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I 1HP. TRIBUNE. NASSAt. N P. L. GILBKKT DDPCCH, Editor and 1'ropriet r OFFIOK Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte Sis imas l'lIONi: 860. P. O. HOX 163. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, YV.-lneaxlay ami Friday— single cow JI Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy IU Saturday—single copy ... ijd Weekly Monthly i f luartcrly 4 s. 6d lall Yearly a t, Yearly 1 8* would be to this Colon\ we bad bettei just be practi1 ,il about tliis thing or we may rue it. BOARD OF AGRICULT1 RE BAHAMAS. PAYABLK IN ADVAM'i: Advertising Rates:—Six peace per line foi lii.-u^ition^lirce pence pel line ^ei^ps*Mrou; ie"^Wub Advertisements under eight lines 4s. zr XLhc {Tribune SATURDAY. August 2. 1915. 0* PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M. The news from the war during the past week lias relic the great depression winch prevailed for some time previously on account of the disastrous Russian retreat. The Russian Naval victory off Riga was a decided relief, as it must necessarily have ups t the plans of the German onslaught upon the Russians. Germany appears to be not quite so indifferent as hitherto, the remonstrances of the UniStaies, she will make repar on for the sinking of the] abic"; she will prevent a etition of the "I.usitania" edy ; and she will provide portunities for escape of lericanson torpedoed vess< Is, rmany lias ci ilainly SUStaina chaime of heart. Operations on the Gallipoli jisula and in the Dardas, though slow and hard, rogressive. ubmarine operations do not gear to be all one way as sed to The assurance te navy has the submarine ce well in hand is distinct relief. The prototype of bmarine is the fish, and of lane is the bird. Man opied nature's forms might well follow her methods of warfare, a natural enemy of fish is the bird, so, to follow the simile the natural enemy of the submarine, so to speak, should be the aeroplane. The gull from its advantage of height sifchjathe fish below the surface :u& with one fell SWOOp strikes* death blow into its prey, and so the aeroplane from its advantagous height should see the submarine below the surface and watch for its rise and with unerring aim drop its bombs into the submarine, before it launches its weapon of destruction against the helpless merchantmen. Of course this is all theory on our part, the practice might be, well impracticable. The following Circular issued by the Hoard of Agriculture is worthy of the attention of all who arc inti 1 ested in the cultivation of ground productions. The pesl referred to is said to have made its appearance on ElcUthera and it is the intention of the Board of Agriculture to confine it to that island until it is Stamp) d out. Drastic measures will be m assary and in these everybody should cooperate w ith the lioard. It dors not need to he told what a loss the Sweet Potato How to fight. THE POTATO WEEVIL. Extract of letter, Imperial Department of Agriculture of .//.' West indie* (April lit!,. 1915.) 1. The disease is the result ol the attacks of the sweet potato weevil, Cylas formicarius, an insect known to occur 111 the Southern States, Cuba, Jamaica and British Guiana, and at various places in the old world tropics. 2. This is a very serious pest, similar in itsattackand the damage' done by it to our West Indian Scarabee, CryPtorynchus batatae. The remedies which are available for the control of the Searabee are equally applicable in the case of the sweet potato weevil. 3. The remedies for control of these pests are, as you will see from the references quoted, purely agricultural. The) include rotation of crops, planting only perfectly uninfested "seed" material, (preferably slips raised in a nursery from clean roots). thoroughness in removing all bits of vine and root alter, harvesting, and the harvesting ol the potatoes as soon as possible after they are ripe. Extract Agricultural Neu April 34th (Vol. XIV 3 ;• DISTRIBUTION. The sweet potato weevil is distributed throughout the tropical and sub-tropical parts of the WOl Id. and it is probably capable of living wherever sweet potatoes are grown on a large scale. At the present time Cylas formicariuo occurs as a swi el potato pest in India and the Far East, in Africa, the United States, Jamaica, Cuba, British Guiana, and the Bahamas It is stated to have been recorded from Baibadoes, hut it does not appear to be known in that island at the present time, nor indeed has it been known there for many years past. This insect has been known and recorded as existing 111 Cuba, Jamaica, British Guiana, and the United States, but the present record of its occurrence in the Bahamas is quite new. This record is based on the Identification of specimens received from the Si 1 retary of the Board of Agriculture, Nassau, Bahamas, by the Imperial Commissioner of Agricrulture for the West Indies. METHOD OF ATTACK. The sweet potato weevil deposits its eggs in the thickest vines near their base, and in the roots of the potato where these are exposed at the surface of the s:il. Once an attack has begun, that is, when the first infestation has saken place in a potato field, the development of the weevil and its increase in numbers is merely a matter of time. The life-cycle occupies about thirty days: the adults developing from the first infestation continue and spread the attack throughout the field and ( any it to the root-. I Each succeeding generation greatly increases the amount of injury, and it will be seen that prevention of the beginning of the attack for as long I as possible after planting, and 1 harvesting as soon the potatoes I are ready will do a gnat deal Mil reducing the amount ul injury. METHOD OF CONTROL. In the first place potatoes ought not to be planted on the same land for two successive crops, and next, all planting material should be quite free from infestation. I Ins can be assure d by planting with slips grown 111 a nursery, from uninli steo! small roots or tubers. The nusery should be 1 stablished where there is the least likelihood of the weevil being present, and should nol be maintained long enough foi it to become infested Slips for planting should never be taken from a field in which either the sweet potato weexil or the scarabee is known to be present. If material for planting is scarce and it become-, necessary to use slips from a field which is suspected of being infested, none but the smallest tips of the vines should be taken the purpose, for the first attacks always occur in the older, more woody portions of the stem. The sweet potato weevil is a serious pest, and every pi caution should be taken to prevcnt its introduclion into A GIF-T TO FRANCE The Travelling X-Ray Moior Ambulance which has been presented loihe French Army by me London Committee of the Scottish Women's Hospitals is the 1 ns kind The Ambulance will be ennrely worked by women. The picture shows J di.: .ii^L-.sbcd people inspecting the Ambulance. From Led 10 right they are Baroness Bamekow. of Sweden. Lady Muir Mackenzie, and the Marchesa Itr periali. the wife of the hanm Ambassador in London Full sized and arra\ed in the picturesque dress of the Fifteenth Century, the figun Carries a s\*\ statuary el win re in the Antilles. In Ci 'lour and in si vie ol dr< also this interesting statue beany colony where it docs not '"' the f' >' which, in spite of exist at present. : the slight b ard, is th ii ol BxtrocX from "West Indian Bulletin" Vol. A, So. i. Thorough cleaning of the land after harvesting the crops, all infested material, and ol all roots, vines, < ; .. ought to be carefully carried out. All infested material should be buried with lime. Planting the field slips from the nursery seems likely to give good results. l'he us energ) s along ihe extended arm. At the base is seen the si mi nude form. also in bronze, ol Anai •" ma, the beautiful Indian Queen, called b) the Spaniards, the flowei 1 if Xaiaguu ; she is lifting a hand imploringly to longs to'a class of its own.The the fig i above tier, as effigy of Columbus as seen though foi protection from in the gardens of a certain the harsh treatment that was mansion at Queen's Park, measured out to her. HimPort of Spain the capital of self, however, be could not Irinidad, makes him a scientific navigator surrounded by "pickings" or bits of roots (nautical instruments : and in periority: and in the fortress from uninfested or slightly Marine Square in the game that guards the entrance to protect : an ungrateful peo pie II' vcr !"! g ::' e 111 III ills suinfested fields may be used to establish a nursery from which slips can be taken. If thi se nurseries are establism d at some distance from potato fields, and if they a>e not kept long enough for any pptatoes to ripen, they will not become infested. 1 he potatoes should be harvested as soon as they are ripe. It is likely that this last recommendation suggests more definite measures of control than any other and of learning, notably the incity, the cast in bronze, shows a man m court dress, the soul of modesty, after his great success. Adorning Colon Park in the Capital ol SontO Domingo, a statue also in bronze, represents an even older Columbus whose 'lean-shaven face bears traces of chastening in the crucible oLstCME weary years ol waitur*^ipon their Catholic Majesties after the rebuffs of the centres it may tO a large extent exIplain why the loss is so much worse in dry seasons than in wet. Nassau N. P. Aug. 20th 1915. SOME REMARKABLE STATUES IN THE WEST INDIES IN THEIR RELATION TO THE 8REAT WAR. IV COLUMBUS A short distance up the stone Bight that leads to the doorway of the residence ol the Governor of the Colonv of the Bahamas, there stands like a sentinel in white, the statue of Christopher Columbus, or as he is know n outside the British world, Cristobal Colon. stitute of Salamanca, that saw in his pet theory only cause foi derision, spite, envy and opposition on the part of the Spaniards with loss of income arising from tin; duplicity of their King. "a Castilla y a Leon nuevo Mundo dio Colon." the river ()/ania, is stil shown the dungeon. wh< re, loaded w ith 1 hams, he lingered, till by order of the governor, a ship was made read) to bear him to Spain. An i\ ed there, he threw linns' ii at the foot of the throne of Queen lsab*l the Catholic and sobbed like a child. I be ham lie hung in his apartment, ns a precious r< lie and directed that it was to have been put into his coffin withhisbody. It was not done. The controversy that arose over the identity of his bones has bun settled in favour of Santo Domingo where in the Cathedral built as early as 1540, the casket is placed under the dome of a costly and superb mausoleum. On the occasion of their evacuation of that country, at the declaration of its mdeSo Sang the Spanish poet: pendence, the Spaniards, by .. "Columbus gave to Cas-1 mistake, took with them to Lille and to Leon, a Newt Cuba, the Casket containing World." Tiny gave the the ashes of Don Diego (' %  .1 great Admiral a name andllumbus, ton of the great Adno money: and it was not miral, who had ruled the till years aftei he had died i Colony as governor ; and 1 lain neglect and in want, that ruins of whose castle slill his heirs were able to recover overlook the peaceful w alias in a Court of law, the rentals of the river O/ama. Santo that had been due to him as Domingo has refused other Viceroy of the Indies and to nations untold ransoms for found the almost princely the ashes in question. The House of the Dukes of Xaralast time the casket was il *.'



