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T I •m L. OILBKKT DUl'CCII, Hi r and Prfrietor. OPPICK torr\er Shirley & CK&rlollc Sts HcM$au t Jv. /*., Bokawun 'PHONE 860. P. O. HOX I6S. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Momlay, Wednesday and Friday — single c.>|>y Jd Tuesday, jin-l Thursl.iv -single copy id Saturday —single Copy ... :$d W.eklv 5.1 ^ Iv .. is. 6.1 4J9uaitcily ... .. 41. 6d Half Yearly ... as. Ve.iily I S. PAYABLE IX ADVANCE Advertising Ratec—Sii pence per line (or first inseitioii; time pence pei line' for second insertion ; and ouepenny |ie I line (or subsqnent insertions. Advertisements under flight lines .is. Zhc tribune THtKSDAY. September 9. 1915. j —————————————— i PT PUBLISHED AT 12.50 P.M. THE 9TH SEPTEMBER 1915 will ever be pn %  emiiit ntlycon spicuous in the history of this ancient and loyal colony of The Bahamas. Today, for the fust time in our varied history, an organized force, (small though it be) distinctively Bahamian will leave our shores to take its part with the other forces of the Empire engaged in the titanic struggle in which Britain is engagi d. It is an epoch making evenl for the Bahamas and equally so for the Empire; it is an assertion of our place in the constituent parts of the Em-1 pire, and it is a recognition of that place by the Empire. The men who will embark on the hired transport "Varun.i" at half [>ast fo'ir this afternoon, form a Roll of Honour peculiarly their own; other Bahamians are now at llie front and some have laid down their, all honour to their memory, but thev were units of the English armv or the Canadian contingent, but %e men who leave US today, wNtJU ei ''ie II •',' of the Co fony, as The Bahamas Contingent. We are of opinion that everyone now regrets that the contingent is not larger, it should have been larger, and would have been larger if, we refrain. We shall bid the Contingent goodbye and God speed this afternoon "With hearts too full for utterance And with a silent tear." We commend our brave boys to the kind thought and consideration of all. THE BAHAMAS CONTINGENT i. William Fletcher Albury 2. William Thompson 3. George Arahna 4. George Maurice Cole Jr. 5. Irwin Pinion Bain 6. Holbreton William Brown 7. Origen Hermas Mason 8. John Demeritte 9. Frederick Clement Cornelius Lightbourn 10. Sydney Cuthbert Earrington 11. James Roderick Taylor 12. Hersal Stanley Hall 13. Robert Livingston Atwell 14. Charles Bain 15. Matthew Armbrister ID. Charles Percival Bethel 17. Artie Kemp 18. Reginald Walters Wood 19. Harold Darent Bascome 20. Frederick Flowers 31. Awstin Vincent Roberts 22. Arthur Henry Fountain 23. James Bain 24. George Hubert Johnson 35. Charles Bethel 26. Alfred I lean 27. Ilenry Archill,! 1 .' Roach .' -. Iohn Williams 29. Bruce Marshall Maura 30. Junes Henry Knowles Now boys one last woi d "Trust in God and keep your powder dry" and "God be with you till we meet again. :o: THE BAHAMAS CONTINGENT The Bahamas Contingent will embark at Rawson Sq at 4 30 this afternoon. The Governor will e present and say Good bye to the men. The Bahamas Contingent and their friends were generously entertained by the Governor and Mrs. Allardvce at a Garden Party in Government House gardens yesterday afternoon. A large number of officials and other citizens with their families were also present and a unique event passed off very pleasantly indeed. An attraction was provided in the Governor's bag piper who gave several tunes on his pipes. His dress, and his instrument were novelties to many who were present. 1 lie piper also marched with The Contingent and played on their way to Government Hill. Boy scouts were also pre sent. The "boys" of The Contingent will remember with much pleasure in the time coming when things will be not so pleasant, the Gover* nor and Mrs. Allardyce and their last treat before leaving home. The Concert give n on Tuesday evening at St. Andrews Hall, by Mr. and Mrs. W. E. S. Callender in aid of The Bahamas Contingent Fund was an unqualified succ< ss, and those who attended for the sake of the music or to aid the funds were well repaid for their outlay. The programme was of a high order, and the execution of Mrs. Callender and Mrs. Pippette in such masterpieces as Mendelssohn's "Concerto in E" and Liszt's "Rhapsodic' No. I-' are very rarely to be seen in our little city. Mrs. Pashley's rendering of The Song "England Mine" was most acceptable and was encored. (ine item, not included in the programme was a pretty little dance by Miss Dorothy Callender and her brother Ernest. Space forbids further commendation than to say that all the various items of the programme were well renderdeied. We understand that over £"20 were realized. We congratulate Mr. and Mis. Callender on the success of their efforts. The programme is appended. PROGRAMME PART I t. "Auld Acquaintance^** 1 The Police Band. 2. Pianoforte Duet Concerto in'IL—Mendtlsshon Mrs. Callender and Mrs. I'ipette. 3. Song—"A song of Thanksgiving"—/-'. Allitsen. Mr. W. E S. Callender. 4. Recitation "Our Folks" Ethel L\ MM Dr. R W. Albury. 5. Song "Fall in" P. Coweu Mr. R. DeGlanyille. 6. PianoforteDuet "Zingareaca" M. Watson. Miss Dorothy Callender and Mrs I'ipette. 7. Song "She is far from the land" F. Lambert. Mr. Asa I'ritchard. 8. Trio "Memory" Mr. A. Pritchard, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. S. Callender. Interval of ten minutes PART II 1. Cornet Solo "The Holy City" S. Adams Constable Roberts Accompanied by Police Band 2. Song "Here's to the day" Mr Asa Pritchard 3. Song "England Mine" Mrs. Pash ey. 4. Piano Solo Rhapsodic No. 1 2 Liszt Mrs. W.E.S. Callender, A.T C.L. 5. Song "When we've wound up the watch on the Rhine" Mr. E.C. Moselcy. 6. Recitation Speech of King henry V before the battle of Agincourt Shakespean I Ion. G. II Gamblin. 7. Song "TniiiniN Atkins" S. Potter Mi. R DeGlanville. 8. Song "There's a Land" /•". Allitsen Mr. W !•:. S. Callender Allies Man li "Carry on" Tipperarj National Anthem. Accompanist. Mis W, li. S. Callender. A. I C L. Scholar and Me dlist, Trinity College, London. — :o.— The Ward Line Steamer "Antilla" steamed for Cuban ports yesterday afternoon. The Mail Steamer "Mexico" arrived last night fri Havana, i^ti



