<%BANNER%>

PAGE 1

[ L. OILBRRT DUPUOH, Editor .mil l'r fritter OKKK i: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sta rVMM, .V. /'., Baham u •PHONK an. I'. O. HOX 169, ri'HI.ISIIIII DAILY they were pledged bravely and fearlessly, not yielding to the many temptations which might assail them, adopting the spirit of the inscription engraved on the Crusader's sword presented to Queen Victoria by Lord Kitchener: "Do not draw me without reason, do not sheathe me without honour." He cheered them with the thought that they would not he forgotten, they would be constantly remembered at the Throne of (irace, closing his address with the simple aspiration, God Bless You, Adrertiiing Rates:Six pence per line breathed in the loving and for first insertion: three pence pei line .1 licet iona te spirit <>f an t. hler lor second insertion • ai.i iHieoeunv i *i i %  i r line lor sutequeui ,:„,:,' P brother, which must we feel Advert'MMueuts under eight lines 41. ever remain with them as an j enduring and precious memory RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday — Single copy ... jd Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy td Saturday—single copy i'.| weakly v i Monthly I s bd Quarterly 4 s. fl Half Yraily M, Yearly I SPAYABLE IN ADVANCE XLbe tribune TUESDAY. September 7. 1915. !**• PUBLISHF.I) AT 6 P.M. The Kirk was filled to overflowing, even to the aisles in which additional seating had bei n placed, and yet many remained standing" throughout the service. His Excellency the Governor, with Mrs. Allardyce, Miss Allardyce, Miss Keva AllarOn Sunday Evening last the strength of the Bahamas Contingent attended service at the Kirk, when the Rev. S. .• %  -... ...,.. %  J. Bennett the Pastor deliverdyce, and Mr. A. 1. S. Shered an impressively powerful wood Smith, P. S, were preand eloquent address to them, j sent. He reminded them ,i the After the Address, "0Love Good day coming foretold by The Lord"an exc< i dingly fine the Prophet Zechariah whenjAnthem by W. K. Stubbs was there shall be complete peace sung by the Choii assisted by „.,,! : i ii ,i r r..; i. . ... .i i-\ .. i through their evolutions by the Commandant and afterwards by Police Corp I. H. Roach. After the drill His Excellency addressed the men and expressed his satisfaction with the progress they had made since their enlistment and if they continued at the same rate, they would, ere long, he did not hesitate to j say compare favourably with any other contingent they might meet, he said also that he was proud of the Contingent and felt that they would acquit themselves in a mann< i creditable to themselves 'and their country and while he fully appreciated them he wished that they were 300. After His Excellency left the Barracks The Contingent went out on a march, their first under arms. A great crowd followed the men and made it verv uncomfortable for them by crowding them and pushing each other about creating a suffocating heat. We wish people would bear in mind that it is really tin1 omfortable marching in the middle of a dense crowd 1 pecially in hot weather. and purity; \\ hen all the affairs of mankind shall be con friends from other Chun hes. After the Benediction ha< IWIIJ VI UIUIIJMLMI >||,IU Ul I l)|| IllbWI l.iV. 1'tlMWItllWi: 11(111 ducted upon the holy princibeen pronounced The Naples of faith, love and obedi. tional Anthem was sung with ence to Gods will ; holiness, much fervour by the Congrein these essentials shall be inRation. The collection taken traduced into the common asIup for the Contingent well as the great things of life amounted to about £14. even into those that s< emed >s unlikely. He impressed upon Yesterday evening an exthem how that they who had traordinary large rrow I now offered, even their lives gathered at the Police BarJo their Country's service and racks to witness the drill of for their Country's honour, The Contingent. could but carry out their re-1 Soon after half past five solves by yielding implicit o'clock the Governor accomobedience to the Law of God panied by Mrs. Allardyce, as revealed to man. and by Miss Allardyce, and His Hon-' loyal and unswerving obediour The Chief Justice arrived fence to those who had been at the barracks, and was reappointed to command, received by the Guard of Hongarding nothing too difficult,'our (The Contingent) under nothing tOOmean. They mUSt command of Commandant not be filled with hate and Crawford with the Royal terrorizing towards theirfoes salute the Police Band playas they have done, but sim-;ing the National Anthem. ply do the work to which The company was then put * %  i %  11 -. I. -.1 By Kequest. FOR THE BAHAMAS CONTINGENT. A SOLDIER'S PRAYER. Lord, ere 1 join in deadly strife, And battles' ti rn rs dare, bust would I render soul and life, To Thine Almighty care. And whin grim death, in smoke-u reaths rob< d Comes thundering o'er the si ene, What fear can reach the soldier's heart, Whose trust in Thee has been. SIR GEORGE COLLI V. The Mail Steamer "Havana" ai rived early this morning from New York, and after transferring the following passengers to the Tender 'Colonia" proceeded to Havana with 134 passengers for that I city: — Misses Eleanor DJ^arrington, and Florrie Faunders; Mesdamcs Bessie C. Knowles, and Maud Sands; Mr. and Mrs. Win. S. Carrick, Mr. and Mrs. (). F. Pritchard and Master Mark S. Pritchard; Dr. Clinton F. Costenbader; Messrs Henrv C. Christie, William A Grist. William St. John Hall, Charles M. Hav wood, Henry A. Highman, George T. FCnowles, John A. McKinney, George Profit, Frank Parks, Herbert J. Wussell,and William F. Saunders; Hon. F. C. Wells Durrant. Miss Katurah Ford; Mesdames Mary Bain and Letitia Ford; Messrs Wilfred R. Pain and Fred. H. Clarke. Messrs Timothy E. Donaldsen and Assed Rawaja. — :o: — The Motor "Francis 1'." left Miami for Nassau this morning with mails and passengers. lion. F. C! Wells Durrant arrived this morning per Mail St< amer "Havana" fiom his summer vacation. —o— We are pleased to see our esteemed friend Mr. II. C. Christie in our office once again. He is looking fresh after his "lay off." Among the passengers pi r Havana this moimug is the enterprising Managi r of the Big 4 who appears to have enjoyed his "double bar railed trip. — :o:— We have much pleasure in publishing the following: — AURORA LODGE, NO. 810, Grand Unite I Win of Odd Fellows. Nassau, Bahamas. 26th August, 1915. Harold I). Eascombe, Esq. Sir & Pro. I am directed to inform you thai during the order of business of the above named Lodge held on the 33rd 11W'.. it became known that you Lq^ enlisted in the Bahamas Contingent now in training for service at Hie front.