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' I ( THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P. WAR ARTIST AT WORK The trtist in the photograph is M. Jon. one of those appointed by the French Government to mke pictorial record of the war. M. Jonas is here seen in the Indian camp in Flanders. His models are keenly interested in his work opened, all save part of a thigh-bone, had been foun_ tins, "The Soul of a People"—5 of the Bishop of London. 4 p.m chism. Junior, (in Church,) Senior (i School) 7.30 p.m. Evensong, "Comfort in tribulation -a Sermon of Sir Thomas Mora. ST. MARGARETS 7.15 a.m. Holy Communion. 7.80 p mEvensong, "A wonderful Church." CHURCH OK ST. AGNKS, V. M. Grants Town, Blue Hill Road Ret: Audlty J, Browne, Hector. Holy Communion 7.30 a.m. Matins 9.50 a.m. Nlissa Cantata and sermon 10 30 a.m Catechism 4 p.m. Solemn Evensong and Sermon 7.30 p.m. Week Day Services Low Mass daily 7.30 except Saturdays. Evensong— Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 5.;i() p.m. Wed. and Friday 7 p.m. St. FRANCIS XAVIER S CHURCH Watt Street Rev. Ckryottom Schreiner, O.S.B., Vicar 1'orane Mass and Sermon 11 a.m. Sermon and Benediction 5 pm. Week


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I THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P. I****** > mmummnimnMMwmmmmmmmmmBBmm m %  m %  as i i % Kest and Comfort l r the mother an 0 b> months upwards. TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES %  *Pamphlet • Infan, Feeding and Management" sent free. ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD.. LONDON, ENGLAND. 1 & 1 i 1 M 1 as ^==D#/AYc= Welch's (fr&pe Juice. JJSJRJS^a F/re Famous "IMP" Cyclecar, JC C f\ Pleasure or Delivery, to YOU for Only &.OU FO. B. NEW YORK. 1 Cent A Mile SPEED, 8 TO 50 MILES PER HOUR. 45 Miles On A Gallon of Gasoline. PRICES •Quarts, 2s. 3d. rach. T'inls is. 4d. t 15s. per (lei/. I Pints', 9d. 8s. 6d. per floz 1 Pints, 5d. 4s. 6d. pei daft. A T V BLACK'S 222 Bay St. AND The Nassau Candy Kitchen, Opp. Hotel Coh Dial. THE CAR THAT SATISFIES r+ */.„ l i • , V Till Sdc-the fiYsYcos "iS !" \hT hew rid unowned "//HP" Cyeclecai fits everv pocketYou're cheatingyourself if you do'nt g-et one. fTHt LINEN STORE.j #ave Received I hi l.ai. si Spring Novelty 77/£ ..£ %  // -LAVE;;ETS Guarantei mishable, %  sts, Yok L) lillinei Wl : %  Vliil and 1 and ' %  Gold, i; (ioldl Sijver and White,C e im.and I tonne Vets, adow \'i | 1 rails, Point (l Ksprit, r ted Net Uurli L. G DUPUCH, Exclusive Agent for the Bahama I TlNUEO FROM FIRST PAQr. i'l'^f^. lhc interesting and bIessS-J^ I( |,.„, t ,, i( | 0|] 125 of thaangel at Moris will cheer many a heart. Yours very sincerely AGNES E. YVESTON. Royal Sailors' Rest, Portsmouth, %  "Ashore and .Afloat." H. DIGHTON PEARSON 1 FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. IN 2 PIECES and UNION SUIT. SANITARY ^^ %  COOL RELIABLE SOLD BY Felhw of the Royal Institute of British Architects. is practicing as an Architect 6-Surveyor in the Bahamas. I hose who are interested in PUBLIC or PRIVATE building schemes will be well advised to consult him as to Designing, Superintending of Building, Surveying, Dilap idations, and improvements of property generally. Address, ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY 1 elephone No. tor. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgently needed ror the above fund and all donations, h iwe\ i i small, will be gratefully ac cepted. and will be a< knowid in the newspap .. H. F. ARviHRISIKR, Consular A cent for France. Nassau, X. P., 2nd July, rqi 5. Washable Marquisettes. Hack and White, Sand and White, Dovblt Width. Poplin >''' %  ck Po| lin, White Poplin, double widl White Washing Silk. Silk Crepe, Cotlon Crepe. May ist, nil 5. Wm. Hilton 260 BAY STREET. T. M. Knowles 528 Bay Street. I S now prepared to supply Rubber Tires for Babies Carriages, also to reset, and repair them. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Mar. 20th, 1915. NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. INSTRUCTIONS have b* en n ceived summoning allFn nchmen born in Martinique, Guadelope or French Guiana belonging to the classes iSqo to igog (born from 1870 to I 1889) l<) present themselves immediately al the Vice Consulate of France at Port-ofSpainor at any of the twelve Consular Agencies of the British Wesl indies to pass .-, medical i xamJnatron. If. F. ARMBRISTF.R Consular A^ent for France. •Nassau. \. p., 2nd July, it,i 5. Just Received by This Steamer Fresh American Fruit. Peaches, Pears, Plums, etc. etc. /. K. AMOURY. day Street. White Lime AM offering FOR SALE my entire sto k of White Lime of about 800 bushels at 6d. per bushel. Orders II'I at Mr. Solomon Finlayson, Deveaux Se^tf Phone 25801"The Tribune" Office. JOSIAH RAMMING June 30, mi -. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson". Prepared Wax ,, pietefimih andaolbh for nil furniture woodworkand (1 1011 Johnson" %  Wood Dye fortbe artiltrl lnh""-'' %  %  '''^ % %  "'. ^t or hard Johnaon. Under La. .,,„„ !" ^ynrochiuperiorto .h.ll, Johnson-. rial Wood ftnlah bMutifuL artittic. band rubbed effect wWiouttheexpen,, D f rubbing %  "tag tbe grain and pom „ f W(l ,„, pnjpanng ,4 for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wa-for bal room i|,„,, %  FOR SALE BY Chas. E GASOLINE ,n ""inis Ej everJ ptDce per Gallon. 1 1 '" Gallon Cans ()ne Shil ling pei Gallon %  C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay Street Nassau \. p, April, 13111 K,I-. WA. MATHER UNDERTAKER D I.-IM.s ,,, m f„r m i„s r. antl the Public! ihmM r h.,jusi received % %  > complete outiii i i 1 li'> fi M -• buisiicps ol an un. deri-ker, which phcea linn j n R posilion to carry 'ut Funerals that ) be entrusted to Ins tare with : '" 1 '" I despatch ; and res,,, t fu "y %  i's theii p itronage G< I Price* in st and prove thai these are the verj lowest for the fin t cl IM work. Here's An Opportunity th f u you cannot afford to lose. II \ ou want to Economize. If you want a First Class Light. II you want to be recog Use the Best Light thut money .an buy. The SI and the Cheapest. THE 3EACQN FMl m MANTLE DtHUUIl LAMPS AND BURNERS are recognised u,.. %  iHlandariT IncandenI cent oil lamps of the world. lOO.OOo satlKflrd users. Ail drll u hlr,|. i roduoea a powerllKht of 1IN> ,„„,ll,power. Buma comII "ion coal -.MI. Costs only one cent for *ii bourn. Hrlirhtcr thnn K^S. electricity or nix ordinary lamps at oi. "Uti (O illii-lHiih ltl „ BM Made entirely of brass. For use In homes, stores, halls and churches. No odor, no noise; safe, simple and clean. There Is only one Benson. Insist o a naving It. Home Supply Co. KANSAS CITY, MO. For Sale By THOS. ENABBIF14 CHRIS nrST., Nassau, N.P. \ ial Term. K ivenif requetted. Write • %  ^aieandtoowaHaboai this won di-rfnl I..111111. Albury FOUND. A Sheep in my field in ih. Y'Uage on Hiursday, 10th August. Owner can have '" l ";'' l,v I roving property : l(l paying expensi Applv ROBERT PRATT. Williams' Shoes Are Better Shingles Rest No. 1 Heart 5in.Cv1.resc bhtngles at |g.6oper thous sand of 20 bundles Difcounts'on lots of ovei 5000 shingles. Special Price 0 oncheapei grades—also ;in. Cypress at $6.73 per !l sand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. 1 resh stock arriving verv week. C C SAUNDERS. i • v L