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c 3 Your King And Country Want You Paul A. Rubens We've watched you playing cricket, And every kind of game At football golf and polo, You men have made your name. But now yout country calls you, To play your part in war, .And r0 matter what befalls you, We shall love you all the more, So come and join the force--, As your fathers did before. We want you from all quarters, So help US, south and north, We want you in your thousands, From Falmouth to the Forth, You'll never find us fail you, When you are in distress, So answer when we hail you, And let the word be "Yes," And so your name in years to come, Each mother's son shall bless. It's easy for us women, To stay at home and shout, But remember there's a duty To the men who first went out. The odds against that handful Were nearly four to one, And we cannot rest until Ils man for man and gun for gun And every woman's duty Is to see that duty done. CHORUS : Oh, we don't want to lose you, But we think you ought to go, For your King and country Both need you BO : We -hall want you and miss you, But with all our might and main We shall cheer you, thank you, bless you, When you come back again. The Mail St.-am<-i 'Mexico' left for New York this afternoon with the following:— Miss Freda II. Burnside; Mr. and Mis. \Y. S. Carrick, Mr. and Mrs Chailes Menendez, and Mr. IT S. Blade; R. H. Curry, R. J. Robertson, II. T. Brice, B. IT Bethel, W. J. t ilth, R. J. Griffith and eph O'Donnell Mi-s Ellen Sands, and Mis. Leonora Wood. Misses Alice Taylor and < iretchen Williams. Messrs. p.. S. Hethell, II. B. Bethell and R. J. Robertson, who are among the passengers per Mail Steamer Mexico to-day are, we understand, on their way to Canada to join the Canadian Contingent for the war. Nassau N. P. Sept. 6th 1915. Dear Mr. Editor, Permit me space in your columns to congratulate the young men of The Bahamas Contingent. Dear boys may God go with you all as you go into this fight for truth and right, may God help you to fight, not for the lust of war hut fur victory over the mighty foe and all that is wrong. May the love of God your steps uphold, and may He help you far and oigh the flag to lift high and may He hasten the time when the strife is o'er. Sad indeed are all life's partings, o'er and o'er again will come the question, shall we meet again? shall you all return to your homes and families? God be with you till we meet again. Brave boys! Good bye! Thanking you Sir for space Yours MISS LEONORA FAWKES, LATEST War News. •September 8th 1915. London oth:—The menace to'Riga, the Russian seaport, is becoming more serious. The Germans still hold the bridgehead at Friederichstadt, the occupation of u lii. Ii effectively cuts off railway communication to the South, while German aircraft are active in the gulf, perhaps preparing another naval clash as part of a con 1.1id German land and sea move to complete the isolation of the city and force its abandonment by the Russians. According to an unofficial Berlin despatch re< 1 ived by wayoi Copenhagen the Germans claim prossession of the (iulf, the Russians have abandoned it. Berlin official communications today claim no further advances by Yon Hinderburg from the Baltic to Grodno The armies of Von Mackensen and Prince Leopold are said to be moving forward. The great artillery duel in the West goes on unabated, with the French and. pre-I sumably the British. London, 6:—A man named Wolf, born in New Jersey, was lost on the Hesperian, according to information given the consul general at Oueenstown. Rome, 6:—Italy has declared cotton contraband of war. Oueenstown, 6th:—Six second cabin passengers, six third cabin passengers aud thirteen of the crew of u^ steamer Hesperian, torpedoed 150 miles off Queenstown Saturday, were unaccounted for tonight according to revised official figures issued by the Allan Line. This brings the list up to 26. The captain 01 the stricken liner remained by his ship until it sank. He declined to comment on the disaster for publication hence the official statement as to whether he believed his ship was the victim of a torpedo or a mine mu-tcomc from the admiralty, although the captain is quoted as having told anAllan Line ofli cial today that the Hesperian was torpedoed. —.0:— September 9th 1915. London, 8th. Governor, Bahamas, Official News: -Three Zeppelins visited Eastern Counties last night. Fifteen small dwellings were seriously damaged and there were several fires. I ( n people wore killed and forty six wounded or missing. 'fhe French government report continuous bombardment along the front. A British fleet bombarded the coast as far as ( ) s!end. Enemy aviation sheds a I ( Kt end were attacked by aircraft. Russian port indicate check of the enemy attack at some points. No material change elsew here. The Italian fJO ei nnien port small local success*! (Signed) BONAR LAW.



