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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 15, 1916, L. OILBRRT DDPTCa. l : .d\'.er and Froprittor. OFFlOIli Corner Shirley & Charlotte Ss Sanaa. A. P., Bahama* "PHONE 2fi0. P. O. BOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy Saturday—single copy Weaklv' Ifeiithiy i s. Quarterly .. ^s. HrllYearly Q =. Tearly 1 ,8s Id id l|d Jd 6.1 6.1 I'AYAHLK IN ADVANUK Advertising Hates :—Six pence |>er line loi first insertion: three pence tier line lor second insertion ; and onepemw prr line for subsqueut insertions. Advertisements under eicht lines j-. Zbc tribune Saturday. April 15.1916 Copy of telegram from the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 8th April. With reference to my predecessor's telegram of 17th April, 1915, His Majesty wishes that on occasion of His Majesty's Birthday as last year no dinners, reviews, salutes or other celebration should take place. — :o:— MAILS FOREIGN Mails to be des patched per S. S. Mexico will be made up and closed on Thursday next, th 20th inst. at 4 p. m. Parcels Mails and money order Lists will be made up and closed on Wednesday, the 9th inst, at ia noon. INTERINSULAR Mails will be made up and closed on Thurs day the 20th inst, at 5 p.m. The "Daughters of the Empire" are rtminded of the Tuesday afternoon sewing meetings as lately the attendence*has fallen off considerably. The attention of our readers is invited to the appeal of the Red Cross Society for old linen, towels of all kinds and walking sticks, all of which are greatly needed. The Mail Steamer "Morro Castle" arrived off the port lust evening with 7 passengers for Nassau, embarked 89 from here and with 62 in transit proceeded *o New York. Mr. and Mrs Solomon R. Noble, Mr. and ..Mrs. Joseph Peck, and Miss Winifred Lowry. The Mail Steamer "Miami" arrived this morning from Mayport, Fla. with 8 passen gers and cargo of lumber shin gles and sundries, and steam ed for Key West this after noon with 15 passengers. Higgs Mr. and Mrs G. M. and infant, Misses Ethel and Enid; Mrs Ida Dowdell; Mr. T. F. Whittin. Mr. Howard Williams. The Ward line Steamer Santiago steamed from New York on Friday afternoon with 5600 bbls. cargo for Nassau. — :o:— To Correspondents.— "WE", Your communication being unaccompanied by either a card or covering letter goes into the waste paper basket. — :o:— (COMMUNICATED.) The Tribune has again rendered public service, by maintaining that the invsion of private rights should be suppressed by the hand responsible for publio service to private individuals and the community at large. Some one has suggested that order can be turned into chaos when the public service eye is in doubt as to whether Church Authorities or public service officials are wholly or in a divided sense to rentier stewardship at wedding ceremonies. The unsuspected participants in the ceremony and church service never for one moment imagined that an unfriendly crowd could collect, and discuss the order of things—distasteful presumably to some of them— and act in the manner so graphically decribed in the Tribune's protest of yesterday's date." The question now arises, in what manner are these malaperts to hear that their conduct is a transgression of every thing that is sacred to those who assembled to witness the ceremony, which binds in inseparable bonds, the two young people who through this medium heartily thanks the Tribune for its manly protest. Not the least in this unseemly conduct was the part taken by those who directed their attention to the mother of the bride but despite her advanced age, and the fact, that like the other members of the party she carried no weapons of defence. But praise be to her, she withstood the assault with a courage and determination which for the moment made her assailants stand aghast. While the damage done is not far beyond the description given by the Tribune it is not too late to ask the question if this "Atlanta"—"Charleston" mob had smashed some part of the sacred edifice who would pay the damage? It is certain that every one present on the evening in question will agree that what is needed most is concerted action. For there was a lamentable absence of something connecting the responsibility—perhaps dividing it.—And the ontsider naturally asks when cenmonies of this kind are given notice of, what is the connecting link between church responsibility and service. public E. Stores Department, 83, Pall Mail. London, S. W. 22nd. March, 1916 Mrs. Hilton, Dear Madam, Your letter of the and inst. to hand this mornip/rrtuid it gives us m note that yon 4 more pai hospital 'ga again I w you that port from the Empire" is v< 1 y much appreciated. I am enclosing a lislof our most urgent needs which covers, as you will notice, garments suitable for the coming Spring and Summer months, and any contribution you can send us on these lines will be most welcome. Yours faithfully, Stores And Transport Dept. Manager. 15th March, 1916. THE OFFICIAL WEEKLY STATEMENT. Having now sufficient stock of warm clothing to last during the remaining cold months, the requirements of the Joint Committee of the British Red Cross Society and The Order of St. John of Jerusalem are, specially:— Pyjamas, Nightshirts, BedJackets,— Made of either Thin Flannel, or Wincey. Day Shirts,—Made of Thin Flannel r Oxford Shirting. Also: Old Linen, Floor Cloths, Towels of all kinds, Walking Sticks, Kitchen Rubbers, Blankets & Sheets. COMMUNICATED. With the coming of Easter we have rumours of many weddings—even in far off Andros. But the one we are privileged to speak of on this occasion actually took place on Thursday evening April sixth. This union allies together Miss Felicia Johnson of Nassau, to Mr. S. Colero Liotta of Girgenti, Sicilia Italy. We need hardly speak of the bride, as she is the well known daughter of Mrs. Alice Johnson of our own city: while the bridegroom has attained distinction as a musician, both in his native land Italy, and in America, while perhaps the short time he was our constituent part of the Colonial— Italia — Orchestra—It is no exaggeration to say that a name was made. The wedding which was a pretty one, took place at the Catherdral, by the Rev. Mr. C. Dudley Lampen, who marked his approval of the part he was to take, by coming in from his country home, which was much appreciated by those interested in the arrnngaments, which afterwards proved complete. Many of the visitors expressed regret that the ceremoney could not take place during their stay at Nassau; but circumstances over which the happy pair had no control intervened, making 7 this arrangement impossible. The reception at the bride's home (which was decorated on the Japanese Style) was attended by many friends of Bahamian birth —was likewise joined in by friends, who yearly make Nassau their winter abode. The gifts, owing to this dislocation of foreign mail service incident to the war conditions were many arrived late in some instances Some of them coming from distant lands, wen of far Norway. And last, igh by no means least, remembrances of Nassau ds and visitors, will be d 101 1 tr after other in 16 Season s of Schedule of proposed sailings of Steamers un dercontract to convey Mails from the Bahamas to Foreign Countries during the month of April 1916. DATE OF NAME OF DESTINATION HOUR OF SAILING STEAMER 1 CLOSING April 4 Miami Jacksonville (Mayport) 9.00 p.m. 7 Mexico New York jo.30 a.m. 7 Miami Jacksonville (Mayport) 8.00 p.m. 11 Miami > 8.00 p.m. ?4 Morro Castle New York 10.30 a.m. '4 Miami Key West, Fla. 8.00 p.m. 21 Mexico New York 10.30 a.m. 28 Morro Castle New York 10.30 a.m. Parcel Mails will be made up and closed as follows: For the United Kingdom and the United States April 6, 13, 20, and 27 at noon. newer interest. We had nearly forgotten about the dresses, which were said by all to be attractive—for the bride in her simple dress of Chiffon over net, was admired by all ; and her attendants wore most appropriate gowns. Miss Leonora Johnson—the aitist,looked pretty in a gown of Chantilly lace, with touches of colour here and there in the shape of tiny bow-knots. While Miss Edwina Johnson in a gown of embroidered silk net, over Japanese silk, was most ex quisite. The happy pair, who for the present will make their home in Nassau, expect shortly to make a sojourn to the outer islands, in order that Mr. Colero Liotta may familiarize himself with the conditions prevailing in the islands associated with the most important step in his life. ST. P. Radiograms April 14th, 1916. Washington, 12:—Great Britains note replying to the American protest against the the seizure of 38 Austrian*, Germans and Turks from the American steamer China near Shanghai was made public today by the state department. Itfollowed the line of argument previously indicated and contends that the seizure is justified on the ground that the prisoners had been engaged in a plot against England in the Far East and were attempting to return home to take up arms. It contends that they were not clothed with the immunity which would attach to enemy subjects who were merely travelling. Great Britain alleges that the prisoners were engaged for some time past in the collecting end transmitting of arms and ammunition to India and if possible for the arming of a ship to play the part of a Far Eastern MoeUT, and were bound for Manilla to continue their work having been exposed to the British authorities at Shanghai. New York, 12:—Four men charged with complicity in the manufacture of fire bombs which were pieced aboard ships carrying ammunition and supplies to the Entente Allies were arrested here tonight by agents of the department of justice acting in concert with the New York police. Three of the suspects are employees of German steamship lines. They areaccused of liavingbcen involved, with others not yet in custody, of fomenting a plot widespread in its ramifications for the destruction of merchantmen. London; 12;—The Germans Northwest of Verdun evident ly are holding in leash their infantry for fresh attacks in an endeavour to capture 304 and LeMort Homme, keypoints which are tenaciously barring the way to the fort. The infantry has remained idle in their trenches while their guns are throwing shells on the region embracing the triangle formed by Hill 304. Esnes and LeMort Homme. Not even a sally by the Germans in this district is reported by the Erench offi rial communication. Comparative quiet prevails to the East of the Meuse, around Douaumont and Vaux where there has been frequent vicious fighting. No infantry attacks have been made by either side and the activity of the artil Iery has been less marked than on previous days. —:o.— 15th April 1916. London:—It is officially re ported today that the Turk ish forces on the Tigris River were driven back three miles by British attack. There are hopes eventually for the relief of Kut el Amara. Paris:— The Germans today attacked the French lines West Hill of 304. Queenstown: Eleven men and the captain of the British steamer Invenyl sunk by a submarine Tuesday landed here today. One American is among the survivors. Eleven men are missing. Washington.—Officials are uninformed on the situation of Major Tompkins and a small force attacked by Mexi cans at Pa rial yesterday. Con grew is apparently united to continue the Villa campaign.