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LATEST RADIOGRAMS f NOTICE The R-egvilnr Delivery "B TRIBUNE" la now guaranteed. NOW IS THE TIME TO SUBSCRIBE. N\il!i\n •.ddiclua |urare In verb* mexgiatrl. BainH bound Iniwtar lo the Dogmjva of no Mrvater. "THE TRIBUNE" WANTS AOVT'S. FOR RESULT ADVERTISE IN "THE TRIBUNE" Special Raiea to Yearly Advertisers Vol. XII. No. 339 NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. AUGUST 28. 1915 Price. THREE CENTS. THE CALL OF THE EMPIRE. im Miss Weston'a Monthly Letter. %  € %  Dear Friend,— T HE call ol tlie Empire is sounding tlie world over, and it is a call to arms. The cause of the war is not aggression, or revenge, but is Bummed up in the words Truth, Honour, and Righteousness; and the Empire is responding to the call, inn Irom all parts of tlie world where the British Sag Hies are flocking to the standard: Canada, Australia, Hew Zealand, India, South Africa, and many another colon) is sending its sons, who are proud to lie able to deI fend and light for the motherland. i he call of the Empire is a Call to SKI FSAi RlPlCft. In the j present peace and quiet of home we do not properly understand i lie 11 I'll that is out there. "I I ell" 14 the word thatevetyman that has been to the front has served in the trenches uses, and uses advisedlj ,and u takes self-sacrifice indeed to go through an experience that may he termed hel ; to lie in wet trenches day alter da). and night after night, to have tin cessation of shell fire, I <>r of bulh-ts w fuzzing < i asi l< sslv, to see your comrades killi d liv youi side, it is hell upon j earth, and w hen you add to that the deliberate ruin >>i villages and towns, and Know that the civil population have been shot down, children tortured and Killed, women outraged, and the whole country a gel euna ol flame and death, it is > n< >ugh to make an angi I wi op; and it is l take part bravely and nobly in stemming this awful tide <>f blood that the Empire calls for her sons Self-sacrifice. There is One who taught us wli.it Mill-sacrifice is. It is the Hiviny away of self, it is the very principle of life; sacrifice is ennoblement, Iva stoop to con 'ON'T, we lose to find, we die to live This is the spirit of the Master and the teaching of I lis word. History affirms it, bio graphy enshrines it, all expert-1 CHIT confirms it. It is the great esl truth of all, that life comes through death; it is Learned on the battlefield; we have been learning it during "he last • l-.\ en months,and the lesson has to bo i epi Rted a : 11n an Quality considered, we Guarantee to ihow you a Living or HI I.HM onK THIRD even 1 i l %  i i ; %  *-'t< oui .it.i ii TV > .*Jnn miMiu '-•fiv Mtutlcd. —I'^'Afl^^^ our money wilIaeavaWtTir>!'v rdiindcd hi I ltd ARI V. Bankers: I. %  Ion City ai I Midland Bank Ltd, *-. Corn sti. .;. i.i is-. %  i Larrle* 1 ; % %  %  %  t LamonH half HoapRinjtv, % In II don.. Ilrtueii (Jov. %  %  nun. i.i with H\ l. rim on my Diamonds M : I'ncc 67 6 $\%M BUM Ring -it with two tin., in imoiKli un,| ihnst u i %  up pIlllVS U llqllll.'.l. I'nr,. 4i $HLO| Every Ring is sent In %  Prelti, Velvet Lined Case suitable lor Presentation. fjenl ct. Holld

The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02403
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, August 28, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
f
NOTICE
The R-egvilnr Delivery
"B TRIBUNE"
la now guaranteed.
NOW IS THE TIME TO
SUBSCRIBE.
N\il!i\n .ddiclua |urare In verb* mexgiatrl.
BainH bound Iniwtar lo the Dogmjva of no Mrvater.
"THE TRIBUNE"
WANTS AOVT'S.
FOR RESULT
ADVERTISE IN
"THE TRIBUNE"
Special Raiea to Yearly
Advertisers
Vol. XII. No. 339
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. AUGUST 28. 1915
Price. THREE CENTS.
THE CALL OF THE EMPIRE.
im
Miss Weston'a Monthly Letter.

