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The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8,1916. L. eiLBERT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. onnafc Corner Shirley & Chnrlotte Sts Nauau, N. P., Bahamas •PHONE 20. P. O. KOX 168. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday— single copy i' 1 Tim-day, and Thursday—single copy id Saturday—single copy ... ijd Vatlcly 5 1 ninthly s. *>\ OuaiWrly .. 4 s M %  alfYearly Taar ly %  % %  18* PAYABL E IN ADVANCE Advertising Rat ei lina loi first insertion: three pern lor second insertion ; .ii. pel line for sutwquent intei li AdrertiatOMOti undei eight linw 4-Zhc tribune Saturday. April H. 1916 From the communication* which reach us r$ The Bahamas General Hospital, several oi which we publish tins evening some of winch we will never i publish, the public is evidently int. rested in this question. It is well that this community should he stirred by something for stagnation is foul in both natural and social life. In dealing with tins matter we have been, we think, very charitable, not being judges we have no opportuuitj of exercising the virtue of mercy, One ol our correspondents, JUSTITIA has evidently just awoke out of a Rip Van Wink lean sleep and objects to pub licitv in public ma 11 e rs, and '•cannot see that any good is served by the great publicity" given by us to a public matter. We think it far better to place the facts in 'he hands of the people than to leave them to fall into confusion worse confounded by garbled rumours and mis statements. Now, we believe, that the > !c 9 should be and a.e the last court of resort, and it isnot poli'ic to discuss who are "their betters." \s to the Commission's needing to be advised by us, we nev er for moment thought it did, at the same time, "a word to the wise is sufficient,"and help ful Perhaps it would be well if the destinies of the Colony were guided in the Columns of the Tribune. Hut anyway, take another sleep, (Rip Van Winkle) Justitia and when vou wake up again rub yout eyes and you'll wondei at what you see. The Mail Str. ••Mexico' ar rived off the port from Havana yesterday afi 'rnoon, transferred 7 passen 'ei i to I i 'er "Col onia," emb n ked i i p is*engers from here and with p issengers in transit proce< ded to New York. Miss Alice E. Clements; Met dames Marion *i. Collins, Harriet Durkee, and Beatrice K. Flynn; Messrs Edgai T. Durkee, Edward E Darling and William J. Pindei -:o: — The \l id Steam it ••Miami" arrived betvVeea ten nnd eleven ,' lock hist night from May port, %  I i with 2 passengers and cargo of shingles.— Miss Lena Johnson; Mrs. A. R. Murrell. The "Miami' steamed at one Nassau. April 4th, 1916. Dear Mr. Editor, In your paper of Saturday last, in commenting on the Hospital's "Cash transactions", you said that when the drafts were lying at the Bank dishonoured, either the Superintendent "had the money to pay" or "he did not have" it. Now, sir, I contend that he must have had it, and I base my argument on the follow-! ing.—Mr, Butler, the Chairman, in his evidence stated that lie had remonstrated with Mr. Farrington on several occasions, to pay the drafts. How could I remonstrate v\ ith vou to pay mv bills, if I knew within ni\ own soul that I had not given VOU the money to do it. \guin : Some of these drafts were overdue for as long as six weeks. Suppos ing then that the Hospital during the course of a mouth did run low in funds, could not the overdue drafts have b. 1 11 paid on the ist of the succeeding month when the Institution had four or live hundred pounds to its ere dit. Mr. Editor this tiling is more far-reaching than the public expe i. Well might you in one of your editorials say "There is a vexing la< k of clarity .-, ,-. whenever" a question arises with regard to the distribution of "the funds". Could not the Commission have cleared up this thing ? I hen again : Donl you feel thai Mr. Butler's excuse was the lamest imaginable? Why, Sir, Mr, But ler is one of the Directors of the Bank ol Nassau : surely, the Cashier directed his attention to the fai t that the Hospital's drafts were overdue. Some time at the meetings of the Direi tors Mr. Butler could lv have called up Mr. Farrington over the telephone and asked him to bring his cheque book to the Hank and have paid the drafts then and there, thus barring the anti cipated friction so much dreaded bv the Chairman Mr. Butler. But no he didn't do it in spite of such splendid opportunity ; and that suggests another thought, I 1 he Chairman must have known that the money was n't there as well as the Su perintendenl did, although as far as the Government and the Commissioners were concerned, it was there Where had this moms gone? The public demand an answer. The Commission has f tiled to answei the ques lion, and has brought on the entiie dissatisfaction <>f the community to BUCh an 1 \tent that it is' felt that a new Commission ought to be ap pointed to deal with thisspe rial phase of the Hospital's affairs. It is quite evident that the Commission has js^de tash findings. H B1B fek en glossed which h explai trut the up to the light that's in him. Let him act-act now; the public demand it. The Governor must act or accept the alternative. Faithfully yours PRO TEMPORE. Schedule of proposed sailings of Steamers uuder contract to convey Mails from the Bahamas to 1-oreign Countries during the month of April 1916. DATE or SAILING NAMK OF STEAMER DESTINATION HOUR OF CLOSING Nassau April 6th 1916. The Editor of The Tribune Dear Sir I regret tu have todabble in newspaper business, but real ly, I cannot refrain from taking keen exception to your remarks in your paper of the 4th issue. In that issue you suggested that the government is composed of Jelly-fish material. I should like you to throw some more light around this thing. Not because a Government makes a mistake or even blunders occasionally, v.m should go so far as to call it •'Jelly fish." Be kind sir. Yours truly ••KINDNESS" Nothing of the kind our only suggestion is that the government should not he "jelly fish." Read again [ED. — :o: — Nassau N. P 1. istern 11 April 7th 1 Dear Mr. Editor What on Earth does the I Ion. member from the Eastern District mean by giving notice of a resolution to txoner vU two quondam clerks of the post of lice? Does he really hope to make headway? "CURIOUS" April 4 7 7 11 M 21 Miami Mexico Miami Miami Mono Castle Miami Mexico Mono Castle Jacksonville (Mayport) New York Jacksonville (Mayport) New York Key West, Fla Now York New York g.oo p.m. 10.30 a.m. 8.00 p.m. 8.00 p.m. 10.30 a.m. 8.00 p.m. 10.30 a.m. 10.30 a.m. Parcel Mails will be made up and closed as follows : For the United Kingdom and the United Mates April 6, 13, 20, and 27 at noon. Nassau 8th April 1916 Dear Mr. Editoi I see by the papers that the Registrai of Records, Mi Dun. 1111 >< %  is changing his place with Mr. Farrington Superintendent of the Hospital; Mr. Reeves,Cadet, is acting Relieving Offi< er. What has become of Mr. Lowe former Relieving < >ffio 1' Has any provision b< en made tor him ? Yours faithfully A. K.M. Nassau 8th April [Qll Editor Tribune Dear Sir Nassau, April 5th 1916. MARRIED. 1.1.> 1 :.\ JOHNSON. -On '1 hum ,i :iv bth April 1916, at the Ca thedral Miss Felicia Johnson ol Nassau to Mr. S. Colero Liotta o| 1 (irenta, Sicilly, Italy. POLICE COURT NEWS. Mar. 27. William M< Caitnev Urea* hCab A< I 8a. 01 7 days. jS. William brooks and Ah, e Rolle Assaulting and beating I' flic Eulin Brooks lined 25s. and 3s. 1 oStS 01 20 days Rolle dismissed. S imuel Fine Using profane and Hide, eilt lai in public St. -jos. or 8 days Nehemiah Munroe found drunk in Baillou Hill Road— ^s. or 4 days. 29. Erskine Sawyer— Aseclock, tins morning foi May port Fla, with twenty six pasI. 1 him Mr, ilut for the well known repu ration of your journal for fairness and learle--m ss 1 would nut ve iiuoI submit thislettei ou for publicatian In dealing with the Bahamas General I lospital imbroglio you •• done so under cover <>f "Charity" while you have entirely lost sight ol another gieat viitiu "Mercy" I can not see I il any good end is s . ...., ..11,11c %  !