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The Tribune, ;. iSSaUt Saturday April 22, 1316, %  'Li.: :,T DUPUCH, !or. lOIfc *r Shirley & Charloiee Sts ''">Bahamas •o.\r. L'I^I R, o. BOS MS. PUBLISHED IIAILV RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday— angle copy ,j I uesday, an j Thursday-single copy id Saturday-angle copy ... ,l d Wtklr Umithly ... „ * irtfVea.ly... £ 6d fMrl >' ".'ft. J^VARLK IN ADVANCK AdirertiMiiK Rats :-.s lx ,, eilce „, ,j *i •' % %  I-H: three peace ,. line *>r second insertion ; end onepeaat line for subsquent insern A.lvrrtieiiifnts U iiler eigh t lini Ghe tribune Saturday. April 22. 1916 It is rumoured thai tin Development Board hai rescued en maw. -:o. — Mr. and Mrs. Thomas '" i fi rs. each. ? [Sawyer, and Ellen M. Culmer, Misses HattieandKitth G Jon, Mesur Henry Clarke and hint t line s 0 6d ea d>-—Miss *<** Gibson, Mr. Richard G. C oper Miss Nattie B. Sands %i 3d each.—Misses U. S Culmer and Persia Gibson 6 Miss Marquerite Archer 2 Miss Letitia Corper ij £ I 3 l 9 19 2. SHORT SI8HTED A8 USUAL. for a long Ume Logwood has been in this community practically valueless. Now there is a good demand for it and at paying prices, and w, notice that a great deal of it [{being brought into market. Why is it neccessary, that the trees should be dug up by the roots instead of being cut down to the roots after this demand lias bcr,. the Out Island people know how they will be 1 he better it will be i>r them. 1 bese art not the days of slavery nor are we in a state ol peonage, but this man is trying to intimidate the people, especially the ignorant. I' my other friends had lie clout we could have compelled him to deliver us our wood and not taken posiion of our property because u w as freighted to Nassau on one of his vessels, but we got weary of the man, The highest price paid for LOGWOOD in any quantity chipped for shippingami delivered on Wharf at Nassau from now on to July 1st. Chas. B. ROCKWELL, Palm Gate, Nassau St. seized on our property paid us what he liked and Hie Mail Steamer"Mexi arrived off the port Last evenPP e d Wl11 t,,ere never be — '" another demand for this valu Sands Charles S. Thompson, Chas. Mather, Orlando F Pri tehard, Clinton A. Albury, the poor out islanders. Edward Saunders Fore rhe question of his right < man. ' ore !:;,!: , ". v ::"!. n :ve rs o f sisai !" <;. no tempanelled ing from Havana with pasfor Nassau, embarked 46 passengers and proce. 10 New York. Mr. and Mrs. Charles H Rockwell, and .\I r Henrv F Aspmwall. —:o:— Hie Mail Steamer "M n terey" steamed from N -—— •" %  1111a \ ' e J 1, %  d i< ,; "" — not likely t with its gates closed. J 10agree. rust that the people Zi The jury were sent bat will insist on their and locked up for the right rhursday April 30 1 The Court met al 10 a.m. —,,,,, a '' n' (,v !T" i 'he Trial of nunUK icti.ii.i. ' "'" "'lery back 4 o loo 10 o thea *ral. Up King and Market Streets through rrin 'iy Place U p Frederick bhirtoyand East starts to the Barracks. BAHAMAS CONTINGENT FUND. Amount previously knowhdged. Job. M.Mer ^^ '" Savannah Sound.— Mr. and Mrs. John V Hilton III Mr. and Mrs. Chas H. Whv.nan Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Johnson Rev. W. T. Culmer 4 s each. M essrs Gibson, Claudius Menassah Snnds, and Caleb tubson 16 0 2s. each.—Messrs Da \ 1,1 Gibson, Henry K. Sands. Mesd.uin Annie }. (iibson and EH a L. Clarke; M LI la Barnett. JO 0 8 o G. 0 John S. Clarke, a few days ago with some Logwood for sale. The owner of the wharf where we landed and also of the v< 1 came by refused to allow me to take my wood and sell 1$ elsewhere unless I paid him 41 0 o per ton freight, twice • much as the usual freight. He even threatened to send los vessel back to Lxuma with the cargo of wood unless it was sold to him. This createdquite a panic amongst "•poor people. Now, Mr. l-ditor is this right, for any man to act in this way he even refuses to allow any one of the other buyers of Loa wood and Sisal Ac to go on us wharf. He is getting a large fleet of vessels to bring, SU-ogwood rite, from the Out Islands, to be landed at' his wharf, sold to hi„ laildno one else, without the privilege of allowing other l> ers to compete at| placed wholly and and delivered a Verdict of Manslaughter with a recom Kl"s and privileges in visit ogany vessels docked al the wharves there and that the Uul Island people will „ot slop freight on any vessels where the.r property is apt to f)e confiscated Shout |w*"iugnierwitna n snouia this man continue mendation to 00 mercv Lanner"^^ h l. present Th %  %  'i' D v, a R 'veratIkskullbr.,l [head and about Dvinsk and via &&*&£* In Galicia „, |bI "";• leutooshavem, "'. ""," m '": i Joints Russia,, '"r I !ol them 10 The Court adjourned until to a. in. tomorrow. Friday April 31 L r m^'nl?^ 6 ,,,an<,i rhirtj <>f train. .... (na '•jury came int., Conn collision of trains delivered a Vcidi, i n f 'Jotk New Haven and the l" l s """ '" i" nal servitude for Life, and adjourned un til I uesday next. —.'o:— IN THE SUPREME COURT. April Sessions 1916 Wednesday April 19. tinued.) 'iformation No. 1 Darnel Stuart, Murder, was called. l he Accused on being arraigned_pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Culmer appeared for the accused. 'be following jury was lielled : 'Ji T. L. Amourv, ; Grist, James (J., Radiograms \pti\ 19th IQI6. .Washington:—The c cation which he has drafted ni the last word id the United States to Germany on the submarine issue was completed today by Presi dent Wilson. I, probably will be despatched to Merlin tomorrow ""' d< cumenl reviews I Ger man lubmariira activities since the "• n was s„ n k.„„t m K ., s plain that only .-,,, immediate %  -' %  th..(i,. rin a„ policy can roakeposs.ble the continuation of friendly relations between the two nations, %  I '--:„..,;;•;;,;;;,;;;;", |,^: £< purred at 7:30 o'clock Jnd [ur hours afterwards wrecking nd bo Pal crews ware s,.„i ? have recovered thirty bodies lli.-dr.ithso.ciHin „,„•„,„ car of a four.coach local train which had stopped at the hnral ; o,o„uli,n„ waeruadowoTby Hi >ffflt-|>aa7'ess bound from 5ofo'New Vork.This coach ;. w ; s r, 7"P' d "lbur„e,l. another ctiiiiimitiicaiin'r tn ,i,. '" ed h..th bulldioip "SU( ,y Al.,,,p„,| ,„(„• „„„, spy**-2 JI nnil decision as to „K„.I %  recalled tn.l.iary attache tojalleg.d blunde !" at A*!""" \MVTI



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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 22, 1916, %  il J 'i *' in the. Dardanelles and MfSopot amia its alleged mistake and dplays in connection with 11111:11 tions and the air service were re viewed and contrasted with the ptrfrat ovgaajxatioti reigning in enemy countries. Hie "TIMES mi Iitary coi respondent printed nn article with an elaborate map pur p 1 ting to show the exact diapos It ion ofeiionnmis forces of tier man troops mas ed along the Bri rich front in Flanders and in France and drawing the conclus ion th-it it" il Bl itains still is lacking the necessary reserves to meet a big attack. Chihuahua:—The governor lias admitted that the reports of Villas death were only rumors. Washington:—President Wilson has sent a note to Germany demanding an absolute change in her submarine policy at once or there will be a break in diplomatic relations. The President explained to Congress that his action was necessary and as they are the only body able to declare w: r he had called a joint session He cited many cases, from the l.usitania to the latest sinking. Copies of th note were sent to all neutral conn tries, assuming that they are equally interested in the out come. No note has been sent to Turkey or Austria yet, it being jus' a matter between in my and the United Slates. The note points out the indiscriminate use ol submarines igainst neutral vessels and states thai parts of a tor pdo found aboard the Sus sex by American naval officers establishes conclusively that the vessel was torped without warning by a German submarine. An appendix to the note its entirely with an analysis of facts in the Sussexcase and di lhal can n ival o .foundscrew b ilts corresponding with th<>se on German t <> 1 pedoes in possession of the French at Toulon. London: -Premier Asquith stated that unless the cabin si works together at once it means an end to the government He will make a stab ment tomorrow*. Paris:—There has been spirited bombardment South of Haudremonl Wood. I he fall of Trebizonde aroused 1 it enthusiasm. It is reported that three Turkish diviStops defended the city. The Black Sea fleet assisted. — 'O.' — April aitt, 1916. Constantinople:—Ac o I<1 ing to the critical condition of the British bines in Kutel Amara the commander has ordered the civilian population t* leave town. Washington: —The answer to the German note is expe :ted by the end of the week, which 'the administration considers a reasonable