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L The Bishop's Eastern School. T he ah ive will 1> reopened on the i jth. Sept. there arc vacancies foi a few mure pupils, applications will In' rea iv< d by the head teacher at 16 Mai thorough -i. 1 ci Shingle: Best No. i I li art 5m. Cypn -• Shingles ;it $9. pei thous sand of 2 bundles Discounts on %  it-of ovei 5000 shingles. Special Price R1S< 1 1 >n 1 hi 5111. Cy] >i thousand of 1 bundles. This price lii.i* 1 poa : by ;i \ en large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNDERS FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgently needed lor the above fund and all donations, however; small, will be gratefully accepted, nnd will be acknowledged in the 111 \ spapers. H. F. AR'HiRISI r R. Consular Agent f r I ranee. Nassau, X. P., 2nd July, Just Received by This bteamer Fresh American Fruit. Peaches, Pears, Plums, etc. etc. J. K. AMOURY. DRINK-Welch's Grape Juice. PRICES 0:i LI [-. 2s. 3d. ei I its, Is. 4d., 15y. ; 1 : doz. \ Pints, 9d. 8s. 6d. pi 1 doz. \ Pints, 5d. 4 J. 6d. pei 'i"/ T BLACK S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen, Opp. Hotel Colcnial. .. The Allies" K Try J. C. Coakloy's new Id. Cig-ars The Allies lend of lun 1 line tobai 1 o They are good to th? end \ To be had at all Grocers C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent Cornei ii %  gi and King Si IN 2 PIECE and UNION SUITS. SANITARY COOL RE LIABLE SOLD BY Wra Hilton 260 BAY STREET. NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS IN • >-, %  1 1 1 %  11 1 e 1 eivi i summoning nllF renchmen born in Martinique, Guad lopi or 1rench Guiana belonging to the classes 1 %  to to, ") (born from 1870 ,() 1B89) to pn sent thi mselvi immediately al the Vii 1 C< insulate of Fram 1 al P01 t-ofSpain or at any of the twi Ive Consular Agi ni ies< if the British West In lit s to pa s a medii al examination. H. r. ARMBRISTRR. Cnnsulnr A %  %  i• %  11 for France. Nassau, N.P., 2nd July, 1915. RUMSEY'3 PUMPS c ST K H N Pumps, VVi P u m j W i n d in i Pumps, I diaphragm I 'umps, I' mps, Pn< I ems. Spraj Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, I >eep Well Pumps, I lectric Pumps, C\ Under and Vah es, I ripli \ P< v er Pumps, Cens tiifugal I'umps, Wati 1 IN n rk, Machinery, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pump Fire I 'umps, Air Compress rs,Ship Pumps Pressure I 'umps, Boiler Feed Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, I [ydrants, die. Installed under the d supervision of II. McPherson iv. I Brother. I'n\ es on I pplicati II. |. THOMPSON Williams' Shoes Are Better*



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irzz Nulllua addlcltis lurnre in vei ba UMIMMI. BeinK bound lo swer to the 1>ii*mf\s of no Mivtiier. VOL. XII. i. N. P.. Bahamas THURSDAY, September 9. 1915 ISO >49 + .—.., . I > I I (f he (f>omradc in \f)hite "/.//r u-n,/ Il'-.rv" 77;r Church of England Magazin i ++ S TRANGE tales reached us in the trendies. Rumours raced up and down that 300mile line from Switzerland lo the sea. We knew neither the Source of them nor the trutli of them. They came quickly and they went quickly. Vet somehow 1 remember the very hour when George Casey turned to me with a queer Ionic in his blur ej e i, a nd aske I me if I had s< en the 1' n rad 0! the Wound ed. \n 1 then he told me all he knew. After many a hoi enuvnt a man in while had :i s -en bending ov< r the v> iun led Snip irs sniped at him. Shells leU around him. Nothing ha 1 po ver to touch him. He v be yond all heroes, or he was something greater still. This mysterious one, whom the F; ench call< I the Comrade in White, : %  \ here at on :e At Nancy, in the \i gonne. al and \ rywhere men 'Acre talking of him with hushed voi Hut soms laughed and said the trenches were telling on men's n i ve 1, whi > was of ten reckless enough in my I ilk, exclaimed that for me seeing was believing, and that I didn't expert any help but a German ^ knife if I was found lying out there wounded. I WAS SHOT. It was the next day that things got lively on this bit of tlie front. Our big guns roared from sunrise to sunset, and began again in the morning At nooi) we got word to take the trenches in front of us. They were two hundred yards away, and we weren't well Started till we knew that the big g i had failed in their work of preparation. It needed heart to go on, but not a man wavered. We ha 1 a Ivan i i 15 j ards when we found it as no good. ( )ur captain called to us to take cover, and jusl then I was shot through both I B iod's mercy I fell into a of some sort, l suppo?