>• til' iw....*.. %  .v to believe that more could by placing a number ol carhave been known than "has' riage wheels in the said entrance in contravention ol Rule 36 of the Rules and more expression of public Regulations of Public Mai been known. I should like to hear some opinion on tins matter. Is it not strange that the "Guardian" should be silent on a publi< question ol such grave import.ne e. Respectfully Yours ki 11914 I" ined .is. II I sing profane and al 11 and indet -nt li I towards Francis Ramsa\ Burnside within the s lidMai ket tending to a Inea. h of P. J. A. M. t | n ,„.,, ,. Pi,,, ,1 ,"i |n rJe Nassau 8th April 1916 Editoi of I he Tribune Sir Can anyone give any good reason wh) an olliaicl whose conduct <>f an importanl establishment of the govern fault 1.1 days [I, Raj mond Scavelifl ()n.' Wilfred Thompson un law fully and maliciously did wound—Adjourned to 3rd April 1916. 1st April. Wilfred Ingram and Thomas H. Bain As incut had been reported upon vaulting and beating Arabele unfavourably should be ap pointed to another important department pending the d(. ision of the Secretary ol Stale. In the light of the report of the Commission, and %  '"' cording lo the tradition of the civil service, such an official should have been sushi \sii -Adjourni d to 5th inst at 10 a. 111. Si(lne\ Ball '1 browing stones to the annoyance and danger of peisons in Petti roal I aie—6 strokes with Tamarind rod. Alex Burrows -Hi ea c h Sponge and I'm tie I isliei ies \i t -Ordered to join SchoOn •I'll %  ! %  • %  • I (.ended until judgment had er Admired and proceed on the been passed upon his ca voyage in her in "lieu of the Why then is Mr Farring 'Sen. "Mystic" on winch he ton retained even for a day? I had originally signed: Is it to give him time 01 Mex Morris—Assaulting whal ? Surely, tht Governor can only expect Ihe Secretary ol ed. Thomas Rae bv presenting a loaded gun at himDismiss State to come 1 inclusion I he public is weary of Mr Farrington and want him re tin d. Yours verv tml\ to but one' Reuben Fiulayson Re moving sand from the beach or foreshore in the Eastern I 'isti ict of New I'lovideiK e the property of the Crown in contravention of 60 V. c 34. T. J. KIRKLAND MYERS. Sec, 3 -Fined 5s. 01 .1 days.



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> The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8, 1916. Radiograms *Apnl 71I1 K)i6. I'on: f*h \ Brii ish sti ship Simla has be< n sunk. II Uiati s, of the crew were drowned. New York:—Stock: — Leather Sleel Maxwell 1st pfel Kans Son. Ore Mi.irtli Seaboard 54 '-a 84 3-4 72 5-8 85 1-4 26 1 a 43 7-8 38 M •5 Continued from 1st page — :o: barrass the administration* of our charities among the victims of Germany, However unfortu nate this may he, n cannot for a moment be held <{ Sufficient weight to counterbalance the reasons w 1 ich demand our inter vention It is of the highest con sequence that the American peo pi should recognize that neutrality is never noble, is often base and cowardly, in our case is souldestroying. and deadly to our influence and reputation a broad and to oui pride and self respect, at home "Let us have a great and im mediate increase in our mib tary and naval strength, but let us be honest and dignified in making our people understand why it is required, yielding neither to undue and foolish fear of nations from which we havt nothing to fear, nor to the vain glorious braggadocio of jingo ism. We know that we ought to be in this war, that v\ sought to be fighting Germany, that e ought to be maintaining decency in Mexico. For these things we ought to have much bet'er armament, but let us not pretend that we need it for other purposes,some illogical, some unworthy, all political." hi the intervals between the addresses the audiences sang the "buttle Hymn of the republic," and "Onward Christian Soldiers," and at the end of the meeting joined in "America." Dr. Richard C Cabot led the singing from the rhoir loft above the speaker's platform The meeting was held under the auspices of the newly form ed "Citizen's League for Ameri ca and the Alhe>." Leaflets distributed among thp audience to secure enr< 'Iment set forth the object of the league as follows : "We believe that the fabric of civilization embodied in free government and diversity of nationality "S menaced by Teu tonic aggression, and that the foundations of public light are endangered bv the violation of Belgium and the atrocities of submarine warfare "We are convinced that our political ideals and our national safety art bound up with the cause of the allies an' that their defeat would mean moral and material disaster to our country. "Therefore this league is formed to use all lawful means to put this nation in a position of definite sympathy with the allies and in an equally definite position of moral disspproba tion of the purposes and me thods of the central Teutonic empires." American Papers. FOUND On Shirley Street, a Sisal Fibre Knitted hat dyed Green. Apply TRIBUNE OFFICE LOST Reward is offered for the re turn to the Tribune Office of a lilagreed silver belt pin, bearing initials of owner and d'-vie 0 reverse side LostApri about S p m. on way t from Frederick Stree Shingles. J UST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 36sper 1000. No bettei grade than iliese on the Market—5 x 18 "Primes" Cypress at {is. per 1000. This grade carries our same guarantee as the Bests." Arty defective shingles can be returned. Also cheaper grade in stock April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS. UNION SUITS Twin H IAJK Sold by W. Hilton 260 Bay St. t THE CHURCHES SUNDAY, APRIL, 9. ST. MATTHEWS PARISH CHURCH LHNT V PASSION SUNDAY 7.15 a.m. Holy Communion. 10.15 am Sunday School. 11 a.m. Holy Eucharist. "Caia phas". 4 p.m. Catechisms. "The Story of the Tower of Mabel." 7 30 p.in Evensong. "The Pro blem of Forgiveablene." Tracts: -"What and Where is the True Church." ST MARGARET'S 3.30 p.m. Sunday School. 7 p.m. Evensong and distribution of Tracts. Sundav April gth to Thursday 13th, Re'vd Father Field S. S J. E. preaches in the various churches of the City in tuin Morning and Evening LOOK Flash Lights 4/Extra Batteries *h Extra Bulbs liCan be had from EDWIN B.CASH East Shirley st. Notice T HE Rector of St. Mat thew's would liketodis pose in one lot of the FUR NITURE.OF THE. RFC TOmflftt OJ agreed price. own 1 at any Tenders. T F.N D E R S ate required for the erection of a stone porch to the Church of St.Agnes. Masons willing to estimate for the work will please apply to: Mr. H. Dighton Pearson, St. Matthew's Rectorv TENDERS will be received, until Easter week, by Mr. R. \V Sawyer, for the fast (one^ sail boat "Waterloo", in good condition, which will be at the wharf of Mr Sawyer for in sped ion at that time. Terms: Cash on Delivery. John S. G Thompson, Owner Wemyss Bight Kleuthera. Tomatoes I CAN take care of your ship ments by the way of Jack sonville. 1 will advance freight, duty and material if neccessy Write or see H.C. CHRISTIE j BbG to notify the 1 public that I will undertake to sell Logwood on commission to the very best advantage. Write or see E. C. Griffin Cor. Biy St. and Victoria Avt. For Sale A IUI Lot in Nassau ctly opposite "Polhem 1 plyto r i!BUN£" OFFICE



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t The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8, 1916. &* LOGWOi D "TTHE undersigned d1 purchasing LOGW( H ,\> and wjl ever I he market price ib Keeping Guarct HERE arc respottsltoilitiSs that every patriot^-iti 'HUM I--M! in this season of nationa] peril dWtr than figntin* for toe Bag. Not the least ol the#is •rvuig the bafi trade. -TH! SHOE^ is on guard, and in spite oi tli.advancing price of leather and ""• increase in the wages of tin factory workers, have succeeded in securing the largeytgrdei of its. historv. 1 1 "v/l opsignment per "KotoniV' sums up *ocases containin %  i ; pairs of boots and I all tall marked with the Big^FrJfir's SJogan With the; nts he f.i:: Four v. dl he '" kee P th ry and ing at the old pn.es i n spiteoi lariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar i i ts abroad. G. T, KNOWL1 Prop. Biff 4. !'.•. >: Spon ; To be had at all Grocers C. L. L()ft/lOUSe=Comp;my\ Agent O1FO0S I he highest price paid for LOGWOOD in any quantity < ;>ed for sh ippingand delivered on Wiarf at Nassau n now on to July 1st. *. B. ROCKWELL, P*lm Gate, Nassau St. mm ARROW COLLAR Insist Oh Kirkman's Borax Soap A Bigger Cake A Better Soap 3d. per Bar At Your Dealer or At The New York House W^EEUXZZ All Arrow collars are made of fabrics bleached and shrunk in our own plants. They always Automobiles & Bicycles fit and sit correctly and are the most durable. —DR/N < V 'ch's Grape Juice. PRICES its, 2s. 3d. Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. pec doz. I Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. I Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. $ BLACK'S 222 B AND The Nassau Candy Opp. Hotel Coloni ON SALS AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CLUETT, I" > I t, CO., Inc. MAKERS, T .iv, N. V. I ., s. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Kxclustve Agent. For Sale. A Columbia ,] ;i loud with lati El i 0 rds Ma< liine and records m Hloli. I'oi paiticulars Apply TR1BI NEOfl Good money can be made Claaning Sisal on Sha Old l'ld Fort, pro\ .(I(1. RF.O CARS AND POPE BICYCLES (JWafara) FOR SALE, AND FOR HIRE. Solo agent for REO MOTOR CAR Co. Pi.:tt attention to all i r airs Supplies and accessorie Gcissoline and 0 Is J. P. SIMMS 47 Market St. PHONE 402 T. BRICE Commission Merchant OFFICE : w e . side tn H sponge K C hng Nassau, N. P. Bahamas. AGENT HORSES *| | SHEEP CATTLE HP POULTRY SPONGE, S/SAL and other ISLAND Products. P



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LATEST RADIOGRAMS NUIHMK Kddltiua (virnre In veibk m&uistrl Belny bound i>, owen.1 IO the Uo|in& a of no Master. Vol. XIII. No. 119 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY, APRIL 7. 1916 2500 Cheer Plea That U. S Join Allies. Resolutions Cabled To President Of France. rweotj five hundred persons,bis criticisms at a time when tain against the aggression of rose, waved hats and programs, the President bad "taken a stand militer> imperialiSm ?h1 orir and cheered wildly yesteiday that was right, and when he hat'' afternoon when George Haven to contend with aspirit in Con 1 ui..am, o| Xrwlurk, <-ne ol gress that approached tr< the speakers at the "America ery." and the Allies" mass meeting in I'remont Temple, declared that u WHS tin duly of tins country 1 throw aside neutrality and it-stand with I ireat Bri lain in the death struggle in which she is engaged. CAST RESERVE ASIDE. Roused to .1 high pitch ol en thusiasm by denunciatory n ences lu President Wilson's di plomai \ find by vigorous conDIPLOMATIC BLIND STAGGERS (Hhera wi re less sparing Bainbridge Colby of New Vork characti rized the present crisis "I negotiations between the'Uni ted Mai.-, and < icrmain as a ; state of "diplomatic blind stag rs," referred facetiousl) tothe President's "su< 111 ding ultima lubbed Ins ciples of democracy. "G1e.1t Britain should know that we are with Great Britain, with her and with France. Those two nations stand for represent aiive government and for the lights of men, and if we are men we are going t> stand by those who maintain such ideals, now and m generations to come." After the Rev. William II van Allen had recited the Lord's Prayer, Mr. Elder sounded the clearing that the United States •could not be neutral at this ta, and dubbed his efforts as 1 belonging to the "sc I of rot k y B ? l of tbe meeting by de ary, cheap diplomacy." Laugh leim.atson of William Jennings "'' f "" 1 PP'ause greeted each inie Bn< t , , K e '"••" l "^" ot \'l !" \ was the case also with Ri 8 hl Bnd wron 6 are not Congress, the big audience cast .. ,, • ,ne c a,8 w,th exehanoMhl* Hiaht ie r,„i,, reserve aside when Mi I'm ^r. Putnam s reference to Bryan i :^ nangeaW e K'K !" "gbt, 1 ntima.elt < ,'s',,v f s "the hue Bryan," whose{ n nd wr ng *\ ""?* %  V > e im inumaicu ine necessity 01 ... • • here to consider who it is who I '"77"""" betw n bS^Z^^^nZl 9 ^^^^^^ nd wh0 Ar er,c i "; •ntenttalliM /' ' '• %  • >' R |, wllo Btands for lici and I 11* f hppi'iihi im .•,. (1 nt attain """ in. 11 iiii. i resnuiii uui not , •> ntth \uu,::!:\^XZ --ainuun.hvhisiion.M, ;;•;;;',;,.•'-' ' di outra c was -• speake, was Man, to a weed "It is tin, a Berlin believes it f '" n( som< thing," he exclaim ed. "It is time foi us to save tins country fiom Berlin and from Bry in, Bei lin's ally, who -~r^i -- twine, the passage of resolutions expressing sympathy with I r anee anil denluncing reci I.I proposals to saci iflce American 1 ights on the sea, Samuel .1. Elder the presiding officer made announcement thai a coi y of the resolutions was to Insent largely the cause for the'death. The first speake. lericans since that time "wage Colby, who yj ..' a %  cable to President nM sow n dissent, timidity and Polncare ol I he F rench republic. .The i ilutinns di clared that the a ltd i "deeply sympathizes iMi France, our sistei i epublic, in hci present life or death st linst foreign conquest," and that it "pro treaclien in our counsi I in such ago was counsel for the | Thompson legislative committee, now investigating the New York public sei vii e i ommission Mr. Colby said in part : "I toes our countrj speak today as .-he. has I" en act ustomed i" sp" unwarned sinking siiuiT'de for IIK eiiciu I'lir.u H sis, me nx oi i< .. ol |>< •[ i (KM I action, theaimsandthe ideals \?l defenc '? M merchantmen! of the citizens of the British r *. W f n A n ,,a y in 8 ,,f womM and children at sea, the trampling down of national life, the The resolution further declared "that we. \li arhiisrtts citieens, without di'stinction of par ly. deplore the recent proposals i" sacrifice American rights to travel in safety on the high approve the Pn sident's refusal to abandon these rights at the n |om forces in defence of ., dictation of B ny foreign power, government ol the people, by the and urge Massachusetts senators l'^'I'b', and for ^the^people, it j and representatives to support him in that COUI \\\ me speakers, while criticising tl t's uncertainl| and Vacillating in the past, \ oic d thcii npi roval of the stand in11 id taken against Gerni.inj s in w submaiine policy. ( I ne of th<-in, Benjamin Apthorp 1 ipuld„an American now living in Toronto, ()nt. Imt formerly a pi C bi idge, a polo to uphold. It owes protection to its own Citizens, and if ti citizens are to be fairly represented, it must also plav a parl in helping to adji rob %  P I'T being Ol | I '-make lenis of the world and to main empire, are in Bubstance itlenti cal with thos,possessed and maintained by the citizens o| 1,,,eril P"" of our legitimate the American Republic if "jutw commerce, the violation England and the lamed States J >. ,e !" n treaties, substitution ol [rightfulness for faith. QU0TE8 GENERAL GRANT "Bettei than %  third or a will not be possible for the for fourth or a fifth note, from our ces of military imperialism to jetete department, each excelling secure domination of th* world. I,s predecessor in rhetorical AMFRIPA UA a nilTV m fi "' 8n Hml (l r,|p '!^''l refineAMERICA HAS A DUTY TO ,„,,„ „, „ M emg ,„ m( sucI) PERf0RM rugged words as were spoken by I he republic has a part to Grant at Fort Donehon: No play, a duty to perform, an ide^l terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be acCCpted. I | to move up on your works immediately." Mr. Gould, who follower Putnam, said in part: I do not think that there has ever issued from the mouth of an\ ol our Presidents a ieqm st as ignoble and infamous as the request made by Mr. Wilson at the outbreak of hostilities that we as individuals endcavoi to maintain what he called 'neu tiality of thought". Such a thing is, of course, in relation to as huge a crisis as the pi, s-ut war a thing entirely impossible. Hut even if it could have been Btl lined it would have been a thing so evil that au\ great na tion practicing it would show thai it had indeed lost its soul "I lad we obeyed Mr. Wilson's request that at such a tune we should be neutral in thought, we would indeed have show n thai those pessimists who claim thui the old American ideals are now foreign to this land were all too right. Price. THREE CENTS "Neutrality is not in itself a thing that is noble or praise worthy It is not a duty which any nation owes to a belligerent It is ado| ted b) a nation for reasons entirely selfish and for its own protection. It in.iyun der certain circumstances be A ise and advisable, and e right, but its wisdom and its righteousness depend upon each particulai case, and no general ization can serve as a guide. Neutrality is often excusable, but never admirable, and the present neutrality of the United States is neither. NEUTRALITY NEVER NOBLE '" I he one valid argument against American interventifn is that it would prevent the ad mirable work of our legations m the warring nations and em (Continued on 3rd pa. gSSmg^SBBB^SBBBZ The True Safeguard of Baby s Health lenhrngsFaods r I nils milk of a !;. althj motberconfera a deJ. gree of immunity to infection to the young infant. Many mothers, however, though willing, cannot nurse their babies for various reasons. In such eases the greatest care should be taken in selecting u proper Substitute. Ordinary cow's milk cannot be regarded as a sale food for infants; it is acid,contains indigestible curd, and i> almost invariably contaminated with harmful germs. By using the "Allenburys" Foods, which are free from all dangerous organisms, and effectually replace human milk, security for baby is ensured and vigorous growth and health are promoted. The "Allenburys" Foods are largely used and recommended by the Medical and Nursing Professions; they have stood the test of timo and have become a household necessity all over the world. The 4 Allenburys' Infant Dietary Mother tmi Child. Pah t'j months. irinMllit'Allrhirys l.; n 4 t MILK FOOD No. I. From Until to 3 mouths MILK rOOD No. 2. %  "MIFDFOODNo. 3 '• months upwards. S? The 'Allenburys' Foods ire made under special processes by machinery, and are entirely untouched by hand. BJBF" Wrllmlortrae book'lnlmnt Fettling and Mana S rma>nt' 64 paves of vafwabfe Information lor mwmrv mathrr. Allen' & Hanburys Ltd., London, England. A.D. 1715. Establ.sl.ed 200 Years. A.D. 1915. tkAit-ru The Tribune, The Office^ nnrtrr%\


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02566
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, April 08, 1916
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02566

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LATEST RADIOGRAMS
NuIHmk Kddltiua (virnre In veibk m&uistrl
Belny bound i>, owen.1 io the Uo|in&a of no Master.
Vol. XIII. No. 119
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY, APRIL 7. 1916
2500 Cheer Plea That U. S
Join Allies.
*
Resolutions Cabled To President Of France.
rweotj five hundred persons,bis criticisms at a time when tain against the aggression of
rose, waved hats and programs, the President bad "taken a stand militer> imperialiSm ?h1 orir
and cheered wildly yesteiday that was right, and when he hat''
afternoon when George Haven to contend with aspirit in Con
1 ui..am, o| Xrwlurk, <-ne ol gress that approached tr<
the speakers at the "America ery."
and the Allies" mass meeting in
I'remont Temple, declared that
u whs tin duly of tins country
' 1 throw aside neutrality and
it-- stand with I ireat Bri
lain in the death struggle in
which she is engaged.
CAST RESERVE ASIDE.
Roused to .1 high pitch ol en
thusiasm by denunciatory n
ences lu President Wilson's di
plomai \ find by vigorous con-
DIPLOMATIC BLIND STAGGERS
(Hhera wi re less sparing
Bainbridge Colby of New Vork
characti rized the present crisis
"I negotiations between the'Uni
ted Mai.-, and < icrmain as a
; state of "diplomatic blind stag
rs," referred facetiousl) tothe
President's "su< 111 ding ultima
lubbed Ins
ciples of democracy.
"G1e.1t Britain should know
that we are with Great Britain,
with her and with France. Those
two nations stand for represent
aiive government and for the
lights of men, and if we are
men we are going t> stand by
those who maintain such ideals,
now and m generations to
come."
After the Rev. William II
van Allen had recited the Lord's
Prayer, Mr. Elder sounded the
clearing that the United States
could not be neutral at this
, ta, and dubbed his efforts as 1
belonging to the "sc......I of rot kyB?l of tbe meeting by de
ary, cheap diplomacy." Laugh
leim.atson of William Jennings "'' f""1 PP'ause greeted each ,inie
" Bn Congress, the big audience cast .. ,, ,ne,c a,8 w,th exehanoMhl* Hiaht ie r,i,,
, reserve aside when Mi I'm ^r. Putnam s reference to Bryan i :^nangeaW.e' K'K "gbt,
1 ntima.elt < ,'s',,v f s "the hue Bryan," whose{nnd.wrng *\ ""?* V>e
im inumaicu ine necessity 01 ... here to consider who it is who
I '"77"""" betwn bS^Z^^^nZl9^^^^^^ nd wh0 "
Ar"er,c".....i""; ntenttalliM /' ' >' R |, wllo Btands for lici. and
I 11* f hppi'iihi im .,. (1nt attain """ in.11 iiii. i resnuiii uui not >
ntth \uu,::!:\^XZ --ainuun.hvhisiion.M, ;;;;;',;,.'-' ' di
outra*c' was - speake, was Man,
to a weed
"It is tin,a Berlin believes it f'"
n( som< thing," he exclaim
ed. "It is time foi us to save
tins country fiom Berlin and
from Bry in, Bei lin's ally, who
-----------------~r^i ......--
twine, the passage of resolu-
tions expressing sympathy with
I-ranee anil denluncing reci i.i
proposals to saci iflce American
1 ights on the sea, Samuel .1. El-
der the presiding officer made
announcement thai a coi y
of the resolutions was to In- sent
largely the cause for the'death. The first speake.
lericans since that time "wage Colby, who yj
..' a cable to President nM sown dissent, timidity and
Polncare ol I he F rench republic.
.The i ilutinns di clared that
the a ltd i "deeply sympa-
thizes iMi France, our sistei
i epublic, in hci present life or
death st linst foreign
conquest," and that it "pro
treaclien in our counsi I in such
ago was counsel for the
| Thompson legislative commit-
tee, now investigating the New
York public sei vii e i ommission
Mr. Colby said in part :
"I toes our countrj speak to-
day as .-he. has I" en act ustomed
i" sp a manner as to encourage more '. r<-< < g.onous pasw
murdersol American citiiens." Cf" w? "gajd ourselves as the
1 find an increasing opinion cbmPlons oi cmlhberti and
tiiron.-!,,,. ,i. ,-,.....,,.- u. "' ll"' oppressed? Do secuntv
t)
and dignit} dwell under the
shadow ol oui Bag ? Is American
< itizensbip all that it has been
in the past, and all that it
throughout the country," Mr.
