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I. OILBRRT DUPUOH, Editor and Proprietor. OFHON Corner Shirley & Cli.. rlotu Sta Nmmtt, V. /', Itiilnimas 'PHOlfl 2D0, P. O. BOX 103. PVBUSH1 D DAILY RATES Mi/i,, fay, V, c>lfie*iay anil Friday— single copy ... ... ... Jil Tuesday, ud Thursday—single copy id Saturday—siuale copy ijd, Weekly Monthly 5eputySpeaker, Messrs J. N. Sands, G. H. Gamblin, G. II. Johnson, G. Weech, Dr. J. J. Culmer, R. W. Turtle, C. E. Bethel, G. M. Cole, T. A. Toote, C. O Anderson, E. I.. Bowen, W. P. Adderley, H. F. Armbrister, C. C. Sweeting, D. S. D. Moselcy, L. VV. Young, C. E. Alburv, R. H. Curry and A. K. Solomon. After certain business of routine, Mr. Cole according to noti the Depu ty Speaker and Members of the Honourable House of Assembly. The Governor has the lion our to draw the attention of the Honourable House of As sembly to the small Bahamian Contingent that was despatch ed on the 9th instant by public subscription to Kingston to join the Jamaica force, and to invite cons : deration to the desirability of despatching a somewhat lar ger contingent to Jamaica at nn early date at the public ex pense. I understand that the Sccre tary of State has informed the Governors of certain West In dian Colonies that the Army Council has stated that the form in which the West Indies can render the most effective help at the present juncture is by sending men. I would therefore suggest for your con sideration that not less than 100 men lie sent. In the case of 3arbadoes and the Leeward Islands the Secretary of Slate has notified those Governments that pay at British rales will commence from the date of embatkation at the Colony of concentration and will be borne by Imperial funds as well as the expensesconnected with the contingent from that date until the date of re turn to the respective Colonies ol recruitment. With regard to the expe-idi tine under what may be termed "non-effective services," namely "disability pensions," "separa lion allowances," "gratuities," etc., it is obviously impossible to form an estimate of the ami ual amount which may be re quired, as it depends on the chances of war, but as in the case of the West Indian Colo nies, we may, I think, "agree to contribute a proportion of the charges in respect of our recruits not exceeding a fixed sum in any one year in addition to paying the cost of passages and food during the voyage." Provision should likewise be made for obtaining further re emits in order to maintain the contingent in a complete state of efficiency while on active service. The alternative methods of rais-ng the necessarj money are well known to the Honourable House, and are either by an in oreast of taxation or by raising a loan. In the United Kingdom the principle has been recogniz ed that the country must pay a considerable proportion of the costs of the war out of its pres ent income and general re sources, and that the burden to be left to posterity should be a minimum. If the war continued for an indefinite period—and I can hold out no hope ol an ear ly termination of hostilities— and a further loan became neecs saw later for normal expendi, Hire, the difficulties of raising such a loan would be very con siderably increased and a high rate of interest would have to be paid, necessitating further taxation for interest and sink ing fund. As you are aware, the Secretary of State has already notified this Government that it is impossible to raise a loan in England. I have no doubt that the Honourable House will take these matters into careful con ideration when deciding this important question. W.L. ALLARDYCK, Governor & Commander inChief. Government House^^^L Nassau, 25th SepL.,.!^^^^. Mr. Cole in addressing the: Commfttee said among other things, that this was one of the most momentous incidents in the history of the House and of the Colony; the question was whether we as a Colony were prepared to send a Contingent to aid the Motherland in its hour of dire need. It was the first time that the Colony had to decide such an issue and he trusted the House would do the right thing. He read an illustration of German colonization showing wdiat would be our fate if Germany should conquer and we became a colony of Germany, he also said that provision for the necessary expenditure would be found in the Loan Act of last year; he then moved the Resolution quoted above. Mr. L. W. Young briefly seconded the motion saying that he saw no reason why the matter should not be disposed of in ten minutes. Mr. J. P. Sands moved in amendment That the expenses attendant on sending a Bahamas Contingent to join the West Indian Contingent should be met by immediate taxation, and that a Select Committee be appointed to report by Bill what increased taxation is advisable; he thought it wise to provide now for the expenses of the Contingent by increased taxation, he suggested increased duty on sugar or 2\ per cent on ad valorem duties. Mr. C. C. Sweeting seconded. Whereupon a keen discussion ensued for and against the amendment and the resolution in which several of the members participated. On the amendment being put it was lost. On the motion being -pm it was carried by 14-5.



