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L l.U.UKKT l>l"l'l 'I II. ft IT inn I -c; ;,-fut UI'KHI. Comer Shirley & ChivrloMo St an, N. P., Bafca "PHONE 200. P. O. BOX IflB. i ••• 111 ISHh.l) DAILY RATES Mond i v. W l "I'l I I lay tingle i npv ... J'l I'm-.' hui lay tingle cop) id sutui.l.n tin le copj i|d Weekli *l Monthly . %  I*. 6 I lerly &f . ii ill i irty ... ')•. I 1 8-. I'AYABLK IN ADVANCK Adver(isiil| R I \ | cure | >er line foi first i erl ee | encs | ei line i ; and one| ennj pe line lor su I ndei ii.:la lines (. Zbc tribune TUESDAY, September >. 1913. i ii i i • PUBLISHED Al 6 P. M. A Special Session of the Legislature was opened on Nfondaj afternoon at one o'clock, when IIis Excellency Governor \V. L. AUardyce, C. M. G., accompanied by Capt. F. J. Lobb R, N. and A. H. Sherwood Smith Esq., Private Secretary arrived at the Court House. His Excellency was attendee! in the Council Chamber by lion. W. Hart Bennet C. M. G., Colonial Secretary; His Honour D. Tudor Esq. K.C,Chief Justice ; and lion. F. C. Wells-Durrant K. C, Attorney i n<'. and was received by the ()i i inert, Hon. F. M. Mem n /., Acting President, Hon. T. I1C. Lofthouse, Hon. W. Miller, Hon. T. V. Matthews I. S. O., and the audience, -.landing; he then commanded tlie attendance of the Honourable House of Assembly,-which preceded by the Serjeant at Arms bearing the Mace and led by the Honourable Deputy Speaker,(Acting Speaker,/ immediately appi area in the ( i on ui i Ch imber, when His Excellem y made a speech which we published yesterday. There was a small attend* anie ui Ladies and gentlemen in the Council Chamber, | among which were Mrs Allardyce, the Misses AUardyce, and wives of members of the Councils. The Lord Bishop and other clergymen, officials and ialier gentlemen. A Police Guard of Honour reo ived 11^ Ext ellency with the customary honours giving the same on his departure. The House of Assembly mel in Special Session at 30 minutes p.m. yesterday, There were pre sent at this sitting His Honour W. C. 1J. Johns* n Acting Speaker (Deputy Spi ker) ; llonournbles j. P. Sands, (i H. Gamblin, and (ill. .1 ihnson ; Messrs Geo. Weech, R. W. Turtle, Dr. J. f. Culm, r, C. E. Bethel, Geo. M. Cole, C. O. Anderson, I 1 n< st L. Low. n, W P. Adderley, H. F. Armbristi r,C. C. Sweeting, D. S. 1). Moseley, L. Walton Young, Chas. E. Albury and A. K. Solomon. The Colonial Secretary presented a Writ of Election for the District of Watlings Island and Rum Cay by which it was shown that T. Augustus Toote, Esq. had been elected to repiesent that district. Mr. Toote being in attendance was escorted to the Clerk's table by Messrs \V. P. Adderley and E. L. Bowen where he took the necessary oaths and was then conducted to his seat. The resignation of Mr. Timothy Culmer.Senior mem her for Cat Island, of his seat in the House was read -and Mr. Culmer was allowed to gn. A Committee was appointed to wait upon His Excellent v' tin 1 Governor request ing him to issue a writ for the election of one member for Cat Lland. At 1 p.m. the Private Secretary of His Excellency the Governor appeared at the Mar of the House an d in HiExcellency's name commanded the immediate attendance of the House in the Chamber of the Legislai live Council. The House immediately repaired to the Council Chaml).i. when His Excellency the Governor delivered a speech which we published yesterday. On the Acting Speaker receiving a copy of lbs Excellency's spet' li the House retired to its own Chamber where the Acting Speaker re I from the Chair the Ciov ei inn's spi ech. It was Resolved that Mrs sers I 1 M ill 1 and I mile L'I immittee to prepare a to the (iovernoi 's spi ech. The Hon. |. 1'. Sands pn sen ted and read Message No. 1 from His Excellency the Gov erm ir. Mi. Cole gave notice that at the next meeting of ihe I louse he would move that The I louse Resolve itself in to a Committee of the whole on the Governor's Message Sox. riie I louse then adjourned until 7:30 p.m. this evening. The Mail Steamer "Morro Castle" arrived at New York on Sunday morning. — ;o: The Motofj left with mails and passen is. To CORRESPONDENTS "An Eve Witness": Your II immunication In ; been re* %  eived, but is unai 1 unpanii d by a card or covering letter, without which we publish no communications. Trail' • s K." for Miami this morning 0:— THE RED CROSS LEAGUE MEETING. COMMUNICATED. Strolling aimlessly around on Thursday afternoon last, I found myself in Princes Street, fuzing at the w^inen ingroupi of three or four or five.uow in (lie street, with hut apparently one and %  the Siime object in view, and then as they were swallowed up bv the open doors of St. Andrew s Midi to he replaced by other formations which again in turn were absorbed. I was Idled with wonder, and I must confess, with Curiosity too, and I wondered if I might sleal in, though as I looked at the determination stamped upon the women's faces, 1 felt no inconsiderable amount of misgiving as to the fate which might befall me there. "No men need apply"* was tlit legend einhla^oned on the banners of ( a< ij^K. I hem And then as I noticed tie ab sence of men, my wonder and doubt increased a hundred fold, but at length curiosity exceed* ing fear I took heart, and having Stealthily made a detour of the Hall, I crept in through a side door at the baek, and enSCi need myself—nevermind just where be a I — hut where [could see without reply being heard. And this is what I saw—A Hall/died with women, and One man, poor man, concealed partly by the more or less seamy drapery Of women, and apparantly without any misgivings for his safety. And I asked myself, "Why is he there ? Is he for ornament, 01 for use, or for ution ? It set it\n\ to me the one discordant note in a re markable symphony. But I quickly gathered in the idea, that, he was there. is a representative, yet, it was inennguous, and if one had remarked it to hiru, he would have replied, "I know it, but my dear fellow, I COUldn'1 help m\ self, "but he did look uncomfortable. I have described the meeting as "a remarkable symphony," and it was remarkable, because it was a women's meeting combining unity and unanimity of purpose with enthusiasm. A combination rarel) met with in men's gatherings A mere glance at those who occupied the platform demonstrated this fact more powerfully than wordl can express. All distinction of religious denomination, class and creed, were levelled by the broad Christian spirit which dominated that grouping and made itself felt in Ihe trumpet tongued addresses of loyalty and patriotism; which soon declared themselves, not the un-Christian patriotism of warring Europe, not the patriotism that drop bombs from the clouds, killing women, and babes in their cradle; the patriotism which makes men lire from trenches at invisible and unknown enemies a mile distant, a patriotism which has at its root, on one side at least, in Race prejudice; but a patriotism that was begun in the fields,'the plains, the highways and hedges and by the seashore and mountain sides of the band of. Israel by Him who constantljHBfvent RDOUt doing good, and which