time. The note arrived in Berlin and it is expected that it was delivered by Ambassador Gerrar-d tod London: -It is authoril ativ 1 -I that the 1 Paris:—A strong Ruisian force has arrived at Marseil les to assist the Allies. The French have assumed the offensive on the right bank or tha Meuse and have captured parts of German trenches and occupied a re doubt. Several hundred Ger man prisoners were captured. Marseilles:—A royal wel Come was accorded to Rus sians who landed here. Washington: —Marines from the Brooklyn Navy Yard have been sent to guard the Tuckerton and Sayville wireless stations. — :o: 22nd April, 1916. Paris, 20: — The French have taken the offensive around Wr dun and are gaining contintinually. No other developments however. Washington 30:—The press of the United States without [regard to political bias praised President Wilsons attitude on the ultimatum to Germany. The New York limes said in j its editorial comment of the la test notes: "Before proceeding to the rupture of relations Ger many might to measure the om nip ttence ol gold before de< id ing in favour of extreme means. Germany wr are certain will think of the fad that there ex istl at the present lime in our banksthree billions of dollars more than exist in the central banks of Prance, England, Rus Ilia, Germany, Holland, Sweden and Japan." Paris, 20 :—The note of Pre Isident Wilson to Germany has caused much enthusiasm here High officials believe (bat B rupture of relations between the two countries is inevitable. Amsterdam, JO:— It is semiofficially known here that the German bankers have appealed to the emperor to use every means in his power to avoid a rupture <>f relations with the United States. They declare that such n break would mean the certain bankruptcy of Ger many The entrance of the United "states into the war would i*na hie the Allies to continue the war indefinitely. are expected in France before Spring. Paris:—The French continue their progress in the region of Deadmans Hill capturing German trenches, four officers and 150 men. East of the Meuse a fierce German attack was repulsed. I he French have gained in the Haudremonl sector. Athens:—The Italians have occupied Thanissi near the Gr ek-Albanian frontier. Washington: —It is report ad that the Canadian govern ment intends removing sail ors ol belligerent nations from all Great Lakes ships touching Canadian ports. Washington:The Japan ese Ambassador has been in consultation with Secretary Lansing regaiding the Cab foinia situation. Washingtim:— The cabinet considered the Mexican situa tion today. No action is ex ted pending ( ieneral Scotts report. LOGWOOD "T"HE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is %  purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what ever the market price is H. J. CLARIDGE East Hay St, Nassau. %  H. T. BRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE : w e t side Big spon*e Exch*ng Nassau, N. P. Bahamas. AGENT HORSES ^j § SHEEP CATTLE | W POULTRY SPONGE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products. JOHN BUTLER <*#*• RELIGIOUS SERVICES. Sunday April 23. r ST. MATTHEWS PARISH CHURCH EASTER DAY 6.00 a in. I lol) Eucharist. s o. ;i in. Holy Communion. 10 15 a.m. Sundaj School. 11 a.m. Mattins 4 p m. The Catechisms. 7 30 p.m. Evensong. 'I HE CATHEDRAL NASSAU. Services ai the Cathedral on and after Eastec I 'ay, will he at 7.00 a.m. Holy Communion 7 30 p.m. l'\' Office : 367 Bay St., East 'Phone 245 Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and Real Estate Agent EXPORTER Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods A G E N T NORWICH UNION FIRE I.'.URANCE SOCIETY, Norwich [ IL A TED j Washington, JO : — President Wilson tins evening informed the Japanese Ambassador that he would use his influence to have stricken from the innni gration hill any features that will he objectionable to Japan n number of which it is under Stood will he incorporated in the bill. — :o:— 22 April 1916. Washington:—Press des patches announce that the submarine note was deliver ed in Uerlin hut there is no official report owing to reli gious holidays in Germany. It is feared the reply will be delaved. The administration will wait a reasonable time. It is feared that in the mean time submarine action may complicate the situation, by killihg Americans ahoatd neutral ships. London:—Lloyds report the Dutch steamer Lodewijk Van Nassau was sunk and five of the crew l 1 an a of a million I! SEVENTH DAY ADVENT1ST CHAPEL. Services at 7.30 Sundaj ing April 23. subject:— "The Kaith That is accounted for Righteousness." All are 1 01 dially invited. collected from the censo correspondence information ol material use in capturing from neutral countries trade which should he theirs legitimatt l\. The accusation is without a particle of truth: the instructions issued to the censors make per fectly i leai thai no reason other than that of possible damage to the enemy can justify the inter ferencs or sves the examination of any correspondence. CHANGED CONDITIONS "There remains the second subdivision of the letter mail, that which is carried on neutral ships and which in the ordinary course of business will not pass 'through the belligerent conn tries or enjoy the postal facili ties of belligerent powers. Let %  t lie stated at once that the Allied (iovernments do not de part from the principle which was initiated during the American civil war. and laid down by Convention No. II of The Hague Conference, 1907, the (Continued from First page) more honorable attempts of ven turesome seamen to run the gauntlet of blockading squad rons, evidence on all of these is lying in the mail. While liual ly the ramification of the (Jer man spy system, all embracing J principle of the inviolability of in its clutches and tending to neutral mails. At the same decentralize to more distant [time the Allied Governments countries as the nearer ones be hold a conception of interim come too hot to hold them, this tional law which admits that we should be all but powerless I changing conditions may necesto check but for the censorship. sitate the re-interpretation of we exercise upon the mail." established principles. In eve Lord Newton next referred to j ry country the postal facilities a change which has been made in Congress. "Before I leave the question of this first subsection of letter mails, it will be well to deal briefly with one point which has very naturally caused some comment in the United States. It has been asserted that the have undergone what amounts to a transformation since 1861 : not only is the conveyance of mail much cheaper and consequently enormously swollen, but trading houses taking ad vantage of this fact have re sorted to every kind of device for twisting the postal facilities censorship of these mails, which to suit their pur as a military measure may be "We legitimate enough, has been merely warped by the censors of the signmeri allied powers into a hip but witfl •her than niilitai in efl 10th I vici ing 1 BfjJ in part %  I 1 Acample, on board the Tuban tia on Uk inward \ o\ge 174,' pounds ol rubber ol the lust quality and seven paicels of wools w ere discovered : on board the steamer Medaii seven parcels of raw rubbei weresei; ed, whili lie sane ntrol L.V ercised upon the Dutch steanteZaandijk discovered no less than 368 packages of dillerent mer cbandise. As instances of arti cles found in mails bound in wrd to European ports maybe mentioned coffee,seeds, linseed, vegetable oil, saltpetre, &C. The Gelria, on its inward v.oy age, contained 1,390 bags of high grade raw rubber, each [hing about one pound, ami on its outward voyage thirteen packets of diamonds valued at $3,350. The Hollandia, oul ward hound, contained 1,265 packets of rubber. The Ryn dam, the Tubantia, the Frisia, the Coen, the Nieuw Amiter dam, the Noordara, the Hotter dam and other boats contained on their outward voyage! an enormously varied cargo of merchandise consisting in mod erate consignments of snane times as often M fifty different species of merchandise. "1 think von will agree that *uch a traffic, both outward and inward, however vexatious certain individual seizures may appear for the moment, does take on the character of a serious business transaction, and one which if left unchecked can produce very serious military effect to the detriment of the allied powers. (To be Continued.) Noti ice T ill. Auction Sale at St Matthew's Rectory on pnl • ,th hns bei C icel :