< I fainted, for when I opened my eyes I was all alone. The | was horrible, but 1 didn't dare ti i move lest the Germans would s.-c mi for they were only fifty yards away, and I did not ex peel mi icy. I was glad when 'he'will lit came. There were me i in my n,vn company who would ina any riskiii the darkness if thev thought a comrade w.-is still alive The night fell, and soon I heard a • %  '>>. not stealthv, as I expected, but quiet and firm, as il neither darkness nor death o>uld check those untroubled feet. ^ > little did I guess what was coming that, even when I saw the gleam of white in die darkness, I thought it was a peasant in a white smock, or perhaps a woman deranged. Suddenly, with a little shivei of joj or ol fear, I don't know which, 1 guessed that it was the Comrade in White. And at that very moment the German : ifles began to shout. The bullets could scarcely miss such a target, for he flung out his arms as though in en treaty, and then drew them back till he stood like one of those wayside crosses we sawso often as wc marched through Franco. And he spoke. The words sounded familiar, but all I remember was the beginning: "If thou hadst known," and the ending, "but now they are hid from thine eyes." Then he stooped and gathered me into his arms—me, the biggest man in tic regime nl and carried s if I had been a child. I must have fainted again, for I woke to consciousness in a little cave by a stream, and the Comrade in White was ihing my wounds and binding them up. It seems foolish to saj it. for I was in terrible pain, but I was happil r at that moment than ever I ren'embei to have been in all my life I e fore. I can't explain it, but it all my days I had n waiting for this without knowing it. As long as that hand touched mi and those eves pitied me 1 did not seem to an\ mere about sickm ss oi health, about life or death. And while he swiftl) removed : y trace ol blood and mire I felt as if m\ whole nature was being wa hed, as if all the grime and soil of sin were going, and as if I were once more a little child. HE TOO HAD BEEN WOUNDED. I suppi Se I slept, for when I awoke this feeling was pone. I was a man. and wanted to know what I could do for my friend to help him or to ervo him. He was looking towards the stream, and ins ban Is were clasped in prayer ; and then I saw that he too had been wounded. I could see as it ware a shot-wound in is hand, and as be prayed a hop of bloc i red :re to day by the water. I will come for you 1. -morrow. 1 bav e w irk f you to do and you will do for me." In a moment He was gon And while 1 wait foi Him 1 write this down that 1 may not lose the memory of it. I feel weak and lonely, and I iv pain increases, but 1 have Id is promise. 1 know that He will come for me-tomorrow —TkiCanadian Whiti /'. %  '' m Tidingt. For Results Advertise The Tribune. A Wear Armbrister's Shoes


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02413
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, September 09, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02413

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Full Text
irzz
Nulllua addlcltis lurnre in vei ba umimmi.
BeinK bound lo swer to the 1>ii*mf\s of no Mivtiier.
VOL. XII.
i. N. P.. Bahamas THURSDAY, September 9. 1915
ISO >49
+ ...,

. i>i I
(f he (f>omradc in \f)hite
"/.//r u-n,/ Il'-.rv" 77;r Church of England Magazin i
++
STRANGE tales reached us
in the trendies. Rumours
raced up and down that 300-
mile line from Switzerland lo
the sea. We knew neither the
Source of them nor the trutli of
them. They came quickly and
they went quickly. Vet some-
how 1 remember the very hour
when George Casey turned to
me with a queer Ionic in his
blur ej e i, a nd aske I me if I had
s< en the 1'nrad 0! the Wound
ed.
\n 1 then he told me all he
knew. After many a hoi en-
uvnt a man in while had
:i s -en bending ov< r the
v> iun led Snip irs sniped at
him. Shells leU around him.