PAGE 1

I am further directed to state that Aurora is very pleasec^to know that you have c ^ftrfu 1 !y obeyed Y< >ur Country's Call" and have cast your lot with others of the bra pi re whoarewillingto lay down their lives for "Justice and Honour." Aurora fully realizes her obligations to humanit) and especially to the bearers of the Three Links. I have great pleasure in informing you that in appreciation (.1 your patriotism, it was unanimously decided 1 hat so long as you shall remain in active service yOU shall be regarded and held as a Financial Brother." In due time ;i travelling card will be presented to you, which will also be supplemented by a letter which may be useful to you. Yours in F. L. & T., Jas. II. Wallace, N. G. Jos. 1). Weir, P. S. Nassau, N. P lst September, 1915. To the Officers and Members of Aurora Lodge No. 810, G.U.O.O.F. Brethren:— 1 desire to thank you for your magnanimous kindness in holding me as a "Financial Brother" as long as I remain on active service, and beg to assure you that as long as memory holds a seat your action shall never be h irgotten by me. In casting my lot with others of the Great Empire, in this gigantic struggle I am prompted so to do si ilely because I think it is mv dutj as a Britisher to be found among the rank and file of my fellow itizens in this the Empire's hour of peril. Again allow me to than!. yOU and ask that your prayers be given me, and hope that the day is not far distant when it shall again be mj privilege to meet with you, around the sacred altar of Friendship Love, and Truth. FVfotfrs in F, L. and T., II. I). BASCOMBE. Private No. ig Bahamsf Contingent. Jos. D. Weir, P. S. OLD LINEN DAY. Those who are responding to the urgent appeal from our hospitals for old linen will kindly bring in their contributions to the ball-room at G vernment House on Tuesday, Sept. 14. The ladies of the Sewing Guild will be pleased to receive them from 4.30 to 6.30 p.m. Old cotton will also be acceptable. Articles must be free from starch I and blue, boiled and pressed ] if possible. It will not be I in cesary to remove the seams. LATEST War News. September 6th 1915. London, 4th:—Although they continue their retirement in ie sectors, and are being driven back in others, the Russians on thfl whole have stiffened their resistance and the German allies now have to fight, and fight hard, for every yard they gain. Berlin, 4th:—The third Ger man war loan announced this week is attracting much atten tion and it is stated that every thing indicates its Buccess. Many hip; subscriptions have already being announced. Geneva, Via Paris, 4:— Ma dame Carton de YViart, wife of the Belgian Minister of Justice, am sted in Belgium in May and sentenced to three months iin prison men t for corresponding with her husband has been n leased. She is expected tore; Basle tomorrow to meet her luisl tand W ho has come to Switzerland for that purp< se. In wnsville, Texas. 4:—With at le -t (en known Mexican dead .1 I probably as many more dead bodies lying in the dense brush, the fight between %  hand of Mexican outlaws and 80 United States cavalrymen aided bj Texas Rangers and armed citizens,ended late this afternoon. One American trooper was wounded At four o'clock the Mexicans withdrew to the south hank of the Rio Grande River and hid in the bpish, apparently await ing another opportunity to attack. Havre, 4th:--The following official communication was issued today by tLe Belgian military authority There has been a heavy bombardment along the front especially in the neighbourhood of Dixmude. Newport News, Virginia, 4:— Property damage estimated at two million dollars resulted from a fire which originated in the Chesapeake and Ohio grain elevator"A." here late tonight. Washington, 4th:— Foreign influences in Haiti working to block the plans of the United States to pacify the republic and rehabilitate its finances, under American supervision, has made it necessary to declare martial law in Port au Prince, the capital, and practically all but two of the countries open ports. Petrograd, Via London. 4th:—A congress of Russia's representative men and institutions summoned by Emperor Nl holas to discuss, organize and unify means for prosecut* ing the war to .1 ful con elusion, held its first meeting this morning in the Imperial Palace. London, (tli:— A novelty in submarine warfare is reported in a despatch fri'in Athens to Paris. It is stated that a Bri tish submarine after threading its n ay through the Gulf oi Is madi landd a party for the purpose 'd dynamiting the railmad I 1 idjjeat Gi bize, 28 miles Southeast of Constantinople. Although the Xpedition was not entirely successful the blue jackets destroyed a portion ol the I ndge killing the Turkish soldiers on guard then and returned safely to the submarine London —The st e a m e r Hi SfH 1 iui has arrived safely at Queeiistown. The vessel had been struck by a torpedo but B< >t sunk. Eight li\ ( si were lost. Athens:—The Greek Parliament has adjourned without the new premier making a statement regarding its foreign policy. Rome:--The Vatican is bombarded with request for information regarding possible papal action with the United States regarding peace J Atlanta, Georgia:—Ameri can gills are "Adopting" soldi, is fighting for the Allies in the trench* s in Eun pe am are sending them letters, 1 igarettes, socks and other welcome little gifts. The British steamers Cymbelinc and the Mimosa were sunk, presumably by torpedoes. Six were killed and sixinjured and thirty one saved on theCymbeline. 'I he Mimosa crew were -;i\ ed. B rlin:—The admiralty lacks information on the sinking of the Hcspcrain and awaits definite news as to whether the steamer was actually torpedoed and under what conditions. Further progress is reported against the Russians on the Eastern front. The situation in the Baltic, however, is unc hang< d. Paris:—Violent • rtillery engagements occurred in the vicinity of Arras, Bretencoui and Champagne districts. Copenhagen :—A n giant biplane is undergc tests, It is German ai. measures 4a meters across th the planes It can carry fui fi 11 ight hours, has wireless, si an Might has spi ce for twelve bombs, live machine guns and eight men and is expectt d to travel from Get many to London and back in live hours, I ondi m:— The T< utonic Allies are relaxing the offensive on the Eastt rn fr< >nt and are believed to 1 e prepai in| to dig in for the Winter. They have pushed their lines beyond the limit of safety expi rts are explaining. There are further 1 imours of dissi sion among the Turks and Germans. White Lime I AM offering FOP SALK my entile stoi k of White Lime of about 800 bushels at 6d. per bushel. Orders 1< ft at Mr, Si ilomon Finlayson, Deveaux St. or I'hone 258 or ••The Tribune" Office. ]0SIAH RAHMING June 30, 1915. A