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will survive the class of arms & the fall of empires now struggl] ing fur world |low r and those fighting for llojiour Liberty and ( [ustfofc B^Rin has become a power in the world, she lias become a mighty organiser; and is now Co niilg into her own, where man would tail, she has succeeded. Among niftse ves, slio has establislied The Daughters of The Empire who have since the be ginniifg of the war been instant in seaton and out of season rais illg money, making clothes, and gathering old linen so much ne. (led, at once her specially and her cherished store. From whom else could the 950 pounds weight of < )ld Linen have been procuri d, u Im h was forwarded free by ihe last parcels p >st which left our shores ? Was it evei heard that a man ha.I stoics of old linen ? Is it known to the women of the Bahamas, that I'll Daughters of-the Empire in the Bahamas raised among ibem selves, and collected £107 which was seal to the AngloBelgian Committee for Red Cross work' And now that the Red Cress League has been organized to do workseparate and apart from the Daughters of the Knipin-, shall w.sa \ thai our women are doing no thing to aid in promoting Lug laud's Cause and their Cause ? It is true that they cannot do what thousands are doing in England,-making munitions ol war, musing the sick a/id wounded, and even training 101 Home Defense, but they have done, and are yt I doing all that they can do with a singh of purp >Se, and in no less is this shewn than in the urgent ap peals made to their fellow women of the Bahamas from Inagua to Bimini to join them in the great and noble Work. It would be impossible to as sign prei miiience to any one ol the speakers 011 tins occasion, the inaugural meeting of The Red Cross League without male in ; invidious distinction, and yet at the risk of being criticis ed, I must request ry readers who were not so fortunate as to be present to hear for them s Ivrs, to give special attention to the introductory address of Mrs W. L. Allardyce the wife of the Governor, and the f>un der of the Red Cross League m the Bahamas. Her earnest and thriwDgly stirring address was followed by the eloquent and persuasive and convincing ad dresses of Mrs. T. H. C. Loft power or more burning elo quence than were used in those house and Mrs. K. T. Higgsand Speeches, the eloquence of Chrv sostom the golden tongued, and tin' thunder of Boanerges. Shall the eloquence and the thunder alike fall upon deaf ears? A collection was taken up at the extracts from Lord Bryce's Official repi 1 is of (jcrman Atro cities read b) Miss Lobb and which perhaps were heard for the first time by some, must have caused .1 shudder to vi brate to the very centre of their the close of the address, amount sensibilities. All of the speech 1 ing 10 £j 7s. and undoubtedly es though on different lines and J would have heen much larger, from distinct standpoints, yet I following a larger attendance, when summed up converged to ;liad the object of the meeting a common focus—"The duty I and the unsectarian character of, and necessity for tinhelp of and liberal and unrestricted inTill-: vitation to attend, been fully And understood -The heart) singing more of the National Anthem closed woman in "Tin-: CAUSE QBBAT AND NOBLE 1AUSB. it could not have been powerfully and impressively conveyed by human tongues. The general character of the mi eting can be described in a single Word SPLENDID. The work cf our women is l i el and unosW ntatious, it is not dunto tin-accompanimi til ol .Hiillery, or in the pi| pat of 1 illshot, ni 1 he applause of the multitude, but in the retirement of the home where the click of the needle against the thimble, or the persistent and Stead) rattle i>| the machine shuttle mark the hourly progress they aie making for the relief of the l.i lysmUhs and Mafekings of the world wide war— MEN OIin.. \\ \u.\M vs HONOUR youn w M: ::. and nightly as you lay your heads upon your pillows, pray, ( JOD BLI S^ I )UB WOMHN The question has been asked ami answered in one and the lli "Whece do the %  1 nen i ome in ?" The) are in IT already. "The Daughters of The Empire" and "The Re 1 Cross League" are there, they have lined up for Active Service asi'.-ilh as any unit of Kitchener's Army, or the Bahamas Contingent. By its first meeting, the Red Cross League impress us that they will leave no stone unturn ed to cause others to enroll themselves, and to this end the\ drove home to those who heard them and to those who shall read 1 beii speeches', with unre lenting insistence the absolute duty of joining these women who may truly be said to be on the firing line, who are endeav ouung to protect themselves by trying tt> save the lives of their wounded and stricken Oil 'he battle field men. It would h.jvr been impossible to outline the duty and stern necessity which is calling, in words of equal this momentous meeting "MAN IN THE CORNER." LATEST War News. September -27th 1915. \Y ishiugton, 271I1:— The tr< • pical storm ovei the Wi st< rn Caribbean Sea is central near and Southwest of the Isle of Bines and apparently moving Northward. It is dangerous to vessels in Western Cuban and South Florida waters and the Yu ntan Channel. London, 35th:— Develop meats in the Balkans and on the Belgian coast monopolize attention, evi n the Russian front eing for the moment oversha dowi d. As far as the Balkans are con* cerni d the present crisis is considered more suited to military than diplomatic action. One minister has stated that great drvt lopeme'its are imminent. Greece and Bulgaria haVI a I read) mobilized The British public, however, are more anxious abo.it events in arer home. Since Monday last theie has been a more 01 less continuous bombardment of n.stend, Zeebrugge and other pouts on the Belgian coast, and it is rumoured that an enterpi ise is being at tempted which m.iv change the whole aspect of the war on the Western front. The activity displayed by the British lb el appi n ntly has noi hem left undisputed Despatch1 1 from I lollnnd say hi \ \ iir ing has been heard on mainoccasions to the North of (me •land. This would indicate that if the (ierin.i'is have not actual 1 undertaken to oppose the Brj tisli fleet, part of the German fleet ventun d out to learn what was happening, But 111 the absence of either British or < %  < man official reports everythi is speculation. 