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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916, • • • # g J %  . r.. ftlLBKRT DUPI7CH l-diiir ttitd PnprittH omoK Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sl .Vassaii, .Y. /'., Bahamas I'UONK MO P. O. BOX MB. PUBLISHED MAll-Y RATES IKUV. We.hiesoay and Friday— H>ecornr ... (•day, and rhursday—tingle o\>y atunlav—single copy Veekh FMnntbly i-. Ouarte \\ ... arl 18to our columns being made Ed. L. Mayer, and Harry |. I rorh Hbenzri Sun the medium of PERSONAL Kugel; Dr. W. A. Bartlei ATTACK, misrepresent.i-1 Mr. and Mrs. LvoOel 1. tioti, or business rivalry. l**oster and Mrs. Gerald 1. From information since I Cupee and soil. School in lieu of treat. I'AVAIil.l IN A OVA Mr. gathered by us, Exumian has deliberately misled us and misrepresented the facts which led up to his communication. We regret and protest against our columns being so used against any one, but particularly so againsta business man whose Misses Lauretta Bethel, and Lena buncombe; Mes dames Wilhelmina Lewis ami Lulu Willie; Mr. Gus Alex ander. — :o: — The Mail Steamer "Morro Castle" arrived off the port from Havana, yesterday Fri Advertising llatei MI BI hue For 6ntinsertion: tlirea pence iw line i "ml insertion ai.o unepsnnv i>ef line lot subsqueut insei tioin. Adverti*eaMntsunrlei eight line* j~. ttbc tribune Saturday. April 29. 1916 The news from England during the past week has bet n of a most disquieting nature. \ e refer particularly to the violent outbreak of the Sinn Fein, apparently to us anew faction, or is it an old one under a new name ? Whatever it may be Mr. A-quith's opinion doubtless is correct, German machinations are responsible. \s to the arch-traitor Roger Casement hanging is too good for him. The government should make no mistake, but hand le this Irish outbreak and Roger Casement with a firm and crushing hand. It is a most unfortunate occurrence just at this junc ture and has a bad effect the empire and without. This evidence of Irish perHdiousness does no) support the claim of Irish loyalty made by Mme. O'Gorman of the O'Gorman of Clanin the article from the New York Times which is printed on the first feage of this issue. The attack on I.owestof*. in Tuesday is a possible pre hide to Der Tag for which Germany has 1 >ng been toast ing and wishing (?) and for which we have been prepared in "Watchful Waiting" and are "Ready Aye Ready." As a set off we have the bombardment of German positions on the Belgium coast; the recent progress of the Russians; the noble stand of the French at Verdun and our grip of the situation in Flan ders. The landing of the Russians at Marseilles may reasonably be assumed to mean a com hined Allied blow on tin Western front at no distant date. No doubt about it, this is a testing time for England and if her sons he true to her and she be true to herself the issue we devoutly pray will be victorious for her. This newspaper does not necessarily endorse or sympathise with all the communications which appear in our columns. There appeared in our issue of the 22nd inst. a communication over the signature EXUMIAN. While we are not responsible for the sentiments of our correspondents, nor do we necessarily endorse them as stated above, yet we object reputation and integrity isIday evening with 2 passeng thereby impugned. lers Miss Florence Poitiei and We repudiate any approvMrs. Laura Poitier for Nas al of, or sympathy with this sau, and 104 in transit for communication, and it is New York, left for our correspondent in! She embarked the follow self defence, to make good ling passengers and proceeded his assertions over his own to New York.— 3 10 o 7 17 b name, and disprove that the Misses Genevieve Griffith, LETTER SIGNED EXL'MLucy Griffith. F. C. Apple l\N IS A PURCHASER ton, Edith Whyte, May Clare, WD NOT A SELLER, AND MISREPRESENTED HIMSELF. We regret that we should have been misled into giving publicity to statements cal dilated to injure one so long Bessie Ryan, Mary Ryan, [Catherine Fitzpatrick, Delia McMahon, Annie Brady, Nel lie Moran, Sarah Mora 11, —:o:— BAHAMAS RED CROSS GUILD. Nassau, Bahamas, 37th April, 1916, The first parcel was shipped on the 11 th October, 191 j, and the last on 20th April, 1916, to the British Red Cross Society. 271 mufflers. 4058 handkerchiefs, 60 towels. 17 shirts, 514 washers 3 cardigans, 18 helmets, 5 pneumonia jackets, 8 pans mittens 46 relic bags, 5 pairs pyjamas, 304 pillow cases, 90 pairs of socks 7b limb pillows, 72 H.W. bottle covers, 11a bandages, 4 sweaters, 1 pair gl< >vs, Mabel Barnett, and Emma 9 eye bandages, Sexton: Mr. and Mrs J. A. Rutherford, Mr. and Mrs. E. time a friend and supporter! L. Durkee and son, Dr. and of our journal as Mr. Moore, Mrs. R. F. Weir, Revd. and and we hereby tender him Mrs. W. S. Lovell and child; our sincere regret at havin 6 inadvertently been the me,ins of causing him unnecessary annoyance, and trust that he will accept this amende honorable. [Ln. OUR 3RD BAHAMAS CONTINGENT will be leaving our shores 011 the iotli May in response to the call of the King for "men and more men" we are pleased to see that 85 brave boys have come forward, voluntarily and offi red tin mselvi s in deft net • if their homes and the Empire which we all love so well, but al this moment a few more men are wanted to complete the e.um bei required. Won't you, and Messrs Ldmund E. Brown, Frederick Mader, and Osw aid Leavitt. Miss Cloraina Wells Mr. W. Harvey Wood. :o: The American Wrecking [o thTBelgians.' lug "Ramos arrived tins j • .> morning from New York. ^ SO]i ^ )[{SSOS There will be a floral Ser Sec. B RC. G vice at St. John's CathadralI (signed) Church on Sunday afternoon CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE. t> walking slicks, ; woollen band, 19 parcels sweets, 1030 gauze pads, 3 bundles old linen, 3 bundles gauze pads, 1 bundle second hand underwear, making a total of 1 articles. We have also shipped a parcels of clothing and hats at 4 o'clock. All are wel; come. — :o: — We have it on good authority that Logwood is selling at £g per ton, —:o: — IN RE ICE Except for some unforseen contingency, we shall not be wail a lack of Ice this year, you, come forward. Tins is no I nor perhaps ever again, for we tune for dull inaction; action, I learn 00 the very best authority your action today may influence j that the enterprising proprietor the. destinies of your country of of The Ice House is expecting the Empire. ; momently a cargo of 100 Tons The heart beats with proud to arrive from Miami. Besides President. :o.— Port Howe S. S. bth April 1916. I he Editor of The Tribune. Dear Sir It may interest your readers to hear what is being done here. On Sunday evening the 191I1 ultimo a meeting was held in /.ion Baptist Chapel Mi. J. D. Dorsett Public School Teacher Presiding. The Chapel was filled to its utmost capacity. The Lesson was taken from The Gospel according to St. Luke 10th Chapter—verses 25 to 37. And an eloquent and well-chosen Address was delivered by our teacher from the words "Go thou and do likewise". Me told us about the origin of The Red Cross Society and pointed out vhat is being done in our sister-islands His pleading for the wounded were so earnest that after B speech by Mr. W. W. Allen, a native of Tarpiim Hay every one present promised to work for I he Bahamas Red Cross Guild Superintendent of The Suud iv School filled with patriotism promised to make a collection from his scholars. It was also decided to deliver to The Commissioner the O I feet ion taken up during the 1st Sunday in every month begining with the month of April, and this will be done as long as the war BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD Statement of Account on 27th April, 1916. Cr. £ lotal amount collected from 1st Sept., 1915 1057 which, he has in stock sufficient to meet any emergency which elation as each man takes up his station under the sheltering folds of the flag that has braved mav arise. for a thousand years the battle I Mr. Johnson has now in and the breeze, the Hag that has course of erection on Last Shir sheltered and protected you.al your life long, will not you be proud to stand up it) i is defence? You will if the blood of free men beats in your veins. Do it now, delay is dangeious. Enlist today and do not let the oppertunity of your life pass you. There are those who envy you the opportunity. As has been announced the Commandants office will be open every day from 8 to 6 you only need it open one day— that is today. —:o: — We had the pleasure of a call at our office today from Dr. Gascoyne St. Pierre Wor rell, who recentl t arrived in our city. The Doctor intends locat ing here, he has been in prac tice in the United States for ten years, is married and no doubt wiUJjDf^K^hJBfeOur midst. Pa j er "Esj on Tl Mi< Mrs. ley Street a building which will contain an Ice Plant with a capacity of twelve tons a day May it flourish. We wish Mr. Johnson abundant sneoess in his new venture in which he no less than we are to be con gratulated upon his laudable enterprise ; he upon a large prospective profitable invest ment. and we upon a relief from those ills which have been our annual heritage IANMAIAN RED CROSS QUILD. 