PAGE 1

e ing. All the work was done by young colored men and women tinder tln'ir own instruct" rs Other schools which exhibitfed articli s nf marked interest were the Virginia Normal School, of Petersburg; tbe Colored Deaf, Dumb, and'Blind Institute, of Raleigh, N. C.; Shaw University. Raleigh ; Vor hees College, South Carolina : Virginia Deaf and Dumb will rank as a great success Some one has aptly said that in | its simplicity, practicableness, and unique interest the Negro Exposition at Richmond was (lie most truly "American" ex: position ever held in this country since the Centennial at* Philadelphia in 1876. A pro-. mi nent speaker at the Exposilion thus summed it up : This exposition, first of the Virginia ucai auu i/uwu; %  School. Newport News; the St.! Kind in the historyolthe worl Paul School, of Lawrenceville;! is a most splendid tribute to and the colored high school of I the courage, the strength, the Richmond. perseverance, the indomitabi 1 A markedly fine exhibit came ty, and the versatility ol the from Washington County and negro race. It signihes the llagerstown in Maryland; and 1 achievments of marvellous Henrico County, Virginia, things by a once downtrodden whose Superintendent of, race within a short span c Schools. Jackson Davis, was the originator of the "Henrico Me It typifies the industrj, the development, the advance NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS INSTRUCTIONS have been received summoning :iIIFrenchmen bom in Martinique, Guadelope or French (iui.'ina belonging to the classes 180,0 to 1909 (born from 1870 to 1889) to present themselves immediately at the ViceConsulate <>f France at Port-ofSpainor at any of the twelve Consulai Agencies of the British Wesl Indies to pa a medical examination. H. r. ARMBRISTKR., Consular Ai'cnt for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1 FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. SUBSCRIP 1 IONS are" ui gentl) thod," had a full exhibit at the ment, and the indefatigability Exposition. The "Henrico I of the negro race, whose era Method" provides a skilled and 1 seems just dawning. Another highly educated colored in-i fifty years of such accomplish structor who travels from rural i ment as has characterized the school to rural school, teaching I negro race during the past fifty teachers and children alike all years, and the colored man will kinds of industrial work, and in stand in his place in the sun. summer provides for neighbormentally, morally, industrially. socially, and financially, as well as physically, emancipated. '/",'/,• American Review of Reviews. K need< d tor th< al ove fund and all donations, however small, will be gratefully accepted, and will be acknowledged in the newspapers. H. F. AB.MBR.ISTFR. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., and July, 1915. hood teachers of canning, gardening, and sew ing. The New York exhibit was a noteworthy one, and occupied a prominent position. This comprised an infinite variety of, manufactured goods, all from! factories owned h There were also m from colored schools in New York and from individuals. Among other displays was a booth occupied bj a negro 111 M I from Charleston, South Caro lina. He was surrounded bythousands of postcards, each bearing some poem, epigram, or motto of his composition. Good Morning! KHJS, Mil IIUII11 r~^ y colored men. Vvc Are Introducing many exhibits American Bilk AM • %  in a i I'1 hroere Aroerii an Cotton Lisle Just Received by This Steamer Fresh American Fruit. Peaches, Pears, Plums, etc. etc. J. K. AMOURY. i3ay Si i I Here's An Opportsinitv that you cannot lUMiy a ff or< i to lose. If You want to Economize. If you want a Ft^t Class Light. If you want to be recognized". Use the Rest Light tln:t monev can buy. The Safest and the Cheapest. THE DC A A All KEROSENE MANTLE BEACON LAMPS AND BURNERS nro rproKnlz<"il on the Htiindaril Incandescent oil lamps of tho World. 100,000 Millafle* n..r< All onr "ui for ala hour". Brighter than RIB-. electricity or six ordinary lamps a' BJI l\ 111 to a.ni'-lrlllk Ike coat. Milo entirely of brass. For use •• homes, store*, halls and churrhes. No Odor, 00 noise: safe. Hlmplo and clean. There Is only one I Beason. Insist o a nuvlng It. Home Supply Co. KANSAS CITY, MO. For Sale By THOS. E NABBIC14 CHRISTIE ST., Nassau, N.I Special Terms sivaoif requested. Write mi' ami know all about tins wonderful Lamp. HOSIERY -The Allies" They have stood the test. Givei foot comfort ' N bei n e li %  baggy. The ahape 11 knit 111no! pressed in. GUAR.ANTEKD foi suj 1 ri irity of material and wurkmanship. Absolutely •'. linleai Will weai 6 a I •• ••••">•'_ • — %  ..... 1 Absolutely stainless These, bein" Inrgclv of the "up without holes, or new ones ree. lift" variety, sold readilj to the OUR SPECIAL on of oiic of crowds. The walls the rest rooms were portraits and paintings of a negro Indianapolis painter twenty-three years of age. At first an entrance fee of fifty cents was exacted at the Expo Sition gates, but later this fee was dispensed with, all visitors being allowed to come in free. Only a dime was charged at the doors of the principal exhibit building. On Thursday, July 8, "White Folks" day was observed, many white citizens of Richmond and vicioity inspecting the Exposi tion. In every cially the to every ne sen ling us fl 00 in cm or pi ital n te, to 1 ver a Ivi I lung with shipping charges, we will send 1 I with written guhrantee, back) million I llai 1 1 m| any, 1 ithi 1 3 Pairs of our 73,0. value • rican Silk 11 4 Pairs of our 50c. value American Caihrni re Hosii rv, 4 Pairs of our 50c. Value. An erican Cotton-Litle II b Pairs of Children's Hosiery. I 'i iNT DELAY I Iffei espin dealei in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL KOISERY CO. P O Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO, U.S.A Try J. C Coakley's new Id. Cigars The Allies A blend of four fine toba< 1 os — 0 They arc good to the end or or or way except finnn Negro Exposition For Results Advertise in The Tribune. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wx > Com I lete finish and polish f->i all furniture woodwork and Boon. Johnson's Wood Dya forthe irtwtic c iloring of .ill wood, soft or hard Johnson's! Under Lr a spirit finish, ver) much superioi to shellac 01 V.llllisll Johnson's Flat Wood Finish— fora beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effect without the expense ol rubbing. Johnson's Past-' Wood Filler -fol ftlling the grain and pore* of wood, proparing i< I01 the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax foi bal room flints. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury RUMSEYS PUMPS C IST E R N Pumps. Wf 11 I' u m i> s, W i u <1 mill Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps, House Pumps, Pneumatic Systems, Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Pams, Mine Pumps, Deep Well Pumps, Electric Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Cens trifugal Pumps. Water work, Machinery, Rotary Pump-, Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps, A Compressors,Ship Pumps Pn --urc Pumps. Boiler Feed Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, rile. 'Installed under the direct supervision of H. McPherson and lirother. Prices off Application. 11. |. THOMPSON, A'Tilt. T. M Knowles 528 Bay Street. I S now prepared t<> supply Rubber Tires for flfUjies Carriages, also to rescind repair them. • Satisfaction Guaranteed. Williams' Shoes Are Better