Putnam continued, "that thi
. ( United .Mates should give to
fnundly regrets the inability of KrRhnd and her allies not mere i
France such military and naval .'. ;|u'u,^u^, ', JJ voice ofourcountrj yet been
,eU,,S '"" terest.the IKo ,1 ,. I h^rd ;- >" unwarned sinking
siiuiT'de for iik eiiciu I'lir.- u h sis, me nx oi i< .. ol |>< [ i (km I *
action, theaimsandthe ideals\?l defenc'?M merchantmen!
of the citizens of the British r *.Wf nAn ,,ayin8 ,,f womM
and children at sea, the tramp-
ling down of national life, the
The resolution further declar-
ed "that we. \li arhiisrtts citi-
eens, without di'stinction of par
ly. deplore the recent proposals
i" sacrifice American rights to
travel in safety on the high
approve the Pn sident's refusal
to abandon these rights at the n |om forces in defence of .,
dictation of Bny foreign power, government ol the people, by the
and urge Massachusetts senators l'^'I'b', and for ^the^people, it j
and representatives to support
him in that COUI
\\\ me speakers, while criti-
cising tl t's uncertain-
l| and Vacillating in the past,
\ oic d thcii npi roval of the
stand in- 11 id taken against Ger-
ni.inj s in w submaiine policy.
(Ine of th<-in, Benjamin Apthorp
1 ipuldan American now living
in Toronto, ()nt. Imt formerly a
pi C bi idge, a polo
to uphold. It owes protection
to its own Citizens, and if ti
citizens are to be fairly repre-
sented, it must also plav a parl
in helping to adji rob
" P I'T being Ol | I '-make lenis of the world and to main
empire, are in Bubstance itlenti
cal with thos,- possessed and
maintained by the citizens o| 1,,,erilP"" of our legitimate
the American Republic if "jutw commerce, the violation
England and the lamed States J >.,en treaties, substitution
ol [rightfulness for faith.
QU0TE8 GENERAL GRANT
"Bettei than third or a
will not be possible for the for fourth or a fifth note, from our
ces of military imperialism to jetete department, each excelling
secure domination of th* world. I,s predecessor in rhetorical
AMFRIPA UA a nilTV m fi"'8n Hml (l'r,|p'!^''l refine-
AMERICA HAS A DUTY TO ,,, , M emg , m( sucI)
PERf0RM- rugged words as were spoken by
I he republic has a part to Grant at Fort Donehon: No
play, a duty to perform, an ide^l terms except unconditional and
immediate surrender can be ac-
CCpted. I | to move up
on your works immediately."
Mr. Gould, who follower
Putnam, said in part:
I do not think that there has
ever issued from the mouth of
an\ ol our Presidents a ieqm st
as ignoble and infamous as the
request made by Mr. Wilson at
the outbreak of hostilities that
we as individuals endcavoi to
maintain what he called 'neu
tiality of thought". Such a
thing is, of course, in relation to
as huge a crisis as the pi, s-ut
war a thing entirely impossible.
Hut even if it could have been
Btl lined it would have been a
thing so evil that au\ great na
tion practicing it would show
thai it had indeed lost its soul
"I lad we obeyed Mr. Wilson's
request that at such a tune we
should be neutral in thought,
we would indeed have show n
thai those pessimists who claim
thui the old American ideals are
now foreign to this land were
all too right.
Price. THREE CENTS
"Neutrality is not in itself a
thing that is noble or praise
worthy It is not a duty which
any nation owes to a belligerent
It is ado| ted b) a nation for
reasons entirely selfish and for
its own protection. It in.iyun
der certain circumstances be
a ise and advisable, and e .
right, but its wisdom and its
righteousness depend upon each
particulai case, and no general
ization can serve as a guide.
Neutrality is often excusable,
but never admirable, and the
present neutrality of the United
States is neither.
NEUTRALITY NEVER NOBLE
'" I he one valid argument
against American interventifn
is that it would prevent the ad
mirable work of our legations
m the warring nations and em
(Continued on 3rd pa.
gSSmg^SBBB^SBBBZ
The True Safeguard
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lenhrngsFaods
r I nils milk of a !;. althj motberconfera a de-
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be taken in selecting u proper Substitute. Ordi-
nary cow's milk cannot be regarded as a sale
food for infants; it is acid,contains indigestible
curd, and i> almost invariably contaminated
with harmful germs. By using the "Allenburys"
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growth and health are promoted. The
"Allenburys" Foods are largely used and
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and have become a household necessity all
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The 4Allenburys' Infant Dietary
Mother tmi Child. Pah t'j months.
irinMllit'Allrhirys,l.;n4t

MILK FOOD No. I.
From Until to 3 mouths
MILK rOOD No. 2.

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The 'Allenburys' Foods ire made under special processes
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BJBF" Wrllmlortrae book'lnlmnt Fettling and ManaSrma>nt'
64 paves of vafwabfe Information lor mwmrv mathrr.
Allen' & Hanburys Ltd., London, England.
A.D. 1715. Establ.sl.ed 200 Years. A.D. 1915.

tkAit-ru
The Tribune, The Office^
nnrtrr%\


The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8,1916.
L. eiLBERT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
onnafc
Corner Shirley & Chnrlotte Sts
Nauau, N. P., Bahamas
PHONE 20. P. O. KOX 168.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday
single copy ......... i'1
Tim-day, and Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturdaysingle copy ... ijd
Vatlcly ............ 51'
ninthly ...........s. *>\
OuaiWrly........ .. 4s- M
alfYearly...........
Taarly ....... 18*
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Rat ei lina
loi first insertion: three pern
lor second insertion ; .ii. pel
line for sutwquent intei li
AdrertiatOMOti undei eight linw 4--
Zhc tribune
Saturday. April H. 1916
From the communication*
which reach us r$ The Bahamas
General Hospital, several oi
which we publish tins evening
some of winch we will never i
publish, the public is evidently
int. rested in this question.
It is well that this community
should he stirred by something
for stagnation is foul in both
natural and social life.
In dealing with tins matter
we have been, we think,
very charitable, not being
judges we have no opportuuitj
of exercising the virtue of
mercy,
One ol our correspondents,
JUSTITIA has evidently just
awoke out of a Rip Van Wink
lean sleep and objects to pub
licitv in public ma 11 e rs, and
'cannot see that any good is
served by the great publicity"
given by us to a public matter.
We think it far better to place
the facts in 'he hands of the
people than to leave them to fall
into confusion worse confounded
by garbled rumours and mis
statements.
Now, we believe, that the
> !c9 should be and a.e the
last court of resort, and it isnot
poli'ic to discuss who are "their
betters."
\s to the Commission's need-
ing to be advised by us, we nev
er for moment thought it did,
at the same time, "a word to
the wise is sufficient,"and help
ful
Perhaps it would be well if
the destinies of the Colony were
guided in the Columns of the
Tribune.
Hut anyway, take another
sleep, (Rip Van Winkle) Justitia
and when vou wake up again
rub yout eyes and you'll wondei
at what you see.
The Mail Str. Mexico' ar
rived off the port from Havana
yesterday afi 'rnoon, transferred
7 passen 'ei i to I i 'er "Col
onia," emb n ked i i p is*engers
from here and with p issengers
in transit proce< ded to New
York.
Miss Alice E. Clements; Met
dames Marion *i. Collins, Har-
riet Durkee, and Beatrice K.
Flynn; Messrs Edgai T. Durkee,
Edward E Darling and William
J. Pindei
- -:o:
The \l id Steam it Miami"
arrived betvVeea ten nnd eleven
,' lock hist night from May port,
! I i with 2 passengers and cargo
of shingles.