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^ On motion of Mr. Cole seconded by Mr. Bethel, Rule 15 was suspended and the Vote of Indemnity was read a 1st, d and 3rd time and passed, ^he Clerk of the House was ordered to convey the Vote of Indemnity to the Legislative Council and request their concurrence. The Committee which conveyed the Message to the Governor informing him of the resignation of Mr. T. Culmer reported the delivery thereof and that the Governor would give it his attention. The House adjourned to Thursday evening. The Motor "Frances B" did not leave for Miami until Wednesday morning, and arrived there early this morning. On Monday in the House of Assembly, Mr. W. P. Adderley and Mr. C. E. Albury were the members who escorted Mr. T. Augustus Toote to the Clerk's table. Bahama* Baptist Union, 22 Parliament Street, Nassau. The Editor of the "Tribune" Dear Sir, Will you please add to the Red Cross List, Baptist Union—Mrs. M. L. Sargent, Secretary, .and oblige, Yours faithfully DANIEL WILSHERE. The Police Hand Concert will be given at 8.15 this evening. PROGRAMME 1. March "The Liberty Bell" 2. Valse "Over the Waves" 3. Overture "Light & Airy" 4. One-Step "Hitchy Koo" 5. Gavotte "Softly Unawares" 6. Selection "Operatic 1 ancies 7. Polka "Wheel of Fortune" 8. Two-Step "Kentucky Wedding Knot" GOD SAVE THE KING. -Corpl. H. ROACH, Actg. Bandmaster. War News. September 30th 1915. London, 39th. Governor, Bahamas. Official News:—General French reports severe fighting around and North of Loos and ; further progress South of Loos. The ground North of Hill 70, retaken by the enemy on the 26th is now held by us. Our captures are now over 3.000 prisoners, 21 guns and 40 machine guns, many were destroyed Ly our bombardment. We are now attacking the enemys third line. The French government reports they have captured crests Best of Souchez and fresh progress in Champagne. 1800 pri soners were captured near Massges. The total losses caused by Allies advance exceed three army corps, and the total cannon brought to near 79. Russian government reports continued fierce fighting near Dvinak and the enemy attacking with large forces on Galician front. (Signed) BONAR LAW. New York: — Plans are completed for the five hundred million dollar loan to the Allies. Bondf will be offered to the public in denominations as low as $100. The plans are awaiting approval. Paris:—A Salonika despatch says that Bulgaria has agreed with the centra] powers to enter the war on October 15th. The French war office announces that German casualties in the recent offensive, including killed wounded and prisoners, exceed uo.ooo. There is continued French progress in Artois and other regions. Athens:—The Greek govern menl has released the Sildis and Gourkas survivors of the wreck of the British transport Mama zan which was sunk by a sub marine. London:— The British have won important successes in Mesopotamia and the Turks arc retreating towards Bagdad, It is reported that 300.000 Austro Germans are advancing on the Serbian front. There is little change on the West. The British are battering the Germans third line Loos. and French official repoits of the battles. The Germans claim that all French attacks have been repulsed and that a number of prisoners have been capnear' tured. It is the same with regard to A Constantinople despatch j the Crown Prince's offensive in says that a British transport I Argonne. This is described by was sunk and all but a few of the French as an important acthe crew lost. tion but the Germans say it is Budapest reports Anglo-French troops intended for service in Serbia have been landed near Salonika. Latest reports indicate that the Russians have not been do ing so well in Southern Poland where the Austrians haveappar ently stemmed the advance and retaken Lutsk. —:o:— September 30th 1915. London, 28th: —In Champagne the French are attacking the German second line trenches and are making further progress but seemingly the Allies offensive movement is not being carried on with the same impetuosity which characterized the first two days operations. The successes won are recongnized as important but the main object, to break through the German lines, lias not been accomplished Both the British and French have greatly improved their positions and by gaining the hills and cresls from which they can dominate the German lines of communication their next attempt to secure a decisive victory should he made easier to carry out, is the view of experts here. The French continue to push toward Fast of Souchez aiming at the heights of Vimy which command the plain to the Fast, while the British to the North are making secure their hold on the LensLabassee Roul and are beating off the German counterattacks. The battle in Champagne is over a sixteen mile front '.here the French are now within two miles from the railway which crosses the country behind the German positions and which has been so usefui to them in moving troops and supplies to threatened points. With the French guns within easy range the railway is rendered useless. As usual there is a great difference between the German a minor one designed to improve the situation, and the desired result has been obtained. There has been no cessation of the heavy fighting on the Russian front. From Riga to Galicia the armies are contesting every inch of the ground and at least four separate battles are in progress. Von llinderburg has resumed his effort to reach Dvinsk and the Germans claim that the Russians have been driven from two successive lines 1 I trenches West of that place. London, 28 :—Thomas McNa mara, Financial Secretary of the Admiralty, explaining silence of the Admiralty garding the work of Briti submarines in the Baltic said in response to a question thai these submarines were under the orders of the Russian Admiralty. "The House will realize that much gallant and successful work is being done by the vessels," Mr. McNamaia said, "But the responsibility of deciding what shall be made public of the proceedings in the Baltic must rest with the Russian Admiralty." Commander Noel Lawrence is the officer who was decorated by the Russian government for the successful torpedo at tack on the Moltke. A report via Stockholm reports tlie explosion in a German ammunition factory at Wittenburg in which 343 men were killed. New Orleans, 28:—The worst storm in its history struck New Orleans last night. Some buildings were destroyed and many others damaged. Five persons were killed. All wire and rail communication is in terrupted and the city is with out light o\\ ing lo the eh Ctl ic stations h e i 11 g flooded. The wind reached a velocity of miles an hour.



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I TSJAve. ait ARR-OW Striped Madras COLLAR One of the most popular of the recent style introductions in Madras collars. ON SAM". AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CI.ll.ri. PBABODY ; CO.. Inc. MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. WA. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES in inform liis.fnends and the Public ibaWe has just received a complete outfit oi \ facilities for the buisness of an un| dertaker, which places him in a; position to carry out Funerals that may be entiusted to his care with system aud despatch] and respect fully Solicits theii patronage Get my Prices first and prove that these are the very lowi -t for the first class work. T. M. Knowles 528 Bay Street. I S now prepared to supplyRubber Tires for Babies Carriages, also to reset, and repair them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. For Sale O NE horse and carriage in good condition. Cab No. 24. < Apply J VMES KELLY, Cabman No. 56 THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of* the Arctic Region, and it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the World. Unlike the Reindeer, SUNLIGHT SOAP is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented housewives who would not be without it. SoMLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-merited reputation, it is absolutely pure,ami will not harm the m< stdclicatc fabric. A piece of Sunlight Soap used in your next wash will convince you of its excellence. %  DRINKWelch's Grape Juice. PRICES Quarts 2s. 3d. eacl Pints, Is. 4d., 15s. per do/. J Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. pei doz. I Pints, 5d. 4 plots finish and polish fu .>il furoitus woodwork ami floors. Johnson's Wood Dye)—foi the artistic Coloring of atl wood, s,,ft or hard Johnson's Under Lac— a spirit linitli, vnv much tupSfioi to shellac or vaimsli Johnson's Fln.1 Wood Finish —fora In .mtifiil. artistic, hand-rubbed effect 111 %  <>iit thr uiptnM of rubbing. Johnson's P&str Wood Filler— foi Biting the grain and parsf >f wood, preparing << foi tipfinish Johnson's Powdered Wax foi bstl room Boon, FOR SALE BY Chas. E. Albury Williams' Shoes Are Better



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\ NVIIIIMI i-iiliiu ins |urare in verbs mi\Kitrl. HciM t ; bound loiwe&r lo Iho llmnnn of no Mtvsler. VOL. XII. Nivssnvi. N. P.. Bahamas. THURSDAY. September. 50. 19IS NO. 3f.7. Conquering The Habits That Handicap Continued from Tuesday September 28 A T the present time the most * harmful form of opiate with which we have to deal, Mr. Towns thinks, is heroin, which was first used in cough mixtures and was believed to be hermlass It is still contained in many cough and asthma patent medicines. Its deleterious effects, moral, mental, and physical, his observations have convinced him, arc more marked than those of any other opiate. The Internal Revenue lieports have shown for years an annual increase in the importa tiou of opium and its deriva tives and cocaine, while last year there was a marked up ward jump in the amount But Mr. Towns does not believe that this has been due to in crease in population, because "our immigrants ate not drug takers." Among the thousands of drug users that Ire has treat ed or known he declares that he has never seen an Italian, a Hungarian,a Russian or a Pole, and has known only four casei of drug taking among Hebrews It is the native "American type," nervous and nlwavs going at full pressure,oul of which comes the upper world's chief iiop of drug addicts. Users of tobacco will not be pli ased to find "my lady Nicn tine classed with opium ami shown to be mother of many ills. Mr. Towns confesses to have been a hard smoker him self until some eighteen years ago, when a bright light upon the error of bis ways induct d him to quit and to go about the investigation of thecharac teristics and results of the to bacco habit. "I consider," he says, "that cigarette smoking is the greatest vice devastating humanity today, because it is doing more than any other vice to deteriorate the race." He is sure that il the comparative ef ficiency of smokers and nonsmokers could be determined the difference would be at least 15 per cent, in favor of the lat tcr. The Chinese have taken to smoking cigarettes since the beginning of the attempt to subdue the opium evil, and are now spending twice as much money for tobacco as for opi Bui Nit Towns thinks they have I gained nothing by the substitu tioil of the one drug habit for the other. We of the Occident condemn and are horrified by the opium habit because we ate able to look "with an unbiased mind on a drug habit that is not oui own." Mr. Towns de votes many pages to showing the toxic effects of tobacco up on the System and the various ways in wnich it works for the mental, moral, and physical deterioration of the smoker, and he draws a striking parallel be tweeil the action and effects of opium, alcohol, and tobaccq. I lisdeductionsconcerning these relations and effects, are the re suit, he says, of his years of stu dy of the drug habit upon many thousands of patients The book is written with very great eaints'm S3, and since the author's statements and discus sions come out of wide observa tion and profound study of the whole subject of the menace of drug addiction it will have high authoritative value among all thinking people. There is an introduction by Dr. Richard C. Cabot of Boston, expressing warm commendation of the author's work and his treatment of drug addicts, and in a long appendix Dr. Alexan der Lambert of Cornell Univer s ; tv discusses "The Relations of Alcohol to Disease." — The New York Times r IN THE MAGISTRATES COURT Sept. 13. Joshua Duncombe — Using profane and indecent language in BaySt.—Dismissed. Bruce I'ernander—I) 11 to— 15s. or 12 days. 14. Clarence Anderson and Jos. Ferguson—Assaulting and beating Brskine Campbell — Each fined 10s. 6d. and to pay each 25. od costs 01 12 dn\s. Joanna Johnson— 1, Using language in sight and hearing of persons in the neighborhood towards D. J. DeGregory tending to a breach of the peace. II, Assaulting and heating the said D. J* DeGregory. Ill, i Throw ing stones to the annoyance and danger <*f persons in Augusta St. — For each offence [fined 16s.and 3s icd. costs. In default of payment of each, I | days imprisonment. Alexander Chambers'Drunk and using profane and indecent language in Bail Ion Hill f?oad 16s 6d. or I | davs. IS Alice Thompson Using IniiKuapp in public street towards Emma N. Peet, tending i to a breach of the peace—Bound in her own recognisance in £"5 to keep the peace for 3 months. 16 Kathleen Gibson —Using I language in street towards Alice Wells tending to a breach of the peace—17s. and 3s. costs or 16 da) Dollie Deveaux-Using profane and indecent language in Bay St.—13s. or 10 days, 17. Cyrus Green—Havirig in his possession 3 fowls value 4S. .6d., reasonably suspected of having been stolen or unlawful Ilyobtained and unable to ac 'count satisfactorily for the same—Sentenced to 9 days im prisonment. Cyril Dean and Hartman Dean--Throwing stones to the annoyance and danger of per sons in M< (ting St.—Sentenced to receive 5 strokes and 4 strokes respectively. 18 Jephtha Hunter—One Jane Duncombe unlawfully did woundSentenced to two months imprisonment. IN 2 PIECE and UNION SUITS. SANITARY COOL RELIABLE SOLD BY Wm Hilton 260 BAY 8TREET. For Results Advertise in 1 he Tribune. Wear Ar-mbrister's Shoes 1!


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02431
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, September 30, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02431

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Full Text
\
NviIIimi i-iiliiu ins |urare in verbs mi\Kitrl.
HciMt; bound loiwe&r lo Iho llmnnn of no Mtvsler.
VOL. XII.
Nivssnvi. N. P.. Bahamas. THURSDAY. September. 50. 19IS
NO. 3f.7.
Conquering The Habits
That Handicap
Continued from Tuesday September 28
A T the present time the most
* harmful form of opiate
with which we have to deal,
Mr. Towns thinks, is heroin,
which was first used in cough
mixtures and was believed to
be hermlass It is still contain-
ed in many cough and asthma
patent medicines. Its deleteri-
ous effects, moral, mental, and
physical, his observations have
convinced him, arc more mark-
ed than those of any other opi-
ate.
The Internal Revenue lie-
ports have shown for years an
annual increase in the importa
tiou of opium and its deriva
tives and cocaine, while last
year there was a marked up
ward jump in the amount
But Mr. Towns does not believe
that this has been due to in
crease in population, because
"our immigrants ate not drug
takers." Among the thousands
of drug users that Ire has treat
ed or known he declares that he
has never seen an Italian, a
Hungarian,a Russian or a Pole,
and has known only four casei
of drug taking among Hebrews
It is the native "American type,"
nervous and nlwavs going at
full pressure,oul of which comes
the upper world's chief iiop of
drug addicts.
Users of tobacco will not be
pli ased to find "my lady Nicn
tine classed with opium ami
shown to be mother of many
ills. Mr. Towns confesses to
have been a hard smoker him
self until some eighteen years
ago, when a bright light upon
the error of bis ways induct d
him to quit and to go about
the investigation of thecharac
teristics and results of the to
bacco habit. "I consider," he
says, "that cigarette smoking
is the greatest vice devastating
humanity today, because it is
doing more than any other vice
to deteriorate the race." He is
sure that il the comparative ef
ficiency of smokers and non-
smokers could be determined
the difference would be at least
15 per cent, in favor of the lat
tcr. The Chinese have taken
to smoking cigarettes since the
beginning of the attempt to
subdue the opium evil, and are
now spending twice as much
, money for tobacco as for opi.....
Bui Nit Towns thinks they have
I gained nothing by the substitu
tioil of the one drug habit for
the other. We of the Occident
condemn and are horrified by
the opium habit because we ate
able to look "with an unbiased
mind on a drug habit that is
not oui own." Mr. Towns de
votes many pages to showing
the toxic effects of tobacco up
on the System and the various
ways in wnich it works for the
mental, moral, and physical
deterioration of the smoker, and
he draws a striking parallel be
tweeil the action and effects of
opium, alcohol, and tobaccq.
I lisdeductionsconcerning these
relations and effects, are the re
suit, he says, of his years of stu
dy of the drug habit upon many
thousands of patients
The book is written with very
great eaints'm S3, and since the
author's statements and discus
sions come out of wide observa
tion and profound study of the
whole subject of the menace of
drug addiction it will have high
authoritative value among all
thinking people.
There is an introduction by
Dr. Richard C. Cabot of Boston,
expressing warm commendation
of the author's work and his
treatment of drug addicts, and
in a long appendix Dr. Alexan
der Lambert of Cornell Univer
s;tv discusses "The Relations of
Alcohol to Disease."
The New York Times
r
In The Magistrates Court
Sept. 13. Joshua Duncombe
Using profane and indecent
language in BaySt.Dismissed.
Bruce I'ernanderI) 11 to
15s. or 12 days.
14. Clarence Anderson and
Jos. FergusonAssaulting and
beating Brskine Campbell
Each fined 10s. 6d. and to pay
each 25. od costs 01 12 dn\s.
Joanna Johnson 1, Using
language in sight and hearing
of persons in the neighborhood
towards D. J. DeGregory tend-
ing to a breach of the peace.
II, Assaulting and heating the
said D. J* DeGregory. Ill,
i Throw ing stones to the annoy-
ance and danger <*f persons in
Augusta St. For each offence
[fined 16s.and 3s icd. costs. In
default of payment of each, I |
days imprisonment.
Alexander Chambers'- Drunk
and using profane and indecent
language in Bail Ion Hill f?oad
16s 6d. or I | davs.
IS Alice Thompson Using
IniiKuapp in public street to-
wards Emma N. Peet, tending
i
to a breach of the peaceBound
in her own recognisance in "5
to keep the peace for 3 months.
16 Kathleen Gibson Using
I language in street towards Al-
ice Wells tending to a breach
of the peace17s. and 3s. costs
' or 16 da) -
Dollie Deveaux-Using pro-
fane and indecent language in
Bay St.13s. or 10 days,
17. Cyrus GreenHavirig in
his possession 3 fowls value 4S.
.6d., reasonably suspected of
! having been stolen or unlawful
Ilyobtained and unable to ac
'count satisfactorily for the
sameSentenced to 9 days im
prisonment.
Cyril Dean and Hartman
Dean--Throwing stones to the
annoyance and danger of per
sons in M< (ting St.Sentenced
to receive 5 strokes and 4
strokes respectively.
18 Jephtha HunterOne
Jane Duncombe unlawfully did
wound- Sentenced to two
months imprisonment.
IN 2 PIECE and
UNION SUITS.
SANITARY
COOL
RELIABLE
SOLD BY
Wm Hilton
260 BAY 8TREET.
For Results
Advertise in
1 he Tribune.
Wear
Ar-mbrister's
Shoes
1!


I. OILBRRT DUPUOH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OFHON
Corner Shirley & Cli.. rlotu Sta
Nmmtt, V. /', Itiilnimas
'PHOlfl 2D0, P. O. BOX 103.
PVBUSH1 D DAILY
RATES
Mi/i,,fay, V, c>lfie*iay anil Friday
single copy ... ... ... Jil
Tuesday, ud Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturdaysiuale copy ijd,
Weekly Monthly 5 Quarterly .. HalfYeaily ... .. 4S. fnl
... 9s.
Yearly ... 18.
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Advertising Halts : Six pence per line
for first insertion: three pence per line
(or second insertion ; and nuepennv pr
line for subsquent insertions.
AdverttatMott under eight lines 4s.
Zhe tribune
THURSDAY. September 30.1915.
JW PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M.
The House of Assembly
met on Tuesday evening,
there were present W. C. B.
Johnson Esq. I >eputySpeaker,
Messrs J. N. Sands, G. H.
Gamblin, G. II. Johnson, G.
Weech, Dr. J. J. Culmer, R.
W. Turtle, C. E. Bethel, G.
M. Cole, T. A. Toote, C. O
Anderson, E. I.. Bowen, W. P.
Adderley, H. F. Armbrister,
C. C. Sweeting, D. S. D.
Moselcy, L. VV. Young, C. E.
Alburv, R. H. Curry and A.
K. Solomon.
After certain business of
routine,
Mr. Cole according to no-
ti Resolutions;
That this House do resolve
itself into a Committee of
the whole House to consider
His Excellency's Message No.
1 with reference to the ques-
tion of sending a Bahamas
Contingent to join the West
Indian Contingent for the'
present war and to provide
the ways and means of so
doing.