PAGE 1

Nulliua a.ddictus Ivirare in veiba malilrl. Beinti bound tn>we&r to the Do|mi of no Mnster VOL. XII. Nivn.au. N. P.. Bahama. TUESDAY. September 7.1915 NO 347 The Negro Exposition At Richmond. By PLUMMER F. JONES. T ill-. Negro Historical and Industrial E x posit ion which was held in the city of Richmond, Virginia, fn>m July 5 to July 27, inclusive, was in a number of ways interesting and encouraging, but in two respects was altogether preeminent. The first of these was the proof which was exhibited by t'.ie Exposition of the cordial rela tioni .ml complete understand ing which exist at the present time between the two rai es in the South ; and the other the indisputable evidence of the natural ability of the negro to achieve things worth while when living and working under the proper environment. 4s an in lex of the rela lions existing between the races, the; Eposition must have proved as founding to those vi itors and l^ii's of -o'-ial econoim who li ive not lived or traveled during recent years in ihe South, and who have not had an opportunity to observe the understanding and coop-ration w hlch has grown up, particularly within the past one or two decades, in all p innl the country where the negro is in evidence. As distinct proof of this, nothing could have surpassed the man tier iii which the Exposition, both in iis beginnings and its progress, was supported by the white people of Virginia and the South. It was largely tLjough the efforts of the leadIT( white citizens of the South that the Exposition was made possible Then again, ? newspapers of Richmond were indefatigable in their efforts to create interest in the Exposition, and devoted columns of -pare to bring the value of the enterprise prominently before the people, urging the support of white people in strong arti cles on their editorial pages. It is interesting, in this connection, to note the manner in winch the Exposition had its ini eption. A \iai or inorengo the Negro Historical and Industrial Association was formed in Richmond, and was incorporated under the laws of the State for the purpose, among other things, of holding an industrial exposition which should show the progress of the negro during the past fifty years. Giles B. [ackson, a well known negro lawyer of Richmond, was made pM'sident, and he mime diately began a campaign for the raising of funds, t nited States Senator Thomas S. Mar tin began the fight for an appropriation by Congress, and with the aid of other Senators and Representatives, succeded in getting the sum of $55,000 from the Government. Later the city of Richmond appro priated 85000. and the State of New York appropriated the sum of $7500 for purposes of showing the progri is of the negro in that State. These sums, together with private contributions, were used for the purpose of collecting exhibits from all parts of the COun try. Shortly after the announce* ments were made exhibits began to flow in from all parts of the South and North,—from industrial schools, county school systems, industrial assoiciations, business organizations, linns, and private individuals. In June of this year Governor Henry Stuart, a kinsman of (jeneral Jeb Stuart, who was killed at Yellow Tavern, a fewmiles from the Exposition grounds, about fifty two years. ago, issued a proclamation call-1 ing earnestly upon the people of the State to support the Ex-: tion in every possible way. Saul he in part : "The friendly illations between the white people and negroes of Virginia is a source 01 gratification to both races, and should be recognized as an important asset' in our civil, political, and industrial life." On July 1 President Wilson, a Virginian, who fifty years ago was a lad in the old I'res1 byterian manse at Staunton, Virginia, issueda proclamation saying among other thing? that "the action of Congress in this matter [the approximation] indicates very happily the desire of the nation, as well as cf the people of Virginia, to encourage the negro in his elicits to solve his industrial problem." And he urges the entire nation to lend every facility to the leaders in the enterprise. On July 5 the Exposition! was opei ed in the State Fail Grounds just outside the city,! the buildings of the Fair Association being used fm theexhi i Ainslie, of Richmond, 1 elivered an address and President Giles I Jackson made a powe.ful and l characteristic speech, r< viewing the work which had been done and emphasizing the importance of the Exposition. THE EXHIBITS The exhibits, the product of negro hands and negro brains, comprised by far the most important feature of the Exposition. These exhibits, shown in the main buildings, were hardly less than marvellous in their wide range and tl eir simplicity and usefulness. The exhibitors were private indii i duals, negro firms, negro manufacturers, negro mechanics, ne gro associations, negro poets, negro painters, and all kind and grades of negro sci cols. The exhibits consisted of a varied line of useful things. from uplift poems on pictun postcards and oil paintings to plows, and lines of manufactured goods, and sets of harness, and beautiful fancy work, and every kind and grade of hold furniture. As might be expected, the exhibit from students of the 1 lain) ton Normal and Industrial Institute was one of the mi st complete and not worthy. Here was to be found almost every conceivable kind of furniture and tool. fanc\ work, and the product of women. In the midst of this exhibit was a handsome brass locomotive, all parts complete, in running order, built entirely by Joseph Hall, a negro of Portsmouth, Virginia. The great industrial school on James River, known is Rock 4 Castle, exhibited very fine s P e *^^fl cimens of wagons, buggu carts, farming tools, ai d furniture of all kinds, as well as much woman's work, including all kinds of sewing and cannbits. At the opening Mayor (continued on fouith page) Wear Armbrister's Shoes


The Tribune.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS DOWNLOADS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02411
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, September 07, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02411

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )

( PDF )


Full Text
Nulliua a.ddictus Ivirare in veiba malilrl.
Beinti bound tn>we&r to the Do|mi of no Mnster
VOL. XII.
Nivn.au. N. P.. Bahama. TUESDAY. September 7.1915
NO 347

The Negro Exposition At Richmond. By PLUMMER F. JONES.