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\ w The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 15, 1916, Soviiv Lansing nnnoun c-d IJMLIV that he isprepared to treat with C&rrtiHzu for withdniwl'of Vrfierkan troops hul indicated that there would be no immediate with drawn 1 litstated that the United S. ites hid not agreed to res trict tli'punitive expedition t ) territory reached by Man h 2jrd and there IS evidentl> some misunderstanding by Cairaiiz.i. Lansing acknowledged to day that the I liilitl Males is in fRDssesstrtri of evidence by French naval forces showing the indcniii y or the submar irte which destroyed the Sus sex. Mexico City:—Carranzi arrived here last night with the memhers of his staff. Hi 1 entrance was quiet. — :o: — April 15th, 1916. Wash in g ton, 13:-The United Statesjs disposed to consider that Germany in the latest submarine notevir.tualIv has admitted that oae of her submarines torpedoed the Channel steamer Sussex President Wilson and Secretary Lansing today exam ined the official text of the communication from Berlin and arc understood to have reached that conclusion. Unless Germany should without equivocation admit attacking the. vessels which had aboard more than a score of American citizens, inflict adequate punishment upon the commander of the sub in a r i n e and in other ways show evidence of good faith action of a drastic nature undoubtedly will follow. Details of the policy to be pursued are expected to be formulated at the cabinet meeting tomorrow. goat valued at many millions if dollars have been amicably settled by repiesrntativrs of the meat pfickeis and the British 1; ivei iitneot. Great Britain Wlil pay for the seized cargoes. Little activity is reported in any of the war theatres. Weather retards fighting in the vicnity of Verdun. In fan try operations are hindered and big guns are busy only on comparatively a small front in the West. With abatement of battle before Verdun and a slate of comparative quiet reigning in all other war theatres diplomatic issues growing out of the war are prominently to the fore in the news of the day. The submarine controversy between the United States and Germany has the American government busy gathering data for information to Germany concerning the Sussex and attacks on various merchantman since the torpedoing of the Lus itania, which it is asserted will bring to a focus the entire ques lion of the submarines. Great Britain has replied to the American protest againt the clause in her Trading with the Enemy Act which prevents trading with any business firm which has affiliations with or is controlled by subjects of enemy countries. The note asserts that the act is being enforced to rejstrict ac tivities and trade of persons an der British jurisdiction and that care will be taken to avoid in jury to neutral commerce The cases of the Chicago meat packers against Great liri tain for the holding up of car Continued from First page ) The proceedings are superintended by a contemplative tabby cat, coiled up in a niche, like a feline flower in a crannied wall. "She used to sit on top of the parapet," explains a f 1 iond Iy I.nice corporal; "but became 1 casualty, OWin' to a sniper mistakin' 'er for a Guardsman's bearskin Show the officer your hack, Christabel !" and the healed scar is duly inspected. Not every time the soldiers jet out of their trenches are they shot at by the enemy. Captain Beith tells how the Germans limbed out to cut the long 1,'rass winch had grown in "No Man's Land'' between the lines and how the Highlanders let them alone. "Let 'em by all means" explains Captain Wagstaff. "If they don't, we must. We don't want their bombthrowers crawling over here through a hayfield. Lrt us encourage them ty every means in our power." For it is the bombs that are the very latest things in modern warfare Rifles were intended for proper, gentle, manly warfare, but 111 the hand to hand butch ery which calls itself war today, the rifle is rapidly becoming demode. For long ranges you require machine guns; for short, bombs and hand grenades. Can you empty a cottage by filing a single rifle shot in at the door? Can you exterminate twenty Ger mans in a fortified back parlor by a single thrust with the bayonet ? Never! Hut you can do both these things with a jam tin, stuff ed witli dynamite and scrap iron. BOMBS AND SNIPERS The Highbinders' historian describes the four types of bomb, the hair-brush, the cricket-ball, the policeman's truncheon, and the jam-tin. The hair-brush, instead of bristles, has a solid block of explosive. The truncheon is gay with streamers of tape, to make it fall nose down wards. The cricket-ball has a fuse timed for five seconds, while the jam-tin has a ten sec ond fuse. Then there is the sniper. A German specimen is dubbed Zaecheus. Wecall him by this name because he lives up a tree. There is a row of pollarded willows standing parallel to our front, a hundred and fifty yards away. Up or in one of these lives Zaecheus. We have never seen him, but we know he is there ; beeause if you look over the top of the parapet he shoots you through the head. We do not even know which of the trees he lives in. There are nine of them, and every morning we comb them out one by one, with a machine gun. But all in vain. Zaecheus merely crawls away into the standing corn behind his trees and waits till we have finished. Then he comes brick again and tries to shoot the machine gun officer. He has not sue ceeded yet, but he sticks to his task with a gentle per sistence. He is evidently of a persevering rather than vindictive disposition. 8A8 AND TRENCH MORTARS 1 here is an excellent descnp lion of an alarm raised foi a supposed gas attack at early morning when the mistisrising and how the men met it: Next moment every man is hurriedly pulling his gas helmet over his head, while Lieutenant Wadded beats a ficn/.ied tocsin upon the instrument provider! for that purpose —to wit, an 18-pound shell which, suspended from a bayonet stuck into the parados (or back-wall) of the trench, makesa mnstefficientahmn gong. The sound is repeat ed all along the trench, and in two minutes every man is in his place, cowled like a member of the Holy Inquisition,glaring through an eye-piece of mica, and firing madly into the ap pfoaching wall of vapor, hut the expected attack did not materialize. When some particular German battery or machine gun becomes too an noring, word is passed by tele phone to the artillery and they play for a while exactly on the spot indicated. A chapter on trench mortars brings out the fact that "the most unpopular man in the trenches is undoubtedly the trench mortar officer. His apparatus consists of what looks like a section of rain pipe, standing on legs. Upon its up turned muzzle is poised a bomb, having the appearance of a plum pudding on a stick. This lie discharges over the parapet into the German trenches, where it causes a comforting explosion. He then walks rapidly away." A trench mortar officer, with his apparatus, made disappear ance in the Highlanders' trench es, and Major Kemp met nim : "No, you don't, my lad !"' announces the Major. "Not if I can help it! Take it away Take your darned liver-pill out of this Burn it Bury it I Eat it But not here Creep away !" It's an Ishmaelitish existence, the trench officer's, the writer comments. THE LETTERS OF T. ATKINS A chapter deals with the let ters of the soldiers—which the officers have to censor—with their "wistful references to old days; tender inquiries after bairns and weans; assurances to anxious wives and mothers that the dangers of modern warfare are merely nominal." Sometimes, also, there is such a "terse, masterly'' letter as this. Dere wife, if you oould make the next postal order a trifle stronger I might be getting an egg to my tea. Your loving husband JAS. MUCKLEWAME, No. 74,077. There is also the army's view of "things at home" as express ed by an officer who has been on leave, and describes London as he saw it last September : One's own friends are down in the dumps. Of course it's only natural, because most of them are in mourning. Our losses ere much more noticeable at home than abroad, some how. People seemed qui surprised when I tolc that things out her right as rain, an troops are simpl over one anoth wed LOGWOOD SISAL R.J. BOWE Commission Merchant (Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission) Offices:—532 Bay St. Alfred's Wharf Christie's Near City Market. STOCK PRODUCE pie read the papers too much. NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT The returned officer discussed conscription and how the side that wanted it "represents that the British Army on the western front is reduced to a few pla toons and is allowed to fire but one shell a day.' while the op position "states quite simply that if the personal liberty of Britain's workers—that doesn't mean you and me, as you might think ; we are the Overbearing Militarist Oligarchy ; a worker is a man who goes on strike— they say that if the personal li berly of these sacred perishcrs is interfered with by the Over boaring Militarist Oligarchy aforesaid, there will be a revo lution. That's all! Oh, they're a sweet lot, the British news paper bosses!" He is asked what the country at large thinks of it all, and replies: The dear old country at large is its dear old self as usual. It is not worrying one jot about conscription or us or anything like that. The one topic of conversation at present is—Charlie Chaplin. "Who is Charlie Chaplin," inquired several voices. Captain Wagstaff shook his head. "I hav'nt the faintest idea. •••••! made several attempts to find out, but wherever I asked the question, the people simply stared at me in amaze ment. I felt quite asham ed ; it was plain that I ought io have known." LOOS FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW Whereupon, with a sigh of relief, it is agreed that the old country is all right and forebo ding were in vain. The chronicle closes with a description of what the author saw of the "battle of the slag heap"—Loos. At half past a o'clock the officers were called. There was no lust of battle, "merely that ordinary snappisli ness which is induced by early rising and uncomfortable sur rounding*" They reach the communication trendies, and as they trail down them are cheered by the sight of seventy German prisoners running for dear life across the open coun try to the safety of the rear af ter their escort. They made no attempt to escape, and their one ambition in life seemed to be "to put as large a space as possible between themselves and their late comrades-in arms and, if possible, overtake their captors." Captain Beith tells nothing if the advance, but draws a pic e officers of the batta 'enty four hours later, fced and very hungry, nrwnrd again. Cap tc dies like a eery er, cutting the wire ween his men and safety. They find the regiments on either side of them bombed out of existence. They are al most surrounded and the Colo nel it badly hit. They have to fall back acrcss the open, and at last, after three days are re lieved by fresh troops. There Captain Beith leaves his First Hundred Thousand, but he promises that "some day, if Providence wills, the tale shall be resumed—and you shall hear how Major Kemp, Captain Wagstaffe, Aylzing, and Bobby Little, asristed by such veterans as Corporal Muaklewame, built up the regiment with copious drafts and a fresh batch of subalterns to its former strength." t THE CHURCHES SUNDAY, APRIL, 16. ST. MATTHEW'S PARISH CHURCH Lwrr vi PALM SUNDAY 7.15 a.m. Holy Communion. 10.15 a.m. Sunday School. 11 a.m. Mattins"Tl.e People". 4 p.m. Catechisms. Passiontide in the Prayer book." 7.30 p.m. Evensong. "The Problem of the historic atone merit, and the 20th centu ry." Public Auction. John Butler Will sell on Tuesday the 25th inst at 11.30 o'clock At St. Matthews Rectory The entire lot of household effects consisting of Parlor, Diningroom, Bedroom furniture, Crockery, Kitchen Utensils &C.&C. Terms Cash. TENDERS will be received, until Easter week, by Mr. R. W Sawyer, for the fast (one^ sail boat "Waterloo", in good condition, which will be atj the wharf of Mr. Sawyer for in spection at that time. Terms:—Cash on Delivery. John S. G. Thompson, Owner Wemyss Bight Eleuthera. NOTICE T HIS is to inform my Patrons and the Public in General that I have opened my Public Black Smith Slop; and am now ready to do anything in the Una of General repair or new work How Shoeing Specially. All work don* Mechanically. %  P A. HUYLEH Advertise in Th Tribimtj. /



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m Masai The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April IS, 1916, .* £ %  .asm. 9s ari 1~ Lr\ ; ^*vj \/-£V White and j ^^^kj I HIP IF ^ ^as^LVS fin,... ^r*^BBBBT SBBBBL 15/1 ^ A 1 rfMK^BS i ^B j .in. with To be bad at all Grocers The highest price paid for LOGWOOD in any quantity chipped for shippingand delivered on Wharf at Nassau from nowon to July 1st. Chas. B ROCKWELL, Palm Gate, Nassau St. T Keeping Guard HEREare responsibilities that every patriotic citizen must bear in this season of national peril, other than fighting for the flag. V.t the least of these is preserving the balance of trade. -TMI SHOE 4 STORE is on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largest order of its history. This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up 210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all, hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan V. K N ^ KNOW With these reinforcements he Big Four will b able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar kets abroad. G, T. KNOWLES, Prop. Big4, Bay St. (Sponge Exchange) r I BbG to notify the public that 1 will undertake to sell Logwood on commission to the very best advantage. Write or see E. C. Griffin Cor. Bay St. and Victoria Av$. ARROW COLLAR If you will give these collars a trial and keep track of their many trips to the laundry you will soon appreciate their worth. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT. PEABODY & CO., Inc. MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. RINGS ?+ ON .-THIKu SAVED. %  Quality considered, we guarantee to show you a saving of at least ONE THIRD .'v. %  b< Dm v .tf au\ 1 an • II YOU arc not perfectly satisfied, ^>-% rrn 1 nave paid out \\ 1. Bankers: London Hy snd Midland Hunk Ltd. 18, Cum Htruet, Drill.,!, tag. Ladles' IHrt Hoi UiuitndH an lliu ..rated. Price 67/0 916.64 laBM Hint; fcet with 1 'iiiiiiuinif. and MMM or 8appbln-H an 1 omitted. Price 41 • 10.05 Every Ring it ssnt In Pretty Velvet Lines] Cat* suitable for Presentation. Gents' 9PI. Hnlld Gold 5i*tiitl RinK i" Htunt'i. iii it h (•'ivemnient si imped, I'lam grooved shoulder*, bjukdaotne limnnlv %  ring. 1 • .4 6 %UI %  m in Iftct Bond Oold. PrJia 30>tTJi Can he • urn-lied m with Blrod Stone < Red Cornelian nt tl I l.iihiK', Inf. Monotfrnin on *,,[ 'in a. i>*r^lKti CuuntrU.'H Id, (16V) extra. WEDDING RINGS %*£& W, Mil W.ddln, Rini, by welalit at only a ,mli profit ov,r th, actual coat ol produc lion. Out Inxh .las. Until) I, ,ccoiul u< none. 1 li* 1111,11 tv ol cvury wtiilrliMK rhiK "old by ii I. plainly %  tamped inlile with IILI rirlu-h Oovernmenl Manip. / WeddlMK Bang* can I %  I tra Wld, or Wire' Fattorn uliluairatcd ,iih, nuir price. In tlol Oold. walKlitfijenuyweiichto. Wire Pattern, fTloe 7 e *e.ii Bound inaida Inl|etOolt1,wi.l">•• w.'lkht.. 1TI.I' SI (S.it With th, abov, W,ddln< Rlnpii. w, t ivea preaent of t ii Sterllnif Sllvar Flatad •a Spoon, A Budar Tonjt, either old KliRllah or Fancy Pallern. Tlieae hpoona are Klectro HllTer Flab'U on tho beat quality Nickel MlfOT and are uuaranteed to ittre •nllii' aatlafactlon. Extra Wide. Flat Inaide. Poala,, iltatrlatiTeil. on Wrrldlnii ItliiK and FrcMill. ltrltlah l.lnplrr 1 J ik-, extra. Fo Countrle, 1/1 Ma eiua. The Tribun for Modern --DRINK-Welch's Grape Juice. + PRICES Quarts, 28. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 153. per doz. t Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. i Pints, 6d. 4s. 6d. per doi. it T BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen Opp. Hotel Colonial. Insist On Kirkman's Borax Soap A Bigger Cake A Better Soap 3d. per Bar At Your Dealer or At The New York House H. T. BRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE: WH side B*J sponge Exch Nassau, N. P. Bahamas. e.nge AGENT HORSES SHEEP CATTLE Mf POULTRY SPONQE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products. Automobiles & Bicycles REO CARS AND POPE BICYCLES (Niagara) FOR SALE, AND FOR HIRE. Sole agent for REO MOTOR CAR Co. Picmtt attention to all repairs Supplies and accessorie PHONE 402 G&ssoline and Oils J. P. StMMS 47 Market St.



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**lp n LATEST RADIOGRAMS Nuillvi. feddictua |virr. in verbs mo.glalri Bolnn bound lo iwer to the Dogmas of no Master. Vol. XIII. No. 123 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 15. 1916 Price. THREE CENTS Kitchener's Army In The Making. /SirHE war has already disvS) covered its liiStorian on the British side. Not the man who will set down scientifically its strategic moves and diplomatic contests, but the man who interpret to the world the ex periences, the sensations and motives of the soldiers who vol unteered at their country's call and went through all the trials of life in the trenches. Naturally enough he is a soldier himself and has won the Military Cross. He has the further qualification for his task that in the days of peace, under the nom de plume of Ian Hay he was a novelist of reputation. Captain Ian Hay Beith of the Argyll and Sutherland High lands was one of the first who answered Kitchener's call for recruits, one of the "first hun dred thousand," and in a collection of short sketchescalled "The First Hundred Thou sand dcjcnbed how a mob of Scottish ironworkers and miners were drilled and diciplined until they became a fighting unit, and what they found when they first stood guard in (he French trenches and then took part in the assault on Loos. Hissketch es were written while on active service under every conceivable discomfort. One of them, a note in the book describes, was put together by the author, lying on a stone floor in a French farm house. The first sketch tells of the early days of drill when the bat talion was but an unruly mob. It pictures the barrack yard where a thousand men in little groups are learning the elements of soldiering. And so the drill goes on. All over the drab, dusty, gritty pa rade ground under the warm September sun similar squads are being pounded into shape. They have no uniforms yet; even their instructors wear bow ler hats or cloth caps. Some of the facesu'nder the brims of these but they're a stout crowd. By to nurse. She qualifies herself gad we'll make them a credit, for her new profession by dressing up like one of the chorus of 'The Quaker Girl' and getting to the Old Regiment yet. "LABOR" PUT IN KHAKI Captain Beith tells of their first struggles and the great triumph it was when one pla toon marched round the square without going through another her portrait, thus attired, in The Tatler. She then proceeds to i invade any hospital that is available, where she flirts with everything in pajamas, and freezes you with a look if you platoon, losing any part of itself. „,i. 1 . %  ask her to empty a basin or or piling up like a tidal wave on the veranda of the married quar ters. But the men found the dicipline at first very irksome. change your sheets. I know her! I've had some, and 1 know her She is one of tiie minor horrors of war! • What France at last, and this is how Private Mucklewame complied with Divisional Orders to "lose no opportunity of cultivating the friendliest relations with those of our allies whom you may chance to encounter." He came across a French sentry. The two gallant fellows regarded each other with shy smiles, after the fashion of two children who have been introduced by their nurses at a party. Presently the sentry, by a happy inspiration, proffers hisbay onet for inspection, as if it were a new doll. Mucklewame bows solemnly and fingers the blade. Then he produces his own bayonet, and the two weapons are compared—still in constrained silence. Mucklewame nods approvingly : "Verra goody!" he remarks, profoundly convinced that he is speaking the French language. "Olrigh! Tipperaree !" replies the seutry, not to be outdone in international courtesy. HUMAN TOUCHES IN THE TRENCHE8 The battalion goes into quarters a little back of the line to get acclimatized. Captain Beith pictures the scene when a German shell falls into that little French town. Ht describes the trenches in daytime, "full of men, mostly asleep, for the night cometh when no man may sleep," but some are cooking, and others cleaning their rifles. Continued on 3rd page. A ,. iiuuuia in vrni ; wild t home they were persons of' .„i. „ %  • .. %  ,. *.. sucli a cm wants is a good old nsequence with veiy definite f „,.i., ,. , fashioned mother who knows how to put a slipper to its right conseq notions about the dignity of labor. They had employers who trembled at their frown and trade union officials who wen ever impressing on them their omnipotence in the industrial world. But in the army they appeared to be nobodies. They were expected to stand stiffly at attention when addressed by an officer. They might not spit; they might not smoke a cigar •tte in the ranks nor keep the residue behind an ear. They might not take beer to bed. And they must shave every day. But gradually fresh air, hard training and clean living wove their spell. They even began to criticise the slovenly habits of the Eighth Battalion, just three weeks younger than themselves. But the "fatigues" still came hard on them. Captain Beith draws a picture of the orderly room, where Private Dunshie is use. So the regiment trains. Its historian tells how it learned to shoot, to skirmish, and above all to dig. He pictures its officers—a master from a famous school, a young doctor from Harley Street, a lawyer aspiring \n Parliament, a Scottish laird, more proud of his $2 a day pay than all his rent roil. He tells how McSnape, the Boy ScofTt, earned his corporal's stripes by his love ol field work, and Private Dunshie sought constantly a "soft snap," even volunteering to be the company chiropodist, when a chiropodist was called for, but had to confess he didn't know the meaning of the term. He describes how "Wee Peer" Carmichael died, worn out from voluntary hardships his frail frame could not bear, and Muc Idewame and the rest of the or dinary run of privates gradually up before an officer for refusing V. K P M **£?' *X iMih fl„r learned to be soldiers, in fact as well as name. After to scrub floors. "I jined the airmy for tae fight they Germans, and no fer tae be learned tae scrub floors—" "Sir-r !" suggests the Sergeant Major in his ear. "Sir-r !"amends Private Dunshie, reluctantly. "I was no in the habit of scrubbin' the floor mysel' where I stayed in Glesca', and ma wife would be affronted—" But there the Captain broke hatsarenottooprosperou*. *.;'" a d au f ht *J • x t,le t Is it possible? Can that awk ?" n sh e ? !• that thesolpossi ward, shy, self conscious mob with scarcely an old soldier in their ranks be pounded within the space of a few months into the Seventh (service) Battalion of the Bruce and Wallace High landers—one of the most famous regiments in the British Army ? The Colonel's boyish figure stiffens. "They're a rough irowd ; he murmurs," and a tough crowd ; dier's first duty is to obey. THE AMATEUR NURSE How the officers looked upon some of the amateur nurses is told in the words of Major Kemp: "I'm not talking about the Florence Nightingales," he said. "Th young person I am referring to is just intelligent enough to understand that the only pos sible thing to do this season is as name. Alter seven months, he writes of the battalion : We can endure hail, rain, snow, and vapor; we can march and dig with the best; we have mastered the first principles of musketry ; we can advance in an extended line without losing touch or bunching, and we have ceased to regard an order as an insult or obedience as a degradation. We eat when we can and what we can get, and we sleep wherever we happen to find ourselves lying. That is something. But there are certain military accomplishments which can only be taught us by the enemy. Taking cover, for instance. CULTIVATING AN The battalion, like Kipi ship, "found itself." It at Sanitary i 1 Reliable Sold by W. Hilton 260 Bay bt. i LOGWOOD T HE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what ever the market price is H. J. CLARIDGE East Bay St, Nassau. 'ALU We do high Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 36s. per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market—5 x 18 "Primes" Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our same.guarantee as the Bests." Any defective shingles can be returned. r grade in stock C. C. SAUNDERS. tliig -/.. : 1 A


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02572
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, April 15, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
**lp
n
*
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
Nuillvi. feddictua |virr. in verbs mo.glalri
Bolnn bound lo iwer to the Dogmas of no Master.
Vol. XIII. No. 123
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. APRIL 15. 1916
Price. THREE CENTS
Kitchener's Army
In The Making.
/SirHE war has already dis-
vS) covered its liiStorian on the
British side. Not the man
who will set down scientifically
its strategic moves and diplo-
matic contests, but the man who
interpret to the world the ex
periences, the sensations and
motives of the soldiers who vol
unteered at their country's call
and went through all the
trials of life in the trenches.
Naturally enough he is a sol-
dier himself and has won the
Military Cross. He has the fur-
ther qualification for his task
that in the days of peace, under
the nom de plume of Ian Hay
he was a novelist of reputation.
Captain Ian Hay Beith of the
Argyll and Sutherland High
lands was one of the first who
answered Kitchener's call for
recruits, one of the "first hun
dred thousand," and in a
collection of short sketchescall-
ed "The First Hundred Thou
sand dcjcnbed how a mob of
Scottish ironworkers and miners
were drilled and diciplined un-
til they became a fighting unit,
and what they found when they
first stood guard in (he French
trenches and then took part in
the assault on Loos. Hissketch
es were written while on active
service under every conceivable
discomfort. One of them, a note
in the book describes, was put
together by the author, lying on
a stone floor in a French farm
house.
The first sketch tells of the
early days of drill when the bat
talion was but an unruly mob.
It pictures the barrack yard
where a thousand men in little
groups are learning the elements
of soldiering.
And so the drill goes on. All
over the drab, dusty, gritty pa
rade ground under the warm
September sun similar squads
are being pounded into shape.
They have no uniforms yet;
even their instructors wear bow
ler hats or cloth caps. Some of
the facesu'nder the brims of these
but they're a stout crowd. By to nurse. She qualifies herself
gad we'll make them a credit, for her new profession by dress-
ing up like one of the chorus of
'The Quaker Girl' and getting
to the Old Regiment yet.
"LABOR" PUT IN KHAKI
Captain Beith tells of their
first struggles and the great
triumph it was when one pla
toon marched round the square
without going through another
her portrait, thus attired, in The
Tatler. She then proceeds to
i invade any hospital that is
available, where she flirts with
everything in pajamas, and
. freezes you with a look if you
platoon, losing any part of itself. ,i. 1
' ask her to empty a basin or
or piling up like a tidal wave on
the veranda of the married quar
ters. But the men found the
dicipline at first very irksome.
change your sheets. I know
her! I've had some, and 1 know
her She is one of tiie minor
horrors of war! What
France at last, and this is how
Private Mucklewame complied
with Divisional Orders to "lose
no opportunity of cultivating
the friendliest relations with
those of our allies whom you
may chance to encounter." He
came across a French sentry.
The two gallant fellows
regarded each other with
shy smiles, after the fashion
of two children who have
been introduced by their
nurses at a party. Present-
ly the sentry, by a happy
inspiration, proffers hisbay
onet for inspection, as if it
were a new doll. Muckle-
wame bows solemnly and
fingers the blade. Then he
produces his own bayonet,
and the two weapons are
comparedstill in con-
strained silence. Muckle-
wame nods approvingly :
"Verra goody!" he remarks,
profoundly convinced that
he is speaking the French
language.
"Olrigh! Tipperaree !"
replies the seutry, not to be
outdone in international
courtesy.
HUMAN TOUCHES IN THE
TRENCHE8
The battalion goes into quar-
ters a little back of the line to
get acclimatized. Captain
Beith pictures the scene when
a German shell falls into that
little French town. Ht des-
cribes the trenches in daytime,
"full of men, mostly asleep, for
the night cometh when no man
may sleep," but some are cook-
ing, and others cleaning their
rifles.
Continued on 3rd page.
A,. iiuuuia in vrni ; wild
t home they were persons of' .i. __.. ,.
*.. sucli a cm wants is a good old
nsequence with veiy definite f,.i- ., .___,. ,
fashioned mother who knows
how to put a slipper to its right
conseq
notions about the dignity of
labor. They had employers
who trembled at their frown and
trade union officials who wen
ever impressing on them their
omnipotence in the industrial
world. But in the army they
appeared to be nobodies. They
were expected to stand stiffly at
attention when addressed by an
officer. They might not spit;
they might not smoke a cigar
tte in the ranks nor keep the
residue behind an ear. They
might not take beer to bed. And
they must shave every day.
But gradually fresh air, hard
training and clean living wove
their spell. They even began
to criticise the slovenly habits
of the Eighth Battalion, just
three weeks younger than them-
selves.
But the "fatigues" still came
hard on them. Captain Beith
draws a picture of the orderly
room, where Private Dunshie is
use.
So the regiment trains. Its
historian tells how it learned to
shoot, to skirmish, and above
all to dig. He pictures its offi-
cersa master from a famous
school, a young doctor from
Harley Street, a lawyer aspiring
\n Parliament, a Scottish laird,
more proud of his $2 a day pay
than all his rent roil. He tells
how McSnape, the Boy ScofTt,
earned his corporal's stripes by
his love ol field work, and Pri-
vate Dunshie sought constantly
a "soft snap," even volunteering
to be the company chiropodist,
when a chiropodist was called
for, but had to confess he didn't
know the meaning of the term.
He describes how "Wee Peer"
Carmichael died, worn out from
voluntary hardships his frail
frame could not bear, and Muc
Idewame and the rest of the or
dinary run of privates gradually
up before an officer for refusing V. k Pm- **?'
*X iMih flr learned to be soldiers, in fact as
well as name. After
to scrub floors.
"I jined the airmy for tae
fight they Germans, and no fer
tae be learned tae scrub floors"
"Sir-r !" suggests the Sergeant
Major in his ear.
"Sir-r !"amends Private Dun-
shie, reluctantly. "I was no in
the habit of scrubbin' the floor
mysel' where I stayed in Glesca',
and ma wife would be affront-
ed"
But there the Captain broke
hatsarenottooprosperou*. *.;'" a"d *aufht *J x't,le"t
Is it possible? Can that awk ?"n.sh'e ? ! that thesol-
possi
ward, shy, self conscious mob
with scarcely an old soldier in
their ranks be pounded within
the space of a few months into
the Seventh (service) Battalion
of the Bruce and Wallace High
landersone of the most famous
regiments in the British Army ?
The Colonel's boyish figure
stiffens.
"They're a rough irowd ; he
murmurs," and a tough crowd ;
dier's first duty is to obey.
THE AMATEUR NURSE
How the officers looked upon
some of the amateur nurses is
told in the words of Major
Kemp:
"I'm not talking about the
Florence Nightingales," he said.
"Th young person I am refer-
ring to is just intelligent enough
to understand that the only pos
sible thing to do this season is
as name. Alter seven
months, he writes of the battal-
ion :
We can endure hail, rain,
snow, and vapor; we can
march and dig with the
best; we have mastered the
first principles of musketry ;
we can advance in an ex-
tended line without losing
touch or bunching, and we
have ceased to regard an
order as an insult or obe-
dience as a degradation.
We eat when we can and
what we can get, and we
sleep wherever we happen
to find ourselves lying.
That is something. But
there are certain military
accomplishments which
can only be taught us by
the enemy. Taking cover,
for instance.
CULTIVATING AN "
The battalion, like Kipi
ship, "found itself." It at
Sanitary
i
1
Reliable
Sold by
W. Hilton
260 Bay bt.
i

LOGWOOD
THE undersigned desires to notify the public that he is
purchasing LOGWOOD and will pay for same what
ever the market price is
H. J. CLARIDGE
East Bay St, Nassau.
'ALU
We do high
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 36s.
per 1000. No better grade than these on the Market5 x 18
"Primes" Cypress at 32s. per 1000. This grade carries our
same.guarantee as the Bests."
Any defective shingles can be returned.
r grade in stock
C. C. SAUNDERS.
tliig -/.. :
1
A


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 15, 1916,
L. OILBRRT DDPTCa.
l:.d\'.er and Froprittor.
OFFlOIli
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Ss
Sanaa. A. P., Bahama*
"PHONE 2fi0. P. O. BOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
single copy.........
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy
Saturdaysingle copy
Weaklv' ............
Ifeiithiy ............is.
Quarterly........ .. ^s.
HrllYearly............q=.
Tearly ............1,8s
Id
id
l|d
Jd
6.1
6.1
I'AYAHLK IN ADVANUK
Advertising Hates :Six pence |>er line
loi first insertion: three pence tier line
lor second insertion ; and onepemw prr
line for subsqueut insertions.
Advertisements under eicht lines j-.
Zbc tribune
Saturday. April 15.1916
Copy of telegram from the
Secretary of State for the
Colonies.
8th April.
With reference to my pre-
decessor's telegram of 17th
April, 1915, His Majesty
wishes that on occasion of
His Majesty's Birthday as
last year no dinners, reviews,
salutes or other celebration
should take place.
:o:
MAILS
Foreign Mails to be des
patched per S. S. Mexico will
be made up and closed on
Thursday next, th 20th inst.
at 4 p. m.
Parcels Mails and money
order Lists will be made up
and closed on Wednesday,
the 9th inst, at ia noon.
Interinsular Mails will be
made up and closed on Thurs
day the 20th inst, at 5 p.m.
The "Daughters of the
Empire" are rtminded of the
Tuesday afternoon sewing
meetings as lately the at-
tendence*has fallen off con-
siderably.
The attention of our read-
ers is invited to the appeal
of the Red Cross Society for
old linen, towels of all kinds
and walking sticks, all of
which are greatly needed.
The Mail Steamer "Morro
Castle" arrived off the port
lust evening with 7 passen-
gers for Nassau, embarked 89
from here and with 62 in
transit proceeded *o New
York.
Mr. and Mrs Solomon R.
Noble, Mr. and ..Mrs. Joseph
Peck, and Miss Winifred
Lowry.
The Mail Steamer "Miami"
arrived this morning from
Mayport, Fla. with 8 passen
gers and cargo of lumber shin
gles and sundries, and steam
ed for Key West this after
noon with 15 passengers.
Higgs Mr. and Mrs G. M.
and infant, Misses Ethel and
Enid; Mrs Ida Dowdell; Mr.
T. F. Whittin.
Mr. Howard Williams.
The Ward line Steamer
Santiago steamed from New
York on Friday afternoon
with 5600 bbls. cargo for
Nassau.
:o:
To Correspondents."WE",
Your communication being
unaccompanied by either a
card or covering letter goes
into the waste paper basket.
:o:
(COMMUNICATED.)
The Tribune has again
rendered public service, by
maintaining that the invsion
of private rights should be
suppressed by the hand res-
ponsible for publio service to
private individuals and the
community at large. Some
one has suggested that order
can be turned into chaos
when the public service eye
is in doubt as to whether
Church Authorities or public
service officials are wholly or
in a divided sense to rentier
stewardship at wedding
ceremonies.
The unsuspected partici-
pants in the ceremony and
church service never for one
moment imagined that an
unfriendly crowd could
collect, and discuss the order
of thingsdistasteful pre-
sumably to some of them
and act in the manner so
graphically decribed in the
Tribune's protest of yester-
day's date." The question
now arises, in what manner
are these malaperts to hear
that their conduct is a trans-
gression of every thing that
is sacred to those who as-
sembled to witness the cere-
mony, which binds in in-
separable bonds, the two
young people who through
this medium heartily thanks
the Tribune for its manly
protest.
Not the least in this un-
seemly conduct was the
part taken by those who dir-
ected their attention to the
mother of the bride but des-
pite her advanced age, and
the fact, that like the other
members of the party she
carried no weapons of defen-
ce.
But praise be to her, she
withstood the assault with a
courage and determination
which for the moment made
her assailants stand aghast.
While the damage done is
not far beyond the description
given by the Tribune it is not
too late to ask the question
if this "Atlanta""Charles-
ton" mob had smashed some
part of the sacred edifice who
would pay the damage?
It is certain that every one
present on the evening in
question will agree that
what is needed most is con-
certed action. For there was
a lamentable absence of
something connecting the
responsibilityperhaps divi-
ding it.And the ontsider
naturally asks when cen-
monies of this kind are given
notice of, what is the con-
necting link between church
responsibility and
service.
public
E.
Stores Department,
83, Pall Mail.
London, S. W.
22nd. March, 1916
Mrs. Hilton,
Dear Madam,
Your letter of the and inst.
to hand this mornip/rrtuid
it gives us m
note that yon
4 more pai
hospital 'ga
again I w
you that
port from
the Empire" is v< 1 y much
appreciated.
I am enclosing a lislof our
most urgent needs which
covers, as you will notice,
garments suitable for the
coming Spring and Summer
months, and any contribution
you can send us on these lines
will be most welcome.
Yours faithfully,
Stores And Transport Dept.
Manager.
15th March, 1916.
THE OFFICIAL WEEKLY STATEMENT.
Having now sufficient stock
of warm clothing to last dur-
ing the remaining cold
months, the requirements of
the Joint Committee of the
British Red Cross Society
and The Order of St. John of
Jerusalem are, specially:
Pyjamas, Nightshirts, Bed-
Jackets, Made of either
Thin Flannel, or Wincey.
Day Shirts,Made of Thin
Flannel r Oxford Shirting.
Also: Old Linen, Floor
Cloths, Towels of all kinds,
Walking Sticks, Kitchen
Rubbers, Blankets & Sheets.
COMMUNICATED.
With the coming of Easter
we have rumours of many
weddingseven in far off
Andros. But the one we are
privileged to speak of on this
occasion actually took place
on Thursday evening April
sixth. This union allies to-
gether Miss Felicia Johnson
of Nassau, to Mr. S. Colero
Liotta of Girgenti, Sicilia It-
aly. We need hardly speak
of the bride, as she is the
well known daughter of Mrs.
Alice Johnson of our own
city: while the bridegroom
has attained distinction as a
musician, both in his native
land Italy, and in America,
while perhaps the short time
he was our constituent part
of the ColonialItalia
OrchestraIt is no exagger-
ation to say that a name was
made.
The wedding which was a
pretty one, took place at the
Catherdral, by the Rev. Mr.
C. Dudley Lampen, who
marked his approval of the
part he was to take, by com-
ing in from his country home,
which was much appreciated
by those interested in the ar-
rnngaments, which after-
wards proved complete.
Many of the visitors ex-
pressed regret that the cere-
money could not take place
during their stay at Nassau;
but circumstances over which
the happy pair had no con-
trol intervened, making7 this
arrangement impossible.
The reception at the bride's
home (which was decorated
on the Japanese Style) was
attended by many friends of
Bahamian birth was like-
wise joined in by friends,
who yearly make Nassau
their winter abode. The gifts,
owing to this dislocation of
foreign mail service incident
to the war conditions were
many arrived late in some
instances Some of them
coming from distant lands,
wen of far Norway. And last,
igh by no means least,
remembrances of Nassau
ds and visitors, will be
d 1011 tr after other in
16 Season
s of
Schedule of proposed sailings of Steamers un
dercontract to convey Mails from the Bahamas to Foreign
Countries during the month of April 1916.
DATE OF NAME OF DESTINATION HOUR OF
SAILING STEAMER 1 CLOSING
April 4 Miami Jacksonville
(Mayport) 9.00 p.m.
7 Mexico New York jo.30 a.m.
7 Miami Jacksonville
(Mayport) 8.00 p.m.
11 Miami > 8.00 p.m.
?4 Morro Castle New York 10.30 a.m.
'4 Miami Key West, Fla. 8.00 p.m.
21 Mexico New York 10.30 a.m.
28 Morro Castle New York 10.30 a.m.
Parcel Mails will be made up and closed as follows:
For the United Kingdom and the United States
April 6, 13, 20, and 27 at noon.
newer interest. We had
nearly forgotten about the
dresses, which were said by
all to be attractivefor the
bride in her simple dress of
Chiffon over net, was admir-
ed by all ; and her attendants
wore most appropriate
gowns.
Miss Leonora Johnsonthe
aitist,looked pretty in a gown
of Chantilly lace, with
touches of colour here and
there in the shape of tiny
bow-knots. While Miss Ed-
wina Johnson in a gown of
embroidered silk net, over
Japanese silk, was most ex
quisite.
The happy pair, who for
the present will make their
home in Nassau, expect
shortly to make a sojourn to
the outer islands, in order
that Mr. Colero Liotta may
familiarize himself with the
conditions prevailing in the
islands associated with the
most important step in his
life.
St. P.
Radiograms
April 14th, 1916.
Washington, 12:Great
Britains note replying to the
American protest against the
the seizure of 38 Austrian*,
Germans and Turks from the
American steamer China
near Shanghai was made
public today by the state de-
partment.
Itfollowed the line of argu-
ment previously indicated
and contends that the seizure
is justified on the ground that
the prisoners had been en-
gaged in a plot against Eng-
land in the Far East and were
attempting to return home
to take up arms.
It contends that they were
not clothed with the immun-
ity which would attach to
enemy subjects who were
merely travelling.
Great Britain alleges that
the prisoners were engaged
for some time past in the col-
lecting end transmitting of
arms and ammunition to In-
dia and if possible for the
arming of a ship to play the
part of a Far Eastern Moe-
ut, and were bound for Man-
illa to continue their work
having been exposed to the
British authorities at Shang-
hai.
New York, 12:Four men
charged with complicity in
the manufacture of fire bombs
which were pieced aboard
ships carrying ammunition
and supplies to the Entente
Allies were arrested here to-
night by agents of the depart-
ment of justice acting in con-
cert with the New York po-
lice.
Three of the suspects are
employees of German steam-
ship lines. They are- accused
of liavingbcen involved, with
others not yet in custody, of
fomenting a plot widespread
in its ramifications for the
destruction of merchantmen.
London; 12;The Germans
Northwest of Verdun evident
ly are holding in leash their
infantry for fresh attacks in
an endeavour to capture 304
and LeMort Homme, key-
points which are tenaciously
barring the way to the fort.
The infantry has remained
idle in their trenches while
their guns are throwing shells
on the region embracing the
triangle formed by Hill 304.
Esnes and LeMort Homme.
Not even a sally by the
Germans in this district is
reported by the Erench offi
rial communication.
Comparative quiet prevails
to the East of the Meuse, a-
round Douaumont and Vaux
where there has been frequent
vicious fighting.
No infantry attacks have
been made by either side
and the activity of the artil
Iery has been less marked
than on previous days.
:o.
15th April 1916.
London:It is officially re
ported today that the Turk
ish forces on the Tigris River
were driven back three miles
by British attack. There are
hopes eventually for the relief
of Kut el Amara.
Paris:The Germans today
attacked the French lines
West Hill of 304.
Queenstown: Eleven men
and the captain of the British
steamer Invenyl sunk by a
submarine Tuesday landed
here today. One American is
among the survivors. Eleven
men are missing.
Washington.Officials are
uninformed on the situation
of Major Tompkins and a
small force attacked by Mexi
cans at Pa rial yesterday. Con
grew is apparently united to
continue the Villa campaign.


\
* w*
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April 15, 1916,


Soviiv Lansing nnnoun
c-d ijmLiv that he isprepared
to treat with C&rrtiHzu for
withdniwl'of Vrfierkan troops
hul indicated that there
would be no immediate with
drawn1.
lit- stated that the United
S. ites hid not agreed to res
trict tli'- punitive expedition
t ) territory reached by Man h
2jrd and there is evidentl>
some misunderstanding by
Cairaiiz.i.
Lansing acknowledged to
day that the I liilitl Males is
in fRDssesstrtri of evidence by
French naval forces showing
the indcniiiy or the submar
irte which destroyed the Sus
sex.
Mexico City:Carranzi
arrived here last night with
the memhers of his staff. Hi1-
entrance was quiet.
:o:
April 15th, 1916.
Wash in g ton, 13:-The
United Statesjs disposed to
consider that Germany in the
latest submarine notevir.tual-
Iv has admitted that oae of
her submarines torpedoed
the Channel steamer Sussex
President Wilson and Sec-
retary Lansing today exam
ined the official text of the
communication from Berlin
and arc understood to have
reached that conclusion.
Unless Germany should
without equivocation admit
attacking the. vessels which
had aboard more than a score
of American citizens, inflict
adequate punishment upon
the commander of the sub
in a r i n e and in other ways
show evidence of good faith
action of a drastic nature
undoubtedly will follow.
Details of the policy to be
pursued are expected to be
formulated at the cabinet
meeting tomorrow.
goat valued at many millions
if dollars have been amicably
settled by repiesrntativrs of the
meat pfickeis and the British
1; ivei iitneot. Great Britain
Wlil pay for the seized cargoes.
Little activity is reported
in any of the war theatres.
Weather retards fighting in
the vicnity of Verdun. In fan
try operations are hindered
and big guns are busy only
on comparatively a small
front in the West.
With abatement of battle
before Verdun and a slate
of comparative quiet reigning
in all other war theatres dip-
lomatic issues growing out
of the war are prominently
to the fore in the news of the
day.
The submarine controversy
between the United States and
Germany has the American
government busy gathering data
for information to Germany
concerning the Sussex and at-
tacks on various merchantman
since the torpedoing of the Lus
itania, which it is asserted will
bring to a focus the entire ques
lion of the submarines.
Great Britain has replied to
the American protest againt
the clause in her Trading with
the Enemy Act which prevents
trading with any business firm
which has affiliations with or is
controlled by subjects of enemy
countries.
The note asserts that the act
is being enforced to rejstrict ac
tivities and trade of persons an
der British jurisdiction and that
care will be taken to avoid in
jury to neutral commerce
The cases of the Chicago
meat packers against Great liri
tain for the holding up of car
Continued from First page )
The proceedings are su-
perintended by a contem-
plative tabby cat, coiled
up in a niche, like a feline
flower in a crannied wall.
"She used to sit on top
of the parapet," explains a
f 1 iond Iy I.nice corporal;
"but became 1 casualty,
OWin' to a sniper mistakin'
'er for a Guardsman's bear-
skin Show the officer your
hack, Christabel !" and the
healed scar is duly inspect-
ed.
Not every time the soldiers
jet out of their trenches are they
shot at by the enemy. Captain
Beith tells how the Germans
limbed out to cut the long
1,'rass winch had grown in "No
Man's Land'' between the lines
and how the Highlanders let
them alone.
"Let 'em by all means"
explains Captain Wagstaff.
"If they don't, we must.
We don't want their bomb-
throwers crawling over
here through a hayfield.
Lrt us encourage them ty
every means in our power."
For it is the bombs that
are the very latest things
in modern warfare Rifles
were intended for proper,
gentle, manly warfare, but
111 the hand to hand butch
ery which calls itself war
today, the rifle is rapidly
becoming demode. For
long ranges you require
machine guns; for short,
bombs and hand grenades.
Can you empty a cottage
by filing a single rifle shot
in at the door? Can you
exterminate twenty Ger
mans in a fortified back
parlor by a single thrust
with the bayonet ? Never!
Hut you can do both these
things with a jam tin, stuff
ed witli dynamite and scrap
iron.
BOMBS AND SNIPERS
The Highbinders' historian
describes the four types of bomb,
the hair-brush, the cricket-ball,
the policeman's truncheon, and
the jam-tin. The hair-brush,
instead of bristles, has a solid
block of explosive. The trun-
cheon is gay with streamers of
tape, to make it fall nose down
wards. The cricket-ball has a
fuse timed for five seconds,
while the jam-tin has a ten sec
ond fuse.
Then there is the sniper. A
German specimen is dubbed
Zaecheus.
Wecall him by this name
because he lives up a tree.
There is a row of pollarded
willows standing parallel
to our front, a hundred and
fifty yards away. Up or in
one of these lives Zaecheus.
We have never seen him,
but we know he is there ;
beeause if you look over
the top of the parapet he
shoots you through the
head. We do not even
know which of the trees he
lives in. There are nine of
them, and every morning
we comb them out one by
one, with a machine gun.
But all in vain. Zaecheus
merely crawls away into
the standing corn behind
his trees and waits till we
have finished. Then he
comes brick again and tries
to shoot the machine gun
officer. He has not sue
ceeded yet, but he sticks to
his task with a gentle per
sistence. He is evidently
of a persevering rather than
vindictive disposition.
8A8 AND TRENCH MORTARS
1 here is an excellent descnp
lion of an alarm raised foi a
supposed gas attack at early
morning when the mistisrising
and how the men met it:
Next moment every man
is hurriedly pulling his gas
helmet over his head, while
Lieutenant Wadded beats
a ficn/.ied tocsin upon the
instrument provider! for
that purpose to wit, an
18-pound shell which, sus-
pended from a bayonet
stuck into the parados (or
back-wall) of the trench,
makesa mnstefficientahmn
gong. The sound is repeat
ed all along the trench,
and in two minutes every
man is in his place, cowled
like a member of the Holy
Inquisition,glaring through
an eye-piece of mica, and
firing madly into the ap
pfoaching wall of vapor,
hut the expected attack did
not materialize. When some
particular German battery or
machine gun becomes too an
noring, word is passed by tele
phone to the artillery and they
play for a while exactly on the
spot indicated. A chapter on
trench mortars brings out the
fact that "the most unpopular
man in the trenches is undoubt-
edly the trench mortar officer.
His apparatus consists of what
looks like a section of rain pipe,
standing on legs. Upon its up
turned muzzle is poised a bomb,
having the appearance of a
plum pudding on a stick. This
lie discharges over the parapet
into the German trenches, where
it causes a comforting explosion.
He then walks rapidly away."
A trench mortar officer, with
his apparatus, made disappear
ance in the Highlanders' trench
es, and Major Kemp met nim :
"No, you don't, my lad !"'
announces the Major. "Not
if I can help it! Take it
away Take your darned
liver-pill out of this Burn
it Bury it I Eat it But
not here Creep away !"
It's an Ishmaelitish existence,
the trench officer's, the writer
comments.
THE LETTERS OF T. ATKINS
A chapter deals with the let
ters of the soldierswhich the
officers have to censorwith
their "wistful references to old
days; tender inquiries after
bairns and weans; assurances
to anxious wives and mothers
that the dangers of modern
warfare are merely nominal."
Sometimes, also, there is such a
"terse, masterly'' letter as this.
Dere wife, if you oould make
the next postal order a trifle
stronger I might be getting an
egg to my tea.
Your loving husband
JAS. MUCKLEWAME,
No. 74,077.
There is also the army's view
of "things at home" as express
ed by an officer who has been
on leave, and describes London
as he saw it last September :
One's own friends are
down in the dumps. Of
course it's only natural,
because most of them are
in mourning. Our losses
ere much more noticeable
at home than abroad, some
how. People seemed qui
surprised when I tolc
that things out her
right as rain, an
troops are simpl
over one anoth
wed
LOGWOOD
SISAL
R.J. BOWE
Commission Merchant
(Stock sold at 5 p.c. Commission)
Offices:532 Bay St.
Alfred's Wharf
Christie's Near City Market.
STOCK
PRODUCE
pie read the papers too
much.
NOTHING TO WORRY ABOUT
The returned officer discussed
conscription and how the side
that wanted it "represents that
the British Army on the western
front is reduced to a few pla
toons and is allowed to fire but
one shell a day.' while the op
position "states quite simply
that if the personal liberty of
Britain's workersthat doesn't
mean you and me, as you might
think ; we are the Overbearing
Militarist Oligarchy ; a worker
is a man who goes on strike
they say that if the personal li
berly of these sacred perishcrs
is interfered with by the Over
boaring Militarist Oligarchy
aforesaid, there will be a revo
lution. That's all! Oh, they're
a sweet lot, the British news
paper bosses!"
He is asked what the country
at large thinks of it all, and
replies:
The dear old country at
large is its dear old self as
usual. It is not worrying
one jot about conscription
or us or anything like that.
The one topic of conversa-
tion at present isCharlie
Chaplin.
"Who is Charlie Chap-
lin," inquired several voic-
es.
Captain Wagstaff shook
his head.
"I hav'nt the faintest
idea. ! made sev-
eral attempts to find out,
but wherever I asked the
question, the people sim-
ply stared at me in amaze
ment. I felt quite asham
ed ; it was plain that I
ought io have known."
LOOS FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW
Whereupon, with a sigh of
relief, it is agreed that the old
country is all right and forebo
ding were in vain.
The chronicle closes with a
description of what the author
saw of the "battle of the slag
heap"Loos. At half past a
o'clock the officers were called.
There was no lust of battle,
"merely that ordinary snappisli
ness which is induced by early
rising and uncomfortable sur
rounding*" They reach the
communication trendies, and
as they trail down them are
cheered by the sight of seventy
German prisoners running for
dear life across the open coun
try to the safety of the rear af
ter their escort. They made no
attempt to escape, and their
one ambition in life seemed to
be "to put as large a space as
possible between themselves
and their late comrades-in arms
and, if possible, overtake their
captors."
Captain Beith tells nothing
if the advance, but draws a pic
' e officers of the batta
'enty four hours later,
fced and very hungry,
nrwnrd again. Cap
tc dies like a eery
er, cutting the wire
ween his men and
safety. They find the regiments
on either side of them bombed
out of existence. They are al
most surrounded and the Colo
nel it badly hit. They have to
fall back acrcss the open, and
at last, after three days are re
lieved by fresh troops.
There Captain Beith leaves
his First Hundred Thousand,
but he promises that "some day,
if Providence wills, the tale
shall be resumedand you shall
hear how Major Kemp, Captain
Wagstaffe, Aylzing, and Bobby
Little, asristed by such veterans
as Corporal Muaklewame, built
up the regiment with copious
drafts and a fresh batch of su-
balterns to its former strength."
t
THE CHURCHES
SUNDAY, APRIL, 16.
ST. MATTHEW'S PARISH
CHURCH
Lwrr vi
Palm Sunday
7.15 a.m. Holy Communion.
10.15 a.m. Sunday School.
11 a.m. Mattins"Tl.e People".
4 p.m. Catechisms. Passion-
tide in the Prayer book."
7.30 p.m. Evensong. "The Pro-
blem of the historic atone
merit, and the 20th centu
ry."
Public Auction.
John Butler
Will sell
on Tuesday the 25th inst
at 11.30 o'clock
At St. Matthews Rectory
The entire lot of household
effects consisting of Parlor,
Diningroom, Bedroom fur-
niture, Crockery, Kitchen
Utensils &C.&C.
Terms Cash.
TENDERS
will be received, until Easter
week, by Mr. R. W Sawyer,
for the fast (one^ sail boat
"Waterloo", in good condi-
tion, which will be atj the
wharf of Mr. Sawyer for in
spection at that time.
Terms:Cash on Delivery.
John S. G. Thompson, Owner
Wemyss Bight
Eleuthera.
NOTICE
THIS is to inform my Patrons
and the Public in General
that I have opened my Public
Black Smith Slop; and am now
ready to do anything in the Una of
General repair or new work How
Shoeing Specially. All work don*
Mechanically.
____________ P A. HUYLEH
Advertise in
Th Tribimtj.
/


m
Masai
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April IS, 1916,
.*
* .asm. 9s ari 1~ Lr\ ; ^*vj
\/-V White and j ^^^kj I hip If ^ ^as^LVS fin,... ^r*^BBBBT sbbbbl' 15/1 ^ A 1
rfMK^BS i
^B j .in. with
To be bad at all Grocers
The highest price paid for
LOGWOOD in any quantity
chipped for shipping-
and delivered on
Wharf at Nassau
from nowon to July 1st.
Chas. B ROCKWELL,
Palm Gate, Nassau St.
T
Keeping Guard
HEREare responsibilities that every patriotic citizen
must bear in this season of national peril, other
than fighting for the flag. V.t the least of these is
preserving the balance of trade.
-TMI
SHOE 4 STORE
is on guard, and in spite of the advancing price of leather
and the increase in the wages of the factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largest order of its history.
This week's consignment per "Kotonia" sums up
210 cases containing 6656 pairs of boots and shoes all,
hall marked with the Big Four's Slogan
V.
K
N
^
KNOW
*
With these reinforcements he Big Four will b
able to keep the enemy High Prices off its territory and
Customers may rely on purchasing at the old prices in
spite of Tariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar
kets abroad.
G, T. KNOWLES, Prop. Big- 4,
Bay St. (Sponge Exchange)
r
IBbG to notify the
public that 1 will
undertake to sell Log-
wood on commission
to the very best ad-
vantage.
Write or see
E. C. Griffin
Cor. Bay St. and Victoria Av$.
ARROW
COLLAR
If you will give these
collars a trial and keep
track of their many
trips to the laundry you
will soon appreciate
their worth.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT. PEABODY & CO., Inc.
MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
RINGS
?+ ON .-THIKu SAVED. *
Quality considered, we guarantee to show
you a saving of at least ONE THIRD .'v.
" ' b< Dm v .tf au\ 1 an
II YOU arc not
perfectly satisfied, ^>- uuroxi.euw, im your money will be promptly
refunded. Inclii.tu.,.' A1.1. t'-[.>% rrn 1
nave paid out \\ 1.
Bankers: London Hy snd Midland Hunk Ltd.
18, Cum Htruet, Drill.,!, tag.
Ladles' IHrt Hoi clew set Dlunioii.l Hair
Hoop Rind wiilicurvi-d
D i d< m, Jli'Ulhli Gov-
*' inn'iit stamped, set
with FIVE floe l>UiuitndH an lliu ..ra-
ted.
Price 67/0 916.64
laBM Hint; fcet with
1 'iiiiiiuinif. and
MMm or 8ap-
pbln-H an 1 omitted.
Price 41 10.05
Every Ring it ssnt In
Pretty Velvet Lines]
Cat* suitable for Pres-
entation.
Gents' 9pI. Hnlld Gold
5i*tiitl RinK i" Htunt'i.
iii it h ('ivemnient
si imped, I'lam grooved
shoulder*, bjukdaotne
limnnlv ring.
1 .4 6 %UI
m in Iftct Bond
Oold. PrJia 30>- tTJi
Can he urn-lied m
with Blrod Stone <
Red Cornelian nt tl
I l.iihiK', Inf.
Monotfrnin on *,,[ IkuI rtyle fid.
L.'li.'i- i xt
'tone 1/6 (C3o(
per Letter extra.
Poalase (Register* fl] I. HhOi 1 raplre Od. H2c>
'in a. i>*r^lKti CuuntrU.'H Id, (16V) extra.
WEDDING RINGS %*&
W, Mil W.ddln, Rini, by welalit at only a
,mli profit ov,r th, actual coat ol produc
lion. Out Inxh .las. Until) I, ,ccoiul u< none.
1 li* 1111,11 tv ol cvury wtiilrliMK
rhiK "old by ii I. plainly
tamped inlile with iili
rirlu-h Oovernmenl Manip. /
WeddlMK Bang* can I
I tra Wld, or Wire'
Fattorn uliluairatcd ,iih,
nuir price. In tlol Oold.
walKlitfijenuyweiichto. Wire Pattern,
fTloe 7 e *e.ii Bound inaida
Inl|etOolt1,wi.l">
w.'lkht.. 1TI.I' SI (S.it
With th, abov, W,ddln<
Rlnpii. w, tivea preaent of
tii Sterllnif Sllvar Flatad
a Spoon, A Budar Tonjt,
either old KliRllah or Fancy
Pallern. Tlieae hpoona are
Klectro HllTer Flab'U on tho
beat quality Nickel MlfOT
and are uuaranteed to ittre
nllii' aatlafactlon.
Extra Wide.
Flat Inaide.
Poala,, iltatrlatiTeil. on Wrrldlnii ItliiK and
FrcMill. ltrltlah l.lnplrr 1 J ik-, extra. Fo
Countrle, 1/1 Ma eiua.
The Tribun
for Modern
--DRINK--
Welch's Grape Juice.
+
PRICES
Quarts, 28. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
153. per doz.
t Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
i Pints, 6d.
4s. 6d. per doi.
it
T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
Insist On
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
A Bigger Cake
A Better Soap
3d. per Bar
At Your Dealer or
At The New York House
H. T. BRICE
Commission Merchant
Office: wh side b*j sponge Exch
Nassau, N. P. Bahamas.
e.nge
AGENT
HORSES SHEEP
CATTLE Mf POULTRY
SPONQE, SISAL and other ISLAND Products.
Automobiles & Bicycles
Reo Cars and Pope Bicycles (Niagara) FOR
SALE, AND FOR HIRE.
Sole agent for
REO MOTOR CAR Co.
Picmtt attention to all repairs
Supplies and accessorie
PHONE 402
G&ssoline and Oils
J. P. StMMS
47 Market St.


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