Nothing ha 1 po ver to touch
him. He v be
yond all heroes, or he was
something greater still. This
mysterious one, whom the
F; ench call< I the Comrade in
White, : \ here
at on :e At Nancy, in the \i
gonne. al and \
rywhere men 'Acre talking
of him with hushed voi
Hut soms laughed and said
the trenches were telling on
men's n i ve 1, whi > was of
ten reckless enough in my I ilk,
exclaimed that for me seeing
was believing, and that I didn't
expert any help but a German
^ knife if I was found lying out
there wounded.
I WAS SHOT.
It was the next day that
things got lively on this bit of
tlie front. Our big guns roared
from sunrise to sunset, and be-
gan again in the morning At
nooi) we got word to take the
trenches in front of us. They
were two hundred yards away,
and we weren't well Started
till we knew that the big g i
had failed in their work of pre-
paration. It needed
heart to go on, but not a man
wavered. We ha 1 a Ivan i i
15 j ards when we found it
as no good. ( )ur captain
called to us to take cover, and
jusl then I was shot through
both I
B iod's mercy I fell into a
of some sort, l suppo?< I
fainted, for when I opened my
eyes I was all alone. The |
was horrible, but 1 didn't dare
ti i move lest the Germans would
s.-c mi for they were only fifty
yards away, and I did not ex
peel mi icy. I was glad when
'he'will lit came. There were
me i in my n,vn company who
would ina any risk- iii the dark-
ness if thev thought a comrade
w.-is still alive
The night fell, and soon I
heard a '>>. not stealthv, as I
expected, but quiet and firm, as
il neither darkness nor death
o>uld check those untroubled
feet. ^ > little did I guess what
was coming that, even when I
saw the gleam of white in die
darkness, I thought it was a
peasant in a white smock, or
perhaps a woman deranged.
Suddenly, with a little shivei
of joj or ol fear, I don't know
which, 1 guessed that it was the
Comrade in White. And at
that very moment the German
: ifles began to shout.
The bullets could scarcely
miss such a target, for he flung
out his arms as though in en
treaty, and then drew them
back till he stood like one of
those wayside crosses we saw-
so often as wc marched through
Franco. And he spoke. The
words sounded familiar, but all
I remember was the beginning:
"If thou hadst known," and the
ending, "but now they are hid
from thine eyes." Then he
stooped and gathered me into
his armsme, the biggest man
in tic regime nl and carried
s if I had been a child.
I must have fainted again,
for I woke to consciousness in
a little cave by a stream, and
the Comrade in White was
ihing my wounds and bind-
ing them up. It seems foolish
to saj it. for I was in terrible
pain, but I was happil r at that
moment than ever I ren'embei
to have been in all my life I e
fore. I can't explain it, but it
' all my days I had
n waiting for this without
knowing it. As long as that
hand touched mi and those eves
pitied me 1 did not seem to
an\ mere about sickm ss oi
health, about life or death.
And while he swiftl) removed
: y trace ol blood and mire I
felt as if m\ whole nature was
being wa hed, as if all the grime
and soil of sin were going, and
as if I were once more a little
child.
HE TOO HAD BEEN WOUNDED.
I suppi Se I slept, for when I
awoke this feeling was pone. I
was a man. and wanted to know
what I could do for my friend
to help him or to ervo him.
He was looking towards the
stream, and ins ban Is were
clasped in prayer ; and then I
saw that he too had been
wounded. I could see as it
ware a shot-wound in is hand,
and as be prayed a hop of
bloc i red : ground. I cried out. 1 could
not help it, for that wound of
his seemed to me a more awful
thing than any that bitter war
had shown me.
"You art wounded too," I
said faintly. Perhaps he heard
me, perhaps it was the look on
my fare, but he answered gent-
lv. "This is an old wound, but
it has troubled me of late
And then I noticed sorrowful!.
thai the same cruel mark W!
on Ins feet. You will womb
that 1 did not know sooner.
wonder myself. Hut it \\
only when I saw His feet tb
knew Him.
HE WILL COME FOR ME
TO-MORROW.
The Living Christ"I had
heard the chaplain say it a few-
weeks before, but now I knew
that lie had come to meto
me who had put Him out of mj
| life in the hot fev< r of my youth.
I was longing to speak and to
thank him, but no words came.
\ed then I le rose swiftly, am
I, "1 ie iii>re to day by the
water. I will come for you
1. -morrow. 1 bav e w irk f
you to do and you will do
for me."
In a moment He was gon
And while 1 wait foi Him 1
write this down that 1 may not
lose the memory of it. I feel
weak and lonely, and I iv pain
increases, but 1 have Id is pro-
mise. 1 know that He will
come for me-tomorrow
TkiCanadian Whiti /'.'' m Tidingt.
For Results
Advertise
The Tribune.
A
Wear
Armbrister's
Shoes


T
I
m
L. OILBKKT DUl'CCII,
Hi r and Prfrietor.
OPPICK
torr\er Shirley & CK&rlollc Sts
HcM$aut Jv. /*., Bokawun
'PHONE 860. P. O. HOX I6S.
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line (or subsqnent insertions.
Advertisements under flight lines .is.
Zhc tribune
THtKSDAY. September 9. 1915. j
i
PT PUBLISHED AT 12.50 P.M.
THE 9TH SEPTEMBER 1915
will ever be pnemiiit ntlycon
spicuous in the history of this
ancient and loyal colony of
The Bahamas.
Today, for the fust time in
our varied history, an or-
ganized force, (small though
it be) distinctively Bahamian
will leave our shores to take
its part with the other forces
of the Empire engaged in the
titanic struggle in which Bri-
tain is engagi d.
It is an epoch making evenl
for the Bahamas and equally
so for the Empire; it is an
assertion of our place in the
constituent parts of the Em-1
pire, and it is a recognition
of that place by the Empire.
The men who will embark
on the hired transport "Varu-
n.i" at half [>ast fo'ir this af-
ternoon, form a Roll of Hon-
our peculiarly their own;
other Bahamians are now at
llie front and some have laid
down their, all honour to
their memory, but thev were
units of the English armv or
the Canadian contingent, but
%e men who leave US today,
wNtJU ei ''ie II ',' of the Co
fony, as The Bahamas Con-
tingent.
We are of opinion that
everyone now regrets that the
contingent is not larger, it
should have been larger, and
would have been larger if,
------we refrain.
We shall bid the Contin-
gent goodbye and God speed
this afternoon
"With hearts too full for ut-
terance
And with a silent tear."
We commend our brave
boys to the kind thought and
consideration of all.
THE BAHAMAS CONTINGENT
i. William Fletcher Albury
2. William Thompson
3. George Arahna
4. George Maurice Cole Jr.
5. Irwin Pinion Bain
6. Holbreton William Brown
7. Origen Hermas Mason
8. John Demeritte
9. Frederick Clement Corne-
lius Lightbourn
10. Sydney Cuthbert Ear-
rington
11. James Roderick Taylor
12. Hersal Stanley Hall
13. Robert Livingston Atwell
14. Charles Bain
15. Matthew Armbrister
ID. Charles Percival Bethel
17. Artie Kemp
18. Reginald Walters Wood
19. Harold Darent Bascome
20. Frederick Flowers
31. Awstin Vincent Roberts
22. Arthur Henry Fountain
23. James Bain
24. George Hubert Johnson
35. Charles Bethel
26. Alfred I lean
27. Ilenry Archill,!1.' Roach
.' -. Iohn Williams
29. Bruce Marshall Maura
30. Junes Henry Knowles
Now boys one last woi d
"Trust in God and keep your
powder dry" and
"God be with you till we
meet again.
:o:
THE BAHAMAS CONTINGENT
The Bahamas Contingent
will embark at Rawson Sq
at 4 30 this afternoon. The
Governor will e present and
say Good bye to the men.
The Bahamas Contingent
and their friends were gen-
erously entertained by the
Governor and Mrs. Allardvce
at a Garden Party in Govern-
ment House gardens yester-
day afternoon.
A large number of officials
and other citizens with their
families were also present
and a unique event passed off
very pleasantly indeed.
An attraction was provided
in the Governor's bag piper
who gave several tunes on
his pipes. His dress, and his
instrument were novelties to
many who were present.
1 lie piper also marched
with The Contingent and
played on their way to Gov-
ernment Hill.
Boy scouts were also pre
sent.
The "boys" of The Con-
tingent will remember with
much pleasure in the time
coming when things will be
not so pleasant, the Gover*
nor and Mrs. Allardyce and
their last treat before leaving
home.
The Concert give n on
Tuesday evening at St. An-
drews Hall, by Mr. and Mrs.
W. E. S. Callender in aid of
The Bahamas Contingent
Fund was an unqualified suc-
c< ss, and those who attended
for the sake of the music or
to aid the funds were well re-
paid for their outlay.
The programme was of a
high order, and the execution
of Mrs. Callender and Mrs.
Pippette in such masterpieces
as Mendelssohn's "Concerto
in E" and Liszt's "Rhapsodic'
No. I-' are very rarely to be
seen in our little city.
Mrs. Pashley's rendering of
The Song "England Mine"
was most acceptable and
was encored.
(ine item, not included in
the programme was a pretty
little dance by Miss Dorothy
Callender and her brother
Ernest.
Space forbids further com-
mendation than to say that
all the various items of the
programme were well render-
deied.
We understand that over
"20 were realized.
We congratulate Mr. and
Mis. Callender on the success
of their efforts.
The programme is append-
ed.
PROGRAMME
PART I
t. "Auld Acquaintance^**1
The Police Band.
2. Pianoforte Duet
Concerto in'ILMendtlsshon
Mrs. Callender and Mrs. I'ipette.
