentlemen:
Through the death of
the Hon. H. F. Armbrister
you will soon be called upon
to elect another represents
tiv for your district.
Because of the ties and
associations that bind me
towards the people I beg to
pfferas a candidate, should
be.so honoured as to be re
turned asyour representative,
shall always'do mv best to
^ily fill the position,
ever, for the people.
.E. II WILLIAMS.
use in
Large
Sitysr Can
\ith Full -
Dinttion*
.SWmimVK*
-<.
To bo had at all Grocers
C. L. LofthOUSe-Company's Agent
i*ar.v;
LOGWOOD
THE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is
purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what
ever the market price is
H. J. CLARIDGE
Bast U-y St, Nassau
The Tribune,
for Modern Printing


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