6 £57 6 ~~£~s Dr. Sent to British Red Cross Society 763 Spent on purchase of materials 183 Now to C r. in Hank of Canada 111 D o o o 8 Hope Town Public School, Stanyard Creek Ra; ged Island Rum Cay Baptist Union. Ben nett Harbour 3 L5 o 10 6 8 o 10 2 5 3 8 15 10 5 >9 6 — :o:— BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD. Singing of the Cruci fixion by Children iff of St. Hilda's Agnes 4 7 1 have examined the accounts of the Bahamas Red Cross Guild and find them to be correct, as shown by the above Statement. The balance in hand agrees with the bank account, (signed) G. H. GAMBLIN. (signed) G. MAUD MILLER, Treasurer, (signed) CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE, President. BAHAMAS CONTINGENT FUND. Amount previously acknowledged £'3'5 '6 7 John Miller Savannah Sound Mr. W, E. Fountain 6th. Collection.— Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Sutton 21 to 2Q week Mr and Mrs. Hugh de Glanvillr continues. Too much credit cann.it be given to our worthy Coin niissonei John A. Bowel', q. for his untiring efforts in arousing the people to a sense I Of the.1 duty as British Subjects. Suitable hymn's wert selected foi thi^occasion and I they were heartily and harD I moniously sung. The Sei vice was brought to a close by the singing of the hymn "God blest our native land" and the pronouncing of The Benediction by our Teacher. Thanking sou in anticipation for space. Yours respectfully A LOYAL CITIZEN. Editor Tribune : — I wish THE TBIBUNS would add to its usefulness and inter/, *st by giving to its readers reg i IO 57 ularly a summary of the points of Hills when introduced before the House and by following up such summary with a report of the progress of such Mills. I lie man who cannot attend the sittings regularly, or who dislikes nosing about for infor nation among the members I who themselves often don't seem to know what is going on), has no way of finding out just wliat is going on j n the ll<>use of Mystification. There is, for instance, the Bill for an Act relating to Diseases of Plants. Every owner of a fruit tree is interested in the health of his tree. Yet the Press has given us no idea of the provisions of the f3ill beyond printing its title. And I am not aware that one can get correct information on any Bill excepting he attends the sittings or begs the loan of the printed Bill from some Member who himself has, I believe, only (me copy. Now, the Plant disease Bill is a very important one and the preservation of our fruit may 4 O iH 7 I if. o 4 0 £1321 19 2 > f l AI urn



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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916, %  J"! hang upon legislation compel ling destruction of scale and disease. But the Bill is so full of odi oui restrict I on and threat that | listment from amongst unattest to most of us turn tree disease ed married men. posals foreshadowing general Compulsion unles success at tend immediate efforts to obtain men required by voluntary en is preferable to bad legislation. Another Bill proposes the ripping up of our streets to lay gas pipe and directly or indirectly (1 don't know which) the erection of a gag plant somewhere along llie water front. If there is a member of the Legislature who knows what an intolerable nuisance <. gas plant is in or iear a residential city, it has been a surprise to me that he has not gn( a move <>n him to Knock the proposal out of I l ie House instanter. Besides being foolish, lepisla live mystification is expensive and the taxpaver has to foot the bills! Witness the folly and expense and impratftabilitv <>f Medical and Health and Hospital Leg islation, and the mystification of amateurishness that runs through so much of our recent legislation. Mr. Editor, you ean be of help • -• •• •*• %  % %  to your readers and to the pub M'OOps near Oaxaco. 500 relic generally by throwing light l) * !s were killed. into dark spots. The government proposals were publicly announced tcday in a long statement to the press. Berlin, 26: -The German na val forces j which bombarded Lowestoft 'yesterday SHn k t | ie steamer King Stephen and cap tured her crew it was officially announced today. This is the same steamer that refused to rescue the crew of the Zeppelin I.. 19 which dropped into the North Sea. It was also announced that a destroyer and another scout boat aside from the King Steph en were sunk and that on one of the cruisers attack a fire was observed. —:o: — April 29th, 191G. Mexico City: —War department advices indicate that a fo ce of 1.000 rebels were defeated by goverumen t would have been just as loyai' and prompt if Belgium had not been involved at all. The Irish There is no reason and no Paris: -Another Contingent sense in having our legislationjof Russians have arrived at born in the smoke of mystery Marseilles. A legislature is not a lying-in, hospital. Keep the public informed oil legislation and proposer! legis lation. Give the exact facts. You have thrown the light of publicity Oil the Hospital fin.in cial scandal Why do you slop short of telling us just how much of the taxpayers' monev has been stolen? Gloss it as you may, any misappropriation or moneys is in plain words steal. Every foolish or impractica bli legal enactment is a misap propriatinn of public money, at least to the extent of the print ing and promulgating of London:—The British bat tleship Russell (14.000 tons) has been sunk bya mine in the Mediterranean.Shecarried a crew of 800 men, of whom 124 are missing. A dmiral Freemantle and 24 officers are among the saved. A German submarine was sunk off the Cast Coast yearn .sappl.cat.o,, of public 1 ler day. 18 of her crew were captured. Reports from Verdun indicate inactivity with fast decreasing bombardments. A heavy action is progress | ing on the British front with renewed German activity impracticability. TAXPAVER. in Ireland are for the empire of which they are a part,first, last, and all the tim, no matter what the Irish of New York may think or say about the matte*" What Mme. O'Gorman really came to this country for is to get fimd. for the military ho6 pitals on the coast of France. "You must not blame France," she said, "fur appealing to the outside people for this help. The French Government is maintaining six thousand hos pitals of its own in the interior. To these institutions are sent the soldiers who may be restor ed within short periods. On the coast we have other hospitals, a large number of them, filled with wounded men, many of whom will never recover. It will be many months before any of them can go back to the tronpe ia the field. It is tn get funds fr this work that I have been sent to America." Mme O'Gorman began her hospital work at the outset of the war, when she was in charge of a big staff of nurses at Ant werp. They were shelled out! of that town, fleeing to Ostend with all their wounded in mo | tor buses, but losing the entire hospital equipment. She next served at Calais at the time of the first battle of Ypres, when 15,000 wounded men were brought in each night. From Calais Mine.O'Gorman went to Dunkirk at the request of the authorities aid there esj tablished a new private hospital for the French wounded, and her next service was in Poper inghe, where, with two Belgian women and a group of Quakers from England, she undertook the work of stamping out a se rious epidemic of typhoid. Their inoculated 43,000 soldiers and civilians before being shelled out again by the Germans. "Let me tell you one more storv of an Irish patriot," said JOHN BUTLER Office : 367 Bay St., East 'Phone 245 Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Real Estate Agent EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods AGENT V NORWICH UNION FIRE INURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich LOGWOOD "THE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same whatever the market price is H. J. CLARIDGE East B?y St, Nassau. The Tribune, for Modern Printing t Radiograms April 118th 1916. London, J6: — In infantry fight ing in the Votges mountains Berlin claims the capture to the Northeast of Celles n| French first and second line trenches aboard munition ships, while 011 the South of this re — gion around Senones the French Berlin:— A Turkish official say they frustrated a German statement s*ys tb.it four attack against their position. 8qua drons of British avalrv which it is thought precedes w-, • M.r rWm... ~rr • %  Xlme Gorman, after sum map ebig German offensive simiWog her hoRpital experiences. lar to that at Verdun. ,* was just ,,;.,, lie k ft Franc I he revolution in Ireland to come to America. On the is practically at an end. j way to Paris I met an Irish offi — |cer who had but one arm. I New York;—The federal letted him if I should cut his returned indict: '"eat for him. He thanked me, grand jury ments against eight Germans harged with placing bombs Aside from this fighting ar. were cut to Hilary bombardments and s.,p%  „„ ,1 \, v ... Ping operations have formed ',n,,,d A m;,tea Wh,ch the chief method of warfare 011 the Western front. The regions of Avocourt I h!| No 308 Esnes and Mon.it Ze. pieces on 2 3 a %  1 which i: far from the Suez Canal. London:—Our aeroplanes velle, Northwest of Verdun, continue the scene of violent artillery activity. The Aerial corps of both the French and t!*e Germans have been engaged in lighting in the air or bomb dropping maneu vies. No reports of important events have been received from any of the other war theatres. London, 2b: — British regul ars from Belfast and Eng land now are in Dublin and have recaptured from the ievo lutionary factions several i 111 portant centers which the mem hers of the Sinn Fein party have occupied. They Include St. Stephens Green and Liberty I lall. London, 26: — Premier Asquith at the secret session nf parHn merit yesterday presented on behalf of the government pro located ;i ship with supplies for Kut el Amara stranded 111 the River four miles below the city. (Continued from First page) —:o: — her people are loyal to Enghnd. In a recent article in "The New York Times" Sidney Brooks attributes the present enthusiasm of Ireland for the war service to three lactors, the settlement of the land tenure question, the granting of Home Rule, and, third, that the plight of Bel gium, a email country, aroused all the sympathy of Ireland. Chiefly because it was a small country. I agree with him as to the first two factors, nut as to the third. It is true tli.it the li ih spii it ol romance, lhf Ireland's generous \\ mpathies, wen-aroused in behalf 0/ Bel gium, but the respons* of be | land to England's call for mm 1 but said that he could mannge very well, as he had been with out the arm forsix months and had learned how to do things without it He was about to return o the fiont and I ex pressed some surprise because of the rule that wounded offi eers do not go back. 'Oh,' he replied, 'that rule only applivs to serious cases. A man who had lost a leg would not go back. He would just be in the way. But an arm does not count." ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL (Meeting Ltd.) The Rev. G. A. Thompson S. T. D. Preacher in Charge Tomorrow Sunday, it a. m. Theme. A premiss of Gods abiding grace Dedication of infants 3. 20 p. m. A Flower Service with an elaborate programme 7. 30 p. 10. The Sin of Envv. There will be music by the Welcome Cornet Band. —Diggis and Roberts The public are cordially vited come and hear them. Comic Entertainment N aid of St. Mary's Church 1 funds .-it (be Church Hal on I uesd iv '-veiling. May 2nd Refreshments will be si Reserved seats is. Gfneial Admi Advice to Nursing Mothers M ANY mothers would like to feed their own children, but are denied the privilege of doing so, because they have not sufficient nourishment for them. The "Allenburys" scientific system of Infant Feeding has provided for all this. When a mother is partly able to feed her baby she may give The "Allenburys" Milk Food No. I for alternate feeds, so alike are the natural and prepared food in this instance, and this food should be continued until the weaning process has been entirely completed. The mother hcrs.lf must be well nourished and to this end may partake freely of the "Allenburys" DIET a partially predicated milk and wheaten food, which like the Milk Food No. 1, is instantly made ready for use by simply adding boiltng water only. After childbirth the "Allenburys" DIET is surprisingly helpful in maintaining the strength and producing a good flow of rich milk. ^llenbumsFcDds T.,"Aii.-k. •• c/-w-vr>e wfci* ..,„ W The "Allenbury." FOODS For Infant*. The "Allenburys" DIET For Nursing Mot hen. For Nursing Mother*. Invalid* Dyspeptic*, and the Aged The 1)1 KT Is gun. distinct 'rom tha 'Allsnburr* Foods lor Infanta. Tkr Allreaarye' laeaa (M.HI..) From 10 month* upward* "Ilk Food Na. I. Milk Pood No. I. '"*m From birth to 3 mouths. 9 to a month*. Malted Food No. S. Ffool 6 months upwards. Tk* 'Alleakarya' Pooder. Tha Simplest and Baal Famine Bottle on Hi.Market. F.asilr cleansed bf flushm* under tha tap. The 'Allenburys' Food* are mad* under special process** by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand. mr Writ, for free book "Infant FMalln* mnd HMaacratnl" C4 pep*.


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Tht Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916, LOGWOOD. SISAL R.J. BOWE Commission Merchant (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Offices:—532 Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Near City Market. STCOK PRODUCE BBB Insist On Kirkman's Borax Soap A Bigger Cake A Better Soap 3d. per Bar At Your Dealer or At The New York Mouse To be had at all Grocers C L. LofthOUSe~Company's Agent DRINX-. Welch's Grape Juice. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. rach. Pints, Is. 4d., %  15s. per doz. t Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 6d. 4-s. 6d. per doc. • T BLACK. S 222' AND The Nassau Cai Opp. Hotel C< Pretty Flower Stand. Wonderful valu<\ If not perfectly aall.faclory. ran be return**! at our exuume aattfour mmiey will u i.r, )i!i[. 11 > %  rduadaa Inrluilliw AI.I. |oat. w chame. you hava paid out. Halilht I2| Inchea. Price 9<-in.X) Poatacaextn. Wright parked 6 Ibi. Sand POSTCARD for Catalogue i.f sil.er Plate. Cutlerv. tVa'cho. ''links. Jewellery, Fountain r 1:I..1 ..-t Artules, Kane; (iuixli, etc.,etc. II will only roil yon a Penny and may nave yon. Pound.. Wo {uarantea tha aafe delivery of all our ftoodS'HintiKtlie War, should any iroods he lost in tran.it, we un. HHlKTnl, RRItlOK. BRISTO Ub ARROW COLLAR If you will give these collars a trial and keep track of their many trips to the laundry you will soon appreciate their worth. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT. TEA BODY & CO., IDC. MAKERS. TROY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. % %  % % % % %  •:• %  1 r •..*..' %  a l^ 1 '" I BhG to notify the public that I will undertake to sell Logwood on commission to the very best advantage. Wr/fe or see E. C. Griffin Biy St. and Victoria Are. NOTICE T his is to inform Mr. Gilbert Thompson that per mission from the undersigned must be obtained before he can enter the Pulpit of St. John's Cathedral (Particular Baptist Society) for the pur pose of officiating in any way. GEO. HUYLER (Chairman) J. H. ROBERTS (Secy) ALE. SYMMONETTE and others (Trustees) NOTICE T ill"-! ii to inform imy Patrons %  ltd the Public in Cianeral Hiui I have opened my Public (•tack Smith Shop; ami am now ready to do anything in 1 %  line ol General repair or new v\ -rk Horn Shoeing -Specially. All work done P. A. HUYLI-.R .. %  %  ' %  Shingles. J US T received from Jacksonville 5 x io."Best Cypress at 36s. gW IO .'.'-_ No bettor grads than these rn the Market—5 x 18 1000. This ^rade 5 carries "Primes" Cypress at s. per same guarantee as the Bests." Any defective shingles can be returned. Also cheaper grade 111 fctock April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS. our '-,-"*• • T Keeping Guard HERB are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these is preserving the balance of trade. TMC SESE H STBEE s on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums aIO cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan 1 is IP S c \ With these reinforcements he Rig Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar kets abroad. G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) Phone 14. East Bay St. Chas. E. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spirits /yiUTILATBDl



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• • LATEST RADIOGRAMS NIIIIIVIN Siddlcdia |urr in vubk moyistrt Balng bound to >wr to the Do(m&i ol no Master. Vol. XIII. No. 156 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 29. 1916 1 '—— %  —^g Pric. THREE CENTS Irish People Loyal, Says Mme O'Gorman. free and easy, I might say, lazy |any better ? Is there anything %  = :-aS&T HERE are something like 150,000 Irish soldi) is fighting under the British colors 111 1-ranee and about as many mure recruited in Ireland and ready to g> to the from. Then arc eighty-seven Irishmen wearing German uniforms, decorated by themselves with a bit of green ribbon and jhe harp,doing trivial military duty in Berlin. I base were the figures given me by Mme. Klora 0 Gorman of Ireland when ilie was asked What there was of truth in the Charges made by some IrishAmericans. Justice ti..IT an.I know before the war and have since seen as a prisoner, that the most despised people in Berlin are those eighty seven Irish traitors with 1 tic green harps on their German uniforms. There is no chance for them to get to the front, the Germau officer told me, because nobody trusts them don't know just what He fails to put the responsibili ty where it belongs, partly 00 himself and partly on the cli mate and customs of Ireland. "The Irish are just a lot of delightful, irresponsible grown up children. They live 111 a boft climate, in a drizzle of warm rain. Everything is kept green and beautilul by nature, and I nobody wants to work hard. If and shiftless, dwellers in the old country. So your prosper ous Irishman in America, who knows nothing of Ireland today, assumes that he knows it all, basing his mistakes on family myths and legends and getting from them his inspiration for mass-meeting attacks on Eng land. "On our own land in Clare, which we gave up to the tenant in the psychology