3. Song"A song of Thanks-
giving"/-'. Allitsen.
Mr. W. E S. Callender.
4. Recitation "Our Folks"
Ethel L\ mm
Dr. R W. Albury.
5. Song "Fall in" P. Coweu
Mr. R. DeGlanyille.
6. PianoforteDuet "Zingareaca"
M. Watson.
Miss Dorothy Callender and
Mrs I'ipette.
7. Song "She is far from the
land" F. Lambert.
Mr. Asa I'ritchard.
8. Trio "Memory"
Mr. A. Pritchard, Mr. and Mrs.
W. E. S. Callender.
Interval of ten minutes
PART II
1. Cornet Solo "The Holy City"
S. Adams
Constable Roberts
Accompanied by Police Band
2. Song "Here's to the day"
Mr Asa Pritchard
3. Song "England Mine"
Mrs. Pash ey.
4. Piano Solo Rhapsodic No.
12 Liszt
Mrs. W.E.S. Callender, A.T C.L.
5. Song "When we've wound
up the watch on the Rhine"
Mr. E.C. Moselcy.
6. Recitation Speech of King
henry V before the battle of
Agincourt Shakespean
I Ion. G. II Gamblin.
7. Song "TniiiniN Atkins"
S. Potter
Mi. R DeGlanville.
8. Song "There's a Land"
/". Allitsen
Mr. W !:. S. Callender
Allies Man li "Carry on"
Tipperarj
National Anthem.
Accompanist. Mis W, li. S.
Callender. A. I C L.
Scholar and Me dlist,
Trinity College, London.
:o.
The Ward Line Steamer
"Antilla" steamed for Cuban
ports yesterday afternoon.
The Mail Steamer "Mexi-
co" arrived last night fri
Havana,
i^ti


c
3
Your King And Country Want You
Paul A. Rubens
We've watched you playing cricket,
And every kind of game
At football golf and polo,
You men have made your name.
But now yout country calls you,
To play your part in war,
.And r0 matter what befalls you,
We shall love you all the more,
So come and join the force--,
As your fathers did before.
We want you from all quarters,
So help US, south and north,
We want you in your thousands,
From Falmouth to the Forth,
You'll never find us fail you,
When you are in distress,
So answer when we hail you,
And let the word be "Yes,"
And so your name in years to come,
Each mother's son shall bless.
It's easy for us women,
To stay at home and shout,
But remember there's a duty
To the men who first went out.
The odds against that handful
Were nearly four to one,
And we cannot rest until
Ils man for man and gun for gun
And every woman's duty
Is to see that duty done.
CHORUS :
Oh, we don't want to lose you,
But we think you ought to go,
For your King and country
Both need you BO :
We -hall want you and miss you,
But with all our might and main
We shall cheer you, thank you, bless you,
When you come back again.
The Mail St.-am<-i 'Mexico'
left for New York this after-
noon with the following:
Miss Freda II. Burnside;
Mr. and Mis. \Y. S. Carrick,
Mr. and Mrs Chailes Menen-
dez, and Mr. IT S. Blade; R.
H. Curry, R. J. Robertson, II.
T. Brice, B. IT Bethel, W. J.
tilth, R. J. Griffith and
eph O'Donnell
Mi-s Ellen Sands, and Mis.
Leonora Wood.
Misses Alice Taylor and
< iretchen Williams.
Messrs. p.. S. Hethell, II. B.
Bethell and R. J. Robertson,
who are among the passen-
gers per Mail Steamer Mexi-
co to-day are, we understand,
on their way to Canada to
join the Canadian Contin-
gent for the war.
Nassau N. P.
Sept. 6th 1915.
Dear Mr. Editor,
Permit me space in your
columns to congratulate the
young men of The Bahamas
Contingent.
Dear boys may God go with
you all as you go into this fight
for truth and right, may God
help you to fight, not for the
lust of war hut fur victory over
the mighty foe and all that is
wrong.
May the love of God your
steps uphold, and may He help
you far and oigh the flag to lift
high and may He hasten the
time when the strife is o'er.
Sad indeed are all life's part-
ings, o'er and o'er again will
come the question, shall we
meet again? shall you all re-
turn to your homes and families?
God be with you till we meet
again.
Brave boys! Good bye!
Thanking you Sir for space
Yours
MISS LEONORA FAWKES,
LATEST
War News.
September 8th 1915.
London oth:The menace
to'Riga, the Russian seaport,
is becoming more serious.
The Germans still hold the
bridgehead at Friederich-
stadt, the occupation of
u lii. Ii effectively cuts off
railway communication to
the South, while German air-
craft are active in the gulf,
perhaps preparing another
naval clash as part of a con
1.1id German land and sea
move to complete the isola-
tion of the city and force its
abandonment by the Russians.
According to an unofficial
Berlin despatch re< 1 ived by
wayoi Copenhagen the Ger-
mans claim prossession of the
(iulf, the Russians have
abandoned it.