Miss Lena Johnson; Mrs. A.
R. Murrell.
The "Miami'
steamed at one
Nassau.
April 4th, 1916.
Dear Mr. Editor,
In your paper of Saturday
last, in commenting on the
Hospital's "Cash transac-
tions", you said that when
the drafts were lying at the
Bank dishonoured, either the
Superintendent "had the mo-
ney to pay" or "he did not
have" it.
Now, sir, I contend that he
must have had it, and I base
my argument on the follow-!
ing.Mr, Butler, the Chair-
man, in his evidence stated
that lie had remonstrated
with Mr. Farrington on seve-
ral occasions, to pay the
drafts. How could I remon-
strate v\ ith vou to pay mv
bills, if I knew within ni\
own soul that I had not giv-
en VOU the money to do it.
\guin : Some of these
drafts were overdue for as
long as six weeks. Suppos
ing then that the Hospital
during the course of a mouth
did run low in funds, could
not the overdue drafts have
b. 1 11 paid on the ist of the
succeeding month when the
Institution had four or live
hundred pounds to its ere
dit.
Mr. Editor this tiling is
' more far-reaching than the
public expe i.
Well might you in one of
your editorials say "There is
a vexing la< k of clarity .-, ,-.
whenever" a question arises
with regard to the distribu-
tion of "the funds".
Could not the Commission
have cleared up this thing ?
I hen again : Donl you feel
thai Mr. Butler's excuse was
the lamest imaginable? Why,
Sir, Mr, But ler is one of the
Directors of the Bank ol Nas-
sau : surely, the Cashier di-
rected his attention to the
fai t that the Hospital's
drafts were overdue. Some
time at the meetings of the
Direi tors Mr. Butler could
lv have called up Mr. Far-
rington over the telephone
and asked him to bring his
cheque book to the Hank and
have paid the drafts then and
there, thus barring the anti
cipated friction so much
dreaded bv the Chairman Mr.
Butler. But no he didn't
do it in spite of such splen-
did opportunity ; and that
suggests another thought,
I 1 he Chairman must have
known that the money was
n't there as well as the Su
perintendenl did, although
as far as the Government and
the Commissioners were con-
cerned, it was there
Where had this moms
gone? The public demand
an answer. The Commission
has f tiled to answei the ques
lion, and has brought on the
entiie dissatisfaction <>f the
community to BUCh an 1 \tent
that it is' felt that a new
Commission ought to be ap
pointed to deal with thisspe
rial phase of the Hospital's
affairs.
It is quite evident that the
Commission has js^de tash
findings.HB1b fek en
glossed
which h
explai
trut
the
up to the light that's in him.
Let him act-act now; the
public demand it. The Gov-
ernor must act or accept the
alternative.
Faithfully yours
PRO TEMPORE.
Schedule of proposed sailings of Steamers uu-
der contract to convey Mails from the Bahamas to 1-oreign
Countries during the month of April 1916.
date or
SAILING
NAMK OF
STEAMER
DESTINATION
HOUR OF
CLOSING
Nassau
April 6th 1916.
The Editor of The Tribune
Dear Sir
I regret tu have todabble
in newspaper business, but real
ly, I cannot refrain from taking
keen exception to your remarks
in your paper of the 4th issue.
In that issue you suggested that
the government is composed of
Jelly-fish material.
I should like you to throw
some more light around this
thing. Not because a Govern-
ment makes a mistake or even
blunders occasionally, v.m
should go so far as to call it
'Jelly fish." Be kind sir.
Yours truly
KINDNESS"
Nothing of the kind our only
suggestion is that the govern-
ment should not he "jelly fish."
Read again [Ed.
:o:
Nassau N. P 1. istern 11
April 7th 1
Dear Mr. Editor
What on Earth does the
I Ion. member from the Eastern
District mean by giving notice
of a resolution to txoner vU two
quondam clerks of the post of
lice? Does he really hope to
make headway?
"CURIOUS"
April 4
7
7
11
M
21
Miami
Mexico
Miami
Miami
Mono Castle
Miami
Mexico
Mono Castle
Jacksonville
(Mayport)
New York
Jacksonville
(Mayport)
New York
Key West, Fla
Now York
New York
g.oo p.m.
10.30 a.m.
8.00 p.m.
8.00 p.m.
10.30 a.m.
8.00 p.m.
10.30 a.m.
10.30 a.m.
Parcel Mails will be made up and closed as follows :
For the United Kingdom and the United Mates
April 6, 13, 20, and 27 at noon.
Nassau
8th April 1916
Dear Mr. Editoi
I see by the papers that the
Registrai of Records, Mi
Dun. 1111 >< is changing his
place with Mr. Farrington
Superintendent of the Hospi-
tal; Mr. Reeves,Cadet, is act-
ing Relieving Offi< er. What
has become of Mr. Lowe for-
mer Relieving < >ffio 1' Has
any provision b< en made tor
him ?
Yours faithfully
A. K.M.
Nassau
8th April [Qll
Editor Tribune
Dear Sir
Nassau, April 5th 1916.
MARRIED.
1.1.> 1 :.\ Johnson. -On '1 hum
,i:iv bth April 1916, at the Ca
thedral Miss Felicia Johnson ol
Nassau to Mr. S. Colero Liotta
o| 1 (irenta, Sicilly, Italy.
POLICE COURT NEWS.
Mar. 27. William M< Caitnev
Urea* hCab A< I 8a. 01 7 days.
jS. William brooks and
Ah, e Rolle Assaulting and
beating I' flic Eulin Brooks
lined 25s. and 3s. 1 oStS 01 20
days Rolle dismissed.
S imuel Fine Using pro-
fane and Hide, eilt lai
in public St. -jos. or 8 days
Nehemiah Munroe found
drunk in Baillou Hill Road
^s. or 4 days.
29. Erskine Sawyer As-
eclock, tins morning foi May
port Fla, with twenty six pas-
I.
1 him
Mr,
ilut for the well known repu
ration of your journal for fair-
ness and learle--m ss 1 would
nut ve iiuo- I submit thislettei
ou for publicatian
In dealing with the Bahamas
General I lospital imbroglio you
. done so under cover <>f
"Charity" while you have en-
tirely lost sight ol another gieat
viitiu "Mercy"
I can not see I il any good
end is s licily that you have given tins
matter, and placing it in the
hands of people who are incom
petent of passing intelligent
judgement upon the merits or
dements of the Case, exposing
, their betters to people w ha are
not worthy of notice.
Tht Commission was com-
posed of men who certainly did
not nved to he advised by you
.is to the method of conducting
their enquiry, and the questions
' which they should or should not
put.
The climax is reached when
vou presume to question the
ability of the Executive to
rightly deal with a matter that
is in their hands, and to whose
judgement you and others will
have to how. w hethei they beat
or whether thev forbear.
I am afraid Sir that you have
mistaken liberty for license, and
I think you would have b
better advised had your caption
been
Mercy is twice blessed,
It blesseth him that gives and
him that receives,
and the exposition in RCCOrd
ance therewith.
In conclusion I would saj
that you evidently imagine that
the destinies of tne Colons aie
columns of the Tribune,
body else dors.
airness however vou will
hearing as well as
"protempore"
sm
cmain
,llll.\
_,, ,.,.,,,.
You have done your part vaulting Lustace Taylor or-
in helping as much as possi- dered to pay 4s. bd. costs.
b!e to pi 'int out the defective ||saida Nurse Assaulting
of the Hospital Commis and beating Sarah Davis
sion in that it failed to throw months,
enough light around the o. DionisiusDeGn :ory
"Cash transactions" ol the Obstructing the mam rn
Hospital when there Ls reason trance to the Public Mar kit
I iOJj/OI>. ....--------,..------------------------ 11,11c !> til'- iw..- ..*....- v
to believe that more could by placing a number ol car-
have been known than "has' riage wheels in the said en-
trance in contravention ol
Rule 36 of the Rules and
more expression of public Regulations of Public Mai
been known.