Till-. Negro Historical and
Industrial E x posit ion
which was held in the city of
Richmond, Virginia, fn>m July
5 to July 27, inclusive, was in a
number of ways interesting and
encouraging, but in two respects
was altogether preeminent.
The first of these was the proof
which was exhibited by t'.ie
Exposition of the cordial rela
tioni .ml complete understand
ing which exist at the present
time between the two rai es in
the South ; and the other the
indisputable evidence of the
natural ability of the negro to
achieve things worth while
when living and working under
the proper environment.
4s an in lex of the rela lions
existing between the races, the;
Eposition must have proved as
founding to those vi itors and
l^ii's of -o'-ial econoim who
li ive not lived or traveled dur-
ing recent years in ihe South,
and who have not had an op-
portunity to observe the under-
standing and coop-ration w hlch
has grown up, particularly with-
in the past one or two decades,
in all p in- nl the country where
the negro is in evidence. As
distinct proof of this, nothing
could have surpassed the man
tier iii which the Exposition,
both in iis beginnings and its
progress, was supported by the
white people of Virginia and
the South. It was largely
tLjough the efforts of the lead-
iT( white citizens of the South
that the Exposition was made
possible Then again, ?
newspapers of Richmond were
indefatigable in their efforts to
create interest in the Exposi-
tion, and devoted columns of
-pare to bring the value of the
enterprise prominently before
the people, urging the support
of white people in strong arti
cles on their editorial pages.
It is interesting, in this con-
nection, to note the manner in
winch the Exposition had its
ini eption. A \iai or inorengo
the Negro Historical and In-
dustrial Association was formed
in Richmond, and was incor-
porated under the laws of the
State for the purpose, among
other things, of holding an in-
dustrial exposition which
should show the progress of the
negro during the past fifty years.
Giles B. [ackson, a well known
negro lawyer of Richmond, was
made pM'sident, and he mime
diately began a campaign for
the raising of funds, t nited
States Senator Thomas S. Mar
tin began the fight for an ap-
propriation by Congress, and
with the aid of other Senators
and Representatives, succeded
in getting the sum of $55,000
from the Government. Later
the city of Richmond appro
priated 85000. and the State
of New York appropriated the
sum of $7500 for purposes of
showing the progri is of the
negro in that State. These
sums, together with private
contributions, were used for
the purpose of collecting exhi-
bits from all parts of the COun
try. Shortly after the announce*
ments were made exhibits be-
gan to flow in from all parts of
the South and North,from
industrial schools, county school
systems, industrial assoiciations,
business organizations, linns,
and private individuals.
In June of this year Governor
Henry Stuart, a kinsman of
(jeneral Jeb Stuart, who was
killed at Yellow Tavern, a few-
miles from the Exposition
grounds, about fifty two years.
ago, issued a proclamation call-1
ing earnestly upon the people
of the State to support the Ex-:
tion in every possible way.
Saul he in part : "The friendly
illations between the white
people and negroes of Virginia '
is a source 01 gratification to
both races, and should be re-
cognized as an important asset'
in our civil, political, and in-
dustrial life."
On July 1 President Wilson,
a Virginian, who fifty years
ago was a lad in the old I'res- 1
byterian manse at Staunton,
Virginia, issueda proclamation
saying among other thing? that
"the action of Congress in this
matter [the approximation] in-
dicates very happily the desire
of the nation, as well as cf the
people of Virginia, to encourage
the negro in his elicits to solve
his industrial problem." And
he urges the entire nation to
lend every facility to the lead-
ers in the enterprise.
On July 5 the Exposition!
was opei ed in the State Fail
Grounds just outside the city,!
the buildings of the Fair Asso-
ciation being used fm theexhi i
Ainslie, of Richmond, 1 elivered
an address and President Giles
I Jackson made a powe.ful and
l characteristic speech, r< viewing
the work which had been done
and emphasizing the import-
ance of the Exposition.
THE EXHIBITS
The exhibits, the product of
negro hands and negro brains,
comprised by far the most im-
portant feature of the Exposi-
tion. These exhibits, shown
in the main buildings, were
hardly less than marvellous in
! their wide range and tl eir sim-
plicity and usefulness. The
exhibitors were private indii i
duals, negro firms, negro manu-
facturers, negro mechanics, ne
gro associations, negro poets,
negro painters, and all kind
and grades of negro sci cols.
The exhibits consisted of a
varied line of useful things.
from uplift poems on pictun
postcards and oil paintings to
plows, and lines of manufac-
tured goods, and sets of har-
ness, and beautiful fancy work,
and every kind and grade of
hold furniture.
As might be expected, the
exhibit from students of the
1 lain) ton Normal and Indus-
trial Institute was one of the
mi st complete and not worthy.
Here was to be found almost
every conceivable kind of fur-
niture and tool. fanc\ work,
and the product of women. In
the midst of this exhibit was a
handsome brass locomotive, all
parts complete, in running or-
der, built entirely by Joseph
Hall, a negro of Portsmouth,
Virginia.
The great industrial school
on James River, known is Rock 4
Castle, exhibited very fine sPe*^^fl
cimens of wagons, buggu
carts, farming tools, ai d furni-
ture of all kinds, as well as
much woman's work, including
all kinds of sewing and cann-
bits. At the opening Mayor
(continued on fouith page)
Wear
Armbrister's
Shoes