'I his applies also to events oil the Russian front, for since the publication early this morning %  of the Russian communication ; nothing official has been receiv led of developments there ex cept the Vienna reports which %  ;\i\<\ nothing new. \ The Russians are believed to be more that holding their own. In the West the artillery is the only thing that could be consid Iend at all active, while in the Dardanelles and on the Italian 'frontier a few local infantry at tacks have broken the monoto ny of tin.' artillery fire. Amsterdam;—Austria mal a complaint that Amercian citi /uis are doing an abnormal business in supplying wai tcrial. It is not true neutrality and the economic lile of the United States is subservient to the production of war material. Officials at Washington appear little Inten sted, considering the position of the United States fi nal. New York:— An American mittee appointed to investi gate Turkish atrocitii s u| on \i in .ins stated tonight that evidence proved that a half million people had either b< 1 n killed or driven to the dese rt. C ipe Haitien:—In an attack by Haitien rebels on American about two miles from here I laitiens wi rjs killed and) ti n Ann uo'ins wounded New York:—The Anglo French Commission and Eastei n bank havi reached a virtual agi ment on details of the loan and four members of the commission lea* e I ere tomorrow for Chica go to confer with Wi stern haul' IS, Panama;—Forty three \ are detained owing to last n eel le iii the canal. It will probably he si veral da) a hi Fi even ships of light draft 4 •con pass *H S L Tribune The I



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.: maud undiluted cocaine ; the taker of morphine in patant medicine, once the habit is formed, must inevitably demand undiluted morphine." The bill which Congress has passed in tended to regulate the traffic in habit forming drugs will not, lie is quite sure, accomplish its purpose unless it is considerably amended He thinks that the only effective way for regulating the use of opium is for its sale to In' made a Government monopoly in all countries, with a system of accounting which would keep track of its passage through all hands to the retail drug-gist, who would he allowed to sell it only on prescripti n. I Jo be continued) For Sale O NE horse and carriage in good condition. Cab No. 24. Apply JAMES KELLY, Cabman No. 56 White Lime I AM offering VCHi SALE m\ entire stock of White Lime of about 800 bushels at 6d, per bushel. Orders left at Mr. Solomon Finlayson, Deveaux St. or Phone 258 or "The Tribune" Office. JOSIAH RAMMING £2 Reward. K EWRAD will be paid to any one giving information leading up to the recovery of an Anchor and Chain belonging to the Schr. "Leander," and removed from her on Friday night 20th August last. Length of Chain : 30 fathoms x 5-8 in. Anchor about 140 lbs. Both in good condition. Report to TRIBUNE OFFICE. W" A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D BSIRKS to inform hisJriends and the Public tliatjte IIHS just received a complete outfit of facilities for the buisnen of an undertulcer, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted to liis care with system aud despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage Get my Prices first and prove thai these are the very lowest for the first class work, T. M. Knowles 528 Bay Street. I S now prepared to supply Rubber Tires for Babies Carriages, also to reset, and repair them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. ''The Allies 9 — o Try J. C. Coakley's new Id. Cigars The Allies A blend of four fine tobai cos — o They are good to the end IN 2 PIECE and UNION SUITS. SANITARY COOL RELIABLE 8 0 L D BY Wm Hilton 260 BAY STREET. THE REINDEER is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, ami it is possibly the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer, SUNLIGHT SOiff is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its great utility is vouched for by millions of contented housewives who would not be without it. SUNLIGHT SOAP enjoys a well-merited reputation, it is absolutely pure,and will not harm the mostdelicate fabric. A piece of Sunlight Soap used in your next wash will convince you of its excellence. =rr=DRINKWelch's Grape Juice. For Results Advertise in The Tribune. PRICES Quarts, 2s. 3d. each. Pints, Is. 4d., 15S. per doz. 1 Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. per doz. I Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. per doz. T BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen, Opp. Hotel Colonial. Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypress, Shingles at $9.60 per tlious sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of ovei 50OO shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades -also 5111. Cypress at $6.73 per thousand of 20 bundles. This . , price made possible by a very II" you haven t anything to advertise, large purchase. Frh st.H k amving every Advertise your Business for sale. C. C SAUNDERS. Williams' Shoes Are Better