I should like to hear some
opinion on tins matter. Is it
not strange that the "Guar-
dian" should be silent on a
publi< question ol such grave
import.ne e.
Respectfully Yours
ki 11914 I" ined .is.
II I sing profane and al 11
and indet -nt li I
towards Francis Ramsa\
Burnside within the s lidMai
ket tending to a Inea. h of
P. J. A. M. t|n ,.,, ,. Pi,,, ,1 ,"i |n rJe
Nassau 8th April 1916
Editoi of I he Tribune
Sir
Can anyone give any good
reason wh) an olliaicl whose
conduct <>f an importanl es-
tablishment of the govern
fault 1.1 days
[I, Raj mond Scavelifl
()n.' Wilfred Thompson un
law fully and maliciously did
woundAdjourned to 3rd
April 1916.
1st April. Wilfred Ingram
and Thomas H. Bain As
incut had been reported upon vaulting and beating Arabele
unfavourably should be ap
pointed to another import-
ant department pending the
d(. ision of the Secretary ol
Stale.
In the light of the report
of the Commission, and '"'
cording lo the tradition of
the civil service, such an offi-
cial should have been sus-
hi \sii -Adjourni d to 5th inst
at 10 a. 111.
Si(lne\ Ball '1 browing
stones to the annoyance and
danger of peisons in Petti
roal I aie- 6 strokes with
Tamarind rod.
Alex Burrows -Hi ea c h
Sponge and I'm tie I isliei ies
\i t -Ordered to join SchoOn
I'll .!'.......------------------ I
(.ended until judgment had er Admired and proceed on the
been passed upon his ca voyage in her in "lieu of the
Why then is Mr Farring 'Sen. "Mystic" on winch he
ton retained even for a day? I had originally signed:
Is it to give him time 01 Mex MorrisAssaulting
whal ?
Surely, tht Governor can
only expect Ihe Secretary ol ed.
Thomas Rae bv presenting a
loaded gun at him- Dismiss
State to come
1 inclusion
I he public is weary of Mr
Farrington and want him re
tin d.
Yours verv tml\
to but one' Reuben Fiulayson Re
moving sand from the beach
or foreshore in the Eastern
I 'isti ict of New I'lovideiK e
the property of the Crown in
contravention of 60 V. c 34.
T. J. KIRKLAND MYERS. Sec, 3 -Fined 5s. 01 .1 days.


>
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8, 1916.



Radiograms
*Apnl 71I1 K)i6.
I'o trv of both sides is quiet ev-
M^tvliere along the western
front in Europe.
On the much disputed
seAors around Verdun the
only activity lias been in the
region of Douamont and
Vaux.
This rather unprecedented
claim follows a successful of-
lensive undertaken by the
Krench, in which they recap-
tured some 01 their lost
ground and drove the Ger-
mans back.
On the eastern line in Rus-
sia, the Germans have taken
up the offensive and are
heavily attacking with infan-
try and artillery the Russian
position.
Unofficial advices from
Petrograd say however that
the Germans .nowhere have
been able to penetrate the
Russian line in frontier at-
tacks.
I he Italians and Austrians
are continuing their opera-
tions along the Austrian
frontier, hut there have, been
no important changes in posi-
tion
The British in Mesopotamia
have captured an important
Turkish position at Ummel
Henna on the Tigris River,
twenty miles below Kut el
A ma 1 a.
This victory is considered
in London as giving hope
for the early relief of the Bri-
tish forces besieged in Kut el
Amaia since last December.
The Russians are also suc-
cessfully operating against
the lurks m the Caucasus
and Persian regions.
El Paso: The story that
Francesco Villa is wounded
and that hiscanture is im-
minent was asserted again
tonight by General Gevera
Carranza Commander at
Juarez. General Carranza
made public a telegram,
winch he said he had re
reived from (General Bertani
at M.idera stating specihcal
ly that the bandit had been
shot and was in hiding some
where between Baehinaba
and Satevo.
Columbus:Tales of the
hardships of the American
soldiers who are pursuing
Villa over the desert and
through the mountains of
Chihuahua were brought
here today by arrivals with
a truce train which had carri-
ed supplies to Col: Dodds.
Ear from being the Smart
eavalry men who three weeks
ago crossed into Mexico, the
soldiers, their shoes ruined
bv the sharp stones of the
mountains and their uniforms
torn by brush, are wearing
sandals made of cowhide and
such clothing as can be ob-
tained from the natives, they
declared.
It was also assserted that
Col: Dodds had lost so many
horses that fully half the men
were without mounts.
Berlin:When the Imperial
Chancellor Dr. Beth man Hoi
lwegg arose today to deliver
his pronouncement on the
attitude of Germany with
respect to the war, the Ren h
stag presented the aspect of
former great days when some
question of national import
was to be discussed. All the
members were piesent and
the galleries were crowded
The Chancellor turned to
the subject of eventual con
dilions of peace. He pointed
out that in his special of
September ninth, he had de
clared readiness to enter in
to discussion of peace but
then as now, Germany's ene
my declined.
"Let us suppose I suggest
to Mr. Asquith to sit down
with me at a table and ex
amine the posibilitirs of
peace," he continued "and
Mr. Asquith begins with a
claim of definitive and com
plete destruction of Prussia's
military power, the conver
sation would be ended before
it began.
To these peace conditions
onlv one answer would he left
and this answer our sword
would give "If our adversaries
want to continue the slaughter
of human beings and the de
vasiation of Europe, theirs will
the guilt and we shall have to
be stand it as men.
:o:
April 8th 1916;
Washington:The prei
dent and cabinet considered
the submarine situation
without deciding action. It
is understood that the situ
ation awaits Geitn;nys ans
wer on the Sussex and other
vessels torpedodd.
San Antonia, Texas:Carr-
awga forces killed ten Villa
men and captured two on
April 4thatCieneguellias, ten
miles South of Satevo. The
prisoners said that Villa left
ear'y in the morning with
200. leaving 50 men as rear-
guard. A erican cavalry are
pushing forward beyond Sa-
tevo.
Pensacola, Florida:A new
naval observation balloon
broke its moorings decended
at Argvle, Florida, 100 miles
Northeast. The balloon was
unoccupied.
Chicago:An internation-
al anarchist plot has ,een
discovered here according to
the authorities. The Czar of
Russia and Emperor of Ger-
many were at the head
of the list of those whom it
was proposed to assassinate.
I he plot was unearthed
during the investigation of
the .activities of Jean Crone
suspected of having placed
poison in the food of guests
at the banquet in honour of
Archbishop Mundeleon sev-
eral weeks ago.
Paris:It isestimated that
German losses before Verdun
so far are 200.000. The Ger-
man forces last night pene-
trated French first line tren-
ches between Bethancourt
and Chattancourt. French
counter-attacks re gained a
large part of the position.
Berlin: The Germans cap-
tured from Canadians nine
crater positions South of St.
Eloi near Vpres.
I ond >n: f*h \ Brii ish sti
ship Simla has be< n sunk. II
Uiati s, of the crew were
drowned.
New York:Stock:
Leather
Sleel
Maxwell
1st pfel
Kans Son.
Ore
Mi.irtli
Seaboard
54 '-a
84 3-4
72 5-8
85 1-4
26 1 a
43 7-8
38 M
5
Continued from 1st page
:o:
barrass the administration* of
our charities among the victims
of Germany, However unfortu
nate this may he, n cannot for
a moment be held <{ Sufficient
weight to counterbalance the
reasons w1 ich demand our inter
vention It is of the highest con
sequence that the American peo
pi should recognize that neutr-
ality is never noble, is often base
and cowardly, in our case is
souldestroying. and deadly to
our influence and reputation a
broad and to oui pride and self
respect, at home
"Let us have a great and im
mediate increase in our mib
tary and naval strength, but let
us be honest and dignified in
making our people understand
why it is required, yielding
neither to undue and foolish fear
of nations from which we havt
nothing to fear, nor to the vain
glorious braggadocio of jingo
ism. We know that we ought
to be in this war, that v\ sought
to be fighting Germany, that e
ought to be maintaining decen-
cy in Mexico. For these things
we ought to have much bet'er
armament, but let us not pre-
tend that we need it for other
purposes,some illogical, some
unworthy, all political."
hi the intervals between the
addresses the audiences sang
the "buttle Hymn of the repub-
lic," and "Onward Christian
Soldiers," and at the end of the
meeting joined in "America."
Dr. Richard C Cabot led the
singing from the rhoir loft
above the speaker's platform
The meeting was held under
the auspices of the newly form
ed "Citizen's League for Ameri
ca and the Alhe>." Leaflets
distributed among thp audience
to secure enr< 'Iment set forth the
object of the league as follows :
"We believe that the fabric
of civilization embodied in free
government and diversity of
nationality "S menaced by Teu
tonic aggression, and that the
foundations of public light are
endangered bv the violation of
Belgium and the atrocities of
submarine warfare
"We are convinced that our
political ideals and our national
safety art bound up with the
cause of the allies an' that their
defeat would mean moral and
material disaster to our country.
"Therefore this league is
formed to use all lawful means
to put this nation in a position
of definite sympathy with the
allies and in an equally definite
position of moral disspproba
tion of the purposes and me
thods of the central Teutonic
empires."
American Papers.
FOUND
On Shirley Street, a Sisal
Fibre Knitted hat dyed Green.
Apply
TRIBUNE OFFICE
LOST
Reward is offered for the re
turn to the Tribune Office of a
lilagreed silver belt pin, bearing
initials of owner and d'-vie 0
reverse side LostApri
about S p m. on way t
from Frederick Stree
Shingles.
JUST received from Jacksonville 5 x 19 "Best Cypress at 36s-
per 1000. No bettei grade than iliese on the Market5 x 18
"Primes" Cypress at {is. per 1000. This grade carries our
same guarantee as the Bests."
Arty defective shingles can be returned.
Also cheaper grade in stock
April 6th. 1916 C. C. SAUNDERS.
UNION
SUITS
Twin HIAJK
Sold by
W. Hilton
260 Bay St.

t
THE CHURCHES
SUNDAY, APRIL, 9.
ST. MATTHEWS PARISH
CHURCH
Lhnt V
Passion Sunday
7.15 a.m. Holy Communion.
10.15 am- Sunday School.
11 a.m. Holy Eucharist. "Caia
phas".
4 p.m. Catechisms. "The Story
of the Tower of Mabel."
7 30 p.in Evensong. "The Pro
blem of Forgiveablene."
Tracts: -"What and Where is
the True Church."
ST MARGARET'S
3.30 p.m. Sunday School.
7 p.m. Evensong and distribu-
tion of Tracts.
Sundav April gth to Thursday
13th, Re'vd Father Field S. S
J. E. preaches in the various
churches of the City in tuin
Morning and Evening
LOOK
Flash Lights 4/-
Extra Batteries *h
Extra Bulbs li-
Can be had from
EDWIN B.CASH
East Shirley st.
Notice
THE Rector of St. Mat
thew's would liketodis
pose in one lot of the FUR
NITURE.OF THE. RFC
TOmflftt OJ agreed price.
own
1 at any
Tenders.
TF.N D E R S ate required
for the erection of a stone
porch to the Church of St.Ag-
nes. Masons willing to esti-
mate for the work will please
apply to:
Mr. H. Dighton Pearson,
St. Matthew's Rectorv
TENDERS
will be received, until Easter
week, by Mr. R. \V Sawyer,
for the fast (one^ sail boat
"Waterloo", in good condi-
tion, which will be at the
wharf of Mr Sawyer for in
sped ion at that time.
Terms: Cash on Delivery.
John S. G Thompson, Owner
Wemyss Bight
Kleuthera.
Tomatoes
I CAN take care of your ship
ments by the way of Jack
sonville. 1 will advance
freight, duty and material
if neccessy
Write or see
H.C. CHRISTIE
j BbG to notify the
1 public that I will
undertake to sell Log-
wood on commission
to the very best ad-
vantage.
Write or see
E. C. Griffin
Cor. Biy St. and Victoria Avt.
For Sale
AIUI Lot in Nassau
ctly opposite
"Polhem
1 plyto
r i!BUN" OFFICE


t
The Tribune, Nassau, Saturday April, 8, 1916.
&*
LOGWOi D
"TTHE undersigned d-
1 purchasing LOGW( H ,\> and wjl
ever I he market price ib
Keeping Guarct
HERE arc respottsltoilitiSs that every patriot^-iti
'Hum I--M! in this season of nationa] peril dWtr
than figntin* for toe Bag. Not the least ol the#is
rvuig the bafi trade.
-TH!
SHOE^
is on guard, and in spite oi tli.- advancing price of leather
and "" increase in the wages of tin factory workers, have
succeeded in securing the largeytgrdei of its. historv.
1'1"- v/l opsignment per "KotoniV' sums up
*ocases containin i ; pairs of boots and I all
tall marked with the Big^FrJfir's SJogan
With the; nts he f.i:: Four v. dl he
'" keeP th ry and
ing at the old pn.es in
spiteoi lariff rumours and rising quotations in the Mar
i i ts abroad.
G. T, KNOWL1 Prop. Biff 4.
. !'.. >: Spon ,;
To be had at all Grocers
C. L. L()ft/lOUSe=Comp;my\ Agent
- O1FO0S
I he highest price paid for
LOGWOOD in any quantity
< ;>ed for sh ipping-
and delivered on
Wiarf at Nassau
n now on to July 1st.
*. B. ROCKWELL,
P*lm Gate, Nassau St.
mm
ARROW
COLLAR
Insist Oh
Kirkman's Borax
Soap
A Bigger Cake
A Better Soap
3d. per Bar
At Your Dealer or
At The New York House '
W^EEUXZZ
All Arrow collars are
made of fabrics bleached
and shrunk in our own -
plants. They always Automobiles & Bicycles
fit and sit correctly and
are the most durable.
DR/N <
V 'ch's Grape Juice.
PRICES
its, 2s. 3d.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. pec doz.
I Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
I Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.
$ BLACK'S 222 B
and The Nassau Candy
Opp. Hotel Coloni
ON SALS AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CLUETT, I" > I t, CO., Inc.
MAKERS, T .iv, n. v. i ., s. a.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Kxclustve Agent.
For Sale.
A Columbia ,];i
loud '
with lati El i 0rds
Ma< liine and records m
Hloli.
I'oi paiticulars
Apply TR1BI NEOfl
Good money
can be made
Claaning Sisal on Sha
Old l' Providi ii
| >ld Fort,
pro\ .(I- (1.
Rf.o Cars and Pope Bicycles (JWafara) FOR
SALE, AND FOR HIRE.
Solo agent for
REO MOTOR CAR Co.
Pi.:tt attention to all i rairs
Supplies and accessorie
Gcissoline and 0 Is
J. P. SIMMS
47 Market St.
PHONE 402
T. BRICE
Commission Merchant
Office : we. side tnH sponge KChng
Nassau, N. P. Bahamas.
AGENT
HORSES *| | SHEEP
CATTLE HP POULTRY
SPONGE, S/SAL and other ISLAND Products.
P


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