[
L. OILBRRT DUPUOH,
Editor .mil l'r fritter
OKKK i:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sta
rVMM, .V. /'., Baham u
PHONK an. I'. O. HOX 169,
ri'HI.ISIIIII DAILY
they were pledged bravely
and fearlessly, not yielding to
the many temptations which
might assail them, adopting
the spirit of the inscription
engraved on the Crusader's
sword presented to Queen
Victoria by Lord Kitchener:
"Do not draw me without
reason, do not sheathe me
without honour." He cheer-
ed them with the thought
that they would not he for-
gotten, they would be con-
stantly remembered at the
Throne of (irace, closing his
address with the simple as-
piration, God Bless You,
Adrertiiing Rates:- Six pence per line breathed in the loving and
for first insertion: three pence pei line .1 licet iona te spirit <>f an t. hler
lor second insertion ai.i iHieoeunv i *i i i r
line lor sutequeui ,:,:,' P brother, which must we feel
Advert'MMueuts under eight lines 41. ever remain with them as an
j enduring and precious mem-
ory
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
Single copy ... ...... jd
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy td
Saturdaysingle copy i'.|
weakly ...... ...... vi
Monthly .........Is. bd
Quarterly........ 4s. fl
Half Yraily...... m,
Yearly ............IS-
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
XLbe tribune
TUESDAY. September 7. 1915.
!** PUBLISHF.I) AT 6 P.M.
The Kirk was filled to over-
flowing, even to the aisles in
which additional seating had
bei n placed, and yet many
remained standing" through-
out the service.
His Excellency the Gover-
nor, with Mrs. Allardyce, Miss
Allardyce, Miss Keva Allar-
On Sunday Evening last
the strength of the Bahamas
Contingent attended service
at the Kirk, when the Rev. S. .......... ...........-... ...,..-
J. Bennett the Pastor deliver- dyce, and Mr. A. 1. S. Sher-
ed an impressively powerful wood Smith, P. S, were pre-
and eloquent address to them, j sent.
He reminded them ,i the After the Address, "0Love
Good day coming foretold by The Lord"an exc< i dingly fine
the Prophet Zechariah whenjAnthem by W. K. Stubbs was
there shall be complete peace sung by the Choii assisted by
.,,!------:......i ii ,i r r..;___i. . ... .i i-\ .. i
through their evolutions by
the Commandant and after-
wards by Police Corp I. H.
Roach.
After the drill His Excel-
lency addressed the men and
expressed his satisfaction
with the progress they had
made since their enlistment
and if they continued at the
same rate, they would, ere
long, he did not hesitate to
j say compare favourably with
any other contingent they
might meet, he said also that
he was proud of the Contin-
gent and felt that they would
acquit themselves in a man-
n< i creditable to themselves
'and their country and while
he fully appreciated them he
wished that they were 300.
After His Excellency left
the Barracks The Contingent
went out on a march, their
first under arms.
A great crowd followed the
men and made it verv un-
comfortable for them by
crowding them and pushing
each other about creating a
suffocating heat.
We wish people would bear
in mind that it is really tin-
1 omfortable marching in the
middle of a dense crowd 1
pecially in hot weather.
and purity; \\ hen all the af-
fairs of mankind shall be con
friends from other Chun hes.
After the Benediction ha<
iwiij VI UIUIIJMLMI >||,IU Ul I l)|| IllbWI l.iV. 1'tlMWItllWi: 11(111
ducted upon the holy princi- been pronounced The Na-
ples of faith, love and obedi- tional Anthem was sung with
ence to Gods will ; holiness, much fervour by the Congre-
in these essentials shall be in- Ration. The collection taken
traduced into the common asIup for the Contingent
well as the great things of life amounted to about 14.
even into those that s< emed
>s
unlikely. He impressed upon Yesterday evening an ex-
them how that they who had traordinary large rrow I
now offered, even their lives gathered at the Police Bar-
Jo their Country's service and racks to witness the drill of
for their Country's honour, The Contingent.
could but carry out their re-1 Soon after half past five
solves by yielding implicit o'clock the Governor accom-
obedience to the Law of God panied by Mrs. Allardyce,
as revealed to man. and by Miss Allardyce, and His Hon-'
loyal and unswerving obedi- our The Chief Justice arrived
fence to those who had been at the barracks, and was re-
appointed to command, re- ceived by the Guard of Hon-
garding nothing too difficult,'our (The Contingent) under
nothing tOOmean. They mUSt command of Commandant
not be filled with hate and Crawford with the Royal
terrorizing towards theirfoes salute the Police Band play-
as they have done, but sim-;ing the National Anthem.
ply do the work to which The company was then put
* . i 11 -. I.-.1 By Kequest.
FOR THE
BAHAMAS CONTINGENT.
A SOLDIER'S PRAYER.
Lord, ere 1 join in deadly
strife,
And battles' ti rn rs dare,
bust would I render soul and
life,
To Thine Almighty care.
And whin grim death, in
smoke-u reaths rob< d
Comes thundering o'er the
si ene,
What fear can reach the sol-
dier's heart,
Whose trust in Thee has been.
Sir George Colli v.
The Mail Steamer "Hava-
na" ai rived early this morn-
ing from New York, and after
transferring the following
passengers to the Tender 'Co-
lonia" proceeded to Havana
with 134 passengers for that
I city:
Misses Eleanor DJ^arring-
ton, and Florrie Faunders;
Mesdamcs Bessie C. Knowles,
and Maud Sands; Mr. and
Mrs. Win. S. Carrick, Mr. and
Mrs. (). F. Pritchard and
Master Mark S. Pritchard;
Dr. Clinton F. Costenbader;
Messrs Henrv C. Christie,
William A Grist. William St.
John Hall, Charles M. Hav
wood, Henry A. Highman,
George T. FCnowles, John A.
McKinney, George Profit,
Frank Parks, Herbert J. Wus-
sell,and William F. Saunders;
Hon. F. C. Wells Durrant.
Miss Katurah Ford; Mes-
dames Mary Bain and Letitia
Ford; Messrs Wilfred R. Pain
and Fred. H. Clarke.
Messrs Timothy E. Donald-
sen and Assed Rawaja.
:o:
The Motor "Francis 1'."
left Miami for Nassau this
morning with mails and
passengers.
lion. F. C! Wells Durrant
arrived this morning per Mail
St< amer "Havana" fiom his
summer vacation.
o
We are pleased to see our
esteemed friend Mr. II. C.
Christie in our office once
again. He is looking fresh
after his "lay off."
Among the passengers pi r
Havana this moimug is the
enterprising Managi r of the
Big 4 who appears to have
enjoyed his "double bar railed
trip.
:o:
We have much pleasure in
publishing the following:
AURORA LODGE, NO. 810,
Grand Unite I Win of Odd
Fellows.
Nassau, Bahamas.
26th August, 1915.
Harold I). Eascombe, Esq.
Sir & Pro.
I am directed to inform
you thai during the order of
business of the above named
Lodge held on the 33rd 11W'..
it became known that you
Lq^ enlisted in the Bahamas
Contingent now in training
for service at Hie front.