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NMIIIVI-. n ,1, Hi in-, |urare in veiba magtatrl. Beini' bound to iwe&r to the Dogma* of no Mslrr VOL. XII. Naiaau. N P.. Bahamaa. TUESDAY. September. 2S. 1915 NO. 365. Conquering The Habits that Handicap Mr. Chas. B. Town; Describes the Menace to Civilization of Opium, Alcohol and Tobacco and Tells How to Overcome Their Use. T HE efforts Mr. Towns has for some years been mak in^ against the drug habit evil have brought liis name promi neatly before the public. To his book, therefore, will be due the prestige consequent upon the attention already attracted by the very great services lie has rendered in the warfare against this social menace. He was instrumental in securing the passage of the lioylan act in this State, which, he says, "establishes for the first time the danger line" for the benefit of the medical profession and the protection ol the public. The treatment he gives for the cure of the drug habit and the methods he employs in the lios pital he has established for that purpose have aroused the inter est and won the commendation of physicians and philanthropists. During his stay in China, where he went to study the drug habit, Mr. Towns pened three hospitals, and in el wen months supervised the treatment of over four thousand Chinese, receiv ing all who presented themselves He has had only four fatalities during the whole four ieen years of his practice, al though many thousands have passed under his ministrations. Mr. Towns's treatment of the drug habit reduces it for the first time to a definite hospital system, with the usual methods of a resident physician and com plete bedside histories and charts. He says that by his method "any case of drug or alcohol habit thai is not com plicated by physical disabilities due to other causes can be successfully treated in a few days without heroic methods and without risk." His system of treatment includes theadminis tering of a meeical formula, which is not given in this book, although it was published for the benefit of the medical profession some years ago. In ad dition to this formula there are certain methods of treating the patient which he insists are es sential for success. The drug user should have individual treatment for each case, and he must be kept away from other addicts When they get toge ther they talk of theirsvmptoms, conditions, and habits, and of drug effects upon them, and so help to feed their craving. He thinks it impossible to cure drug users as long ns they are whit he calls "colonized" in sanitariums with constant free dom of conversation with one another. There must also be treatment, which he does not describe, designed to rid the patient's body of the poison with which it is soaked. After this is accomplished there should he a thorough examination to find out whether he is ailing physically or mentally. "Physical revelations," he Saj'S, I "which follow the unpoisoningl of patients frequently startle the patients themselves as well as the physicians who have had their well being in charge for long periods. Nor are the mental revelations less astonishing." Mr. Towns thinks that a wholly impersonal relation between physician and patient is necessary for the best results, and he does not believe that his treatment can be successful ly administered in the patient's own home, nor in either an or diuary sanitarium or hospital. In his own hospital in New York City he has fifty beds, and receives and discharges an aver age of four patients each day. He hopes to see, he says, many similar hospitals established by cities and Slates. He thinks there should always be a charge made for the treatment, even if its pavment must be deferred until after the cure is complete. He emphasizes his conviction that this should be a fixed charge, the same for each case, and sets forth at some length and with righteous indignation the evils that have resulted from the practice of the sanitariums of charging their patients ac cording to the weeks or months of their stay. The author is merciless in his showing up of the methods in vogue at these sanitariums and of the so called "cures" which they use. He has investigated many of these "cures," and has found that they all contain the very drugs for which thev are supposed to be an antidote. Their only appreciable effect, he declares, is to fasten the ha bit more firmly upon the unfor tunate patient. Mr. Towns bases his discus lion of these matters, of the psychology of the question, and of the conditions and needs of 1 lie patients upon the bedside notes he has taken of the many I cases he has examined and treated during the fourteen years in which he has been en gaged in this work. Many of his statements will surprise the average reader and convince him that the author's zealous spirit is sanctioned by his knowledge. He deals almost entirely with the extent of the drug habit and its menace in the per world of reputable, u| and well -meaning citi; And the chief source of the | ril in that upper world he i to be in the very hands that are supposed to conserve its health and defend it from disease, the hands of physicians, nurses, and druggists. Ninety-five percent of his morphine or other opium alkaloid patients have taken the drug hypodermically, and with few exceptions he has found that their first knowledge of its use has come through the administration of a hypodermic by a physician. The hypodermic syringe, he thinks, has been the chief creator of the drug habit in this country. Anyone could buy it cheaply and with out question, and, except in New York, can do so still. The vast amount of patent medi cines containing habit forming drugs consumed by the Ameri can people is, he thinks, another grave source of the increasing numbers of drug addicts. One wholesale house alone prepares and 5< Its Coo remedies contain ing some form of opiate. A great majority of the cases of cocaine habit which have hi n under his observation were ere ated by so-called catarrh cures, sold openly everywhere, con taining cocaine. They may have only from 2 to 4 per cent, of that drug, but the small amount he has found to be just as efficacious as the large in forming the habit. "In the end," he says, "the snuffer of catarrh powders comes to de (Continued an fourth page) in, Wear Armbrister's Shoes


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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
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Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 28, 1915
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
NmIIivi-. n ,1, Hi in-, |urare in veiba magtatrl.
Beini' bound to iwe&r to the Dogma* of no Mslrr
VOL. XII.
Naiaau. N P.. Bahamaa. TUESDAY. September. 2S. 1915
NO. 365.
Conquering The Habits
that Handicap
Mr. Chas. B. Town; Describes the
Menace to Civilization of Opium,
Alcohol and Tobacco and Tells How
to Overcome Their Use.
THE efforts Mr. Towns has
for some years been mak
in^ against the drug habit evil
have brought liis name promi
neatly before the public. To
his book, therefore, will be due
the prestige consequent upon
the attention already attracted
by the very great services lie
has rendered in the warfare
against this social menace. He
was instrumental in securing
the passage of the lioylan act
in this State, which, he says,
"establishes for the first time
the danger line" for the benefit
of the medical profession and
the protection ol the public.