Mr. G. Weech seconded Mr.
Cole's motion in a speech
eloquent, patriotic and en-
thusiastic in which he mag-
nified the British Empire, and
laid that the spirit of patrio-
tism was not dead in the
Bahamas and should be en-
couraged in every way.
Mi. A. K. Solomon wanted
to know what the Hon.
Member intended to bring
before the House.
Mr. Cole said he had no
objection te saying that he
intended to move the House
into a Committee of the
Whole instead of a Select
Committee on the following
Vote of Indemnity:
Resolved, that this House
will indemnify the Receiver
General and Treasurer in
paying out of the Public
Treasury, by warrant in the
usual manner, to the Govern-
or in Council, a sum not ex-
reeding five thousand pounds
5.000, for the purpose of
paying all necessary expenses
incurred in the sending of a
Contingent of ioo men to
Jamaica, to form a part of
the West Indian Contingent
fer service during the present
war.
On mot'on of Mr. G. M.
Cole seconded by Mr. C. E.
Bethel the House res lived it-
self into a Comniiiteeof the
Whole of the Governor's
Message No. i:
BAHAMAS.
No. 1.
Message from His Excellency
the Governor ti> the Depu
ty Speaker and Members of
the Honourable House of
Assembly.
The Governor has the lion
our to draw the attention of
the Honourable House of As
sembly to the small Bahamian
Contingent that was despatch
ed on the 9th instant by public
subscription to Kingston to join
the Jamaica force, and to invite
cons:deration to the desirability
of despatching a somewhat lar
ger contingent to Jamaica at
nn early date at the public ex
pense.
I understand that the Sccre
tary of State has informed the
Governors of certain West In
dian Colonies that the Army
Council has stated that the
form in which the West Indies
can render the most effective
help at the present juncture is
by sending men. I would
therefore suggest for your con
sideration that not less than
100 men lie sent.
In the case of 3arbadoes and
the Leeward Islands the Secre-
tary of Slate has notified those
Governments that pay at Bri-
tish rales will commence from
the date of embatkation at the
Colony of concentration and
will be borne by Imperial funds
as well as the expensesconnect-
ed with the contingent from
that date until the date of re
turn to the respective Colonies
ol recruitment.
With regard to the expe-idi
tine under what may be termed
"non-effective services," namely
"disability pensions," "separa
lion allowances," "gratuities,"
etc., it is obviously impossible
to form an estimate of the ami
ual amount which may be re
quired, as it depends on the
chances of war, but as in the
case of the West Indian Colo
nies, we may, I think, "agree to
contribute a proportion of the
charges in respect of our recruits
not exceeding a fixed sum in
any one year in addition to pay-
ing the cost of passages and
food during the voyage."
Provision should likewise be
made for obtaining further re
emits in order to maintain the
contingent in a complete state
of efficiency while on active
service.
The alternative methods of
rais-ng the necessarj money are
well known to the Honourable
House, and are either by an in
oreast of taxation or by raising
a loan. In the United Kingdom
the principle has been recogniz
ed that the country must pay a
considerable proportion of the
costs of the war out of its pres
ent income and general re
sources, and that the burden to
be left to posterity should be a
minimum. If the war continued
for an indefinite periodand I
can hold out no hope ol an ear
ly termination of hostilities
and a further loan became neecs
saw later for normal expendi,
Hire, the difficulties of raising
such a loan would be very con
siderably increased and a
high rate of interest would have
to be paid, necessitating further
taxation for interest and sink
ing fund. As you are aware, the
Secretary of State has already
notified this Government that it
is impossible to raise a loan in
England. I have no doubt that
the Honourable House will take
these matters into careful con
ideration when deciding this
important question.
W.L. ALLARDYCK,
Governor & Commander in-
Chief.
Government House^^^L
Nassau, 25th SepL.,.!^^^^.
Mr. Cole in addressing the:
Commfttee said among other
things, that this was one of
the most momentous inci-
dents in the history of the
House and of the Colony;
the question was whether we
as a Colony were prepared
to send a Contingent to aid
the Motherland in its hour of
dire need. It was the first
time that the Colony had to
decide such an issue and he
trusted the House would do
the right thing.
He read an illustration of
German colonization show-
ing wdiat would be our fate
if Germany should conquer
and we became a colony of
Germany, he also said that
provision for the necessary
expenditure would be found
in the Loan Act of last year;
he then moved the Resolu-
tion quoted above.
Mr. L. W. Young briefly
seconded the motion saying
that he saw no reason why
the matter should not be dis-
posed of in ten minutes.
Mr. J. P. Sands moved in
amendment That the expens-
es attendant on sending a
Bahamas Contingent to join
the West Indian Contingent
should be met by immediate
taxation, and that a Select
Committee be appointed to
report by Bill what increased
taxation is advisable; he
thought it wise to provide
now for the expenses of the
Contingent by increased tax-
ation, he suggested increased
duty on sugar or 2\ per cent
on ad valorem duties.
Mr. C. C. Sweeting second-
ed.
Whereupon a keen discus-
sion ensued for and against
the amendment and the reso-
lution in which several of
the members participated.
On the amendment being
put it was lost.
On the motion being -pm
it was carried by 14-5.


^
On motion of Mr. Cole sec-
onded by Mr. Bethel, Rule 15
was suspended and the Vote
of Indemnity was read a 1st,
d and 3rd time and passed,
^he Clerk of the House
was ordered to convey the
Vote of Indemnity to the
Legislative Council and re-
quest their concurrence.
The Committee which
conveyed the Message to the
Governor informing him of
the resignation of Mr. T.
Culmer reported the delivery
thereof and that the Gover-
nor would give it his atten-
tion.
The House adjourned to
Thursday evening.
The Motor "Frances B"
did not leave for Miami un-
til Wednesday morning, and
arrived there early this morn-
ing.
On Monday in the House
of Assembly, Mr. W. P. Ad-
derley and Mr. C. E. Albury
were the members who es-
corted Mr. T. Augustus Toote
to the Clerk's table.
Bahama* Baptist Union,
22 Parliament Street,
Nassau.
The Editor of the "Tribune"
Dear Sir,
Will you please add to
the Red Cross List, Baptist
UnionMrs. M. L. Sargent,
Secretary, .and oblige,
Yours faithfully
DANIEL WILSHERE.
The Police Hand Concert
will be given at 8.15 this
evening.
PROGRAMME
1. March "The Liberty Bell"
2. Valse "Over the Waves"
3. Overture "Light & Airy"
4. One-Step "Hitchy Koo"
5. Gavotte "Softly
Unawares"
6. Selection "Operatic
1 ancies
7. Polka "Wheel of Fortune"
8. Two-Step "Kentucky
Wedding Knot"
GOD SAVE THE KING.
-- Corpl. H. ROACH,
Actg. Bandmaster.
War News.
September 30th 1915.
London, 39th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:General
French reports severe fighting
around and North of Loos and
; further progress South of Loos.
The ground North of Hill 70,
retaken by the enemy on the
26th is now held by us.
Our captures are now over
! 3.000 prisoners, 21 guns and 40
machine guns, many were des-
troyed Ly our bombardment.
We are now attacking the
enemys third line.
The French government re-
ports they have captured crests
Best of Souchez and fresh pro-
gress in Champagne. 1800 pri
soners were captured near Mass-
ges.
The total losses caused by
Allies advance exceed three
army corps, and the total cannon
brought to near 79.
Russian government reports
continued fierce fighting near
Dvinak and the enemy attacking
with large forces on Galician
front.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
New York: Plans are com-
pleted for the five hundred
million dollar loan to the
Allies. Bondf will be offered
to the public in denominations
as low as $100. The plans are
awaiting approval.
Paris:A Salonika despatch
says that Bulgaria has agreed
with the centra] powers to en-
ter the war on October 15th.
The French war office announ-
ces that German casualties in
the recent offensive, including
killed wounded and prisoners,
exceed uo.ooo. There is contin-
ued French progress in Artois
and other regions.
Athens:The Greek govern
menl has released the Sildis and
Gourkas survivors of the wreck
of the British transport Mama
zan which was sunk by a sub
marine.
London: The British have
won important successes in
Mesopotamia and the Turks arc
retreating towards Bagdad,
It is reported that 300.000
Austro Germans are advancing
on the Serbian front.
There is little change on the
West. The British are battering
the Germans third line
Loos.
and French official repoits of
the battles. The Germans claim
that all French attacks have
been repulsed and that a num-
ber of prisoners have been cap-
near' tured.
It is the same with regard to
A Constantinople despatch j the Crown Prince's offensive in
says that a British transport I Argonne. This is described by
was sunk and all but a few of the French as an important ac-
the crew lost. tion but the Germans say it is
Budapest reports Anglo-French
troops intended for service in
Serbia have been landed near
Salonika.
Latest reports indicate that
the Russians have not been do
ing so well in Southern Poland
where the Austrians haveappar
ently stemmed the advance and
retaken Lutsk.
:o:
September 30th 1915.
London, 28th: In Champagne
the French are attacking the
German second line trenches
and are making further progress
but seemingly the Allies offen-
sive movement is not being
carried on with the same
impetuosity which characterized
the first two days operations.
The successes won are
recongnized as important but
the main object, to break
through the German lines,
lias not been accomplished
Both the British and French
have greatly improved their
positions and by gaining the
hills and cresls from which they
can dominate the German lines
of communication their next
attempt to secure a decisive
victory should he made easier
to carry out, is the view of ex-
perts here.