I am further directed to
state that Aurora is very
pleasec^to know that you
have c ^ftrfu 1 !y obeyed Y< >ur
Country's Call" and have
cast your lot with others of
the bra pi re whoarewillingto
lay down their lives for "Jus-
tice and Honour."
Aurora fully realizes her
obligations to humanit) and
especially to the bearers of
the Three Links.
I have great pleasure in in-
forming you that in appreci-
ation (.1 your patriotism, it
was unanimously decided
" 1 hat so long as you shall re-
main in active service yOU
shall be regarded and held as
a Financial Brother."
In due time ;i travelling
card will be presented to you,
which will also be supple-
mented by a letter which may
be useful to you.
Yours in F. L. & T.,
Jas. II. Wallace, N. G.
Jos. 1). Weir, P. S.
Nassau, N. P ,
lst September, 1915.
To the Officers and Members
of Aurora Lodge No. 810,
G.U.O.O.F.
Brethren:
1 desire to thank you for
your magnanimous kindness
in holding me as a "Finan-
cial Brother" as long as I
remain on active service, and
beg to assure you that as
long as memory holds a seat
your action shall never be
h irgotten by me.
In casting my lot with
others of the Great Empire,
in this gigantic struggle I
am prompted so to do si ilely
because I think it is mv dutj
as a Britisher to be found
among the rank and file of
my fellow itizens in this the
Empire's hour of peril.
Again allow me to than!.
yOU and ask that your
prayers be given me, and hope
that the day is not far distant
when it shall again be mj
privilege to meet with you,
around the sacred altar of
Friendship Love, and Truth.
FVfotfrs in F, L. and T.,
II. I). BASCOMBE.
Private No. ig Bahamsf
Contingent.
Jos. D. Weir, P. S.
OLD LINEN DAY.
Those who are responding
to the urgent appeal from our
hospitals for old linen will
kindly bring in their contri-
butions to the ball-room at
G vernment House on Tues-
day, Sept. 14. The ladies of
the Sewing Guild will be
pleased to receive them from
4.30 to 6.30 p.m. Old cotton
will also be acceptable. Ar-
ticles must be free from starch
I and blue, boiled and pressed
] if possible. It will not be
I in cesary to remove the seams.
LATEST
War News.
September 6th 1915.
London, 4th:Although they
continue their retirement in
ie sectors, and are being driv-
en back in others, the Russians
on thfl whole have stiffened their
resistance and the German allies
now have to fight, and fight
hard, for every yard they gain.
Berlin, 4th:The third Ger
man war loan announced this
week is attracting much atten
tion and it is stated that every
thing indicates its Buccess.
Many hip; subscriptions have al-
ready being announced.
Geneva, Via Paris, 4: Ma
dame Carton de YViart, wife of
the Belgian Minister of Justice,
am sted in Belgium in May and
sentenced to three months iin
prison men t for corresponding
with her husband has been n
leased. She is expected tore;
Basle tomorrow to meet her
luisl tand W ho has come to
Switzerland for that purp< se.
In wnsville, Texas. 4:With
at le -t (en known Mexican
dead .1 I probably as many
more dead bodies lying in the
dense brush, the fight between
hand of Mexican outlaws and
80 United States cavalrymen
aided bj Texas Rangers and
armed citizens,ended late this
afternoon. One American
trooper was wounded
At four o'clock the Mexicans
withdrew to the south hank of
the Rio Grande River and hid
in the bpish, apparently await
ing another opportunity to at-
tack.
Havre, 4th:--The following
official communication was is-
sued today by tLe Belgian mili-
tary authority -
There has been a heavy bom-
bardment along the front es-
pecially in the neighbourhood
of Dixmude.
Newport News, Virginia, 4:
Property damage estimated at
two million dollars resulted
from a fire which originated in
the Chesapeake and Ohio grain
elevator"A." here late tonight.
Washington, 4th: Foreign
influences in Haiti working to
block the plans of the United
States to pacify the republic
and rehabilitate its finances, un-
der American supervision, has
made it necessary to declare
martial law in Port au Prince,
the capital, and practically all
but two of the countries open
ports.
Petrograd, Via London.
4th:A congress of Russia's
representative men and institu-
tions summoned by Emperor
Nl holas to discuss, organize
and unify means for prosecut*
ing the war to .1 ful con
elusion, held its first meeting
this morning in the Imperial
Palace.
London, (tli: A novelty in
submarine warfare is reported
in a despatch fri'in Athens to
Paris. It is stated that a Bri
tish submarine after threading
its n ay through the Gulf oi Is
madi land- d a party for the
purpose 'd dynamiting the rail-
mad I 1 idjjeat Gi bize, 28 miles
Southeast of Constantinople.
Although the Xpedition was
not entirely successful the blue
jackets destroyed a portion ol
the I ndge killing the Turkish
soldiers on guard then and re-
turned safely to the submarine
London-The st e a m e r
Hi SfH 1 iui has arrived safely
at Queeiistown. The vessel
had been struck by a torpedo
but B< >t sunk. Eight li\ ( si
were lost.
Athens:The Greek Par-
liament has adjourned with-
out the new premier making
a statement regarding its for-
eign policy.
Rome:--The Vatican is
bombarded with request for
information regarding possi-
ble papal action with the
United States regarding peace
_____J
Atlanta, Georgia:Ameri
can gills are "Adopting" sol-
di, is fighting for the Allies
in the trench* s in Eun pe am
are sending them letters,
1 igarettes, socks and other
welcome little gifts.
The British steamers Cym-
belinc and the Mimosa were
sunk, presumably by torpe-
does. Six were killed and six-
injured and thirty one saved
on theCymbeline. 'I he Mim-
osa crew were -;i\ ed.
B rlin:The admiralty
lacks information on the
sinking of the Hcspcrain and
awaits definite news as to
whether the steamer was
actually torpedoed and under
what conditions.
Further progress is report-
ed against the Russians on
the Eastern front. The situa-
tion in the Baltic, however,
is unc hang< d.
Paris:Violent rtillery
engagements occurred in the
vicinity of Arras, Bretencoui
and Champagne districts.
Copenhagen :A n
giant biplane is undergc
tests, It is German ai.
measures 4a meters across th
the planes It can carry fui
fi 11 ight hours, has wireless,
si an Might has spi ce for
twelve bombs, live machine
guns and eight men and is
expectt d to travel from Get
many to London and back
in live hours,
. I ondi m: The T< utonic
Allies are relaxing the offen-
sive on the Eastt rn fr< >nt and
are believed to 1 e prepai in|
to dig in for the Winter.
They have pushed their
lines beyond the limit of
safety expi rts are explaining.
There are further 1 imours
of dissi sion among the Turks
and Germans.
White Lime
I AM offering FOP SALK
my entile stoi k of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders 1< ft at Mr, Si ilomon
Finlayson, Deveaux St. or
I'hone 258 or The Tribune"
Office.
]0SIAH RAHMING
June 30, 1915.
A