The treatment he gives for the
cure of the drug habit and the
methods he employs in the lios
pital he has established for that
purpose have aroused the inter
est and won the commendation
of physicians and philanthro-
pists.
During his stay in China,
where he went to study the drug
habit, Mr. Towns pened three
hospitals, and in el wen months
supervised the treatment of over
four thousand Chinese, receiv
ing all who presented them-
selves He has had only four
fatalities during the whole four
ieen years of his practice, al
though many thousands have
passed under his ministrations.
Mr. Towns's treatment of the
drug habit reduces it for the
first time to a definite hospital
system, with the usual methods
of a resident physician and com
plete bedside histories and
charts. He says that by his
method "any case of drug or
alcohol habit thai is not com
plicated by physical disabilities
due to other causes can be suc-
cessfully treated in a few days
without heroic methods and
without risk." His system of
treatment includes theadminis
tering of a meeical formula,
which is not given in this book,
although it was published for
the benefit of the medical pro-
fession some years ago. In ad
dition to this formula there are
certain methods of treating the
patient which he insists are es
sential for success. The drug
user should have individual
treatment for each case, and he
must be kept away from other
addicts When they get toge
ther they talk of theirsvmptoms,
conditions, and habits, and of
drug effects upon them, and so
help to feed their craving. He
thinks it impossible to cure
drug users as long ns they are
whit he calls "colonized" in
sanitariums with constant free
dom of conversation with one
another. There must also be
treatment, which he does not
describe, designed to rid the
patient's body of the poison
with which it is soaked. After
this is accomplished there should
he a thorough examination to
find out whether he is ailing
physically or mentally. "Phy-
sical revelations," he Saj'S, I
"which follow the unpoisoningl
of patients frequently startle
the patients themselves as well
as the physicians who have had
their well being in charge for
long periods. Nor are the men-
tal revelations less astonishing."
Mr. Towns thinks that a
wholly impersonal relation be-
tween physician and patient is
necessary for the best results,
and he does not believe that
his treatment can be successful
ly administered in the patient's
own home, nor in either an or
diuary sanitarium or hospital.
In his own hospital in New
York City he has fifty beds, and
receives and discharges an aver
age of four patients each day.
He hopes to see, he says, many
similar hospitals established by
cities and Slates. He thinks
there should always be a charge
made for the treatment, even if
its pavment must be deferred
until after the cure is complete.
He emphasizes his conviction
that this should be a fixed
charge, the same for each case,
and sets forth at some length
and with righteous indignation
the evils that have resulted from
the practice of the sanitariums
of charging their patients ac
cording to the weeks or months
of their stay.
The author is merciless in his
showing up of the methods in
vogue at these sanitariums and
of the so called "cures" which
they use. He has investigated
many of these "cures," and has
found that they all contain the
very drugs for which thev are
supposed to be an antidote.
Their only appreciable effect,
he declares, is to fasten the ha
bit more firmly upon the unfor
tunate patient.
Mr. Towns bases his discus
lion of these matters, of the
psychology of the question, and
of the conditions and needs of
1 lie patients upon the bedside
notes he has taken of the many I
cases he has examined and
treated during the fourteen
years in which he has been en
gaged in this work. Many of
his statements will surprise the
average reader and convince
him that the author's zealous
spirit is sanctioned by his know-
ledge. He deals almost entire-
ly with the extent of the drug
habit and its menace in the
per world of reputable, u|
and well -meaning citi;
And the chief source of the |
ril in that upper world he i
to be in the very hands that are
supposed to conserve its health
and defend it from disease, the
hands of physicians, nurses, and
druggists. Ninety-five percent
of his morphine or other opium
alkaloid patients have taken
the drug hypodermically, and
with few exceptions he has
found that their first knowledge
of its use has come through the
administration of a hypodermic
by a physician. The hypoder-
mic syringe, he thinks, has been
the chief creator of the drug
habit in this country. Anyone
could buy it cheaply and with
out question, and, except in
New York, can do so still. The
vast amount of patent medi
cines containing habit forming
drugs consumed by the Ameri
can people is, he thinks, another
grave source of the increasing
numbers of drug addicts. One
wholesale house alone prepares
and 5< Its Coo remedies contain
ing some form of opiate. A
great majority of the cases of
cocaine habit which have hi n
under his observation were ere
ated by so-called catarrh cures,
sold openly everywhere, con
taining cocaine. They may
have only from 2 to 4 per cent,
of that drug, but the small
amount he has found to be just
as efficacious as the large in
forming the habit. "In the
end," he says, "the snuffer of
catarrh powders comes to de
(Continued an fourth page)
in,
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Zbc tribune
TUESDAY, September >. 1913.
i ii i i
PUBLISHED Al 6 P. M.
A Special Session of the
Legislature was opened on
Nfondaj afternoon at one o'-
clock, when IIis Excellency
Governor \V. L. AUardyce,
C. M. G., accompanied by
Capt. F. J. Lobb R, N. and
A. H. Sherwood Smith Esq.,
Private Secretary arrived at
the Court House.
His Excellency was attend-
ee! in the Council Chamber
by lion. W. Hart Bennet C.
M. G., Colonial Secretary;
His Honour D. Tudor Esq.
K.C,Chief Justice ; and lion.
F. C. Wells-Durrant K. C,
Attorney i n<- '. and was
received by the ()i i inert, Hon.
F. M. Mem n /., Acting
President, Hon. T. I1C. Loft-
house, Hon. W. Miller, Hon.