Dear Friend,
THE call ol tlie Empire is
sounding tlie world over,
and it is a call to arms. The
cause of the war is not aggres-
sion, or revenge, but is Bummed
up in the words Truth, Honour,
and Righteousness; and the Em-
pire is responding to the call,
in- n Irom all parts of tlie world
where the British Sag Hies are
flocking to the standard: Cana-
da, Australia, Hew Zealand, In-
dia, South Africa, and many an-
other colon) is sending its sons,
who are proud to lie able to de- I
fend and light for the mother-
land.
i he call of the Empire is a
Call to SKI FSAi RlPlCft. In the j
present peace and quiet of home '
we do not properly understand
i lie 11 I'll that is out there. "I I ell"
14 the word thatevetyman that
has been to the front has served !
in the trenches uses, and uses
advisedlj ,and u takes self-sacri-
fice indeed to go through an ex-
perience that may he termed
hel ; to lie in wet trenches day
alter da). and night after night,
to have tin cessation of shell fire, I
<>r of bulh-ts w fuzzing < i asi l< ss-
lv, to see your comrades killi d
liv youi side, it is hell upon j
earth, and w hen you add to that
the deliberate ruin >>i villages
and towns, and Know that the
civil population have been shot
down, children tortured and
Killed, women outraged, and
the whole country a gel euna ol
flame and death, it is > n< >ugh to
make an angi I wi op; and it is
l take part bravely and nobly
in stemming this awful tide <>f
blood that the Empire calls for
her sons
Self-sacrifice.
There is One who taught us
wli.it Mill-sacrifice is. It is the
Hiviny away of self, it is the
very principle of life; sacrifice is
ennoblement, Iva stoop to con
'on't, we lose to find, we die to
live This is the spirit of the
Master and the teaching of I lis
word. History affirms it, bio
graphy enshrines it, all expert-1
chit confirms it. It is the great
esl truth of all, that life comes
through death; it is Learned on
the battlefield; we have been
learning it during "he last l-.\ en
months,and the lesson has to bo
i epi Rted a : 11n an mother and the wife send their
dearest, and in sending ihem
they die. Why do they do it ?
the Empire calls, the men must
g.j, if tin re is nn ounce ol cour-
ii patriotism, in them, and
with the same, if not greater,.
courage and patriotism, the
women stay at home.
* Now what does the Master
say ? "Except a corn of wheat fall
into the ground and die, it abidcth
\i.o\r. but if it die, it bringeth
jfirth much fruit." Life through
death is a I iospel truth. The
farmer has a bag of seed corn, he
prepares the soil of the field,
then goes out sowing, and covers
the seed up. We do not Know
all that happens, for growth is
still a seen l; but we know that
the seed dies to live; the husk
di i omposi s.and th< living grain
becomi S the mother of many.
now let us look from the
cornfield to the life of our Savi-
our. He only lived for thirty-
three years. Why ? He might
have lived for double that time,
moving from place to place tell- 1
ing them parables, and working
fresli miracles, showing love in
a hundred ways; but Christ's!
love was Kill mptive, the Cross!
loomed nearer, and was unavoi-
dable; to redeem the world. He
must die, to win, lie must lose i
Jesus Know that IIis death I
would do what His life could
novcr accomplish. One day oil
the cross would give llinij
eternity by the loss of 'Himself,
lie would save the world,- and
so He gave His life, the life of
God, ''(i ransom for many.' An
Dr. Horton puts it: "He knew
that He must he ground in the
mills of death if He wore to be
the bread of the World."
The call of the Empire is an
tm^ldbh'ssing, as it plants deep '
andmrfPin thousands of men
this glorious principle of self-
sacrifice, even in the giving of
life for that Empire whose flag
waves in every part of the world.
The call of the Empire is to
Womna.
It has been truly said that
women suffer more from war
than men do. They have many
of them to face the sufferings of
an invaded countiy, to see their
homes in flames, their children
tortured and then Killed, their
husbands, fathers, and lovers,!
shot down like sheepthey have I
to face hideous violation by I
ruthless conquerors, and also1
they have to face their own |
shattered lives after wards; mans
sufferings, either mentally or
morally, are as nothing to the
sufferings of women. You say,
perhaps, women are not called
to heir arms and to light. As a
i lass X'.i; but there are excep-
tions to this rule. The latest
saint canonised by the Roman
Catholic Church is La Pucelle,
the warrior maid, whose patrio-
tism and self-sacrifice was so
[great that she obeyed a call
higher than that of her country,
the call of God, and led the ar-
mies of Franca and the King of
France to victory, and, after five
centuries, she has been'canonis
led as a saint. Then as we turn
I the leaves of our Bible to the
| book of Judges, in the Old Tes-
tament, we come to the match-
less poem of
the warrior saint Deborah,
without whose leadership the
enemy could not be faced. If
1 war continues, possibly other
! Jean d'Ares and Deborahs will
! arise, and will stand in the ranks j
with the men.
But he that as it may, the call
[ to the Hmpire in this great war
I isto women as well as to men,
and the call is to be up and do-
ing. The magnificent army of
nurses, the great organisation of
the Red Cross, shows what they
are doing. Frame, Belgium, Xht
Dardanelles, at every base hos
pital, in every camp, there are
the brave, patient, skilled WO
men who have answered their
Country's Call. Look for a mo-
ment Bit Antwerp, a few months
back, and bear the story of those !
British nurses quietly proceed-
ing with their work when shells
were falling around them, re!
moving the sick Irom the groat
ball in which they were nursed !
on account of its danger from
shell fire, none of them shewing
the slightest siyn of fear; and
the same courae and absolute
devotion is shewn everywhere
by all the brave women who are
tending the wounded and dying.
I lere is self-sacrifice indeed, and
in the Homeland the call of the
Empire comes to every woman
to be up and doing, to fill as far
as possible the gaps made in
trade, agriculture,and whatnot,
by the loss of the men. Are
munitions of war wanted, and
t he) are, let the girls and women
blithe ranks at the factories,
and so help to bring the war to
88 speedy a close as possible.
Every girl and every woman has
a work- to do nowadays, and the
Empire, cannot get on without
them.
There is a goad and true sav-
ing as regards this war:
Fight but do not hate.
Germany has written manv
books, and lias sent them forth
to the world, and the teaching
is the Gospel of Hate : conquer
the world b) any and every cruel
means, Germany must be above
all, and so this Gospel of Hate,
which is the very spirit of the
Evil One, is inculcated through-
out the length & breadth of the
fatherland, and the very chil-
drefl are taught hymns of bate.
A pamphlet is issued by the
Garden City Press Letchwortk,
entitled "Why Germany will be
Defeated," by a Prussian, price,
post free, yd. I would advise
every reader to send for a copy
of this pamphlet.
The call of the Empire will
change into the call of love,
which is the call of Christ when
He comes, as He will ere long,
to inaugurate a universal reign
of love, peace, and righteousness,
and His message is "Behold l\
come quickly."
That message concludes our
Scriptures, it is Christ's parting
word, and amidst this frightful
clash of arms who would not
reply:
"Even so come Lord Jesus."
This is the firm foundation
on which we build God's pro-
mise of a golden age.
The call of the Empire is ga-
thered up in (lod's call to each
separate soul, and that call is
to life, and not to death; to life
eternal and everlasting. The
choice is left to each one, and
the call is "Trust and odey."
I heseare cardinol virtues in the
soldier, full trust and full obe-
dience. Trust Christ as your
Saviour, obey I lim as your Lord,
and all is well.
Our British, Canadian, Aus-
tralian lads in the Army and
Navy, God bless them. One of
them writes to me: "Just receiv I
ed your welcome letter, and as
1 have a few minutes to spare, I
write this one. I am very sorry
to say that whilst on duty guard-
in-: a barricade against the Ger-
mans, my chum was killed. We
were hai ing a few quiet words
about home, when suddenly he
fell shot through the head. He
had only said to me a few hours
before that he would not like to
be shot withour a chance, he
would like to die fighting, the
post that we were on was abso-
lutely stormed by bullets, and I
will say that I was verv glad
when morning came. Dear Miss
Weston, thanks very much for
the Gospel, I shall carry it and
read it. Of course we chaps do
not enjoy ourselves here;but we
have the satisfaction of doing
what wc all feel proud of, striv"
ing to maintain the cause ol
Right against Wrong, and vou
may be sure that Right will
conquer. God bless us all, and
bring us safe to our friends
again. Dowriteto me-soonas
wc long for letters from home.
My kindest regards to the staff
at the Rest, and to you my sin
cereet respect and gratitude, and
God bless you, and bring us
boys back to the land of free-
dom, right, and mercy."
And God will watch over
them, it is our daily and hourlv
(' Htinued on fourth /
RINGS
*** ONE-THIRD SAVED. ?">
Quality considered, we Guarantee to ihow
you a Living or hi i.hm onK THIRD even
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Bankers: I. Ion City ai I Midland Bank Ltd,
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fjenl ct. Holld Signet RmR no M mo ,
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I
1HP. TRIBUNE. NASSAt. N P.
L. GILBKKT DDPCCH,
Editor and 1'ropriet r
OFFIOK
Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte Sis
imas
l'lIONi: 860.
P. O. HOX 163.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, YV.-lneaxlay ami Friday
single cow ......... JI
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lall Yearly............at,
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would be to this Colon\
we bad bettei just be practi-
1 ,il about tliis thing or we
may rue it.
BOARD OF AGRI-
CULT1 RE BAHAMAS.
PAYABLK IN ADVAM'i:
Advertising Rates:Six peace per line
foi lii.-u^ition^lirce pence pel line
^ei^ps*Mrou;
ie"^Wub
Advertisements under eight lines 4s.
zr
XLhc {Tribune
SATURDAY. August 2. 1915.
0* PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M.
The news from the war dur-
ing the past week lias relic
the great depression winch pre-
vailed for some time previously
on account of the disastrous
Russian retreat.
The Russian Naval victory
off Riga was a decided relief,
as it must necessarily have up-
s t the plans of the German on-
slaught upon the Russians.
Germany appears to be not
quite so indifferent as hitherto,
the remonstrances of the Uni-
Staies, she will make repar
on for the sinking of the]
abic"; she will prevent a
etition of the "I.usitania"
edy ; and she will provide
portunities for escape of
lericanson torpedoed vess< Is,
rmany lias ci ilainly SUStain-
a chaime of heart.
Operations on the Gallipoli
jisula and in the Darda-
s, though slow and hard,
rogressive.
ubmarine operations do not
gear to be all one way as
sed to The assurance
te navy has the submarine
ce well in hand is distinct
relief. The prototype of
bmarine is the fish, and of
lane is the bird. Man
opied nature's forms
might well follow her methods
of warfare, a natural enemy of
fish is the bird, so, to follow the
simile the natural enemy of the
submarine, so to speak, should
be the aeroplane.
The gull from its advantage
of height sifchjathe fish below
the surface :u& with one fell
SWOOp strikes* death blow into
its prey, and so the aeroplane
from its advantagous height
should see the submarine below
the surface and watch for its rise
and with unerring aim drop its
bombs into the submarine, be-
fore it launches its weapon of
destruction against the helpless
merchantmen.
Of course this is all theory
on our part, the practice might
be, well impracticable.
The following Circular is-
sued by the Hoard of Agri-
culture is worthy of the at-
tention of all who arc inti 1
ested in the cultivation of
ground productions.
' The pesl referred to is said
to have made its appearance
on ElcUthera and it is the in-
tention of the Board of Agri-
culture to confine it to that
island until it is Stamp) d out.
Drastic measures will be m -
assary and in these every-
body should cooperate w ith
the lioard.
It dors not need to he told
what a loss the Sweet Potato
How to fight.
THE POTATO WEEVIL.
Extract of letter, Imperial
Department of Agriculture
of .//.' West indie*
(April lit!,. 1915.)
1. The disease is the result
ol the attacks of the sweet
potato weevil, Cylas formi-
carius, an insect known to
occur 111 the Southern States,
Cuba, Jamaica and British
Guiana, and at various places
in the old world tropics.
2. This is a very serious
pest, similar in itsattackand
the damage' done by it to our
West Indian Scarabee, CryP-
torynchus batatae. The re-
medies which are available
for the control of the Seara-
bee are equally applicable in
the case of the sweet potato
weevil.
3. The remedies for control
of these pests are, as you will
see from the references quot-
ed, purely agricultural. The)
include rotation of crops,
planting only perfectly un-
infested "seed" material, (pre-
ferably slips raised in a nur-
sery from clean roots).
thoroughness in removing all
bits of vine and root alter,
harvesting, and the harvest-
ing ol the potatoes as soon as
possible after they are ripe.
Extract Agricultural Neu .
April 34th (Vol. XIV 3 ;
DISTRIBUTION. The
sweet potato weevil is distri-
buted throughout the tropical
and sub-tropical parts of the
WOl Id. and it is probably ca-
pable of living wherever sweet
potatoes are grown on a large
scale.
At the present time Cylas
formicariuo occurs as a swi el
potato pest in India and the
Far East, in Africa, the Unit-
ed States, Jamaica, Cuba,
British Guiana, and the Ba-
hamas It is stated to have
been recorded from Baiba-
does, hut it does not appear
to be known in that island at
the present time, nor indeed
has it been known
there for many years past.
This insect has been known
and recorded as existing 111
Cuba, Jamaica, British Guia-
na, and the United States,
but the present record of its
occurrence in the Bahamas is
quite new. This record is
based on the Identification of
specimens received from the
Si 1 retary of the Board of
Agriculture, Nassau, Baha-
mas, by the Imperial Com-
missioner of Agricrulture for
the West Indies.
METHOD OF ATTACK.
The sweet potato weevil de-
posits its eggs in the thickest
vines near their base, and in
the roots of the potato where
these are exposed at the sur-
face of the s:il. Once an at-
tack has begun, that is, when
the first infestation has saken
place in a potato field, the
development of the weevil
and its increase in numbers is
merely a matter of time. The
life-cycle occupies about
thirty days: the adults deve-
loping from the first infesta-
tion continue and spread the
attack throughout the field
and ( any it to the root-.
I Each succeeding generation
greatly increases the amount
of injury, and it will be seen
that prevention of the beginn-
ing of the attack for as long
I as possible after planting, and
1 harvesting as soon the potatoes
I are ready will do a gnat deal
Mil reducing the amount ul
injury.
METHOD OF CONTROL.
In the first place potatoes
ought not to be planted on the
same land for two successive
crops, and next, all planting
material should be quite free
from infestation. I Ins can be
assure d by planting with slips
grown 111 a nursery, from un-
inli steo! small roots or tubers.
The nusery should be 1 s-
tablished where there is the
least likelihood of the weevil
being present, and should nol
be maintained long enough
foi it to become infested
Slips for planting should
never be taken from a field in
which either the sweet pota-
to weexil or the scarabee is
known to be present. If ma-
terial for planting is scarce
and it become-, necessary to
use slips from a field which
is suspected of being infested,
none but the smallest tips of
the vines should be taken
the purpose, for the first at-
tacks always occur in the ol-
der, more woody portions of
the stem.
The sweet potato weevil is
a serious pest, and every pi -
caution should be taken to
prevcnt its introduclion into
A GIF-T TO FRANCE
The Travelling X-Ray Moior Ambulance which has been presented loihe French
Army by me London Committee of the Scottish Women's Hospitals is the 1
ns kind The Ambulance will be ennrely worked by women. The picture shows
J di.:.ii^L-.sbcd people inspecting the Ambulance. From Led 10 right they
are Baroness Bamekow. of Sweden. Lady Muir Mackenzie, and the Marchesa Itr
periali. the wife of the hanm Ambassador in London
Full sized and arra\ed in
the picturesque dress of the
Fifteenth Century, the figun
Carries a s\* while from the left hand rest
gua, 1.inking among the first
grandees ol Spain. Such
,\ as the pi ice the gn it Gen
ie. paid for glory : or ratbi r
ins glory shrank from being
ing hip-wise, trail the. ani-#priced. His statue in tIn-
pie folds of a great cloak. j cenl re of (lie fragrant llowei -
looped v 1 'the right shoul-'beds in Santo Domingo re
der. Far and away the key-' presents him in the acl ol
note to the pose is the sue
gestiim of hardihood, the fit-
ness for adventure and for
si If deien e : qualities as in-
dispensable to the indn idual
in those troublous times, as
reaping that glory ; places
linn in dramatic attitude,
pointing to the light w hich
he was then seeing on the
shore of San Salsadur. All
Ins soul is mirrored in the
were the nei essaries of life. I a i e
Intention and will are seen
All
a
younger Columbus than is
iited l>\ statuary el
win re in the Antilles. In
Ci 'lour and in si vie ol dr<
also this interesting statue be-
any colony where it docs not '"' the f' >' which, in spite of
exist at present. : the slight b ard, is th ii ol
BxtrocX from "West Indian
Bulletin" Vol. A, So. i.
Thorough cleaning of the
land after harvesting the
crops, all infested material,
and ol all roots, vines, < ; ..
ought to be carefully carried
out. All infested material
should be buried with lime.
Planting the field slips from
the nursery seems likely to
give good results. l'he
us energ)
s along ihe extended
arm. At the base is seen the
si mi nude form. also in
bronze, ol Anai " ma, the
beautiful Indian Queen, call-
ed b) the Spaniards, the
flowei 1 if Xaiaguu ; she is
lifting a hand imploringly to
longs to'a class of its own.The the fig i above tier, as
effigy of Columbus as seen though foi protection from
in the gardens of a certain the harsh treatment that was
mansion at Queen's Park, measured out to her. Him-
Port of Spain the capital of self, however, be could not
Irinidad, makes him a scien-
tific navigator surrounded by
"pickings" or bits of roots (nautical instruments : and in periority: and in the fortress
from uninfested or slightly Marine Square in the game that guards the entrance to
protect : an ungrateful peo
pie II' vcr !"! g::' e 111 III ills su-
infested fields may be used
to establish a nursery from
which slips can be taken. If
thi se nurseries are establism d
at some distance from potato
fields, and if they a>e not kept
long enough for any pptatoes
to ripen, they will not be-
come infested.
1 he potatoes should be
harvested as soon as they are
ripe. It is likely that this
last recommendation sug-
gests more definite measures
of control than any other and of learning, notably the in-
city, the cast in bronze, shows
a man m court dress, the soul
of modesty, after his great
success.
Adorning Colon Park in
the Capital ol SontO Domin-
go, a statue also in bronze,
represents an even older Col-
umbus whose 'lean-shaven
face bears traces of chasten-
ing in the crucible oLstCME
weary years ol waitur*^ipon
their Catholic Majesties af-
ter the rebuffs of the centres
it may tO a large extent ex-
Iplain why the loss is so much
worse in dry seasons than in
wet.
Nassau N. P.
Aug. 20th 1915.
SOME REMARKABLE STATUES
IN THE WEST INDIES IN
THEIR RELATION TO
THE 8REAT WAR.
IV
Columbus
A short distance up the
stone Bight that leads to the
doorway of the residence ol
the Governor of the Colonv
of the Bahamas, there stands
like a sentinel in white, the
statue of Christopher Colum-
bus, or as he is know n out-
side the British world, Cris-
tobal Colon.
stitute of Salamanca, that
saw in his pet theory only
cause foi derision, spite, en-
vy and opposition on the
part of the Spaniards with
loss of income arising from
tin; duplicity of their King.
"a Castilla
y a Leon
nuevo Mundo
dio Colon."
the river ()/ania, is stil
shown the dungeon. wh< re,
loaded w ith 1 hams, he lin-
gered, till by order of the
governor, a ship was made
read) to bear him to Spain.
An i\ ed there, he threw linn-
s' ii at the foot of the throne
of Queen lsab*l the Catholic
and sobbed like a child.
I be ham lie hung in his
apartment, ns a precious r<
lie and directed that it was
to have been put into his
coffin withhisbody. It was
not done. The controversy
that arose over the identity
of his bones has bun settled
in favour of Santo Domingo
where in the Cathedral built
as early as 1540, the casket is
placed under the dome of a
costly and superb mausoleum.
On the occasion of their eva-
cuation of that country, at
the declaration of its mde-
So Sang the Spanish poet: pendence, the Spaniards, by
.. "Columbus gave to Cas-1 mistake, took with them to
Lille and to Leon, a Newt Cuba, the Casket containing
World." Tiny gave the the ashes of Don Diego (' .1
great Admiral a name andllumbus, ton of the great Ad-
no money: and it was not miral, who had ruled the
till years aftei he had died i Colony as governor ; and 1 la-
in neglect and in want, that ruins of whose castle slill
his heirs were able to recover overlook the peaceful w alias
in a Court of law, the rentals of the river O/ama. Santo
that had been due to him as Domingo has refused other
Viceroy of the Indies and to nations untold ransoms for
found the almost princely the ashes in question. The
House of the Dukes of Xara- last time the casket was
il
*.'


' I

(
THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P.
WAR ARTIST AT WORK
The trtist in the photograph is M. Jon. one of those appointed by the French
Government to mke pictorial record of the war. M. Jonas is here seen in the
Indian camp in Flanders. His models are keenly interested in his work
opened, all save part of a
thigh-bone, had been foun to have crumbled. On each
anniversary of the re-discov
ery of America by Columbus,
the Minster is thrown open
and a group of high military
officers is told olT to mount
guard from sunrise to sunset.
The casket, taken from its
encasement, is at such time
exposed to full view of the
thousands that hie past.
Availing himself of the op
portunity, the writer made
bold to stretch out his hand
and touch it, only to feel !
guilty of the sacrilege, of him!
of old, who on daring to|
handle Jehovah's mercy seat,
fell dead on the road from;
Kirjathjearim. It detracts
nothing to call the exploit of
Columbus by its right name,
that is to say, a re discovery.
Five hundred years had flown
since Biarne the Norseman,
in the year iooo A. D., had
landed on the east coast of
North America which lie
named Vinlancl. Settlments
failed and the sea rovers wen-
driven off by the Indians.
The old world groaning in
the gyves of feudalism, was
not yet ripe to receive the
boon of free squatting upon
free soil. When Columbus
came, the old ordei was all
but worn out. Printing came
and with it, learning that
scattered to the four winds of
heaven, all the superstitions
that fettered adventure. The
Hags of the great Powers of
Europe were hoisted over
tracts of fabulous area. The
flag of Great Britain waved
over New England : and hit
er crossed northward over
the forty-ninth parallel into
Can ida, "the Lady of the
Snows," who today is at her
post where danger threatens
that Hag. Meanwhile, the
New England Colonies, wax-
ed fat with hinterland, broke
awny like an overgrown
bough from the parent trunk
and Britain learned, how not
to govern. Today, that
severed bough renders veo-
man's service as a great house
of supply and in order to be
thus useful, fights.shy of the
400
2 o
1 o
2 o
1 o
2 o
1 o
1 o
1 o
1 9
4 o
1 o
8 o
2 o
1 o o
10 o
I o o
3 o
3 4
Mr. and Mrs. Gamblin
C. F. S.
St. Matthew's Church.
Second donation
Dr. and Mrs. J. J.
jCulmer
Clarence T. Far-
rington.
(4s. a week for 1 yean
T. J. Know lea 1 o o
Commissioner A. S. M.
()'l(rien 300
J. J. Knowles 6 o
10 o o
500
5^<
4 o
687 4 7
Vj^BAHAMAS CONTINGENT.
Funds are ugently needed to
equip the men and send them to
the front.
Everybody is asked to sub-
scribe.
Subscriptions will be receiv-
ed at the Bank- of Nassau or the
Royal Bank of Canada.
ty announces that German sub-]
marine losses are important1
though they have not been made
public by us where the en< im
has no other source of informa-
tion.
The French government re
port important air raids on
various enemy railways, iron-
works, etc, etc.
The Russian government re
port gradual retirement in the
'direction of Vilna and on the
Middle Niemen.
German reports claim the
capture of Draatlitowsk.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
a speechdelivered by Mr. Roose-
velt at Plattsburg military
'amp, declaring that such talk
incites controversy, antagonism
and ill feeling.
Mr. Roosevelt responds by
declaring that people should be
notified just what they should
say.
Washington: No evidence
has been found to substantiate
reports that Germans are laying
big gun foundations at any
place in the United States.
0 o
6 o
o o
The following have been en
listed instead :
8. John Demeritte.
26. Alfred Dean.
27. Henry Archibald Roach.
28. John Williams.
The Bahamas Con-
tingent Fund-
Amount previously acknow-
ledged "6j8 15 o
St. Francis Xavier's
Church 6
Anonymous
'!'. E. D. Brace 8
Nficolls Town, Andros.
W. (i. D. Stevenson 4
Fldridge Davis
William. I Knowles
Alphews Evans
Timothy Coleby
John Lewis
James Brown
Ida Evans
James Scott
M.Johnson
Samuel Johnson
Ellen Cox
Nathaniel Conyers
Samuel Thompson
H. P. Treco
P. J.C.Davis
Reginald II. Christie
Rev Arthur Bow leg
Sums smaller than is.
BOX AI
August 27th 1915.
London, 25th: An official
report issued today regarding
recent operations in Gallipoli
Peninsula aet at rest rumours
crediting the British with hav-
ing cut off or outflanked the
Turkish forces opposed to them.
'Flic; report says that the Allies
gain is of great value but that
the true objective has not been
reai lied.
Early in the month the Aus-
tralians and New Zealanders
reached the summit of llaribahr
and Chanakbahr commanding
positions on the West coast but
through failure of the new land-
ing party at Suvla Bay to make
the progress expected the Do-
minion troops were compelled
to fall back.
In another attack last Satur-
day the British had lost the ad-
vantage of surprise and were
compelled to retire again. The
report admits heavy British
losses but adds that the Turks
losses must have been greater.
Altogether the British hold ai
front of 12 miles along the West I
side of the Peninsula and at I
some points have advanced
some dis'ance into the interior.
The Turks are making a stub-
born defense.
The Allies have confidence
that with the strong resources
at their command and the as-
sistance of the fleet the Darda-
nelles will be forced before the
arrival of bad weather, due to
wards the end of September.
Newport News: Federal
authorities today held up the
clearance papers of the British
steamer Waimana because she
had a four inch rifle mounted on
her after deck.
stant death, when, to their won-
der, they saw between them and
the enenn a whole troop of an-
gels, and the horses of the Ger-
mans turned round terrified out
of their senses, and regularlv
stampeded, the men tugging at
their bridles while the poor
horses tore away in a different
direction from our men. He
swore
HE SAW THE ANGELS
whom the horses saw plainly
enough, if not the German sol-
diers, and this gave our men
time to reach the little fort, or
whatev. 1 the shelter was, and
save themselves."
New York, 25.The English
pound sterling is now less than
ever before. Fxchange rates
are so demoralized that the
pound is worth 23 cents below
par, France lost io' cents, JLires
si- German money alone sus
tained the torrent of downward
rates
"Pro Patria"
We've begun to do our best,
boys;
Begun to do what's right.
Let's give it all our zest, boys ;
And give it all our might.
We're leaving friends and mo-
thers, boys;
We're leaving home behind.
Let's put it up toothers, boys,
To come and join our kind.
Does Duty call on onl\ boys?
Nay; Duty calls on all.
Each one to do his best, oh
boys,
Whether they stand or fall.
C.
A Great Vision
Of Angels.
1. Mat-

Fight.
Bahamas Continoent
The following men we are
Sony to learn have been turned
down as "not likely to be efti.
cie.it.
8. Ernest Albert Glinton.
26 Charles Edward Vfrgil.
27. Alexander Pat ton.
28. Nathaniel Clatke.
A GOSPEL MEETING
Mr. John C. Bertram, Evan-
gelist, will preach tomorrow
(Sunday) evening at 7.30 in
the Gospel Hall, on corner
of Dowdeswell and Christie
Streets.
Come and bring your
friends with you.
Latest War News
August 2.vth 1015.
London, August 27th 1915.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:The Admiral-
Paris:- A despatch from Dun-
kirk gives particulars of the
battle on August 22nd. in which
a French destroyer sank a Ger-
man torpedo boat. The German
destroyer was more powerful
than the French, the despatch
adds, and the commander of the
French boat asked by wireless
for assistance.
Without waiting, however,
for the arrival of help he engag-
ed the German. The French
boat fired first and scored a hit.
She then launched a torpedo
which missed her adversary.
After the first shot the German
vessel limped towards Ostend
where the German coast battei.
ies fired at the pursuing destroy,
er, but only prevented the
French destroyer from rescuing
the crew of the sinking. German
boat. A French torpedo boat
which replied to the destroyers
call for help arrived only in
time to see the German vessel
go down.
London, 25: The Balkan
crisis took a favourable turn to-
day from the Allies viewpoint
according to reports reaching
here. Serbia's reply to the note
of the Allies is expected in
London tomorrow and there is
reason to believe, it is said in
official circles, that it will con
cede the main points the Allies
have asked in behalf of Bulga-
ria to obtain the tatter's co-
operation in the war.
Washington: Secretary of
War Garrison is indignant over
A Hereford gentleman has re-
ceived a letter giving an ac-
count of an extraordinary inci-
dent in the British retreat from
Mont. The German armies were
sweeping down on the British
forces in overwhelming num-
bers; our troops were in immi-
nent peril of annihilation, when
suddenly a great vision appear-
ed and stood in the way of the
advancing German host, which
turned and fled. The letter is as
follow;:
'"Last Sunday I met Miss Mar-
able, daughter of the well-known
Canon Marable, and she told me
she knew the officers, both of
whom had themselves
SEEN THE ANCKLS
who saved the left wing from
the Germans, when they came
right upon them during our re-
treat from Mons. They expect-
ed annihilation, as they were
almost helpless, when to their
amazement, the Germans stood
like dazed men, never so much
as touched their guns, nor stirr-
ed, till we had turned round and
escaped by some cross roads.
One of Miss Marable't friends,
who was not a religious man,
told her he saw
A TROOP OF ANGELS
between us and the enemy, and
he has been a changed man ever
since. The other man she rnel
in London, and she asked him if
he had heard of the wonderful
story of the angels. He said he
had seen them himself,as, while
he and his company were re-
treating, they heard the German
cavalry tearing after them.
I la v ran for a place where tl
thought a stand might be made,
with some hopes of safetj, but
before they could reach it, the
German cavalry were upon
them, so they turned round and
faced the enemy, expecting in-
REUQIOUS SERVICE8
Sunday, 29th August.
st matthews parish church
Church and Shirley St.
Rev. IP. S. Low//, Ruftv
TkiNl __
10.15 a.m. Sunday School! -,>_
tins, "The Soul of a People"5
of the Bishop of London. 4 p.m
chism. Junior, (in Church,) Senior (i
School) 7.30 p.m. Evensong, "Comfort in
tribulation -a Sermon of Sir Thomas
Mora.
ST. MARGARETS
7.15 a.m. Holy Communion. 7.80 p m-
Evensong, "A wonderful Church."
CHURCH OK ST. AGNKS, V. M.
Grants Town, Blue Hill Road
Ret: Audlty J, Browne, Hector.
Holy Communion 7.30 a.m. Matins 9.50
a.m. Nlissa Cantata and sermon 10 30
a.m Catechism 4 p.m. Solemn Even-
song and Sermon 7.30 p.m.
Week Day Services
Low Mass daily 7.30 except Saturdays.
Evensong Monday, Tuesday and Thurs-
day 5.;i() p.m. Wed. and Friday 7 p.m.
St. FRANCIS XAVIER S CHURCH
Watt Street
Rev. Ckryottom Schreiner, O.S.B.,
Vicar 1'orane
Mass and Sermon 11 a.m. Sermon and
Benediction 5 pm. Week BAORBD HEART CHAPKL
East Shirley Street.
Mass it Sermon 9 am. Benediction
ST. ANDREWS PRESBYTER
CHURCH
Princes Street
Rev S J. Bennett, Pastor.
Morning 11 a.m. Evening 7 p.m.
ZION BAITIST CHURCH
Corner East and Shirley Sts.
Rev. Chas. A. Dann, Pastor.
11 am. and 7 p in.
BAPTIST UNION CHURCH
Parliament St
Rev. I). Wihkert, Pastor,
Singing, Prayer, Sermon, 11 a.mft.7
Sunday School, 3 p m.
A Grand Cone
in aid of the
Bahamas Contingent
will be given
On TUESDAY
7th September
by Mr. and Mrs.
Callendar,
At ST. ANDREWS HALL
under the distinguished
patronage of
His Excellency the Governor
and Mrs. Allardyce.
The follow^* ladies and
gentlemen u%e kindly con-
sented to assist.
Mrs. W. J. Pinder, Miss
Reardon, Hon. G. H. Gam-
blin and R. J. DeGlanville,
Esq.,
By kind permission of the
Commandant The Ha ha mas
Police Band will be in atten-
dance and will render selec-
tions.
Admission:
RESERVED SEATS, 3s. and 2S.
UNRESERVED, IS.
Tickets can he obtained at
Mo I s Book Stoic, and
"'I lie Tribune" Office.
The .
Cosmopolitan
High School.
< (pens on
MONDAY, Aug. 30th.
Patronage Solicited.
Prof. G. G. COFFIN,
l'rin.

I


I
THE TRIBUNE. NASSAU. N P.
I****** > mmummnimnMMwmmmmmmmmmBBmm

m

m

as
i
i
%
Kest and Comfortl r the mother an u lines led on the Alleuburys" Foods invariably thrive t
^Rllenhmi
MILK FOOD No. L MII.K FOOD No. 2. IFOODHVS tk.a.i ,
*-**,* .,..,. kJII.I "w^;; The MY * B r<> 0 b> months upwards.
TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES
*- Pamphlet Infan, Feeding and Management" sent free.
ALLEN & HANBURYS LTD.. LONDON, ENGLAND.
1
&
1
i
1
M
1
as
^==D#/AYc=
Welch's (fr&pe Juice.
JJSJRJS^a
F/re Famous "IMP" Cyclecar, JC C f\
Pleasure or Delivery, to YOU for Only &.OU
F- O. B. NEW YORK.
1 Cent
A Mile
SPEED, 8 TO 50 MILES
PER HOUR.
45 Miles On A Gallon
of Gasoline.
PRICES
Quarts, 2s. 3d. rach.
T'inls is. 4d.t "
15s. per (lei/.
I Pints', 9d.
8s. 6d. per floz
1 Pints, 5d.
4s. 6d. pei daft.
A
TV BLACK'S 222 Bay St.
and The Nassau Candy Kitchen,
Opp. Hotel Coh Dial.
THE CAR THAT SATISFIES
* r+ */.......-l i ,-
V
Till
Sdc-the fiYsYcos"iS\hT hewrid unowned "//HP" Cyeclecai fits everv pocket-
You're cheating- yourself if you do'nt g-et one.
fTHt LINEN STORE.j
#ave Received
I hi l.ai. si Spring Novelty
77/ ..// -lave- ;;ets
Guarantei mishable,

' sts, Yok
L) lillinei
Wl : Vliil and
1
. and
' Gold,
i; (ioldl
Sijver and
White,C e im.and I
tonne Vets, adow \'i |
1 rails, Point
(l Ksprit, r ted Net Uurli
L. G DUPUCH, Exclusive Agent for the Bahama I
TlNUEO FROM FIRST PAQr.
i'l'^f^. lhc interesting and
bIessS-J^I(|,., t,,i(| 0|]
125 of thaangel at Moris will
cheer many a heart.
Yours very sincerely
AGNES E. YVESTON.
Royal Sailors' Rest,
Portsmouth,
"Ashore and .Afloat."
H. Dighton Pearson1 FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
IN 2 PIECES and
UNION SUIT.
SANITARY
^^
COOL
RELIABLE
SOLD BY
' Felhw of the Royal Institute
of British Architects.
is practicing as an
Architect 6-Surveyor
in the Bahamas.
I hose who are interested in
PUBLIC or PRIVATE
building schemes will be well
advised to consult him as to
Designing, Superintending
of Building, Surveying, Dilap
idations, and improvements
of property generally.
Address,
ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY
1 elephone No. tor.
Subscriptions are urgently
needed ror the above fund
and all donations, h iwe\ i i
small, will be gratefully ac
cepted. and will be a< know-
id in the newspap ..
H. F. ARviHRISIKR,
Consular A cent for France.
Nassau, X. P.,
2nd July, rqi 5.
Washable Marquisettes.
Hack and White, Sand and
White, Dovblt Width.
Poplin
>''' ck Po| lin, White Poplin,
double widl
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotlon Crepe.
May ist, nil 5.
Wm. Hilton
260 BAY STREET.
T. M. Knowles
528 Bay Street.
IS now prepared to supply
Rubber Tires for Babies
Carriages, also to reset, and
repair them.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Mar. 20th, 1915.
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Instructions have b* en n
ceived summoning allFn nch-
men born in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes iSqo
to igog (born from 1870 to I
1889) l<) present themselves
immediately al the Vice Con-
sulate of France at Port-of-
Spainor at any of the twelve
Consular Agencies of the Bri-
tish Wesl indies to pass .-,
medical i xamJnatron.
If. F. ARMBRISTF.R
Consular A^ent for France.
Nassau. \. p.,
2nd July, it,i 5.
Just Received by
This Steamer
Fresh American
Fruit.
Peaches, Pears,
Plums, etc. etc.
/. K. AMOURY.
day Street.
White Lime
AM offering FOR SALE
* my entire sto k of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders I- I'i at Mr. Solomon
Finlayson, Deveaux Se^tf
Phone 25801- "The Tribune"
Office.
JosiaH Ramming
June 30, mi -.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson". Prepared Wax ,,
pietefimih andaolbh for nil furniture
woodwork- and (1 1011
Johnson" Wood Dye fortbe artiltrl
lnh""-'-'''''^"'. ^t or hard
Johnaon. Under La. .,,
^ynrochiuperiorto .h.ll,
Johnson-. rial Wood ftnlah
bMutifuL artittic. band rubbed effect
wWiouttheexpen,, Df rubbing
"tag tbe grain and pom f W(l,,
pnjpanng ,4 for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wa-for bal
room i|,,, ""
FOR SALE BY
Chas. E
GASOLINE
,n ""inis EjeverJ ptDce
per Gallon.
11'" Gallon Cans ()ne Shil
ling pei Gallon
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay Street
Nassau \. p,
April, 13111 k,i-.
W- A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DI.-IM.s ,,, mfrm is r.
antl the Public! ihmM r h.,-
jusi received > complete outiii i i
1 li'> fi M - buisiicps ol an un.
deri-ker, which phcea linn jn r
posilion to carry 'ut Funerals that
) be entrusted to Ins tare with
:'"1 '" I despatch ; and res,,, t
fu"y i's theii p itronage G< I
' Price* inst and prove thai these
are the verj lowest for the fin t cl im
work.
Here's An Oppor-
tunity thfu you cannot
afford to lose.
II \ ou want to Economize.
If you want a First Class
Light.
II you want to be recog
' Use the Best Light
thut money .an buy. The
SI and the Cheapest.
THE
3EACQN FMlm MANTLE
DtHUUIl LAMPS and BURNERS
are recognised u,..
iHlandariT Incanden-
I cent oil lamps of the
world.
lOO.OOo satlKflrd
users. Ail drlluhlr,|.
i roduoea a power-
llKht of 1IN> ,,ll,-
power. Buma com-
II "ion coal-.mi. Costs
only one cent for *ii
bourn.
Hrlirhtcr thnn k^s.
electricity or nix or-
dinary lamps at oi.
"Uti (O illii-lHiih ltl
BM
Made entirely of
brass. For use In
homes, stores, halls
and churches. No
odor, no noise; safe,
simple and clean.
There Is only one
- Benson. Insist o a
naving It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E- Nabbif-
14 Chrisnr- St., Nassau, N.P.
\ ial Term. Kivenif requetted. Write
' ^aieandtoowaHaboai this won
di-rfnl I..111111.
Albury
FOUND.
A Sheep in my field in ih.
Y'Uage on Hiursday, 10th
August. Owner can have
'"l";'' l,v I roving property
:"l(l paying expensi .
Applv
ROBERT PRATT. '
Williams' Shoes Are Better
Shingles
Rest No. 1 Heart 5in.Cv1.resc
bhtngles at |g.6oper thous
sand of 20 bundles
Difcounts'on lots of ovei
5000 shingles.
Special Price
! 0 oncheapei gradesalso
;in. Cypress at $6.73 per
!l.....sand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
1 resh stock arriving verv
week.
C C SAUNDERS.
i

v
L
*

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