The French continue to push
toward Fast of Souchez aiming
at the heights of Vimy which
command the plain to the Fast,
while the British to the North
are making secure their hold on
the LensLabassee Roul and are
beating off the German counter-
attacks.
The battle in Champagne is
over a sixteen mile front '.here
the French are now within two
miles from the railway which
crosses the country behind the
German positions and which has
been so usefui to them in mov-
ing troops and supplies to
threatened points. With the
French guns within easy range
the railway is rendered use-
less.
As usual there is a great dif-
ference between the German
a minor one designed to im-
prove the situation, and the de-
sired result has been obtained.
There has been no cessation
of the heavy fighting on the
Russian front. From Riga to
Galicia the armies are contest-
ing every inch of the ground
and at least four separate bat-
tles are in progress.
Von llinderburg has resum-
ed his effort to reach Dvinsk
and the Germans claim that
the Russians have been driven
from two successive lines 1 I
trenches West of that place.
London, 28 :Thomas McNa -
mara, Financial Secretary of
the Admiralty, explaining '
silence of the Admiralty
garding the work of Briti
submarines in the Baltic said
in response to a question thai
these submarines were under
the orders of the Russian Ad-
miralty. "The House will rea-
lize that much gallant and suc-
cessful work is being done by
the vessels," Mr. McNamaia
said, "But the responsibility of
deciding what shall be made
public of the proceedings in the
Baltic must rest with the Rus-
sian Admiralty."
Commander Noel Lawrence
is the officer who was decorat-
ed by the Russian government
for the successful torpedo at
tack on the Moltke.
A report via Stockholm re-
ports tlie explosion in a Ger-
man ammunition factory at
Wittenburg in which 343 men
were killed.
* New Orleans, 28:The worst
, storm in its history struck New
! Orleans last night. Some
buildings were destroyed and
many others damaged. Five
persons were killed. All wire
and rail communication is in
terrupted and the city is with
out light o\\ ing lo the eh Ctl ic
stations h e i 11 g flooded. The
wind reached a velocity of
miles an hour.


I
TSJAve. ait
ARR-OW
Striped Madras
COLLAR
One of the most popu-
lar of the recent style
introductions in Mad-
ras collars.
ON SAM". AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
CI.ll.ri. PBABODY ; CO.. Inc.
MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. U., S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
W- A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES in inform liis.fnends
and the Public ibaWe has _
just received a complete outfit oi \
facilities for the buisness of an un- |
dertaker, which places him in a;
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entiusted to his care with
system aud despatch] and respect
fully Solicits theii patronage Get
my Prices first and prove that these
are the very lowi -t for the first class
work.
T. M. Knowles
528 Bay Street.
IS now prepared to supply-
Rubber Tires for Babies
Carriages, also to reset, and
repair them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
For Sale
ONE horse and
carriage in good
condition. Cab No.
24. <
Apply
J VMES KELLY,
Cabman No. 56
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of* the Arctic Region, and it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the World. Unlike the Reindeer,
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented
housewives who would not
be without it. SoMLIGHT
Soap enjoys a well-merited
reputation, it is absolutely
pure,ami will not harm the
m< stdclicatc fabric. A piece
of Sunlight Soap used in
your next wash will con-
vince you of its excellence.
DRINK-
Welch's Grape Juice.
PRICES
Quarts 2s. 3d. eacl
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15s. per do/.
J Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. pei doz.
I Pints, 5d.
4 T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen,
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
I If you haven't anything to advertise,
Advertise your Business for sale.

or
White Lime
I AM offering FOK SALE
my entire stock of Whiter
I .ime of about Soo bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
1'inlavson, Peveaux S
Phone 258 or "The Tjfi^JS
Office.
JoSlAH RaIIMING
2 Reward.
n EWRAD will be paid to
l\ any one giving inform-
ation leading up to the re-
covery of an Anchor and
Chain belonging to the Schr.
"I.cnndcr." and removed from
her on Friday night 20th Au-
gust last.
Length of Chain : 30 fa-
thoms x 5-8 in.
Anchor about 140 lbs.
Both in good condition.
Report to
TRIBUNK OFFICE.
Shingles
Best No. t Heart 5in. Cypress
Shingles at *9.60 per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5111. Cypress at $6.73 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large' purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wax I '"">
plots finish and polish fu .>il furoitus
woodwork ami floors.
Johnson's Wood Dye)foi the artistic
Coloring of atl wood, s,,ft or hard
Johnson's Under Laca spirit
linitli, vnv much tupSfioi to shellac or
vaimsli
Johnson's Fln.1 Wood Finish fora
In .mtifiil. artistic, hand-rubbed effect
111 <>iit thr uiptnM of rubbing.
Johnson's P&str Wood Fillerfoi
Biting the grain and parsf >f wood,
preparing << foi tip- finish
Johnson's Powdered Wax foi bstl
, room Boon,
FOR SALE BY
, Chas. E. Albury
Williams' Shoes Are Better


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