T. V. Matthews I. S. O., and
the audience, -.landing; he
then commanded tlie attend-
ance of the Honourable
House of Assembly,-which
preceded by the Serjeant at
Arms bearing the Mace and
led by the Honourable Depu-
ty Speaker,(Acting Speaker,/
immediately appi area in the
( i on ui i Ch imber, when His
Excellem y made a speech
which we published yester-
day.
There was a small attend*
anie ui Ladies and gentle-
men in the Council Chamber, |
among which were Mrs Al-
lardyce, the Misses AUardyce,
and wives of members of the
Councils. The Lord Bishop
and other clergymen, officials
and ialier gentlemen.
A Police Guard of Honour
reo ived 11^ Ext ellency with
the customary honours giving
the same on his departure.
The House of Assembly mel
in Special Session at 30 min-
utes p.m. yesterday, There
were pre sent at this sitting
His Honour W. C. 1J. Johns* n
Acting Speaker (Deputy
Spi ker) ; llonournbles j. P.
Sands, (i H. Gamblin, and
(ill. .1 ihnson ; Messrs Geo.
Weech, R. W. Turtle, Dr. J. f.
Culm, r, C. E. Bethel, Geo. M.
Cole, C. O. Anderson, I 1 n< st
L. Low. n, W P. Adderley,
H. F. Armbristi r,C. C. Sweet-
ing, D. S. 1). Moseley, L.
Walton Young, Chas. E. Al-
bury and A. K. Solomon.
The Colonial Secretary
presented a Writ of Election
for the District of Watlings
Island and Rum Cay by
which it was shown that T.
Augustus Toote, Esq. had
been elected to repiesent that
district.
Mr. Toote being in attend-
ance was escorted to the
Clerk's table by Messrs \V. P.
Adderley and E. L. Bowen
where he took the necessary
oaths and was then conducted
to his seat.
The resignation of Mr.
Timothy Culmer.Senior mem
her for Cat Island, of his seat
in the House was read -and
Mr. Culmer was allowed to
gn.
A Committee was appoint-
ed to wait upon His Excel-
lent v' tin1 Governor request ing
him to issue a writ for the
election of one member for
Cat Lland.
At 1 p.m. the Private Secre-
tary of His Excellency the
Governor appeared at the Mar
! of the House an d
in Hi- Excellency's name
commanded the immediate
attendance of the House in
the Chamber of the Legisla-
i live Council.
The House immediately re-
paired to the Council Cham-
l).i. when His Excellency the
Governor delivered a speech
which we published yester-
day.
On the Acting Speaker re-
ceiving a copy of lbs Excel-
lency's spet' li the House re-
tired to its own Chamber
where the Acting Speaker
re I from the Chair the Ciov
ei inn's spi ech.
It was Resolved that Mrs
sers I 1 m ill1 and I mile
l'i immittee to prepare a
to the (iovernoi 's spi ech.
The Hon. |. 1'. Sands pn sen
ted and read Message No. 1
from His Excellency the Gov
erm ir.
Mi. Cole gave notice that
at the next meeting of ihe
I louse he would move that
The I louse Resolve itself in
to a Committee of the whole
on the Governor's Message
Sox.
riie I louse then adjourned
until 7:30 p.m. this evening.
The Mail Steamer "Morro
Castle" arrived at New York
on Sunday morning.
;o: -
The Motofj
left
with mails and passen is.
To Correspondents
"An Eve Witness": Your
II immunication In ; been re*
eived, but is unai 1 unpanii d
by a card or covering letter,
without which we publish
no communications.
Trail' s K."
for Miami this morning
0:
THE RED CROSS LEAGUE
MEETING.
COMMUNICATED.
Strolling aimlessly around on
Thursday afternoon last, I found
myself in Princes Street, fuzing
at the w^inen ingroupi of three
or four or five.uow in (lie street,
with hut apparently one and
the Siime object in view, and
then as they were swallowed up
bv the open doors of St. An-
drew s Midi to he replaced by
other formations which again
in turn were absorbed. I was
Idled with wonder, and I must
confess, with Curiosity too, and
I wondered if I might sleal in,
though as I looked at the deter-
mination stamped upon the wo-
men's faces, 1 felt no inconsi-
derable amount of misgiving as
to the fate which might befall
me there. "No men need apply"*
was tlit legend einhla^oned on
the banners of ( a< ij^K. I hem
And then as I noticed tie ab
sence of men, my wonder and
doubt increased a hundred fold,
but at length curiosity exceed*
ing fear I took heart, and having
Stealthily made a detour of the
Hall, I crept in through a side
door at the baek, and enSCi need
myselfnevermind just where
be a I hut where [could see without
reply being heard. And this is what I
sawA Hall/died with women,
and One man, poor man, con-
cealed partly by the more or less
seamy drapery Of women, and
apparantly without any misgiv-
ings for his safety. And I asked
myself, "Why is he there ? Is he
for ornament, 01 for use, or for
ution ? It set it\n\ to me
the one discordant note in a re
markable symphony. But I
quickly gathered in the idea,
that, he was there.is a represen-
tative, yet, it was inennguous,
and if one had remarked it to
hiru, he would have replied, "I
know it, but my dear fellow, I
COUldn'1 help m\ self,"but he did
look uncomfortable. I have
described the meeting as "a re-
markable symphony," and it
was remarkable, because it was
a women's meeting combining
unity and unanimity of purpose
with enthusiasm. A combina-
tion rarel) met with in men's
gatherings A mere glance at
those who occupied the platform
demonstrated this fact more
powerfully than wordl can ex-
press. All distinction of religi-
ous denomination, class and
creed, were levelled by the broad
Christian spirit which dominat-
ed that grouping and made it-
self felt in Ihe trumpet tongued
addresses of loyalty and patrio-
tism; which soon declared them-
selves, not the un-Christian pa-
triotism of warring Europe, not
the patriotism that drop bombs
from the clouds, killing women,
and babes in their cradle; the
patriotism which makes men lire
from trenches at invisible and
unknown enemies a mile dis-
tant, a patriotism which has at
its root, on one side at least, in
Race prejudice; but a patriotism
that was begun in the fields,'the
plains, the highways and hedges
and by the seashore and moun-
tain sides of the band of. Israel
by Him who constantljHBfvent
RDOUt doing good, and which


will survive the class of arms & '
the fall of empires now struggl- ]
ing fur world |low r and those
fighting for llojiour Liberty and (
[ustfofc
B^Rin has become a power
in the world, she lias become a
mighty organiser; and is now
Co niilg into her own, where man
would tail, she has succeeded.
Among niftse ves, slio has esta-
blislied The Daughters of The
Empire who have since the be
ginniifg of the war been instant
in seaton and out of season rais
illg money, making clothes, and
gathering old linen so much
ne. (led, at once her specially and
her cherished store. From whom
else could the 950 pounds weight
of < )ld Linen have been procur-
i d, u Im h was forwarded free by
ihe last parcels p >st which left
our shores ? Was it evei heard
that a man ha.I stoics of old
linen ? Is it known to the wo-
men of the Bahamas, that I'll
Daughters of-the Empire in the
Bahamas raised among ibem
selves, and collected 107
which was seal to the Anglo-
Belgian Committee for Red
Cross work' And now that
the Red Cress League has been
organized to do work- separate
and apart from the Daughters
of the Knipin-, shall w.- sa \
thai our women are doing no
thing to aid in promoting Lug
laud's Cause and their Cause ?
It is true that they cannot do
what thousands are doing in
England,-making munitions ol
war, musing the sick a/id
wounded, and even training 101
Home Defense, but they have
done, and are yt I doing all that
they can do with a singh
of purp >Se, and in no less is this
shewn than in the urgent ap
peals made to their fellow wo-
men of the Bahamas from Ina-
gua to Bimini to join them in
the great and noble Work.
It would be impossible to as
sign prei miiience to any one ol
the speakers 011 tins occasion,
the inaugural meeting of The
Red Cross League without male
in ; invidious distinction, and
yet at the risk of being criticis
ed, I must request ry readers
who were not so fortunate as
to be present to hear for them
s Ivrs, to give special attention
to the introductory address of
Mrs W. L. Allardyce the wife
of the Governor, and the f>un
der of the Red Cross League m
the Bahamas. Her earnest and
thriwDgly stirring address was
followed by the eloquent and
persuasive and convincing ad
dresses of Mrs. T. H. C. Loft
power or more burning elo
quence than were used in those
house and Mrs. K. T. Higgsand Speeches, the eloquence of Chrv
sostom the golden tongued, and
tin' thunder of Boanerges.
Shall the eloquence and the
thunder alike fall upon deaf
ears?
A collection was taken up at
the extracts from Lord Bryce's
Official repi 1 is of (jcrman Atro
cities read b) Miss Lobb and
which perhaps were heard for
the first time by some, must
have caused .1 shudder to vi
brate to the very centre of their the close of the address, amount
sensibilities. All of the speech 1 ing 10 j 7s. and undoubtedly
es though on different lines and J would have heen much larger,
from distinct standpoints, yet I following a larger attendance,
when summed up converged to ;liad the object of the meeting
a common focus"The duty I and the unsectarian character
of, and necessity for tin- help of and liberal and unrestricted in-
Till-: vitation to attend, been fully
And understood -The heart) singing
more of the National Anthem closed
woman in "Tin-: Cause '
QBBAT AND NOBLE 1AUSB.
it could not have been
powerfully and impressively
conveyed by human tongues.
The general character of the
mi eting can be described in a
single Word SPLENDID.
The work cf our women is
l i el and unosW ntatious, it is
not dun- to tin-accompanimi til
ol .Hiillery, or in the pi| pat of
1 ill- shot, ni 1 he applause of the
multitude, but in the retirement
of the home where the click of
the needle against the thimble,
or the persistent and Stead)
rattle i>| the machine shuttle
mark the hourly progress they
aie making for the relief of the
l.i lysmUhs and Mafekings of
the world wide war Men oi-
in.. \\ \u.\M vs Honour youn
w m: ::. and nightly as you lay
your heads upon your pillows,
pray, ( Jod Bli s^ i )ub Womhn
The question has been asked
ami answered in one and the
lli "Whece do the
1 nen i ome in ?" The) are
in it already. "The Daughters
of The Empire" and "The Re 1
Cross League" are there, they
have lined up for Active Service
asi'.-ilh as any unit of Kitch-
ener's Army, or the Bahamas
Contingent.
By its first meeting, the Red
Cross League impress us that
they will leave no stone unturn
ed to cause others to enroll
themselves, and to this end the\
drove home to those who heard
them and to those who shall
read 1 beii speeches', with unre
lenting insistence the absolute
duty of joining these women
who may truly be said to be on
the firing line, who are endeav
ouung to protect themselves by
trying tt> save the lives of their
wounded and stricken Oil 'he
battle field men. It would h.jvr
been impossible to outline the
duty and stern necessity which
is calling, in words of equal
this momentous meeting
"MAN IN THE CORNER."
LATEST
War News.
September -27th 1915.
\Y ishiugton, 271I1: The tr<
pical storm ovei the Wi st< rn
Caribbean Sea is central near
and Southwest of the Isle of
Bines and apparently moving
Northward. It is dangerous to
vessels in Western Cuban and
South Florida waters and the
Yu ntan Channel.
London, 35th: Develop
meats in the Balkans and on the
Belgian coast monopolize at-
tention, evi n the Russian front
eing for the moment oversha
dowi d.
As far as the Balkans are con*
cerni d the present crisis is con-
sidered more suited to military
than diplomatic action.
One minister has stated that
great drvt lopeme'its are immi-
nent. Greece and Bulgaria haVI
a I read) mobilized
The British public, however,
are more anxious abo.it events
in arer home. Since Monday
last theie has been a more 01
less continuous bombardment of
n.stend, Zeebrugge and other
pouts on the Belgian coast, and
it is rumoured that an enterpi ise
is being at tempted which m.iv
change the whole aspect of the
war on the Western front.
The activity displayed by the
British lb el appi n ntly has noi
hem left undisputed Despatch-
1 1 from I lollnnd say hi \ \ iir
ing has been heard on main- oc-
casions to the North of (me
land.
This would indicate that if
the (ierin.i'is have not actual1
undertaken to oppose the Brj
tisli fleet, part of the German
fleet ventun d out to learn what
was happening, But 111 the ab-
sence of either British or < <
man official reports everythi
is speculation.
'I his applies also to events oil
the Russian front, for since the
publication early this morning
' of the Russian communication
; nothing official has been receiv
led of developments there ex
cept the Vienna reports which
' ;\i\<\ nothing new.
\ The Russians are believed to
be more that holding their own.
In the West the artillery is the
only thing that could be consid
Iend at all active, while in the
Dardanelles and on the Italian
'frontier a few local infantry at
tacks have broken the monoto
ny of tin.' artillery fire.
Amsterdam;Austria mal
a complaint that Amercian citi
/uis are doing an abnormal
business in supplying wai !
tcrial. It is not true neutrality
and the economic lile of the
United States is subservient to
the production of war material.
Officials at Washington appear
little Inten sted, considering the
position of the United States fi
nal.
New York: An American
mittee appointed to investi
gate Turkish atrocitii s u| on
\i in .ins stated tonight that
evidence proved that a half
million people had either b< 1 n
killed or driven to the dese rt.
C ipe Haitien:In an attack
by Haitien rebels on American
about two miles from here
I laitiens wi rjs killed and)
ti n Ann uo'ins wounded
New York:The Anglo French
Commission and Eastei n bank
, havi reached a virtual agi
ment on details of the loan and
four members of the commission
lea* e I ere tomorrow for Chica
go to confer with Wi stern
haul' IS,
Panama;Forty three \
are detained owing to last
n eel le iii the canal. It will
probably he si veral da) a hi Fi
even ships of light draft 4
con
pass '
*HSL Tribune
The
I


.:
maud undiluted cocaine ; the
taker of morphine in patant
medicine, once the habit is
formed, must inevitably demand
undiluted morphine." The bill
which Congress has passed in
tended to regulate the traffic in
habit forming drugs will not,
lie is quite sure, accomplish its
purpose unless it is considerably
amended He thinks that the
only effective way for regulat-
ing the use of opium is for its
sale to In' made a Government
monopoly in all countries, with
a system of accounting which
would keep track of its passage
through all hands to the retail
drug-gist, who would he allowed
to sell it only on prescripti n.
I Jo be continued)
For Sale
ONE horse and
carriage in good
condition. Cab No.
24.
Apply
JAMES KELLY,
Cabman No. 56
White Lime
I AM offering VCHi SALE
m\ entire stock of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at 6d, per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
Finlayson, Deveaux St. or
Phone 258 or "The Tribune"
Office.
Josiah Ramming
2 Reward.
KEWRAD will be paid to
any one giving inform-
ation leading up to the re-
covery of an Anchor and
Chain belonging to the Schr.
"Leander," and removed from
her on Friday night 20th Au-
gust last.
Length of Chain : 30 fa-
thoms x 5-8 in.
Anchor about 140 lbs.
Both in good condition.
Report to
TRIBUNE OFFICE.
W" A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DBSIRKS to inform hisJriends
and the Public tliatjte Iihs
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the buisnen of an un-
dertulcer, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted to liis care with
system aud despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Get
my Prices first and prove thai these
are the very lowest for the first class
work,
T. M. Knowles
528 Bay Street.
IS now prepared to supply
Rubber Tires for Babies
Carriages, also to reset, and
repair them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
''The Allies9'
o---
Try J. C. Coakley's
new Id. Cigars
The Allies
A blend of four fine tobai cos
o -
They are good to the end
IN 2 PIECE and
UNION SUITS.
SANITARY
COOL
RELIABLE
8 0 L D BY
Wm Hilton
260 BAY STREET.
THE REINDEER
is an inhabitant of the Arctic Region, ami it is possibly
the most useful of all the animals which dwell in this
part of the world. Unlike the Reindeer,
SUNLIGHT SOiff
is to be found in all parts of the civilised world, and its
great utility is vouched for by millions of contented
housewives who would not
be without it. Sunlight
Soap enjoys a well-merited
reputation, it is absolutely
pure,and will not harm the
mostdelicate fabric. A piece
of Sunlight Soap used in
your next wash will con-
vince you of its excellence.
=rr=DRINK-
Welch's Grape Juice.
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. each.
Pints, Is. 4d., "
15S. per doz.
1 Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. per doz.
I Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. per doz.
T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen,
Opp. Hotel Colonial.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5m. Cypress,
Shingles at $9.60 per tlious
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of ovei
50OO shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper grades -also
5111. Cypress at $6.73 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This .
price made possible by a very II" you haven t anything to advertise,
large purchase.
Frh st.H k amving every Advertise your Business for sale.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Williams' Shoes Are Better
!


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