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The Triune, Nassau, Saturday April 22, 1916, GWOOD SISAL I R.J.BOWE Commission Merchant (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Offices:—532 Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Near City Market. PRODUCE WONDERFUL VALUE Solid Gold Safety Pin Brooch** set with Pin* P*rl* 3 1 (TICinU) /" EACH. Insist On cap A Bigger Cake A Better ooap 3u. per BP At Your Dealer or At The New York House Every Brood la carefully ex .mined be ton Ifttvinit lln workshop aoi lid. latal BIX Btooi bat M I 1" '"*' Send POBT CARD for Catalomie of J-wellery, .1 i.un. ram %  etc. u in V i-m ana m*y -vrot W^ i*UKr*ntaa 'ha afe delivery of all our f>od8't'inntr th* W 1 B 10 replace th< m v, rlteoui Bank Banker*: U ndon < 1 > and M.ih 1 th Ud„ *> < orn tJireen, nnmoi. tog era DC I'm /E.td,\ Wholeaale Export rt/VK3 LIU. I IH4( Jewellera, 236 LB.&TOL BI3GE. BRlsrOL, En K ... —J-T-; -, %  Sold by W. Hilton 260 Bay St. qBiaBawawnaBs.n'.T.si'i m; 10 be hau at all Grocers C L. LofthOUSe-Company'i Agent ARROW COLLAR All Arrow collars are made of fabrics bleached and shrunk in our own plants. They always fit and sit correctly and are the most durable. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, PFAi ..' 1 & CO.. Inc. MAKERS. TBUY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 3 x 19"Best Cypress at 36s. per 1000. No better grade than tliese on tlie Market—5 x 18 "Primes" Cypress lit 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our same guarantee as the Bests." AMY defective shingles can be returned. \lo cheaper grade in ttock April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS. T Keeping Guard HERE arc responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the Flag. Not the least of these is preserving the balance of trade. -THESHOE £4=DRISK= Welch's Grape Juice. PRICES : its, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per doz. i Ihnts, 9d. 8S. 6d. per doz. J Pints, 5d. 49. 6d. per do*. BLACK'S AND The Nassau C Opp. Hotel I BbG to notify the public that I will undertake to sell Logwood on commission to the very best advantage. Write or see E. C. Griffin Cor. Bay St. and Victoria Ave. FOP Sale 1 Red room Set 1 Dining-room Set 1 Parlor Set Can be inspectedat anytime. Applv to A.M. WILI'.IAMS i, on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan K ^rV KNOWLES With these reinforcements he Big Four will be able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar kets abroad. G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big 4, Hay St. (Sponge Exchange) Phone 914. East Bay St. FOP Rent Rooms over "Tribune*' Office Apply jILBKRT DUPUCH, fribune" Office Chas. E. Bethell Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Ales Wines Spirits •> r



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• LATEST RADIOGRAMS <• Nvilllsja B.ddirlua turnre In verb* rrnsujatri Beinu. bound to awetir to the Dogmn.* of no Master. %  %  Vol. XIII. No. 130 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 22. 1916 Price. THREE CENTS Get Many Secrets In German Mail LONDON, March 24. —"The censorship of mails always h;ts had in free countries an ominous sound. It is a subject which is very easily confused ljucause theie is more than one suit of mail and more than one kind of case which must be contemplated. It is therefore well worth whileto explain exactly what is claimed and what is being done by the British and Allied Governments, "The neutral powers have a right to demand that nothing 1done against the law, ami further, when this Iris been de moostraft d, it is only reason,! ble that they -should expert thai whatevei is done should be performed with the inaxi mum amount oi regard for then convenience winch it is possi ble for the belligerent to exer .11 statement will dc very much to remove a sense of am e, a Inch is produced express reservation for this pur pose was made by the German delegate and accepted without dissent. PARCEL MAIL AS MERCHANDISE "Parcels then are covered by HO convention and can be treat ed in exactly the same way as ordinary cargo. This is a view accepted by the United Slates. In a letter dated April 8, 1915, the Second Assistant Postmaster General at Washington, who has charge of the division of foreign mails, writing doubt less with the authority of the United States Administration, admits without comment the contention of the Commander of the Prinz Mitel Freidrich that the parcel mail on board the French steamer Floride, which he had sunk, could legally be regarded as merchandise. "On Sept. 23 last his Majes ty's Government informed the neutial Governments that the carried no less than 69 parcels by the parcel mails service, which contained 400 revolvers destined for Germany via. Amsterdam. In eight shipsdestined for Hamburg (steamships, Tijuca, Bahia, Jaguaribe, Ma ranhao, Acre, Olinda, Para, Brazil) there were discovered no less than 1,30a parcels con taining m 311437,510 kilograms of raw rubber. In the steamship United States, bound for Scandinavia, it was discovered that the parcel mails contained 1,594 parcels of furskins, 221 parcels of military boots, 418 parcels of strip iron, and 80 parcels of ferro-vanadium. In the parcel mails on the Of car II., inward bonnd, were found 21 packages of machinery tools, in the Hergensfjord two packages of iron pyrites, and six of machinery parts. and inagnihed bv the suspicion! ,, ., .... ,. h [attention of the Allied Govern >vrarbeanng or tyrannous! 1 j 1 %  .1 1 mciiK had ol • conduct easily believed to lie behind what ii unknown or imperfectly understood." In thi lids Lord Newton, who has taken over at the British Foreign Office some of the departments of which Lord Robert Cecil had charge before he 1 <\\c Minister ol Blockade, began an exhaustive and carefully considered statement in re ply to American criticisms ol an I objections to the policy ol the Grand Alliance in regard to the exaniinate.n of the mails. There has been an exchange of diplomatic correspondence between the governments at Washington and London on this vexed question, and while the exact terms of the notes have not been disclosed, it has been generally assumed that on the American side the corres poudence began with a formal protest against British interference with Aroeiican mails While Lord Newton speaks as an individual, it may equally be assumed that the statement which he has prepared for "The New York Times" closely follows the lines of the official re ply drawn up by Sir Edward Grey. "Mails may be parcels or let. been drawn to the increasingextentto which goods on then w ay to or from enemy countries were being s^nt by parcel post. The British Goi ernment stated that they would regret if the Allies were obliged to interfere in any way with parcel mails, but they pointed out that if the practicecontinu ed they would have to exercise then undoubted right of seizing go'ids in parrel mails which were liable to rapture. Other wise they could not prevent contraband reaching the enemy 01 restrict effectively their ex porl trade. "Thus every opportunity was given to neutrals, if they wished to avoid interference with par eel mails, to take Bt< ps to pre vent goods being sent by them which would render it necessary for the Allied Governments to interfere. "It is therefore legal to exer cise belligerent rights against the parcel mails, but when once this has been admitted, there is the further point whether or not international courtesy toward the neutraM powers is really Over ridden by the necessity of war from the point of view of the belligerent. To this the Allied Governments must ante -r mails.'* Lord Newton con.lswer in the affirmative. One tinned. "Let us start by clem mi;;ht make out an extremely long list of ships which ostensi ing up the rase of the former. It was at The Hagut Confer ence of 1907 that the first pro posal WM made for the immu nity of postal correspondence, and it was made clear in the discussion of the fourthcommis sion of that conference that there was no intention of ex tending to parcels the proposed immunity of letter mails. An bly convey parcel mails, but are in reality conveying nothing more nor less than merchandise ALL OF MILITARY VALUE "It isunnecessarj to erapha size the great military value of all these articles, and you will probably ngrer that the action of the Allied Governments, which has never been disputed as illegal, has been guided by sound military considerations which override their disinclination to inconvenience the legitimate business interests of neutral countries.'' Passing on to the question of mails. Lord Newton said he would divide these into two subdivisions. "There are, on the one hand, the mails from England or bran, e to the United States, or from the United States to England or France," he said, "and there are, on the other hand, the mails, which, coming fiom another country, are unshipped at English oaajirench ports and pass in transit under English or French jurisdiction, just as coming into United States territory they would pnss under the ju risdiction of the United States. These two types form tie first subdivision, and it is not denied by lawyers that mail in this subdivision has alwnys been li able to a censorship, which forms part of the sovereign rights of the country through which the mail passes, a censor ship which has been employed in all wars since Governmentcarried mail existed ; the Span ish American and the RussoJapanese, to mention only two of those in recent history. "It is necessary once more to in that form to the Central | prove something beyond the Powers. I will content myself mere legality of the restrictions with quoting a few examples, but the list can easily be pro longed on the demand of any inquirer who is curious. For upon this t\ peof material wliii h the Allied Governments impew It is necessary to prove not inly that it is legal, but that it is instance, the steamship Gelria %  essential for military re?S0l w e do high cla : ,* /H UT/L A TBD neutral opinion is to accept its reasonable character. "What is it that this kind of censorship discovers? There is first of all the type of letter which gives information as to those military secrets which have passed through the German censors, a perfectly possi ble contingency, however vigilant the censors may be, secrets which the German Headquar ters Staff would have given much to have suppressed. These may seem innocent enough to the civilian eye, but the censor will transfer them to the intel ligence division of the General Staff and there they will be noted and compared with a hundred other statementsof like nature and, when these counter checking statements are numer ous enough, it may be that both the position of more German troops are fixed and German plans anticipated. INSIDE LIGHT ON GERMANY "Again there are important discoveries to be made about the condition of Germany or Austria or Turkey, discoveries which throw a flashlight upon the question of all questions which our sailors have to watch —is or is not Germany approaching the condition of cxhaus tion which finally crushed the gallant South in your civil war? "Lastly, this is a war in which not only land and sea but commerce is an area of warfare. The desperate efforts of the Ger man export trade to wriggle from the allied navies' clutch, together with the struggle of enemy or neutral firms to trade with German houses, and the Continued on 3rd peye attempt to provide a correct system for the progressive feeding of Inf.ints was ever successfully carried out until the 'Allenburys' scries of Infants' Foods were introduced. So successful have the'Allenburys' Foods Nos. I, 2 and 3 proved, that whenever a child isdeni 'I the privilege of the mother's milk they ITC indispensable. Gratifying evidence of their remarkable value in the feeding of infants from birth is constantly coming to DUd The following is a copy of one of many men voluntary letters receive 1 from Medical Men, Nurses and Parents resident in nearly all parts of the world. A NURSE WRITKS: "I am pleased to say I have nsrd yonr Foods t.X and J for the last twenty yearn and have found none better. The noal dellcuto baby ever born I nursed and reared on the Foods until he was 3 years old. and now ho Is 18 YEARS, and a • (MM healthy boy nearly 8 reel high and as rosy as an apple. You can make whatever use you like of this as I should like your Foods and other things to be more used in future, as Instead or making fnl nlonr they make bone and muscle, which Is what children need." (Signed) NURSE DAVIE. The practical results from a continually extending ute of the 'Allenburys' Foods, prove beyond doubt thai children thrive exceptionally well on them. Such children are healthy and well grown; the flesh is (irm, without eseess ol fat and the formation of bone is solid. *j£Henbur#sF(Dds The Best Alternative to Human Milk. Mother mi! Child. Babyblimmtlu. Fli/rom birth an tkt'A!l>*l>urys' Foods MILK (001) No. I From turtti to 3 months MilK FOOD No. I r rom 3 tull moniliM MAUED IO0D No. J I'r :n G months upwards. The 'Allenburys' Rusks (Malted). A us-ful ItJdU I 'lietary when 10 months old and afiajr The 'Allenburys' Foods are made under special protest** by machinery, end ere entirely untouched by hand. Write lor free boo* "Infant Fcmdln t antf Mmnmntmuni." 6*J pages of vtfu.i'jfa Information for m

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02577
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, April 22, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02577

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Nvilllsja B.ddirlua turnre In verb* rrnsujatri
Beinu. bound to awetir to the Dogmn.* of no Master.
"
Vol. XIII. No. 130
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 22. 1916
Price. THREE CENTS
Get Many Secrets In
German Mail
LONDON, March 24. "The
censorship of mails always h;ts
had in free countries an omi-
nous sound. It is a subject
which is very easily confused
ljucause theie is more than one
suit of mail and more than one
kind of case which must be con-
templated. It is therefore well
worth while- to explain exactly
what is claimed and what is
being done by the British and
Allied Governments,
"The neutral powers have a
right to demand that nothing
1- done against the law, ami
further, when this Iris been de
moostraft d, it is only reason,!
ble that they -should expert
thai whatevei is done should
be performed with the inaxi
mum amount oi regard for then
convenience winch it is possi
ble for the belligerent to exer
.11 statement will dc
very much to remove a sense of
. am e, a Inch is produced
express reservation for this pur
pose was made by the German
delegate and accepted without
dissent.
PARCEL MAIL AS MERCHANDISE
"Parcels then are covered by
HO convention and can be treat
ed in exactly the same way as
ordinary cargo. This is a view
accepted by the United Slates.
In a letter dated April 8, 1915,
the Second Assistant Postmaster
General at Washington, who
has charge of the division of
foreign mails, writing doubt
less with the authority of the
United States Administration,
admits without comment the
contention of the Commander
of the Prinz Mitel Freidrich that
the parcel mail on board the
French steamer Floride, which
he had sunk, could legally be
regarded as merchandise.
"On Sept. 23 last his Majes
ty's Government informed the
neutial Governments that the
carried no less than 69 parcels
by the parcel mails service,
which contained 400 revolvers
destined for Germany via. Am-
sterdam. In eight shipsdestin-
ed for Hamburg (steamships,
Tijuca, Bahia, Jaguaribe, Ma
ranhao, Acre, Olinda, Para,
Brazil) there were discovered
no less than 1,30a parcels con
taining m 311437,510 kilograms
of raw rubber. In the steam-
ship United States, bound for
Scandinavia, it was discovered
that the parcel mails contained
1,594 parcels of furskins, 221
parcels of military boots, 418
parcels of strip iron, and 80
parcels of ferro-vanadium. In
the parcel mails on the Of car
II., inward bonnd, were found
21 packages of machinery tools,
in the Hergensfjord two packa-
ges of iron pyrites, and six of
machinery parts.
and inagnihed bv the suspicion! ,, ., .... ,.
h. [attention of the Allied Govern
>vrarbeanng or tyrannous! 1 j 1 .1
1 mciiK had
ol
conduct easily believed to lie
behind what ii unknown or im-
perfectly understood."
In thi lids Lord Newton,
who has taken over at the Bri-
tish Foreign Office some of the
departments of which Lord Ro-
bert Cecil had charge before he
1 <\\c Minister ol Blockade, be-
gan an exhaustive and careful-
ly considered statement in re
ply to American criticisms ol
an I objections to the policy ol
the Grand Alliance in regard to
the exaniinate.n of the mails.
There has been an exchange of
diplomatic correspondence be-
tween the governments at
Washington and London on
this vexed question, and while
the exact terms of the notes
have not been disclosed, it has
been generally assumed that on
the American side the corres
poudence began with a formal
protest against British interfer-
ence with Aroeiican mails
While Lord Newton speaks as
an individual, it may equally
be assumed that the statement
which he has prepared for "The
New York Times" closely fol-
lows the lines of the official re
ply drawn up by Sir Edward
Grey.
"Mails may be parcels or let.
been drawn to the
increasingextentto which goods
on then w ay to or from enemy
countries were being s^nt by
parcel post. The British Goi
ernment stated that they would
regret if the Allies were obliged
to interfere in any way with
parcel mails, but they pointed
out that if the practicecontinu
ed they would have to exercise
then undoubted right of seizing
go'ids in parrel mails which
were liable to rapture. Other
wise they could not prevent
contraband reaching the enemy
01 restrict effectively their ex
porl trade.
"Thus every opportunity was
given to neutrals, if they wished
to avoid interference with par
eel mails, to take Bt< ps to pre
vent goods being sent by them
which would render it necessary
for the Allied Governments to
interfere.
"It is therefore legal to exer
cise belligerent rights against
the parcel mails, but when once
this has been admitted, there is
the further point whether or not
international courtesy toward
the neutraM powers is really
Over ridden by the necessity of
war from the point of view of
the belligerent. To this the
Allied Governments must an-
te -r mails.'* Lord Newton con.lswer in the affirmative. One
tinned. "Let us start by clem mi;;ht make out an extremely
long list of ships which ostensi
ing up the rase of the former.
It was at The Hagut Confer
ence of 1907 that the first pro
posal WM made for the immu
nity of postal correspondence,
and it was made clear in the
discussion of the fourthcommis
sion of that conference that
there was no intention of ex
tending to parcels the proposed
immunity of letter mails. An
bly convey parcel mails, but are
in reality conveying nothing
more nor less than merchandise
ALL OF MILITARY VALUE
"It isunnecessarj to erapha
size the great military value of
all these articles, and you will
probably ngrer that the action
of the Allied Governments,
which has never been disputed
as illegal, has been guided by
sound military considerations
which override their disincli-
nation to inconvenience the le-
gitimate business interests of
neutral countries.''
Passing on to the question of
mails. Lord Newton said he
would divide these into two
subdivisions.
"There are, on the one hand,
the mails from England or
bran, e to the United States, or
from the United States to Eng-
land or France," he said, "and
there are, on the other hand,
the mails, which, coming fiom
another country, are unshipped
at English oaajirench ports and
pass in transit under English or
French jurisdiction, just as com-
ing into United States territory
they would pnss under the ju
risdiction of the United States.
These two types form tie first
subdivision, and it is not denied
by lawyers that mail in this
subdivision has alwnys been li
able to a censorship, which
forms part of the sovereign
rights of the country through
which the mail passes, a censor
ship which has been employed
in all wars since Government-
carried mail existed ; the Span
ish American and the Russo-
Japanese, to mention only two
of those in recent history.
"It is necessary once more to
in that form to the Central | prove something beyond the
Powers. I will content myself mere legality of the restrictions
with quoting a few examples,
but the list can easily be pro
longed on the demand of any
inquirer who is curious. For
upon this t\ peof material wliii h
the Allied Governments impew
It is necessary to prove not inly
that it is legal, but that it is
instance, the steamship Gelria essential for military re?S0l '
we do high cla:,*

/H UT/L A TBD
neutral opinion is to accept its
reasonable character.
"What is it that this kind of
censorship discovers? There is
first of all the type of letter
which gives information as to
those military secrets which
have passed through the Ger-
man censors, a perfectly possi
ble contingency, however vigi-
lant the censors may be, secrets
which the German Headquar
ters Staff would have given
much to have suppressed. These
may seem innocent enough to
the civilian eye, but the censor
will transfer them to the intel
ligence division of the General
Staff and there they will be
noted and compared with a
hundred other statementsof like
nature and, when these counter
checking statements are numer
ous enough, it may be that both
the position of more German
troops are fixed and German
plans anticipated.
INSIDE LIGHT ON GERMANY
"Again there are important
discoveries to be made about
the condition of Germany or
Austria or Turkey, discoveries
which throw a flashlight upon
the question of all questions
which our sailors have to watch
is or is not Germany approa-
ching the condition of cxhaus
tion which finally crushed the
gallant South in your civil war?
"Lastly, this is a war in which
not only land and sea but com-
merce is an area of warfare.
The desperate efforts of the Ger
man export trade to wriggle
from the allied navies' clutch,
together with the struggle of
enemy or neutral firms to trade
with German houses, and the
Continued on 3rd peye
attempt to provide a
correct system for the
progressive feeding of
Inf.ints was ever success-
fully carried out until the
'Allenburys' scries of Infants'
Foods were introduced. So
successful have the'Allenburys'
Foods Nos. I, 2 and 3 proved,
that whenever a child isdeni 'I
the privilege of the mother's
milk they ITC indispensable. Gratifying
evidence of their remarkable value in the
feeding of infants from birth is constantly
coming to DUd The following is a copy of
one of many men voluntary letters receive 1
from Medical Men, Nurses and Parents
resident in nearly all parts of the world.
A NURSE WRITKS:
"I am pleased to say I have nsrd yonr Foods t.X and J for the
last twenty yearn and have found none better. The
noal dellcuto baby ever born I nursed and reared on the
Foods until he was 3 years old. and now ho Is 18 YEARS, and
a (MM healthy boy nearly 8 reel high and as rosy as an
apple. You can make whatever use you like of this as I
should like your Foods and other things to be more used in
future, as Instead or making fnl nlonr they make
bone and muscle, which Is what children need."
(Signed) NURSE DAVIE.
The practical results from a continually extending ute of the
'Allenburys' Foods, prove beyond doubt thai children thrive excep-
tionally well on them. Such children are healthy and well grown; the
flesh is (irm, without eseess ol fat and the formation of bone is solid.
*jHenbur#sF(Dds
The Best Alternative to Human Milk.
Mother mi! Child. Babyblimmtlu.
Fli/rom birth an tkt'A!l>*l>urys' Foods
MILK (001) No. I
From turtti to 3 months
MilK FOOD No. I
r rom 3 tull moniliM
MAUED IO0D No. J
I'r :n G months upwards.
The 'Allenburys' Rusks (Malted).
A us-ful ItJdU I 'lietary when 10 months old and afiajr
The 'Allenburys' Foods are made under special protest**
by machinery, end ere entirely untouched by hand.
Write lor free boo* "Infant Fcmdln t antf Mmnmntmuni."
6*J pages of vtfu.i'jfa Information for m & Hanburys Ltd., London, England.
- -'.I, .he 1 210 Years. A.D. 1I5.
|


The Tribune, ;. iSSaUt Saturday April 22, 1316,
'Li.: :,t DUPUCH,
!or.
lOIfc
*r Shirley & Charloiee Sts
''">- Bahamas
o.\r. l'i^i r, o. BOS MS.
PUBLISHED IIAILV
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
angle copy ...... ,j
I uesday, anj Thursday-single copy id
Saturday-angle copy ... ,ld
Wtklr ......
Umithly ... *
irtfVea.ly... ...... 6d
fMrl>' ".'ft.
J^VARLK IN ADVANCK
AdirertiMiiK Rats :-.slx ,,eilce , ,j
*i 'i-h: three peace ,. line
*>r second insertion ; end onepeaat
line for subsquent insern
A.lvrrtieiiifntsUiiler eight lini
Ghe tribune
Saturday. April 22. 1916
It is rumoured thai tin De-
velopment Board hai rescued
en maw.
-:o.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
'" i fi
rs. each. ?
[Sawyer, and Ellen M. Cul-
mer, Misses HattieandKitth
GJon, Mesur Henry Clarke
and hint t line s 0
6d- ead>-Miss *<** Gib-
son, Mr. Richard G.
Coper
Miss Nattie B. Sands %i
3d each.Misses U. S Cul-
mer and Persia Gibson 6
Miss Marquerite Archer 2
Miss Letitia Corper ij
I3l9 19 2.
SHORT SI8HTED A8 USUAL.
for a long Ume Logwood
has been in this community
practically valueless. Now
there is a good demand for it
and at paying prices, and w,
notice that a great deal of it
[{being brought into market.
Why is it neccessary, that
the trees should be dug up
by the roots instead of
being cut down to the roots
after this demand lias bcr,.
' the Out Island
people know how they will
be 1 he better it will
be i>r them.
1 bese art not the days of
slavery nor are we in a state
ol peonage, but this man is
trying to intimidate the peo-
ple, especially the ignorant.
I' my other friends had
lie clout we could have com-
pelled him to deliver us our
wood and not taken pos-
iion of our property be-
cause u was freighted to
Nassau on one of his vessels,
but we got weary of the man,
The highest price paid for
LOGWOOD in any quantity
chipped for shipping-
ami delivered on
Wharf at Nassau
from now on to July 1st.
Chas. B. ROCKWELL,
Palm Gate, Nassau St.
seized on our property
paid us what he liked and
Hie Mail Steamer"Mexi
arrived off the port Last even- PP,ed Wl11 t,,ere never be
'- another demand for this valu
Sands Charles S. Thompson,
Chas. Mather, Orlando F Pri
tehard, Clinton A. Albury,
the poor out islanders. Edward Saunders Fore
rhe question of his right < man. ore
!:;,!:,.,".v::"!.,n:-ve.rsof sisai <;. notempanelled
ing from Havana with pas-
for Nassau, embarked
46 passengers and proce.