of ownership of land, in the increased selfrespect that is supposed to come from it, that will make the Irish farmers do better than they did as tenants ? I hope s, but it is too soon to make any general statement covering the whole country. Some of them have bucked up and taken a new start. No doubt there are many of them who wish they had feraiS under the provisions of | the old landlords to help them [fraction of a per cent eighty a tile falls off a roof it seven is of ;> o,ooo, but I shouii saj for a guess that the propor tion of the eighty seven traitors wearing German uniforms to the 300,000 Irishmen wearing British uniforms would indicate Senator O'Gorman, fo.examJabout all the disloyalty there is pie, that the Irish of Ireland had! throughout Ireland, assuming no love or loyally [or England, thai there is auy at all." thai they wanted Germany to' The next point that Mine win tlie war. iO'Gormsn wanted to make was One of the things that Mine.' that Senator O'Gorman was no 1 > Gorman was determined nol: kinsman of hers. to do when she came to this' "There was a Judge Odor country to get aid for WOUDded J m;m of our family 111 this coun soldiers in France was to talk [try," she said, "and when I first politics. Hut she happened to (arrived I thought that the Sen arrive at about the time of the|*tor was his son, but I have pro-German meeting of Irishmen learned differently. TheO'Gorin the Hotel Astor and her in mans of Clare, my husband's dignation and her own loyalty family, have lived in the same as an Irishwamau got the better p'*' • for 1,100 vears. Mv bus of her determination for a brief half hour. "Th %  '1 shmen here, who know nothing whatever about it," she said, "try to give ihe impression that Ireland is not loyal. I, who live in Ireland and clo know about it, tell \ nu that Ireland is loyal and will do her full share to help England and France win this war. I thought possibly somebod\ would ask me, so before leav ing France I got mv figures from my husband, The O'Gorman, of County Clare, who is a Colonel and staff officer of the British Army now at the front. There are 151.000 Irish soldiers now in the field and about as many more have ben recruited. "Many thousands of the Irish have been taken as prisoners of war, and to each of them the Germans have offered freedom if he would renounce England and become a German soldier. Tnat is the way of the Germans with all Irish prisoners. They, too, seem to have the same mistake 1 idea that Ireland is not loyal. Isn't there a remarkable similarity between the Berlin notion and the pro-German no tion in New York ? Well, of the thousands of Irish soldiers who have had the chance to buy freedom by treason only eighty-seven have availed themselves of it. I know that. I also know, from a German money than he could at home, and immediately jumps to the foolish conclusion that England was entirely to blame for his officer whom I happened to' l ack of success on the other side. band has served in the British Army for thirty two vears, and for twenty of tln.se sears I ha>e been with him in every part of the British Empire. Always have we had lush soldiers, and always have they been among the best. So I know the Irish at home and away from home, ^iu\ nowhere do thev think of England as the Irish in America would have yOU belies e "I wonder what the Seuatoi O'Gorinans and the Justice Guffs and all the rest of them in the United Slates hope to accomplish by their pro German activities. I low do they ima gine that helping Germans would help Ireland? Should Ireland be* oine a German colo ny the Irish would leave it in rowboatS, they would swim away from it to get to their friends in England. "It is easier to understand why in times of peace a certain type of Irishman in America gets some satisfaction out of denouncing England, and it does no particular harm. It Serves chiefly to disclose the ig norance of the denouncers con cerning the country from which they or their fathers or Brand fa thers have come. An Irishman s easier to let it alone than to put it back. It is easier to remain unethical, d ill such a country than to work hard for mental progress. But when the roofs leak and the children are igno rani and the people live rough ly, it is not a matter of English misrule, hui a matter of climate and the temperament of the I" Ople. It is much as it is in Sicily and other warm coun tries. "But in a generation or so away from the native sod the r< al cause is lost sight of. The Irishman who conns over here I nds iii the more rigorous cli mate and in ihe examples of thrift and hustle on all sides of him an incentive to go to work. His wit, which at home has been merely one of his lovable qualities, here seives him well in the Struggle to make money. Me makes it, inanies a thrifty wife from Ireland —that is, she becomes thrifty aftei she gets to America and they have children. The children go to school and get an education. (It is quite probable that the father, at any rate, the giandfa ther, had never taken the trou ble to learn to write his own name.) The children get bet ter jobs than the immigrant fa ther bad. They get into poll tics and make money. They have fewer children and send them to college, and then this third generation owns automo biles, holds high places in chutch and society and the Government. But they would have done as well in England or Canada or any other part of the British Empire, except in Ireland, where climate, in some parts the soil, and the easy tern perament of the people are the determining factors, not thepo litical conditions. "But the stories of the immi grant grandfathers or fathers about the hard times they had in Ireland are passed down, growing a littls from exaggern the new land laws, we had ten ants who had not paid then rent for sixteen years. We never asked them for it. On the contrary, we mended their roofs for them, kept their gates on the hinges, and when necessary furnished them with cows and pigs. Now these same tenants own the land, as they do through out Ireland. Are they doing out of their difficulties." There is less chafing and less discontent than there was under the old regime, but the climate is just the same, the Irish are still lush. "There is one general statement, however, that can be made to cover all Belaud—all (Continued on 3rd page) Automobiles & Bicycles REO CARS AND POPE BICYCLES (Niagara) FOR SALE, AND FOR HIRE. Sole agent for REO MOTOR CAR Co. Pz^wbt attention to all l^airs Supplies and accessorie Gassoline and Oils PHONE 402 J. P. SIMMS 47 Market St. The highest price paid for LOGWOOD in any quantity chipped for shipping: and delivered on Wharf at Nassau from nowon to July 1st. CAas. B. ROCKWELL, Palm Gate, Nassau St. nrrnrifcWMBMMTinririiiiii IMIIIMII IHH 1 comes here and makes more tion with each generation and spiced always with dennncia tion for England because it puts the ancestors in a better light to look back upon them as mar tyrs to misrule rather than as H. T. BRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE : Wet Side Big Sponge Exchange Nassau, N. P. Bahamas. AGENT HORSES CATTLE w SHEEP POULTRY and other ISLAND Products. We do high I Al MTIL A TBD cla "g


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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, April 29, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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oclc - 9994850
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NiiIIIvin Siddlcdia |urr in vubk moyistrt
Balng bound to >wr to the Do(m&i ol no Master.
Vol. XIII. No. 156
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 29. 1916
1 '^g
Pric. THREE CENTS
Irish People Loyal,
Says Mme O'Gorman.
free and easy, I might say, lazy |any better ? Is there anything
=:-aS&-
T
HERE are something like
150,000 Irish soldi) is
fighting under the British
colors 111 1-ranee and about as
many mure recruited in Ireland
and ready to g> to the from.
Then arc eighty-seven Irish-
men wearing German uniforms,
decorated by themselves with a
bit of green ribbon and jhe
harp,doing trivial military duty
in Berlin.
I base were the figures given
me by Mme. Klora 0 Gorman
of Ireland when ilie was asked
What there was of truth in the
Charges made by some Irish-
Americans. Justice ti..IT an.I
know before the war and have
since seen as a prisoner, that
the most despised people in
Berlin are those eighty seven
Irish traitors with 1 tic green
harps on their German uniforms.
There is no chance for them to
get to the front, the Germau
officer told me, because nobody
trusts them
don't know just what
He fails to put the responsibili
ty where it belongs, partly 00
himself and partly on the cli
mate and customs of Ireland.
"The Irish are just a lot of
delightful, irresponsible grown
up children. They live 111 a
boft climate, in a drizzle of warm
rain. Everything is kept green
and beautilul by nature, and I
nobody wants to work hard. If
and shiftless, dwellers in the
old country. So your prosper
ous Irishman in America, who
knows nothing of Ireland today,
assumes that he knows it all,
basing his mistakes on family
myths and legends and getting
from them his inspiration for
mass-meeting attacks on Eng
land.
"On our own land in Clare,
which we gave up to the tenant
in the psychology of ownership
of land, in the increased self-
respect that is supposed to come
from it, that will make the Irish
farmers do better than they did
as tenants ? I hope s, but it is
too soon to make any general
statement covering the whole
country. Some of them have
bucked up and taken a new
start. No doubt there are ma-
ny of them who wish they had
feraiS under the provisions of | the old landlords to help them
[fraction of a per cent eighty a tile falls off a roof it
seven is of ;> o,ooo, but I shouii
saj for a guess that the propor
tion of the eighty seven traitors
wearing German uniforms to
the 300,000 Irishmen wearing
British uniforms would indicate
Senator O'Gorman, fo.- exam- Jabout all the disloyalty there is
pie, that the Irish of Ireland had! throughout Ireland, assuming
no love or loyally [or England, thai there is auy at all."
thai they wanted Germany to' The next point that Mine
win tlie war. iO'Gormsn wanted to make was
One of the things that Mine.' that Senator O'Gorman was no
1 > Gorman was determined nol: kinsman of hers.
to do when she came to this' "There was a Judge Odor
country to get aid for WOUDded J m;m of our family 111 this coun
soldiers in France was to talk [try," she said, "and when I first
politics. Hut she happened to (arrived I thought that the Sen
arrive at about the time of the|*tor was his son, but I have
pro-German meeting of Irishmen learned differently. TheO'Gor-
in the Hotel Astor and her in mans of Clare, my husband's
dignation and her own loyalty family, have lived in the same
as an Irishwamau got the better p'*' for 1,100 vears. Mv bus
of her determination for a brief
half hour.
"Th '1 shmen here, who
know nothing whatever about
it," she said, "try to give ihe
impression that Ireland is not
loyal. I, who live in Ireland
and clo know about it, tell \ nu
that Ireland is loyal and will
do her full share to help Eng-
land and France win this war.
I thought possibly somebod\
would ask me, so before leav
ing France I got mv figures from
my husband, The O'Gorman, of
County Clare, who is a Colonel
and staff officer of the British
Army now at the front. There
are 151.000 Irish soldiers now
in the field and about as many
more have ben recruited.
"Many thousands of the Irish
have been taken as prisoners of
war, and to each of them the
Germans have offered freedom
if he would renounce England
and become a German soldier.
Tnat is the way of the Germans
with all Irish prisoners. They,
too, seem to have the same mis-
take 1 idea that Ireland is not
loyal. Isn't there a remarkable
similarity between the Berlin
notion and the pro-German no
tion in New York ? Well, of
the thousands of Irish soldiers
who have had the chance to
buy freedom by treason only
eighty-seven have availed
themselves of it. I know that.
I also know, from a German
money than he could at home,
and immediately jumps to the
foolish conclusion that England
was entirely to blame for his
officer whom I happened to'lack of success on the other side.
band has served in the British
Army for thirty two vears, and
for twenty of tln.se sears I ha>e
been with him in every part of
the British Empire. Always
have we had lush soldiers, and
always have they been among
the best. So I know the Irish
at home and away from home,
^iu\ nowhere do thev think of
England as the Irish in America
would have yOU belies e
"I wonder what the Seuatoi
O'Gorinans and the Justice
Guffs and all the rest of them
in the United Slates hope to
accomplish by their pro German
activities. I low do they ima
gine that helping Germans
would help Ireland? Should
Ireland be* oine a German colo
ny the Irish would leave it in
rowboatS, they would swim
away from it to get to their
friends in England.
"It is easier to understand
why in times of peace a certain
type of Irishman in America
gets some satisfaction out of
denouncing England, and it
does no particular harm. It
Serves chiefly to disclose the ig
norance of the denouncers con
cerning the country from which
they or their fathers or Brand fa
thers have come. An Irishman
s easier
to let it alone than to put it
back. It is easier to remain
unethical, d ill such a country
than to work hard for mental
progress. But when the roofs
leak and the children are igno
rani and the people live rough
ly, it is not a matter of English
misrule, hui a matter of climate
and the temperament of the
I" Ople. It is much as it is in
Sicily and other warm coun
tries.
"But in a generation or so
away from the native sod the
r< al cause is lost sight of. The
Irishman who conns over here
I nds iii the more rigorous cli
mate and in ihe examples of
thrift and hustle on all sides of
him an incentive to go to work.
His wit, which at home has
been merely one of his lovable
qualities, here seives him well
in the Struggle to make money.
Me makes it, inanies a thrifty
wife from Ireland that is, she
becomes thrifty aftei she gets
to America and they have
children. The children go to
school and get an education.
(It is quite probable that the
father, at any rate, the giandfa
ther, had never taken the trou
ble to learn to write his own
name.) The children get bet
ter jobs than the immigrant fa
ther bad. They get into poll
tics and make money. They
have fewer children and send
them to college, and then this
third generation owns automo
biles, holds high places in
chutch and society and the
Government. But they would
have done as well in England
or Canada or any other part of
the British Empire, except in
Ireland, where climate, in some
parts the soil, and the easy tern
perament of the people are the
determining factors, not thepo
litical conditions.
"But the stories of the immi
grant grandfathers or fathers
about the hard times they had
in Ireland are passed down,
growing a littls from exaggern
the new land laws, we had ten
ants who had not paid then
rent for sixteen years. We ne-
ver asked them for it. On the
contrary, we mended their roofs
for them, kept their gates on
the hinges, and when necessary
furnished them with cows and
pigs. Now these same tenants
own the land, as they do through
out Ireland. Are they doing
out of their difficulties." There
is less chafing and less discon-
tent than there was under the
old regime, but the climate is
just the same, the Irish are still
lush.
"There is one general state-
ment, however, that can be
made to cover all Belaudall
(Continued on 3rd page)
Automobiles & Bicycles
Reo Cars and Pope Bicycles (Niagara) for
SALE, AND FOR HIRE.
Sole agent for
REO MOTOR CAR Co.
Pz^wbt attention to all l^airs
Supplies and accessorie
Gassoline and Oils
PHONE 402
J. P. SIMMS
47 Market St.
The highest price paid for
LOGWOOD in any quantity
chipped for shipping:
and delivered on
Wharf at Nassau
from nowon to July 1st.
CAas. B. ROCKWELL,
Palm Gate, Nassau St.
nrrnrifcWMBMMTinririiiiii imiiimii ihh 1
comes here and makes more tion with each generation and
spiced always with dennncia
tion for England because it puts
the ancestors in a better light
to look back upon them as mar
tyrs to misrule rather than as
H. T. BRICE
Commission Merchant
OFFICE : Wet Side Big Sponge Exchange
Nassau, N. P. Bahamas.
AGENT
HORSES
CATTLE
w
SHEEP
POULTRY
and other ISLAND Products.
We do high
I Al MTIL A TBD
cla
"g


-------------

The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916,

#
g J '. .
r.. ftlLBKRT DUPI7CH
l-diiir ttitd PnprittH
omoK
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sl
.Vassaii, .Y. /'., Bahamas
I'Uonk MO P. O. BOX MB.
PUBLISHED MAll-Y
RATES
ikUv. We.hiesoay and Friday
H>ecornr ...
(day, and rhursdaytingle o\>y
atunlavsingle copy
Veekh
FMnntbly ........ i-.
Ouarte \\ ... naif Yearly. .|s.
r>arl 18-
to our columns being made Ed. L. Mayer, and Harry |. I rorh Hbenzri Sun
the medium of PERSONAL Kugel; Dr. W. A. Bartlei
ATTACK, misrepresent.i-1 Mr. and Mrs. LvoOel 1.
tioti, or business rivalry. l**oster and Mrs. Gerald 1.
From information since I Cupee and soil.
School in lieu of
treat.
I'AVAIil.l IN A OVA Mr.
gathered by us, Exumian has
deliberately misled us and
misrepresented the facts
which led up to his commu-
nication. We regret and
protest against our columns
being so used against any
one, but particularly so
againsta business man whose
Misses Lauretta Bethel,
and Lena buncombe; Mes
dames Wilhelmina Lewis ami
Lulu Willie; Mr. Gus Alex
ander.
:o:
The Mail Steamer "Morro
Castle" arrived off the port
from Havana, yesterday Fri
Advertising llatei mi bi hue
For 6ntinsertion: tlirea pence iw line
i "ml insertion ai.o unepsnnv i>ef
line lot subsqueut insei tioin.