e
ing. All the work was done by
young colored men and women
tinder tln'ir own instruct" rs
Other schools which exhibit-
fed articli s nf marked interest
were the Virginia Normal
School, of Petersburg; tbe
Colored Deaf, Dumb, and'Blind
Institute, of Raleigh, N. C.;
Shaw University. Raleigh ; Vor
hees College, South Carolina :
Virginia Deaf and Dumb
will rank as a great success
Some one has aptly said that in |
its simplicity, practicableness,
and unique interest the Negro
Exposition at Richmond was
(lie most truly "American" ex- :
position ever held in this coun-
try since the Centennial at*
Philadelphia in 1876. A pro-.
mi nent speaker at the Exposi-
lion thus summed it up :
This exposition, first of
the Virginia ucai auu i/uwu; ........
School. Newport News; the St.! Kind in the historyolthe worl
Paul School, of Lawrenceville;! is a most splendid tribute to
and the colored high school of I the courage, the strength, the
Richmond. perseverance, the indomitabi 1
A markedly fine exhibit came ty, and the versatility ol the
from Washington County and negro race. It signihes the
llagerstown in Maryland; and 1 achievments of marvellous
Henrico County, Virginia, things by a once downtrodden
whose Superintendent of, race within a short span c
Schools. Jackson Davis, was the
originator of the "Henrico Me
It typifies the industrj,
the development, the advance
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS
Instructions have been re-
ceived summoning :iIIFrench-
men bom in Martinique,
Guadelope or French (iui.'ina
belonging to the classes 180,0
to 1909 (born from 1870 to
1889) to present themselves
immediately at the ViceCon-
sulate <>f France at Port-of-
Spainor at any of the twelve
Consulai Agencies of the Bri-
tish Wesl Indies to pa a
medical examination.
H. r. ARMBRISTKR.,
Consular Ai'cnt for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Subscrip 1 ions are" ui gentl)
thod," had a full exhibit at the ment, and the indefatigability
Exposition. The "Henrico I of the negro race, whose era
Method" provides a skilled and 1 seems just dawning. Another
highly educated colored in-i fifty years of such accomplish
structor who travels from rural i ment as has characterized the
school to rural school, teaching I negro race during the past fifty
teachers and children alike all years, and the colored man will
kinds of industrial work, and in stand in his place in the sun.
summer provides for neighbor- mentally, morally, industrially.
socially, and financially, as well
as physically, emancipated.
'/",'/, American Review of Reviews.
K
need< d tor th< al ove fund
and all donations, however
small, will be gratefully ac-
cepted, and will be acknow-
ledged in the newspapers.
H. F. AB.MBR.ISTFR.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
and July, 1915.
hood teachers of canning, gar-
dening, and sew ing.
The New York exhibit was a
noteworthy one, and occupied a
prominent position. This com-
prised an infinite variety of,
manufactured goods, all from!
factories owned h
There were also m
from colored schools in New
York and from individuals.
Among other displays was a
booth occupied bj a negro 111 m I
from Charleston, South Caro
lina. He was surrounded by-
thousands of postcards, each
bearing some poem, epigram,
or motto of his composition.
Good Morning!
KHJS, Mil IIUII11 r~^
y colored men. Vvc Are Introducing
many exhibits American Bilk
Am in a i I'1 hroere
Aroerii an Cotton Lisle
Just Received by
This Steamer
Fresh American
Fruit.
Peaches, Pears,
Plums, etc. etc.
J. K. AMOURY.
i3ay Si i I
Here's An Oppor-
tsinitv that you cannot
lUMiy affor If You want to Economize.
If you want a Ft^t Class
Light.
If you want to be recog-
nized". Use the Rest Light
tln:t monev can buy. The
Safest and the Cheapest.
THE
DC A A All KEROSENE MANTLE
BEACON LAMPS and BURNERS
nro rproKnlz<"il on the
Htiindaril Incandes-
cent oil lamps of tho
World.
100,000 Millafle*
n..r< All Produces a power-
ful, brilliant white
llKnt of IOO eanille-
|iurr. Duma CO
mon roal-oll. Coats
.... 1 >- onr "ui for ala
hour".
Brighter than rib-.
electricity or six or-
dinary lamps a' bji
l\ 111 to a.ni'-lrlllk Ike
coat. -
Milo entirely of
brass. For use
homes, store*, halls
and churrhes. No
Odor, 00 noise: safe.
Hlmplo and clean.
There Is only one
I Beason. Insist o a
nuvlng It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E Nabbic-
14 Christie St., Nassau, N.I .
Special Terms sivaoif requested. Write
. mi' ami know all about tins won-
derful Lamp.
HOSIERY -The Allies"
They have stood the test. Givei
foot comfort N
bei n e li ..... baggy. The ahape 11
knit 111- no! pressed in.
GUAR.ANTEKD foi '
suj 1 ri irity of material and wurkmanship.
Absolutely '. linleai Will weai 6 a I
">'_......... ,...........1 Absolutely stainless
These, bein" Inrgclv of the "up without holes, or new ones ree.
lift" variety, sold readilj to the our special on .
of
oiic
of
crowds. The walls
the rest rooms were
portraits and paintings of a
negro Indianapolis painter
twenty-three years of age.
At first an entrance fee of fifty
cents was exacted at the Expo
Sition gates, but later this fee
was dispensed with, all visitors
being allowed to come in free.
Only a dime was charged at the
doors of the principal exhibit
building.
On Thursday, July 8, "White
Folks" day was observed, many
white citizens of Richmond and
vicioity inspecting the Exposi
tion.
In every
cially the
to every
ne sen ling us fl 00 in cm
or pi ital n te, to 1 ver a Ivi I
lung with shipping charges, we will send 1 I
with written guhrantee, back)
million I llai 11 m| any, 1 ithi 1
3 Pairs of our 73,0. value
rican Silk 11
4 Pairs of our 50c. value
American Caihrni re Hosii rv,
4 Pairs of our 50c. Value.
An erican Cotton-Litle II
b Pairs of Children's Hosiery.
I 'i iNT DELAY I Iffei espin
dealei in your locality is selected.
The International Koisery co.
P O Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO, U.S.A
Try J. C Coakley's
new Id. Cigars
The Allies
A blend of four fine toba< 1 os
0 -
They arc good to the end
or
or
or
way except finnn
Negro Exposition
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wx > Com
I lete finish and polish f->i all furniture
woodwork and Boon.
Johnson's Wood Dya forthe irtwtic
c iloring of .ill wood, soft or hard _
Johnson's! Under Lr a spirit
finish, ver) much superioi to shellac 01
V.llllisll
Johnson's Flat Wood Finish fora
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effect
without the expense ol rubbing.
Johnson's Past-' Wood Filler -fol
ftlling the grain and pore* of wood,
proparing i< I01 the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wax foi bal
room flints.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
RUMSEYS PUMPS
CIST E R N Pumps. Wf 11
I' u m i> s, W i u <1 mill
Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Pams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cens
trifugal Pumps. Water work,
Machinery, Rotary Pump-,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
A Compressors,Ship Pumps
Pn --urc Pumps. Boiler Feed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, rile.
'Installed under the direct
supervision of H. McPherson
and lirother.
Prices off Application.
11. |. THOMPSON,
A'Tilt.
T. M Knowles
528 Bay Street.
IS now prepared t<> supply
Rubber Tires for flfUjies
Carriages, also to rescind
repair them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Williams' Shoes Are Better


University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM