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asL. CILBKKT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprittor. OFFICK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte St* .\ asiau, JV. P., Bahamas "P1IONK S0. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesdrv, and Thursday—single copy id Saturday—single copy ... ijd Weekly 5


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T Radiograms May 17th, 1916. London, 15:—The writing of a new chftttpf of the history of the Sinn Feirurebellion was bo gun to lay win Sir Roger Casement, Knighted in 1911 for services to the British govern ment and Daniel Julian Bailey an Irish private soldier, were placed in the dock of the How Street police court for preliminary examination on the charge of high treason. Little heavy fighting is in progress in any of the various war theatres. The French in the Mouse Hills to the East of Verdun in a surprise attack have cleared the Germans from the trenches over a front of about two hundred yards and also have put down in Champagne several German attacks. Bombardments alone are tak ing place around Verdun. Along the British line in France bom bardments and sapping operations are being carried on. Fast of Loos th" Germans succeeded in gaining a footing in Bri tisli trenches but were unable to hold them under a counter attack. The Italians in the Monte Adamello xcne hav succeeded in occupying positions in the sector between Crozzon di FargojidMmnd Crozzon di Lares which are of great strategic value in their movement against Trente. The Italians also have made further progress against the Austrian* oi Nit. Sperone. Austrian attacks to the North of Lenzumo were repulsed by the Italians. Flsewhere along this front there have been only artillery engagements. Artillery duels are reported from the Russian front. In the Caucasus region the Russians are continuing their advance againtt the Turks according to Petrograd. In the operation to ward Mosul having Bagdad as its objective the Turks are de clared to have retreated pre cipitately. The differences between Greece and the Entente Powers have been amicably settled accord ing to announcement of the British Foreign Office. This may mean that Greece has acquiesced in the requests of the Allies for permission for Serbian troops to cross Greece to Salonica from the Island of Corfu^k Gibbstown, New Jersev:—At least 14 men were killed and about 30 injured today in an explosion at the Repauno plant ol the Dupont Powder Com pany near here: The blast oc cuired in the building in which Trinitrotoluil is manufactured and wrecked that structure and three others The cause of the explosion may never be ascertained ac cording to officials of the plant as all those believed to have been in the building were kil led. Santo Domingo, 15:—Ameri can marines today took posses sion of the centre of this city. The rebels had withdrawn Sat urday afternoon being warned by American Minister Russell that the city would be taken unless the rebels eva CUSted it by sundown. The en try of the American forces was unopposed. Washington, 15: —Both the state department and General Carranza are awaiting detailed reports of the recent Fl Paso military conference before seek ing an agreement as to the Mexican border situation through diplomatic conversa tions. iStli May, 1916. London;—British destroyers engaged German destroyers off trie coast of Belgium and forced them to return to home ports. There were no British casual ties. Paris:—Bombardments in Ver dun region continue, also heavy artillery actions at Haudremont, Vaux and Le Mort Homme. London:—The American Km bassy was informed today that I.ugi Martin Manciui, an Am erican citizen, was d rtwned when the Dutch steamer Data vier V. was blown up. Berlin:— The Austrians con tinue a successful offensive on the Italian front, capturing 5,000 prisoners and many cannon Washington:—President Wil son, through the Apostolic Del egate, replied to the Pope's re cent message to the United States asking that an attempt be made to bring the Furo pean war to an end. The president informed the l kill* O .; 1 ; DJEJ Cvi\*. of the Mi'i..'is pn verl^a!. • • it is a wcll-lcn. wn fact bat who have tried SUNI 1 to use any Other. SUNLIGHT SOAP as their ally, can look forward to wash-day without dread, for they are assured of a quick despatch of all dirt. TRY IT IN YOUR £ V 0'" NEXT WASH. Pope that the United States would endeavour to refrain from war but could promise nothing further. —:o: — May 18th, 1916. London, 16: — Progress for the Austrians against the Italians in Southern Tyrol and on the Lower l*onzo, and a continua tion of the Russian advance through Kurdistan toward Monzul, the Russian objective toward Bagdad, are in the latest official communications from Vienna and Petrograd. In the other theatres there is much artillery firing but little activity by the infantry. The Austrians in the regions South and Southeast of Trente are reported by Vienna to have captured Italian trenches at several points taking prisoner 268^ men among tnem 86 offi cers and captured 7 guns and 11 machine guns. The entry of Austrians into Italian trenches East of Monfal cone near the Head of the Gulf of Trieste and the capture here of additional officers and men is also recorded. Petrograd reports that the Russian force which recently drove out the Turks from the Rowanduz region iscontinueing its progress Westward toward Mosul and the Tigris River re gion and drawing nearer to the Bagdad Railway. To Hie Northwest around Dirabckil tn Turks attempted an attack 01 the Russians but were repulsed. KjgRi£> A .3 I BB ^~— • m m-T ixJu f~~' %  ^P. miSml V J. JS %  SMBBBBW < • .. %  "Elgin" ARROW COLLAR Made of a fine white Moire Madras — an attractive novelty that is in good form. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, PEA BODY & CO.. IM. MAKERS, TROY. NY. 0 ., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent.



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LOGWOOD SISAL R.J. BOWE Commission Merchant (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Logwood sold at n\ p. c. according to quantity Sisal sold at i| p. c. according to quantity Prompt and careful attention given to all consignments Offices: —533 Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Near City Market. %  •-•*--" STOCK PRODUCE -DRINK: Insist On Kirkman's Borax Soap f A Bigger Cake A Better Soap 3d. per Bar At Your Dealer or At The New York House Welch's Grape uuice. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pint*, la. 4d., 15s. per doz. i Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 6d. 4-S. 6d. per doz. H. T. BRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE : We.l Side Big Sponge Exchange Nassau, N. P. Hahamas AGENT IiC 3SES ^ fa SHEEP CATTLE S.,/. POULTRY T BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colonial. SPOXCJE, SISAL and other ISLAND Product* Automobiles & Bicycles Reo CARS AND POPE BICYCLES (Niagara) FO R SALE, AND FOR HIRE. Sole agent for REO MOTOR CAR Co. Pi.Titt attention to all 1 pa/rs Supplies and accessorie Gassoline and Oils LOGWOOD ""pHE undersigned desires to notify the public that ho is I purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same whatevor the market price is H. J. CLAR1DGE East Boy St, Nassau. PHONE 402 J. P. SIMMS 47 Market St The Tribune, for Modern Printing



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.,v= Nulllua ndtlliius lurnre In vciba m&uistri Bein bound to swear to ihe Unimiki of no Master. VOL. XIII. Nai.nvj. N. P., Bahamas. THURSDAY May. 18 1916 No. 155 Bigger French Guns Ready For Battle jjtjtjtjjt For tlie first time since the European war started, the French are now employing howitzers of the 370.13111*metei (14.6 inch) type againsi the 1 I rmans Until recently the' Central Powers had %  monoply f the war the hi' nrli did not take the trouble to intrei ch nor com eal tl eii ai tillery the way they do now; I the result was that the heavy ; German batteries, when us< counter batteries and sssi b\ aeroplanes, had a cleai field 'and managed to destroy whole battens of the light 75 milli j meter French guns without the latter I" ing able to do them any harm. "After the opening battles of the war the French realized that they must have heavy field artillery, and made every effort lo obtain it as soon as possible The result was that August, 1914, and Man h, 191 they had sent a number of foui gun batteries or 10.5 centn: [i ^uns to tht front and had adopt ed and issued to the service a considerable number f new 15 centimeter rapid-fire howitzers, and had start, d to Construct 14 inch mortarsi In other words, a few months after the war started the French school of artillery thought hnd complete ly veered around and adopted the German artillery iden. and, therefore, has tin chance ol SUI c< ss. "Before the present war start ed most of our artillery officers believed that the heaviest fell gun 01 how itzer bii %  weal be needed bj an armj >** th< 6 inch how itcer hung a 1 x> I ound pn ji cl ile, and in justice to them 11 must be stated that, with Ihe ex< e| ion of the Cter man and Austrian Armies, I1H [eneral, They a ls believed thai tl e funci 1 n ai the heavy hukl guns of snare than 6 inch calibre, wh oh it was known Germany •• Aus tria 1 d, was 10 •• % %  • field forts of siet 1 nnd eeoerets, %  nd that it \\uuld net •< pr*i poit either of these i or tl <• an mm ill, n tire} required with lie field armies. "How wrong (hisassumption was is shown b\ the preseal w r, in which the Germans Aus' r ians have actual!) I seal ported wilh I hi ir held 1 units II inch howitzers, 13 inch hew itzers. 16 iix h boa 1 leers, and 17.7 iuc h how %  171 is. All re l 110W inrl .ate ihat 1 K SUCCI SSI rr,' l,\ the German and Austrian .' raie on the eastern front wese din no small measure to the MS< of these enormous field pieces which must hereafter be IGB sidered as essential te fur-cess in war." —The Sew York Times. EC "From the artillery point of view Ihe lesson to be learned from the war is the same Ii 1, that has been taught by every Wat since the discovery ol can non, namely, that everything being equal, the side having the heaviest gun and the best am munition-Supply system is the one that is best able to give the proper support to its infantry, W. A! MATHER D UNDERTAKE* I'.SIKFS in inform hijj h iaoe)i and the Public tlmftc In* just received a complete e J facilities for the Buisnoss n! *N undertaker, which places him ia c position io carry oul Fuae may he entrusted to His cmr* system nrul despatch ; and jt, fiilly solicit* theii fmr ttu work.


The Tribune.
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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, May 18, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02598

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Full Text
.,v=
Nulllua ndtlliius lurnre In vciba m&uistri
Bein bound to swear to ihe Unimiki of no Master.
VOL. XIII.
Nai.nvj. N. P., Bahamas. THURSDAY May. 18 1916
No. 155
Bigger French Guns Ready
For Battle
jjtjtjtjjt
For tlie first time since the
European war started, the
French are now employing
howitzers of the 370.13111*metei
(14.6 inch) type againsi the
1 I rmans Until recently the'
Central Powers had monoply
fact, more than to any oilier, in
the opinion of ordnance experts
here, has been due the German
successes. 1
I Ipon this new gun the French,
it is raid, ill put their great
est reliance in future opera
tions. The report that civil
ians are leaving Met* may he
dueSAjtfiefact that Id. Germans
kno Pihat the big French uns
are ready to go into action.
A re< ''Mt memorandum of the
War Collet;'' Division of the
' 1 meral Staff of the United
States Army has this to say of
the new weapons:
"The French have been mak-
ing a new 370 millimeter (1 \.(.
inch) howitzer. Six or ei^ht
have been completed and are
to he sent into the field immed-
iately. This piece was under
Study when the war broke out,
and is comparatively simple in
construction The trials have
given most satisfactory results."
At the outbreak of the war
the mobile artillery of France
consisted, the War College
states, substantially of the 65
millimeter (3.65 inch) moun-
tain, 75-millimeter (2 <)2 inch)
field gun. end the 155 millim
eter 6 1 inch) rapid fire Rim
nilho gun.
"About one month before the
outbreak of the war," the War
College report adds, "six regi-
ments of 105 millimeter (4 1.;-
'nch/ guns a ere authorized, but
the guns u 1 r< not ready for
issue at the outbreak of the war.
Since then these regiments have
been furnished tl ese, and other
calibres have b( en introduced:
150 millin it( 1 1 i Schnei
der rapid lire how itx< is; 2(10
indium ler (10.5 inch) howitz
eis; 305 millimeter (12 inch)
navy gun, mounted on railway
Carriage; 340 millimeter (13.8
inch) navj gun, mounted on
railway cai I iage
The report refers to the ef
fectivem s~ of the G< rman 42
centimeter puns, and adds the
statement that 'ii is claimed
that the Krupp Company has
pi rfect< d the 511 entimeter
(ai.al gun, a ilh a range
of thirt\ eight miles."
I he ^ustrians, Recording to a
it quoted in the War Col
lege document, are using their
large guns up to the 43 centim
eter type against field works,
field Runs, storage depots, rail
way stations, and village where
troops aie quartered, and to
di stsoy entanglements.
"These uses,"adds therein,it
"are made because the guns are
available. The writer has seen
the effect of fire of the 30.5 cen
timeter and 15 centimeter mor
tars on semi permanent earth
works. Tlie craters on the hill
in Ihe rear of the line "of works
were twenty feet deep and thirty
feet in diameter."
The War College memoran
dum goes on:
'The successes of the German
Army for the first four months
of the war can be attributed, in
a great measure, to the heavy
field artillery with which they
re equipped, and to its pro
per handling. Our observers
all state that the moral effect
produced on the French in the
opening battles of the war by
the heavy German field artillery
was tremendous, and came to
most of the Frenchmen, who
[ had been taught and had belii v
ed that 75 millimeter gun was
the ruler of Ihe artillery World,
as a ter.'ific sho< k. At the com
menc mi nt <>f the war the
hi' nrli did not take the trouble
to intrei ch nor com eal tl eii
ai tillery the way they do now;
I the result was that the heavy
; German batteries, when us<
! counter batteries and sssi
b\ aeroplanes, had a cleai field
'and managed to destroy whole
batten- s of the light 75 milli
j meter French guns without the
latter I" ing able to do them
any harm.
"After the opening battles of
the war the French realized
that they must have heavy field
artillery, and made every effort
lo obtain it as soon as possible
The result was that
August, 1914, and Man h, 191
they had sent a number of foui
gun batteries or 10.5 centn: [i ,
^uns to tht front and had adopt
ed and issued to the service a
considerable number f new 15
centimeter rapid-fire howitzers,
and had start, d to Construct 14
inch mortarsi In other words,
a few months after the war
started the French school of
artillery thought hnd complete
ly veered around and adopted
the German artillery iden.
and, therefore, has tin
chance ol SUI c< ss.
"Before the present war start
ed most of our artillery officers
believed that the heaviest fell
gun 01 how itzer bii weal
be needed bj an armj >** th<
6 inch how itcer hung a 1 x>
I ound pn ji cl ile, and in justice
to them 11 must be stated that,
with Ihe ex< e| ion of the Cter
man and Austrian Armies, i1h
[eneral, They a ls
believed thai tl e funci 1 n ai
the heavy hukl guns of snare
than 6 inch calibre, wh oh it
was known Germany Aus
tria 1 d, was 10
field forts of siet 1 nnd eeoerets,
nd that it \\uuld net < pr*i
poit either of these
i or tl < an mm ill, n tire}
required with lie field armies.
"How wrong (hisassumption
was is shown b\ the preseal w r,
in which the Germans
Aus'rians have actual!) I seal
ported wilh I hi ir held 1 units
II inch howitzers, 13 inch hew
itzers. 16 iix h boa 1 leers, and
17.7 iuc h how 171 is. All re
l 110W inrl .ate ihat 1 K
SUCCI SSI rr,' l,\ the
German and Austrian .' raie
on the eastern front wese d-
in no small measure to the MS<
of these enormous field pieces
which must hereafter be igb
sidered as essential te fur-cess
in war."
The Sew York Times.
EC
"From the artillery point of
view Ihe lesson to be learned
from the war is the same Ii 1,
that has been taught by every
Wat since the discovery ol can
non, namely, that everything
being equal, the side having the
heaviest gun and the best am
munition-Supply system is the
one that is best able to give the
proper support to its infantry,
W. A! MATHER
D UNDERTAKE*
I'.SIKFS in inform hijj h iaoe)i
and the Public tlmftc In*
just received a complete e J
facilities for the Buisnoss n! *n un-
dertaker, which places him ia c
position io carry oul Fuae
may he entrusted to His cmr*
system nrul despatch ; and jt,
fiilly solicit* theii fm my Prices first and pi< are the very lowest r>r ttu
work.


as-
L. CILBKKT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprittor.
OFFICK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte St*
.\ asiau, jV. P., Bahamas
"P1IONK S0. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy......... Jd
Tuesdrv, and Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturdaysingle copy ... ijd
Weekly ............ 5 Monthly ............is. 6d
Quarterly..........4s. 6tl
FlalfY.'arly...........os.
feaily ............18s
I'AYAHLK IN ADVANCK
Advertising Rates :Six pence per line
for fi'St insertion: three pence pet line
for second insertion ; au.i OMpennf pe
line lor subsqiient insertions.
Advertisements under cicht lines 4s.
Zbe tribune
Thursday. Mey IS. 1916
Our Third Contingent must
be well on the way to Jamaica
by this, and we notice that the
Recruiting Committee is calling
for more men to m;tke up the
strength of tlie Contingent! al
ready sen! on. Men and more
men are needed and wa have
not the least doubt th.it the
number called for will beensily
raised. In some respects our voi
unteers arc to be envied. The
experience they will gain by
travelling and the wider out
look "ii life which seeing new
countries and mixing with fresh
people involves should beinval
uablc. Seeing the woild isa very
important branch of education,
and one which is invariably of
great value, as is proved by the
fact that vour travelled man is
generally belter all round than
one who stays at home and
just vegetates. There are seve
1.1I other obvious advantages
and inducements to enterprising
young men who join thearmv,
not the least of which is the satis
faction of knowing that they are
doing their duty which need not
be specified* The Colony Is just
ly proud of those of her sons
who have responded to their
Country's call, and some of the
old boys are quite sorry that the
age limit robs them of the
Chance of joining the Colours
and doing their bit. Three Con
tin cents already Not a bad re
cord. ;uid we must not forget to
include inour list all those brave
young men who left here an d
joined the Canadian contingents
before a Bahamas Contingent
was thought of. Some of them
have laid down their lives, and
we are proud to know their that
names are placed on the Roll
of Honour which may be seen
in the Cathedral.
:o:
We beg to acknowledge
the receipt of a copy of the
"Third Supplement to the
London Gazette," which was
sent us by the Colonial Sec-
retary.
:o:
We are informed that some
of the machinery which is to
be used by Mr. H. E. M.
Johnson in connection with
his ice manufacturing plant,
has already arrived. The
work on the Ice Plant is be-
ing pushedforwardandbefore
very long we hope to be able
to report its completion.
:o:
If any of our readers have
copies of our Special Contin
gent Number, dated May
nth inst., we shall be glad
to purchase them: This
number has proved so popu-
lar that although we print-
ed a large number of extra
copies, our supply was soon
exhausted, and the demand
for fuither copies is still
brisk.
:o:
While returning from a
nocturnal ramble last night
we were overtaken by a
party of the Nassau Cyclists
Tourist Club, who were re-
turning from a moonlight
spin on their wheels round
the eastern end of the island.
We could not help thinking
that this was an extremely
healthful and pleasant way
of spending an evening, and
wondered that more of our
young people do not take
advantage of the delights of
cycling by moonlight.
We gathered from scraps of
conversation overheard that
the ride had been extremely
enjoyable but the mosquitos
and sandflies had forbidden
a lengthy stay in the neigh-
bourhood of the Eastern
Fort. We also learnt that a
gentleman of the party, re-
nowned for his gallantry,
chivalrously rode his wheel
into the gutter and so saved
one of the ladies from a col-
lision. Fortunately he escap-
ed serious injury, and al
i though we heard him com
! plain of a sprained wrist, we
should not have cared to
risk a back-hander from that
I wrist. The members of the
I party were:Mr. and Mrs. A.
Kenneth Solomon: Misses;
i LoisCulmer, Sybil Burnside,
I Dot Adderley, Doris Gam
iblin, and Daisy Curry.
Messrs. D. S. D. Mosely, E.
C. Mosely, J. Burnside, K.
McLure, H. Brown, A. D.
Slurwood Smith, and F. S.
Armbrister
so;
AN8WER TO
CORRESPONDENT.
We have received a com-
munication signed "Long
Island" but as the writer has
sent no covering letter we
cannot publish same. We
recommend our correspon-
dent to write the proper
authorities on the subject of
his communication, and back
his complaint with the sig-
natures of some responsible
householders of the district.
If he does this, and if his
statements arc correct he
will no doubt soon have the
wrong righted. We do not
desire to identify ourselves
with any mud throwing un-
less it is necessary in the
public interest to counteract
undue whitewashing.
:o:
From "M o n t re a 1 Daily
Star" of May gth, ig16;
BIRTH.
Dupuch At the Women's
Hospital, iooo St. Catherine
Street, West, on May g, igib,
to the wife of Mr. E. G.
Dupuch, a son.
:o:
The following passengers ar
rived perSch. "Wm. H. Albury"
on Sunday, May 14.
Mesdames and Misses:Al
vilda Rolle, Nettie Grey, Doro
thy Miller, Aphelia Brown, O.
Colebrooke, Mary Humes, Mar
garette Gaiter, Diana Gaiter
Addelle Sweeting, Myrtle Bled
soeJemina LewisMirmm Humes
Doris Rolle, Emily Miller; Mes
srs:Richard Rolle. Zephaniah
Rolle, Alfred Grey. Stanley
Knowles, 3enjamin Sands, Jos.
Sands, Lawrence Lightbourn,
Geo. Lightbourn, Zeph. Humes
Alonio Bethel,James Bain, Har
ry Newbold, James Dorsett,
Chas Hepburn, John Wildgoose
Howard Baitlett' .Dirisie Bar
tlett, Elisha Carrol, Harvey
Bledsoe, Nathairfyl Caiter, Ed
ward Gaiter, Harold Miller Is
aac Miller. (37)
:o
Hon. House of assembly
Monda\ evening,
May 15th, 1916.
Present :
The Hon. the Speaker and
Deputy Speaker; Hons. G.
H. Gamblin, G. H. Johnson
and J. R, C. Young ; Messrs.
Weech, Turtle, Toote, Toote,
Anderson, Bowtn, E. V. Sol*
onion, C. C. Sweeting, L. W.
Young, Albury, Brice, Fin-
der, Curry, and A. K. Solo-
mon.
On motion made by the
leader of the Government for
a vote of indemnity in which
was included 30 spent at
Governor's Harbour for up-
keep of roads, when it came
to the knowledge of the
House that the Executive
Council deeming the 20
which appeared in the Ap-
propriation Bill as an error,
authorized the Commissioner
at Governor's Har^Mfr to
spend an additional f*$o.
Upon this a motion was
made that the item be struck
out, and after considerable
discussion the motion was
lost by one vote.
On motion of Mr. Albury,
which to many members
went too far, inasmuch as it
appeared to take back all
that had been said by mem
bers in the House when dis
cussing the Committee of
the whole house to consider
'1000 additional grant to
the Development Board, ano
ther discussion took place,
with the result that at the
request of several members
Mr. Albury withdrew his mo
tion.
The Gas and Ice Plant
Bill was not proceeded with
because the Bill was late
from printers and not consi
dered by members. Its 2nd
reading and committal will
be considered this (Thurs
day) evening. 9



T
Radiograms
May 17th, 1916.
London, 15:The writing of
a new chftttpf of the history of
the Sinn Feirurebellion was bo
gun to lay win Sir Roger Case-
ment, Knighted in 1911 for
services to the British govern
ment and Daniel Julian Bailey
an Irish private soldier, were
placed in the dock of the How
Street police court for prelimi-
nary examination on the charge
of high treason.
Little heavy fighting is in
progress in any of the various
war theatres. The French in the
Mouse Hills to the East of Ver-
dun in a surprise attack have
cleared the Germans from the
trenches over a front of about
two hundred yards and also
have put down in Champagne
several German attacks.
Bombardments alone are tak
ing place around Verdun. Along
the British line in France bom
bardments and sapping opera-
tions are being carried on. Fast
of Loos th" Germans succeed-
ed in gaining a footing in Bri
tisli trenches but were unable to
hold them under a counter at-
tack.
The Italians in the Monte
Adamello xcne hav succeeded
in occupying positions in the
sector between Crozzon di Far-
gojidMmnd Crozzon di Lares
which are of great strategic
value in their movement against
Trente. The Italians also have
made further progress against
the Austrian* oi Nit. Sperone.
Austrian attacks to the North
of Lenzumo were repulsed by
the Italians. Flsewhere along
this front there have been only
artillery engagements.
Artillery duels are reported
from the Russian front. In the
Caucasus region the Russians
are continuing their advance
againtt the Turks according to
Petrograd. In the operation to
ward Mosul having Bagdad as
its objective the Turks are de
clared to have retreated pre
cipitately.
The differences between Greece
and the Entente Powers have
been amicably settled accord
ing to announcement of the
British Foreign Office.
This may mean that Greece
has acquiesced in the requests
of the Allies for permission for
Serbian troops to cross Greece
to Salonica from the Island of
Corfu^k
Gibbstown, New Jersev:At
least 14 men were killed and
about 30 injured today in an
explosion at the Repauno plant
ol the Dupont Powder Com
pany near here: The blast oc
cuired in the building in which
Trinitrotoluil is manufactured
and wrecked that structure and
three others
The cause of the explosion
may never be ascertained ac
cording to officials of the plant
as all those believed to have
been in the building were kil
led.
Santo Domingo, 15:Ameri
can marines today took posses
sion of the centre of this city.
The rebels had withdrawn Sat
urday afternoon being warned
by American Minister
Russell that the city would
be taken unless the rebels eva
CUSted it by sundown. The en
try of the American forces was
unopposed.
Washington, 15: Both the
state department and General
Carranza are awaiting detailed
reports of the recent Fl Paso
military conference before seek
ing an agreement as to the
Mexican border situation
through diplomatic conversa
tions.
iStli May, 1916.
London;British destroyers
engaged German destroyers off
trie coast of Belgium and forc-
ed them to return to home ports.
There were no British casual
ties.
Paris:Bombardments in Ver
dun region continue, also heavy
artillery actions at Haudremont,
Vaux and Le Mort Homme.
London:The American Km
bassy was informed today that
I.ugi Martin Manciui, an Am
erican citizen, was d rtwned
when the Dutch steamer Data
vier V. was blown up.
Berlin:The Austrians con
tinue a successful offensive on
the Italian front, capturing 5,-
000 prisoners and many cannon
Washington:President Wil
son, through the Apostolic Del
egate, replied to the Pope's re
cent message to the United
States asking that an attempt
be made to bring the Furo
pean war to an end.
The president informed the
l kill* O .; 1 ; DJEJ Cvi\*.
of the Mi'i..'- is pn verl^a!. ,
it is a wcll-lcn. wn fact bat
who have tried Suni
1
to use any Other.
SUNLIGHT
SOAP
as their ally, can look forward
to wash-day without dread,
for they are assured of a
quick despatch of all dirt.
TRY IT IN YOUR V
0- '"
NEXT WASH.
Pope that the United States
would endeavour to refrain from
war but could promise nothing
further.
:o:
May 18th, 1916.
London, 16: Progress for the
Austrians against the Italians
in Southern Tyrol and on the
Lower l*onzo, and a continua
tion of the Russian advance
through Kurdistan toward
Monzul, the Russian objective
toward Bagdad, are in the latest
official communications from
Vienna and Petrograd.
In the other theatres there is
much artillery firing but little
activity by the infantry.
The Austrians in the regions
South and Southeast of Trente
are reported by Vienna to have
captured Italian trenches at
several points taking prisoner
268^ men among tnem 86 offi
cers and captured 7 guns and 11
machine guns.
The entry of Austrians into
Italian trenches East of Monfal
cone near the Head of the Gulf
of Trieste and the capture here
of additional officers and men
is also recorded.
Petrograd reports that the
Russian force which recently
drove out the Turks from the
Rowanduz region iscontinueing
its progress Westward toward
Mosul and the Tigris River re
gion and drawing nearer to the
Bagdad Railway. To Hie
Northwest around Dirabckil tn
Turks attempted an attack 01
the Russians but were repulsed.
KjgRi>A.3
I Bb ^~ mm-T
ixJu f~~'
^P.
miSml V
J. JS "
SMbbbbW < ..
"Elgin"
ARROW
COLLAR
Made of a fine
white Moire
Madrasan at-
tractive novelty
that is in good
form.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, PEA BODY & CO.. Im.
MAKERS, TROY. NY. 0., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.



LOGWOOD SISAL
R.J. BOWE
Commission Merchant
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Logwood sold at n\ p. c. according to quantity
Sisal sold at i| p. c. according to quantity
Prompt and careful attention given to all consignments
Offices: 533 Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Near City Market.
-*--"
STOCK
PRODUCE
-DRINK:
Insist On
Kirkman's Borax
Soap f
A Bigger Cake
A Better Soap
3d. per Bar
At Your Dealer or
At The New York House
Welch's Grape uuice.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pint*, la. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
i Pints, 9d. "
8s. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 6d.
4-S. 6d. per doz.
H. T. BRICE
Commission Merchant
OFFICE : We.l Side Big Sponge Exchange
Nassau, N. P. Hahamas
AGENT
IiC 3SES ^ fa SHEEP
CATTLE S.,/. POULTRY
T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
SPOXCJE, SISAL and other ISLAND Product*
Automobiles & Bicycles
Reo Cars and Pope Bicycles (Niagara) FOr
SALE, AND FOR HIRE.
Sole agent for
REO MOTOR CAR Co.
Pi.Titt attention to all 1 pa/rs
Supplies and accessorie
Gassoline and Oils
LOGWOOD
""pHE undersigned desires to notify the public that ho is
I purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what-
evor the market price is
H. J. CLAR1DGE
East Boy St, Nassau.
PHONE 402
J. P. SIMMS
47 Market St
The Tribune,
for Modern Printing


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