Berlin official communica-
tions today claim no further
advances by Yon Hinderburg
from the Baltic to Grodno
The armies of Von Mackensen
and Prince Leopold are said
to be moving forward.
The great artillery duel in
the West goes on unabated,
with the French and. pre-I
sumably the British.
London, 6:A man named
Wolf, born in New Jersey,
was lost on the Hesperian,
according to information
given the consul general at
Oueenstown.
Rome, 6:Italy has declar-
ed cotton contraband of war.
Oueenstown, 6th:Six
second cabin passengers, six
third cabin passengers aud
thirteen of the crew of u^
steamer Hesperian, torpedoed
150 miles off Queenstown
Saturday, were unaccounted
for tonight according to
revised official figures issued
by the Allan Line. This
brings the list up to 26.
The captain 01 the stricken
liner remained by his ship
until it sank.
He declined to comment
on the disaster for publication
hence the official statement
as to whether he believed his
ship was the victim of a
torpedo or a mine mu-tcomc
from the admiralty, although
the captain is quoted as hav-
ing told an- Allan Line ofli
cial today that the Hesperian
was torpedoed.
.0:
September 9th 1915.
London, 8th.
Governor,
Bahamas,
Official News: -Three
Zeppelins visited Eastern
Counties last night. Fifteen
small dwellings were serious-
ly damaged and there were
several fires.
I ( n people wore killed and
forty six wounded or missing.
'fhe French government
report continuous bombard-
ment along the front.
A British fleet bombarded
the coast as far as ()s!end.
Enemy aviation sheds a I ( Kt -
end were attacked by aircraft.
Russian port indicate check
of the enemy attack at some
points. No material change
elsew here.
The Italian fJO ei nnien
port small local success*!
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.


L
The Bishop's
Eastern School.
The ah ive will 1> re-
opened on the i jth.
Sept.
there arc vacancies foi a
few mure pupils, applications
will In' rea iv< d by the head
teacher at 16 Mai thorough -i.
1 ci
Shingle:
Best No. i I li art 5m. Cypn -
Shingles ;it $9. pei thous
sand of 2 bundles
Discounts on ! it-- of ovei
5000 shingles.
Special Price
r1s< 1 1 >n 1 hi
5111. Cy] >i
thousand of 1 bundles. This
price lii.i* 1 poa : by ;i \ en
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Subscriptions are urgently
needed lor the above fund
and all donations, however;
small, will be gratefully ac-
cepted, nnd will be acknow-
ledged in the 111 \ spapers.
H. F. AR'HiRISI r R.
Consular Agent f r I ranee.
Nassau, X. P.,
2nd July,
Just Received by
This bteamer
Fresh American
Fruit.
Peaches, Pears,
Plums, etc. etc.
J. K. AMOURY.
DRINK--
Welch's Grape Juice.
PRICES
0:i li [-. 2s. 3d. ei
I its, Is. 4d.,
15y. ; 1 : doz.
\ Pints, 9d.
8s. 6d. pi 1 doz.
\ Pints, 5d.
4 j. 6d. pei 'i"/
T BLACK S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen,
Opp. Hotel Colcnial.
..
The Allies"
K
Try J. C. Coakloy's
new Id. Cig-ars
The Allies
lend of lun 1 line tobai 1
o -
They are good to th? end \
To be had at all Grocers
C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent
Cornei ii gi and King Si
IN 2 PIECE and
UNION SUITS.
SANITARY
COOL
RE LIABLE
SOLD BY
Wra Hilton
260 BAY STREET.
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS
In >-, 1 1 1 11 1 e
1 eivi i summoning nllF rench-
men born in Martinique,
Guad lopi or 1- rench Guiana
belonging to the classes 1
to to, ") (born from 1870 ,()
1B89) to pn sent thi mselvi -
immediately al the Vii 1 C< in-
sulate of Fram 1 al P01 t-of-
Spain or at any of the twi Ive
Consular Agi ni ies< if the Bri-
tish West In lit s to pa s a
medii al examination.
H. r. ARMBRISTRR.
Cnnsulnr A i . 11 for France.
Nassau, N.P.,
2nd July, 1915.
RUMSEY'3 PUMPS
c
ST K H N Pumps, VVi
P u m j W i n d in i
Pumps, I diaphragm I 'umps,
I' mps, Pn<
I ems. Spraj Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
I >eep Well Pumps, I lectric
Pumps, C\ Under and Vah es,
I ripli \ P< v er Pumps, Cens
tiifugal I'umps, Wati 1 innrk,
Machinery, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pump Fire I 'umps,
Air Compress rs,Ship Pumps
Pressure I 'umps, Boiler Feed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
I [ydrants, die.
Installed under the d
supervision of II. McPherson
iv. I Brother.
I'n\ es on I pplicati
II. |. THOMPSON
Williams' Shoes Are Better*


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