10 New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H
Rockwell, and .\Ir. Henrv F
Aspmwall.
:o:
Hie Mail Steamer "M n
terey" steamed from N
- " 1111a \ able dye-wood, and if there
pe, where will thewoodcome
from then, if the trees be
pulled up by the roots now.
:o:
. f"he Daughters of the Em-
P'fe acknowledge with grate-
tul appreciation the sum of
eived from the ladies
1,1 Hope fownAbaro coll |
other products to go on his
Mjnajrf is a moo! one, and I
fnmk wouldnotstand many
Court of Law. because he
has a store or/ents a store
-also the people
were discharged until Tues
day next at 10.30.
The Court and jury ad-
journed to the ? of the
minder.
The Court resumed its sit
Y!;rk o fhursday afternoon ^W
with 24 passengers for Nas- : Kendnck for the
sau. '-"'i c ross I'und.and lake this
:_ opportunity of thanking these
The Police Band Concert w,1,", wwkers for over two
hundred articles made by
' "' for the hospital u 1
be interviewed by whom thev
like, he cannot prevent peo-
ple from going to buy from
this store. Again, in pre
venting persons from visiting Corp.. Walk,
Jbe people on (he vessels at ^h.ill, Harold
Ins wharf '
"ii I hursday (li
well attende I,and 1!..' bright
programme was apparently
enjoyed.
:o:
Doui forget thai mu
vice in Zion torn irrow
Nassau X. P.. Bahamas,
April uth. 1916.
Editor of Tribune
Sir,
i it not remarkable that
night, nave that little bit of .
silverready for the collection- 7nenevera beneficent provi-
it will be worth it ,'"''' ,UI1IS UP something
that might be of profit, or in
[actisreallj a God send to
fe labouring classes, a Shy-
lock invariably arises and de-
011 ral vessels docked ting.
rfhavea right to Witnesses: James Hende.
son, George Wallace, Dr
P'tt,Parke. Rayside, Frank
Armbrister, Howard Wil
-Samuel Sweeting,
Howard Mar'
Longley, Da
vid Young, John Scavella,
VI illiam Smith.
The trial proceeded.
1 Court adjourned at
Q,ng until 10.30 am. to
morrow.
The Jury being J, k,,j ,,.,
for the night.
.... Thursday, April J((.
[he Court met at 10.30
'be trial of Daniel Stuart,
Murder, was resumed
H will 1),. worth it.
:o:
. Tbe Rev. C A. Dann ar-
nved yesterday afternoon
from n pastoral visit to " i'"*'"'""'"'"|C,'S;"U,(I-
Abaco and Moores Island ?*?*? ""! onlv ,l"' Poundof
-,,._ Iflesi ?ut every dr p f blood
with it.
I refer now to the boom in
Logwood, so will you kindly
publish thefoMowingforthe
formation < your readers,
3RD BAHAJJrlA CONTINGENT.
I he Third Contin at will
make then fust Church par
^Christ Church Cathe ..rmar.on o you,
draUt oclock tomorrow J^^"^
'e is practically
making prisoners of them, if
they but Knew it.
I Ins ,11-111 says Ins wharf
"as cost him several thous
''" P*d for- We imagine that
d lie continues i this man
er it will be paid for ten!
thousand times over again.
I am no lawyer, but weon
the Island have the right to
iput a vessel up tohighwatei
[mark on any seashore, with-
out trespassing on the own-
ers land. It follows there
ton if Mr. Moore's wharf is
ouilt out into t
tbe German Embassy at Washier,
loo was indicated by ihe Federal
I jury heir today as the ,,,
gaoixei and financier of an alleged
pirat ) tu blow up Hie Wtl-
land Canal in Canada
_ W uii luni also were indicated
Captain Hans Tauscbei alleged a.
Kent of the Krupps |n the United
1 tes.
Alfred J. Pritaco, and anothei
man hose name baa not been ie
I wei ilso indictt 1. I: w ,s
1 source ili ii
the last named is r prominem
11 rm in whose nami
entioned frequently in com 1
lion with German | n I., hjs
airest is expei ted Jomotrow.
Thi Germai have 1 .inched
"'ul infantry aif.ck -cams,
jne French position I,. ,,, tne
Meusetn I) luamnntand again they
1 swept back exo pi v,
tney obtained a footinR in
portion of the Cfmoffour W
Heavj casualties were inflicted
"M Ibeatticaing forces aloi E the
two and half mile battle front
" as have kept up .heir
heavy ,he| ,g of Hill ,,
V lun ind th ------((
linn or the French in 1 ..
Probably u,,|, the in.entlon ol
,:i throwing theii infaatn for
ward in an endeavour Ki capture
this important point, kej u, ,i.
erdun position on the \\
Bn?pthe Un,;v|1 ,r'"" i" Belgium
""l Fr"n the heavy bombard
fhe Trial of Daniel
murder, was resumed.
J*5- 5 P- m. the trial was
- sea which ended and the jury n
-^Kjf- ;jng th, ,, W^Wtj?
twt'l a" ",;,lv'l>'eJ1, di<',;""! not likely
t with its gates closed. J 10agree.
' rust that the people Zi The jury were sent bat
will insist on their and locked up for the right
rhursday April 30 1
The Court met al 10 a.m. .....,- ,,,, a '' n' (,v!T"i
'he Trial of nunUK........icti.ii.i. "'" "'lery
back
4 o
loo
10 o
thea*ral. Up King and
Market Streets through rrin
'iy Place Up Frederick
bhirtoyand East starts to
the Barracks.
BAHAMAS CONTINGENT FUND.
Amount previously
knowhdged.
Job. M.Mer ^^ '" '
Savannah Sound.
Mr. and Mrs. John V
Hilton III
Mr. and Mrs. Chas
H. Whv.nan
Mr. and Mrs. S. W.
Johnson
Rev. W. T. Culmer
, 4s- each.......Messrs
Gibson, Claudius
Menassah Snnds, and Caleb
tubson
16 0
2s. each.Messrs Da \ 1,1
Gibson, Henry K. Sands.
Mesd.uin Annie }. (iibson
and EHa L. Clarke; M
LI la Barnett. JO 0
8 o
G. 0
John S.
Clarke,
a few days ago with some
Logwood for sale. The own-
er of the wharf where we
landed and also of the v<
1 came by refused to allow
me to take my wood and sell
1$ elsewhere unless I paid him
41 0 o per ton freight, twice
much as the usual freight.
He even threatened to send
los vessel back to Lxuma
with the cargo of wood un-
less it was sold to him. This
createdquite a panic amongst
"poor people. Now, Mr.
l-ditor is this right, for any
man to act in this way he
even refuses to allow any one
of the other buyers of Loa
wood and Sisal Ac to go on
us wharf. He is getting a
large fleet of vessels to bring,
SU-ogwood rite, from the
Out Islands, to be landed at'
his wharf, sold to hilaildno
one else, without the privi-
lege of allowing other l>
ers to compete at|
placed wholly and
and delivered a Verdict of
Manslaughter with a recom
Kl"s and privileges in visit
ogany vessels docked al the
wharves there and that the
Uul Island people will ot
slop freight on any vessels
where the.r property is apt
to f)e confiscated
Shout |w*"iugnierwitna n
snouia this man continue mendation to 00 mercv
Lanner"^^ hl. present Th iii.Miiiei, the sooner the people
should raise their voices the
better it will be for them
I hanking you Mr. Editor
for the space.
Yours faithfully
BXUMIAN.
,"I"VIU'1" "' between St
,' .'V" nminesCanal
na been especially marl
Tjwi German, have poured shells
K;r"" p> "
'i'Dv,"aR'veratIkskullbr.,l
[head and about Dvinsk and via
&&*&* '
In Galicia , |b-
I ""; leutooshavem,
"'. "","m'":i Joints Russia,,
'"r I !ol them ..... 10
The Court adjourned until
to a. in. tomorrow.
Friday April 31 Lr m^'nl?^6 ,,,an<,i rhirtj
<>f train. .... (na
'jury came int., Conn collision of trains
delivered a Vcidi, i nf 'Jotk New Haven and
. the
l"ls""" '" i" nal servitude
for Life, and adjourned un
til I uesday next.
.'o:
IN THE SUPREME COURT.
April Sessions 1916
Wednesday April 19.
tinued.)
. 'iformation No. 1 Darnel
Stuart, Murder, was called.
l he Accused on being ar-
raigned_pleaded Not Guilty.
Mr. Culmer appeared for
the accused.
'be following jury was
lielled :
'Ji T. L. Amourv,;
Grist, James (J.,
Radiograms
\pti\ 19th iqi6.
.Washington:The c
cation which he has drafted ni the
last word id the United States to
Germany on the submarine issue
was completed today by Presi
dent Wilson. I, probably will be
despatched to Merlin tomorrow
""' d< cumenl reviews I Ger
man lubmariira activities since the
"n was snk- .t m,K.,s
plain that only .-,,, immediate
"-''" th..(i,.rina policy can
roakeposs.ble the continuation of
friendly relations between the two
nations,
I
'--:..,;;;;,;;;,;;;;", |,^:
< purred at 7:30 o'clock Jnd
[ur hours afterwards wrecking
"nd boPal crews ware s,.i ?
have recovered thirty bodies
. lli.-dr.ithso.ciHin ,,
car of a four.coach local train
which had stopped at the hnral
;o,ouli,n waeruadowoTby
Hi>ffflt-|>aa7'ess bound from
5ofo'New Vork.This coach
;.w;s r,7"P'd"lbure,l. another
ctiiiiimitiicaiin'r tn ,i,. '"
ed h..th bulldioip "-SU(,y
Al.,,,p,| ,( ,
spy**--2ji
nnil decision as to k.i
. recalled tn.l.iary attache tojalleg.d blunde at A*!"""

\MVTI


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 22, 1916,
il'J'i'
*'
in the. Dardanelles and MfSopot
amia its alleged mistake and dp-
lays in connection with 11111:11
tions and the air service were re
viewed and contrasted with the
ptrfrat ovgaajxatioti reigning in
enemy countries. Hie "TIMES mi
Iitary coi respondent printed nn
article with an elaborate map pur
p 1 ting to show the exact diapos
It ion ofeiionnmis forces of tier
man troops mas ed along the Bri
rich front in Flanders and in
France and drawing the conclus
ion th-it it" il Bl itains still is
lacking the necessary reserves to
meet a big attack.
Chihuahua:The govern-
or lias admitted that the re-
ports of Villas death were
only rumors.
Washington:President
Wilson has sent a note to
Germany demanding an ab-
solute change in her subma-
rine policy at once or there
will be a break in diploma-
tic relations.
The President explained
to Congress that his action
was necessary and as they are
the only body able to declare
w: r he had called a joint ses-
sion
He cited many cases, from
the l.usitania to the latest
sinking. Copies of th note
were sent to all neutral conn
tries, assuming that they are
equally interested in the out
come.
No note has been sent to
Turkey or Austria yet, it be-
ing jus' a matter between
in my and the United
Slates.
The note points out the
indiscriminate use ol subma-
rines igainst neutral vessels
and states thai parts of a tor
pdo found aboard the Sus
sex by American naval offi-
cers establishes conclusively
that the vessel was torped
without warning by a Ger-
man submarine.
An appendix to the note
its entirely with an anal-
ysis of facts in the Sussex-
case and di lhal
can n ival o .foundscrew
b ilts corresponding with
th<>se on German t <> 1 -
pedoes in possession of the
French at Toulon.
London: -Premier Asquith
stated that unless the cabin si
works together at once it
means an end to the govern-
ment He will make a stab
ment tomorrow*.
Paris:There has been
spirited bombardment South
of Haudremonl Wood. I he
fall of Trebizonde aroused
1 it enthusiasm. It is report-
ed that three Turkish divi-
Stops defended the city. The
Black Sea fleet assisted.
'O.'
April aitt, 1916.
Constantinople:Ac oi<1
ing to the critical condition
of the British bines in Kutel
Amara the commander has
ordered the civilian popula-
tion t* leave town.
Washington: The answer
to the German note is ex-
pe :ted by the end of the week,
which 'the administration
considers a reasonable time.
The note arrived in Berlin
and it is expected that it was
delivered by Ambassador
Gerrar-d tod
London: -It is authoril
ativ 1 -I that the
1
Paris:A strong Ruisian
force has arrived at Marseil
les to assist the Allies.
The French have assumed
the offensive on the right
bank or tha Meuse and have
captured parts of German
trenches and occupied a re
doubt. Several hundred Ger
man prisoners were captured.
Marseilles:A royal wel
Come was accorded to Rus
sians who landed here.
Washington: Marines
from the Brooklyn Navy
Yard have been sent to guard
the Tuckerton and Sayville
wireless stations.
:o: -
22nd April, 1916.
Paris, 20: The French have
taken the offensive around Wr
dun and are gaining contintin-
ually. No other developments
however.
Washington 30:The press
of the United States without
[regard to political bias praised
President Wilsons attitude on
the ultimatum to Germany.
The New York limes said in
j its editorial comment of the la
test notes: "Before proceeding
to the rupture of relations Ger
many might to measure the om
nip ttence ol gold before de< id
ing in favour of extreme means.
Germany wr are certain will
think of the fad that there ex
istl at the present lime in our
banksthree billions of dollars
more than exist in the central
banks of Prance, England, Rus
Ilia, Germany, Holland, Sweden
and Japan."
Paris, 20 :The note of Pre
Isident Wilson to Germany has
caused much enthusiasm here
High officials believe (bat B
rupture of relations between the
two countries is inevitable.
Amsterdam, jo:It is semi-
officially known here that the
German bankers have appealed
to the emperor to use every
means in his power to avoid a
rupture <>f relations with the
United States. They declare
that such n break would mean
the certain bankruptcy of Ger
many
The entrance of the United
"states into the war would i*na
hie the Allies to continue the
war indefinitely.
are expected in France before
Spring.
Paris:The French con-
tinue their progress in the re-
gion of Deadmans Hill cap-
turing German trenches,
four officers and 150 men.
East of the Meuse a fierce
German attack was repulsed.
I he French have gained in
the Haudremonl sector.
Athens:The Italians have
occupied Thanissi near the
Gr ek-Albanian frontier.
Washington: It is report
ad that the Canadian govern
ment intends removing sail
ors ol belligerent nations
from all Great Lakes ships
touching Canadian ports.
Washington:- The Japan
ese Ambassador has been in
consultation with Secretary
Lansing regaiding the Cab
foinia situation.
Washingtim: The cabinet
considered the Mexican situa
tion today. No action is ex
ted pending ( ieneral
Scotts report.
LOGWOOD
"T"HE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is
purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what
ever the market price is
H. J. CLARIDGE
East Hay St, Nassau.

H. T. BRICE
Commission Merchant
Office : wet side Big spon*e Exch*ng
Nassau, N. P. Bahamas.
AGENT
HORSES ^j SHEEP
CATTLE | W POULTRY
SPONGE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products.
JOHN BUTLER
<*#*
Religious Services.
Sunday April 23.
r
ST. MATTHEWS PARISH
CHURCH
EASTER DAY
6.00 a in. I lol) Eucharist.
s' o. ;i in. Holy Communion.
10 15 a.m. Sundaj School.
11 a.m. Mattins
4 p m. The Catechisms.
7 30 p.m. Evensong.
'I HE CATHEDRAL
NASSAU.
Services ai the Cathedral on
and after Eastec I 'ay, will he at
7.00 a.m. Holy Communion
7 30 p.m. l'\'
Office : 367 Bay St., East
'Phone 245
Commission Merchant, Auctioneer and
Real Estate Agent
--------------EXPORTER --------------
Sisal, Sponges, Bark, Cotton and Woods
--------------------------A G E N T--------------------------
NORWICH UNION FIRE I.'.URANCE SOCIETY, Norwich
[ '
IL A TED j
Washington, jo : President
Wilson tins evening informed
the Japanese Ambassador that
he would use his influence to
have stricken from the innni
gration hill any features that
will he objectionable to Japan
n number of which it is under
Stood will he incorporated in
the bill.
:o:
22 April 1916.
Washington:Press des
patches announce that the
submarine note was deliver
ed in Uerlin hut there is no
official report owing to reli
gious holidays in Germany.
It is feared the reply will be
delaved. The administration
will wait a reasonable time.
It is feared that in the mean
time submarine action may
complicate the situation, by
killihg Americans ahoatd
neutral ships.
London:Lloyds report
the Dutch steamer Lodewijk
Van Nassau was sunk and
five of the crew l
1 an a
. of a million I!
SEVENTH DAY ADVENT1ST
CHAPEL.
Services at 7.30 Sundaj
ing April 23. subject:
"The Kaith That is accounted
for Righteousness." All are 1 01
dially invited.
collected from the censo
correspondence information ol
material use in capturing from
neutral countries trade which
should he theirs legitimatt l\.
The accusation is without a
particle of truth: the instructions
issued to the censors make per
fectly i leai thai no reason other
than that of possible damage to
the enemy can justify the inter
ferencs or sves the examination
of any correspondence.
CHANGED CONDITIONS
"There remains the second
subdivision of the letter mail,
that which is carried on neutral
ships and which in the ordinary
course of business will not pass
'through the belligerent conn
tries or enjoy the postal facili
ties of belligerent powers. Let
t lie stated at once that the
Allied (iovernments do not de
part from the principle which
was initiated during the Ame-
rican civil war. and laid down
by Convention No. II of The
Hague Conference, 1907, the
(Continued from First page)
more honorable attempts of ven
turesome seamen to run the
gauntlet of blockading squad
rons, evidence on all of these is
lying in the mail. While liual
ly the ramification of the (Jer
man spy system, all embracing J principle of the inviolability of
in its clutches and tending to neutral mails. At the same
decentralize to more distant [time the Allied Governments
countries as the nearer ones be hold a conception of interim
come too hot to hold them, this tional law which admits that
we should be all but powerless I changing conditions may neces-
to check but for the censorship. sitate the re-interpretation of
we exercise upon the mail." established principles. In eve
Lord Newton next referred to j ry country the postal facilities
a change which has been made
in Congress.
"Before I leave the question
of this first subsection of letter
mails, it will be well to deal
briefly with one point which
has very naturally caused some
comment in the United States.
It has been asserted that the
have undergone what amounts
to a transformation since 1861 :
not only is the conveyance of
mail much cheaper and conse-
quently enormously swollen,
but trading houses taking ad
vantage of this fact have re
sorted to every kind of device
for twisting the postal facilities
censorship of these mails, which to suit their pur
as a military measure may be "We
legitimate enough, has been merely
warped by the censors of the signmeri
allied powers into a hip but witfl
her than niilitai
in efl 10th I vici
ing 1 BfjJ
in part '
I
1
Acample, on board the Tuban
tia on Uk inward \ o\ge 174,'
pounds ol rubber ol the lust
quality and seven paicels of
wools w ere discovered : on
board the steamer Medaii seven
parcels of raw rubbei weresei;
ed, whili lie sane ntrol l.v
ercised upon the Dutch steante-
Zaandijk discovered no less than
368 packages of dillerent mer
cbandise. As instances of arti
cles found in mails bound in
wrd to European ports maybe
mentioned coffee,seeds, linseed,
vegetable oil, saltpetre, &C.
The Gelria, on its inward v.oy
age, contained 1,390 bags of
high grade raw rubber, each
[hing about one pound, ami
on its outward voyage thirteen
packets of diamonds valued at
$3,350. The Hollandia, oul
ward hound, contained 1,265
packets of rubber. The Ryn
dam, the Tubantia, the Frisia,
the Coen, the Nieuw Amiter
dam, the Noordara, the Hotter
dam and other boats contained
on their outward voyage! an
enormously varied cargo of
merchandise consisting in mod
erate consignments of snane
times as often M fifty different
species of merchandise.
"1 think von will agree that
*uch a traffic, both outward and
inward, however vexatious cer-
tain individual seizures may
appear for the moment, does
take on the character of a serious
business transaction, and one
which if left unchecked can
produce very serious military
effect to the detriment of the
allied powers.
(To be Continued.)
Noti
ice
Till. Auction Sale at St
Matthew's Rectory on
pnl ,th hns bei C icel
:


The Triune, Nassau, Saturday April 22, 1916,

GWOOD
SISAL
I
R.J.BOWE
Commission Merchant
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Offices:532 Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Near City Market.
PRODUCE
WONDERFUL VALUE
Solid Gold
Safety Pin
Brooch**
set with
Pin* P*rl*
3 1 (TICinU)
/" EACH.
Insist On
cap
A Bigger Cake
A Better ooap
3u. per BP
At Your Dealer or
At The New York House
Every Brood
la carefully ex
.mined be ton
Ifttvinit lln
workshop aoi
(.. -u.Mirely act.
We will r.*i lav
KKt.Kof IIAlCUF
auy brooch not
Crfeotly satla-
.tory. or w*
will irnmptl)
refund f o I
liiflml
taf aXLpoatafi
ehrgi |
la. Ju-
t you v\ h
'osuivwly tii
; |v .
vty l"(
on Uv
nmrkft. K I
11 In 1
BNtC] v.-lvrt
oajM Mil
: pretv
ttuoa Sli pa
n- shown
Bwa4to,BQUai D Crot nl nowir
......3-
Kh Sll for.. 16 91**. 10)
., r. 1 .1, t-nipiK. ForaKn Coantrlta
Od lie
R ;iro^h Id ttr> lid. latal
BIX Btooi bat M I 1" '"*'
Send POBT CARD for Catalomie of J-wellery,
. .1 i.un-
. ram etc. u
...... in V i-m ana m*y -v- rot
W^ i*UKr*ntaa 'ha afe delivery of
all our f>od8't'inntr th* W
1 b 10 replace th< m
v, rlteoui Bank
Banker*: U ndon < 1 > and M.ih
1 th Ud *> < orn tJireen, nnmoi. tog
era DC I'm /E.td,\ Wholeaale Export
rt/VK3 LIU. I ih4( Jewellera,
236 LB.&TOL BI3GE. BRlsrOL, EnK.

... ,----------J-T-;------- -,
Sold by
W. Hilton
260 Bay St.
qBiaBawawnaBs.n'.T.si'i m;
10 be hau at all Grocers
C L. LofthOUSe-Company'i Agent
ARROW
COLLAR
All Arrow collars are
made of fabrics bleached
and shrunk in our own
plants. They always
fit and sit correctly and
are the most durable.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, PFAi ..' 1 & CO.. Inc.
MAKERS. TBUY, N. Y. U., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 3 x 19"Best Cypress at 36s.
per 1000. No better grade than tliese on tlie Market5 x 18
"Primes" Cypress lit 33s. per 1000. This grade carries our
same guarantee as the Bests."
Amy defective shingles can be returned.
\lo cheaper grade in ttock
April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS.
T
Keeping Guard
HERE arc responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the Flag. Not the least of these is
preserving the balance of trade.
-THE-
SHOE 4-
=DRISK=
Welch's Grape Juice.
PRICES
: its, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per doz.
i Ihnts, 9d.
8S. 6d. per doz.
J Pints, 5d.
49. 6d. per do*.
* BLACK'S
and The Nassau C
Opp. Hotel
IBbG to notify the
public that I will
undertake to sell Log-
wood on commission
to the very best ad-
vantage.
Write or see
E. C. Griffin
Cor. Bay St. and Victoria Ave.
Fop Sale
1 Red room Set
1 Dining-room Set
1 Parlor Set
Can be inspectedat anytime.
Applv to
A.M. WILI'.IAMS
i, on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
K
^rV
KNOWLES
*
With these reinforcements he Big Four will be
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar
kets abroad.
G. T, KNOWLES, Prop. Big 4,
Hay St. (Sponge Exchange)
Phone 914.
East Bay St.
Fop Rent
Rooms over "Tribune*' Office
Apply
jILBKRT DUPUCH,
fribune" Office
Chas. E. Bethell
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in
Ales
Wines
Spirits
*
>
r


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