Adverti*eaMntsunrlei eight line* j~.
ttbc tribune
Saturday. April 29. 1916
The news from England
during the past week has bet n
of a most disquieting nature.
\ e refer particularly to the
violent outbreak of the Sinn
Fein, apparently to us anew
faction, or is it an old one
under a new name ?
Whatever it may be Mr.
A-quith's opinion doubtless
is correct, German machina-
tions are responsible.
\s to the arch-traitor Roger
Casement hanging is too
good for him.
The government should
make no mistake, but hand
le this Irish outbreak and
Roger Casement with a firm
and crushing hand.
It is a most unfortunate
occurrence just at this junc
ture and has a bad effect the
empire and without.
This evidence of Irish per-
Hdiousness does no) support
the claim of Irish loyalty
made by Mme. O'Gorman of
the O'Gorman of Clan- in the
article from the New York
Times which is printed on the
first feage of this issue.
The attack on I.owestof*.
in Tuesday is a possible pre
hide to Der Tag for which
Germany has 1 >ng been toast
ing and wishing (?) and for
which we have been prepared
in "Watchful Waiting" and
are "Ready Aye Ready."
As a set off we have the
bombardment of German po-
sitions on the Belgium coast;
the recent progress of the
Russians; the noble stand of
the French at Verdun and our
grip of the situation in Flan
ders.
The landing of the Russians
at Marseilles may reasonably
be assumed to mean a com
hined Allied blow on tin
Western front at no distant
date.
No doubt about it, this is a
testing time for England and
if her sons he true to her and
she be true to herself the issue
we devoutly pray will be vic-
torious for her.
This newspaper does not
necessarily endorse or sym-
pathise with all the commu-
nications which appear in
our columns.
There appeared in our is-
sue of the 22nd inst. a com-
munication over the signa-
ture EXUMIAN.
While we are not responsi-
ble for the sentiments of our
correspondents, nor do we
necessarily endorse them as
stated above, yet we object
reputation and integrity isIday evening with 2 passeng
thereby impugned. lers Miss Florence Poitiei and
We repudiate any approv- Mrs. Laura Poitier for Nas
al of, or sympathy with this sau, and 104 in transit for
communication, and it is New York,
left for our correspondent in! She embarked the follow
self defence, to make good ling passengers and proceeded
his assertions over his own to New York.
3 10 o
7 17 b
name, and disprove that the
Misses Genevieve Griffith,
LETTER SIGNED EXL'M- Lucy Griffith. F. C. Apple
l\N IS A PURCHASER ton, Edith Whyte, May Clare,
WD NOT A SELLER,
AND MISREPRESENTED
HIMSELF.
We regret that we should
have been misled into giving
publicity to statements cal
dilated to injure one so long
Bessie Ryan, Mary Ryan,
[Catherine Fitzpatrick, Delia
McMahon, Annie Brady, Nel
lie Moran, Sarah Mora 11,
:o:
BAHAMAS RED CROSS GUILD.
Nassau,
Bahamas,
37th April, 1916,
The first parcel was ship-
ped on the 11 th October,
191 j, and the last on 20th
April, 1916, to the British
Red Cross Society.
271 mufflers. 4058 handker-
chiefs, 60 towels.
17 shirts, 514 washers 3
cardigans,
18 helmets, 5 pneumonia
jackets,
8 pans mittens 46 relic
bags, 5 pairs pyjamas,
304 pillow cases, 90 pairs
of socks 7b limb pillows,
72 H.W. bottle covers, 11a
bandages,
4 sweaters, 1 pair gl< >v- s,
Mabel Barnett, and Emma 9 eye bandages,
Sexton: Mr. and Mrs J. A.
Rutherford, Mr. and Mrs. E.
time a friend and supporter! L. Durkee and son, Dr. and
of our journal as Mr. Moore, Mrs. R. F. Weir, Revd. and
and we hereby tender him Mrs. W. S. Lovell and child;
our sincere regret at havin6
inadvertently been the me,ins
of causing him unnecessary
annoyance, and trust that
he will accept this amende
honorable. [Ln.
OUR 3RD BAHAMAS
CONTINGENT
will be leaving our shores 011
the iotli May in response to the
call of the King for "men and
more men" we are pleased to
see that 85 brave boys have
come forward, voluntarily and
offi red tin mselvi s in deft net if
their homes and the Empire
which we all love so well, but
al this moment a few more men
are wanted to complete the e.um
bei required. Won't you, and
Messrs Ldmund E. Brown,
Frederick Mader, and Osw
aid Leavitt.
Miss Cloraina Wells
Mr. W. Harvey Wood.
:o:
The American Wrecking [o thTBelgians.'
lug "Ramos arrived tins j .>
morning from New York. ^ SO]i^)[{SSOS
There will be a floral Ser Sec. B- R- C. G
vice at St. John's CathadralI (signed)
Church on Sunday afternoon CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE.
t> walking slicks, ; woollen
band,
19 parcels sweets, 1030
gauze pads,
3 bundles old linen, 3
bundles gauze pads,
1 bundle second hand un-
derwear, making a total of
1 articles.
We have also shipped a
parcels of clothing and hats
at 4 o'clock. All are wel;
come.
:o:
We have it on good auth-
ority that Logwood is sell-
ing at g per ton,
:o:
IN RE ICE
Except for some unforseen
contingency, we shall not be
wail a lack of Ice this year,
you, come forward. Tins is no I nor perhaps ever again, for we
tune for dull inaction; action, I learn 00 the very best authority
your action today may influence j that the enterprising proprietor
the. destinies of your country of of The Ice House is expecting
the Empire. ; momently a cargo of 100 Tons
The heart beats with proud to arrive from Miami. Besides
President.
:o.
Port Howe S. S.
bth April 1916.
I he Editor of The Tribune.
Dear Sir
It may interest your read-
ers to hear what is being done
here.
On Sunday evening the
191I1 ultimo a meeting was
held in /.ion Baptist Chapel
Mi. J. D. Dorsett Public
School Teacher Presiding.
The Chapel was filled to
its utmost capacity. The
Lesson was taken from The
Gospel according to St. Luke
10th Chapterverses 25 to
37. And an eloquent and
well-chosen Address was de-
livered by our teacher from
the words "Go thou and do
likewise". Me told us about
the origin of The Red Cross
Society and pointed out
vhat is being done in our
sister-islands His pleading
for the wounded were so
earnest that after B speech
by Mr. W. W. Allen, a native
of Tarpiim Hay every one
present promised to
work for I he Bahamas Red
Cross Guild Superintendent
of The Suud iv School filled
with patriotism promised to
make a collection from his
scholars.
It was also decided to de-
liver to The Commissioner
the O I feet ion taken up dur-
ing the 1st Sunday in every
month begining with the
month of April, and this will
be done as long as the war
Bahamian Red Cross Guild
Statement of Account on
27th April, 1916.
Cr.
lotal amount col-
lected from 1st
Sept., 1915 1057
which, he has in stock sufficient
to meet any emergency which
elation as each man takes up
his station under the sheltering
folds of the flag that has braved mav arise.
for a thousand years the battle I Mr. Johnson has now in
and the breeze, the Hag that has course of erection on Last Shir
sheltered and protected you.al
your life long, will not you be
proud to stand up it) i is defence?
You will if the blood of free
men beats in your veins. Do it
now, delay is dangeious.
Enlist today and do not let
the oppertunity of your life pass
you. There are those who envy
you the opportunity.
As has been announced the
Commandants office will be
open every day from 8 to 6 you
only need it open one day
that is today.
:o:
We had the pleasure of a
call at our office today from
Dr. Gascoyne St. Pierre Wor
rell, who recentl t arrived in
our city.
The Doctor intends locat
ing here, he has been in prac
tice in the United States for
ten years, is married and no
doubt wiUJjDf^K^hJBfeOur
midst.
Pa j
er "Esj
on Tl
Mi<
Mrs.
ley Street a building which
will contain an Ice Plant with
a capacity of twelve tons a day
May it flourish. We wish
Mr. Johnson abundant sneoess
in his new venture in which he
no less than we are to be con
gratulated upon his laudable
enterprise ; he upon a large
prospective profitable invest
ment. and we upon a relief from
those ills which have been our
annual heritage
IANMAIAN RED CROSS QUILD.
6
57 6
~~~s
Dr.
Sent to British Red
Cross Society 763
Spent on purchase
of materials 183
Now to C r. in
Hank of Canada 111
D
o o
o 8
Hope Town
Public School, Stan-
yard Creek
Ra; ged Island
Rum Cay
Baptist Union. Ben
nett Harbour
3 L5 o
10 6
8 o
10 2
5 3 8
15 10
5 >9 6
:o:
BAHAMIAN RED CROSS GUILD.
Singing of the Cruci
fixion by Children
iff of St. Hilda's
Agnes
4 7
1 have examined the ac-
counts of the Bahamas Red
Cross Guild and find them
to be correct, as shown by
the above Statement.
The balance in hand agrees
with the bank account,
(signed)
G. H. GAMBLIN.
(signed)
G. MAUD MILLER,
Treasurer,
(signed)
CONSTANCE ALLARDYCE,
President.
BAHAMAS CONTINGENT FUND.
Amount previously
acknowledged '3'5 '6 7
John Miller
Savannah Sound
Mr. W, E. Fountain
6th. Collection.
Mr. and Mrs. A. B.
Sutton 21 to 2Q week
Mr and Mrs. Hugh de
Glanvillr
continues.
Too much credit cann.it
be given to our worthy Coin
niissonei John A. Bowel', q.
for his untiring efforts in
arousing the people to a sense
I Of the.1 duty as British Sub-
jects. Suitable hymn's wert
selected foi thi^occasion and
I they were heartily and har-
D I moniously sung. The Sei vice
was brought to a close by
the singing of the hymn "God
blest our native land" and
the pronouncing of The
Benediction by our Teacher.
Thanking sou in anticipa-
tion for space.
Yours respectfully
A LOYAL CITIZEN.
Editor Tribune :
I wish THE TBIBUNS would
add to its usefulness and inter-
/- *st by giving to its readers reg
i io57 ularly a summary of the points
of Hills when introduced before
the House and by following up
such summary with a report of
the progress of such Mills.
I lie man who cannot attend
the sittings regularly, or who
dislikes nosing about for infor
nation among the members
I who themselves often don't
seem to know what is going
on), has no way of finding out
just wliat is going on jn the
ll<>use of Mystification.
There is, for instance, the
Bill for an Act relating to Di-
seases of Plants.
Every owner of a fruit tree
is interested in the health of his
tree.
Yet the Press has given us no
idea of the provisions of the
f3ill beyond printing its title.
And I am not aware that one
can get correct information on
any Bill excepting he attends
the sittings or begs the loan of
the printed Bill from some
Member who himself has, I be-
lieve, only (me copy.
Now, the Plant disease Bill
is a very important one and the
preservation of our fruit may
4 O
iH 7
I if. o
4 0
1321 19 2

>
f
l ai urn


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916,
J"!
hang upon legislation compel
ling destruction of scale and
disease.
But the Bill is so full of odi
oui restrict I on and threat that | listment from amongst unattest
to most of us turn tree disease ed married men.
posals foreshadowing general
Compulsion unles success at
tend immediate efforts to obtain
men required by voluntary en
is preferable to bad legislation.
Another Bill proposes the
ripping up of our streets to lay
gas pipe and directly or indi-
rectly (1 don't know which) the
erection of a gag plant some-
where along llie water front.
If there is a member of the
Legislature who knows what
an intolerable nuisance <. gas
plant is in or iear a residential
city, it has been a surprise to
me that he has not gn( a move
<>n him to Knock the proposal
out of ilie House instanter.
Besides being foolish, lepisla
live mystification is expensive
and the taxpaver has to foot
the bills!
Witness the folly and expense
and impratftabilitv <>f Medical
and Health and Hospital Leg
islation, and the mystification
of amateurishness that runs
through so much of our recent
legislation.
Mr. Editor, you ean be of help - * '
to your readers and to the pub M'OOps near Oaxaco. 500 re-
lic generally by throwing light l)*!s were killed.
into dark spots.
The government proposals
were publicly announced tcday
in a long statement to the press.
Berlin, 26: -The German na
val forcesj which bombarded
Lowestoft 'yesterday SHnk t|ie
steamer King Stephen and cap
tured her crew it was officially
announced today.
This is the same steamer that
refused to rescue the crew of the
Zeppelin I.. 19 which dropped
into the North Sea.
It was also announced that a
destroyer and another scout
boat aside from the King Steph
en were sunk and that on one
of the cruisers attack a fire was
observed.
:o:
April 29th, 191G.
Mexico City: War depart-
ment advices indicate that
a fo ce of 1.000 rebels were
defeated by goverumen t
would have been just as loyai'
and prompt if Belgium had not
been involved at all. The Irish
There is no reason and
no
Paris: -Another Contingent
sense in having our legislationjof Russians have arrived at
born in the smoke of mystery Marseilles.
A legislature is not a lying-in,
hospital.
Keep the public informed oil
legislation and proposer! legis
lation. Give the exact facts.
You have thrown the light of
publicity Oil the Hospital fin.in
cial scandal Why do you slop
short of telling us just how
much of the taxpayers' monev
has been stolen? Gloss it as
you may, any misappropriation
or
moneys is in plain words
steal.
Every foolish or impractica
bli legal enactment is a misap
propriatinn of public money, at
least to the extent of the print
ing and promulgating of
London:The British bat
tleship Russell (14.000 tons)
has been sunk bya mine in
the Mediterranean.Shecarried
a crew of 800 men, of whom
124 are missing. A dmiral
Freemantle and 24 officers are
among the saved.
A German submarine was
sunk off the Cast Coast yea-
rn .sappl.cat.o,, of public 1 lerday. 18 of her crew were
captured.
Reports from Verdun indi-
cate inactivity with fast de-
creasing bombardments.
A heavy action is progress
| ing on the British front with
renewed German activity
impracticability.
TAXPAVER.
in Ireland are for the empire of
which they are a part,first, last,
and all the tim, no matter
what the Irish of New York
may think or say about the
matte*"
What Mme. O'Gorman really
came to this country for is to
get fimd. for the military ho6
pitals on the coast of France.
"You must not blame France,"
she said, "fur appealing to the
outside people for this help.
The French Government is
maintaining six thousand hos
pitals of its own in the interior.
To these institutions are sent
the soldiers who may be restor
ed within short periods. On
the coast we have other hospi-
tals, a large number of them,
filled with wounded men, many
of whom will never recover.
It will be many months before
any of them can go back to the
tronpe ia the field. It is tn get
funds fr this work that I have
been sent to America."
Mme O'Gorman began her
hospital work at the outset of
the war, when she was in charge
of a big staff of nurses at Ant
werp. They were shelled out!
of that town, fleeing to Ostend
with all their wounded in mo |
tor buses, but losing the entire
hospital equipment. She next
served at Calais at the time of
the first battle of Ypres, when
15,000 wounded men were
brought in each night.
From Calais Mine.O'Gorman
went to Dunkirk at the request
of the authorities aid there es- j
tablished a new private hospi-
tal for the French wounded, and
her next service was in Poper
inghe, where, with two Belgian
women and a group of Quakers
from England, she undertook
the work of stamping out a se
rious epidemic of typhoid. Their
inoculated 43,000 soldiers and
civilians before being shelled
out again by the Germans.
"Let me tell you one more
storv of an Irish patriot," said
JOHN BUTLER
Office : 367 Bay St., East
'Phone 245
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Real Estate Agent
---------------EXPORTER ----------------
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
----------------------AGENT----------------------
V
NORWICH UNION FIRE INURANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
LOGWOOD
"THE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is
purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what-
ever the market price is
H. J. CLARIDGE

East B?y St, Nassau.
The Tribune,
for Modern Printing
t

Radiograms
April 118th 1916.
London, j6: In infantry fight
ing in the Votges mountains
Berlin claims the capture to the
Northeast of Celles n| French
first and second line trenches aboard munition ships,
while 011 the South of this re
gion around Senones the French Berlin:A Turkish official
say they frustrated a German statement s*ys tb.it four
attack against their position. 8quadrons of British avalrv
which it is thought precedes w-,
M.r rWm... ~rr Xlme- Gorman, after sum map
ebig German offensive simi- Wog her hoRpital experiences.
lar to that at Verdun. ,* was just ,,;.,, lie k.ft Franc,
I he revolution in Ireland to come to America. On the
is practically at an end. j way to Paris I met an Irish offi
|cer who had but one arm. I
New York;The federal letted him if I should cut his
returned indict- : '"eat for him. He thanked me,
grand jury
ments against eight Germans
harged with placing bombs
Aside from this fighting ar.
were cut to
Hilary bombardments and s.,p- ,1 \, .v ...
Ping operations have formed '-,n,,,d A'm;,tea Wh,ch '
the chief method of warfare 011
the Western front.
The regions of Avocourt I h!|
No 308 Esnes and Mon.it Ze.
pieces on 2 3 a
1 which i:
far from the Suez Canal.
London:Our aeroplanes
velle, Northwest of Verdun, con-
tinue the scene of violent artill-
ery activity.
The Aerial corps of both the
French and t!*e Germans have
been engaged in lighting in the
air or bomb dropping maneu
vies.
No reports of important ev-
ents have been received from
any of the other war theatres.
London, 2b: British regul
ars from Belfast and Eng
land now are in Dublin and
have recaptured from the ievo
lutionary factions several i 111
portant centers which the mem
hers of the Sinn Fein party have
occupied.
They Include St. Stephens
Green and Liberty I lall.
London, 26: Premier Asquith
at the secret session nf parHn
merit yesterday presented on
behalf of the government pro
located ;i ship with supplies
for Kut el Amara stranded 111
the River four miles below
the city.
(Continued from First page)
:o:
her people are loyal to Enghnd.
In a recent article in "The New
York Times" Sidney Brooks at-
tributes the present enthusiasm
of Ireland for the war service to
three lactors, the settlement of
the land tenure question, the
granting of Home Rule, and,
third, that the plight of Bel
gium, a email country, aroused
all the sympathy of Ireland.
Chiefly because it was a small
country. I agree with him as
to the first two factors, nut as to
the third. It is true tli.it the
li ih spii it ol romance, lhf
Ireland's generous \\ mpathies,
wen-aroused in behalf 0/ Bel
gium, but the respons* of be |
land to England's call for mm 1
but said that he could mannge
very well, as he had been with
out the arm forsix months and
had learned how to do things
without it He was about to
return o the fiont and I ex
pressed some surprise because
of the rule that wounded offi
eers do not go back. 'Oh,' he
replied, 'that rule only applivs
to serious cases. A man who
had lost a leg would not go
back. He would just be in the
way. But an arm does not
count." "
ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL
(Meeting Ltd.)
The Rev. G. A. Thompson
S. T. D. Preacher in Charge
Tomorrow Sunday,
it a. m. Theme. A premiss of
Gods abiding grace
Dedication of infants 3. 20
p. m. A Flower Service with an
elaborate programme 7. 30 p.
10. The Sin of Envv.
There will be music by the
Welcome Cornet Band. Diggis
and Roberts
The public are cordially
vited come and hear them.
Comic Entertainment
N aid of St. Mary's Church
1 funds .-it (be Church Hal
on I uesd iv '-veiling.
May 2nd
Refreshments will be si
Reserved seats is.
Gfneial Admi
Advice to
Nursing Mothers
MANY mothers would like to feed their
own children, but are denied the privilege
of doing so, because they have not suffi-
cient nourishment for them. The "Allenburys"
scientific system of Infant Feeding has provided
for all this. When a mother is partly able to
feed her baby she may give The "Allenburys" Milk
Food No. I for alternate feeds, so alike are the
natural and prepared food in this instance, and this
food should be continued until the weaning process
has been entirely completed. The mother hcrs.lf
must be well nourished and to this end may partake
freely of the "Allenburys" DIET a partially pre-
dicated milk and wheaten food, which like the
Milk Food No. 1, is instantly made ready for use
by simply adding boiltng water only. After
childbirth the "Allenburys" DIET is surprisingly
helpful in maintaining the strength and producing
a good flow of rich milk.
^llenbumsFcDds
T.,- "Aii.-k.___ c/-w-vr>e wfci* .., ,-----------
W
The "Allenbury." FOODS
For Infant*.
The "Allenburys" DIET
For Nursing Mot hen.
For Nursing Mother*. Invalid*
Dyspeptic*, and the Aged
The 1)1 KT Is gun. distinct 'rom
tha 'Allsnburr* Foods lor Infanta.
Tkr Allreaarye' laeaa
(M.HI..)
From 10 month* upward*
"Ilk Food Na. I. Milk Pood No. I.
'"*m From
birth to 3 mouths. 9 to a month*.
Malted Food No. S.
Ffool 6 months upwards.
Tk* 'Alleakarya' Pooder.
Tha Simplest and Baal Famine Bottle
on Hi.- Market. F.asilr cleansed bf
flushm* under tha tap.
The 'Allenburys' Food* are mad* under special process**
by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand.
mr Writ, for free book "Infant FMalln* mnd HMaacratnl" C4
pep*. Allen 16 Hanburys Ltd.. London, England.
A.D. 1715. Est.bli.bed 200 Year*. A.D. 1915.
LATBD


Tht Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 29, 1916,

LOGWOOD. SISAL
R.J. BOWE
Commission Merchant
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Offices:532 Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Near City Market.
STCOK
PRODUCE
BBB
Insist On
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
A Bigger Cake
A Better Soap
3d. per Bar
At Your Dealer or
At The New York Mouse
To be had at all Grocers
C L. LofthOUSe~Company's Agent
DRINX-.
Welch's Grape Juice.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. rach.
Pints, Is. 4d.,
15s. per doz.
t Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 6d.
4-s. 6d. per doc.

t BLACK. S 222'
and The Nassau Cai
Opp. Hotel C<
Pretty
Flower
Stand.
Wonderful valu<\ If not perfectly aall.faclory.
ran be return**! at our exuume aattfour mmiey
will u i.r,)i!i[.11 > rduadaa Inrluilliw AI.I. |oat.
w chame. you hava paid out. Halilht I2|
Inchea. Price..........................9<-in.X)
Poatacaextn. Wright parked 6 Ibi.
Sand POSTCARD for Catalogue i.f sil.er Plate.
Cutlerv. tVa'cho. ''links. Jewellery, Fountain
r 1:- I..1 ..-t Artules, Kane; (iuixli, etc.,etc. II
will only roil yon a Penny and may nave yon.
Pound.. Wo {uarantea tha aafe delivery of
all our ftoodS'HintiKtlie War, should any iroods
he lost in tran.it, we un .' hi II Uulh Write our llnna
for Uifereiire. Bankan: l.ondou City and Mid-
land Hank, Ltd., 4K, lorn Ntroet. Bristol, Bug.
FFAR^ ITTI (K,u'-\alTefi.Cutltn.
rC/tiVO LIU. V ,.,i- /andSllvarimithi.
W>. HHlKTnl, RRItlOK. BRISTO
Ub
Arrow
COLLAR
If you will give these
collars a trial and keep
track of their many
trips to the laundry you
will soon appreciate
their worth.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT. TEA BODY & CO., Idc.
MAKERS. TROY, N. Y. U., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
: 1 r ..*..- ' a l^1'"
IBhG to notify the
public that I will
undertake to sell Log-
wood on commission
to the very best ad-
vantage.
Wr/fe or see
E. C. Griffin
Biy St. and Victoria Are.
NOTICE
This is to inform Mr. Gil-
bert Thompson that per
mission from the undersigned
must be obtained before he
can enter the Pulpit of St.
John's Cathedral (Particular
Baptist Society) for the pur
pose of officiating in any
way.
Geo. Huyler (Chairman)
J. H. Roberts (Secy)
Ale. Symmonette
and others (Trustees)
NOTICE
Till"-! ii to inform imy Patrons
ltd the Public in Cianeral
Hiui I have opened my Public
(tack Smith Shop; ami am now
ready to do anything in 1 line ol
General repair or new v\ -rk Horn
Shoeing -Specially. All work done
P. A. HUYLI-.R
..'-.' '"*
*
Shingles.
JUS T received from Jacksonville 5 x io."Best Cypress at 36s.
gW IO.'.'-_ No bettor grads than these rn the Market5 x 18
1000. This ^rade
. 5
carries
"Primes" Cypress at s. per
same guarantee as the Bests."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
Also cheaper grade 111 fctock
April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS.
our
'-,-"*
T
Keeping Guard
HERB are responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. Not the least of these is
preserving the balance of trade.
-------TMC-------
SESE H STBEE
s on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums
aIO cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
1

is IP
S c \
With these reinforcements he Rig Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar
kets abroad.
G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big- 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
Phone 14.
East Bay St.
Chas. E. Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
Spirits
/yiUTILATBDl


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