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L. GILBKRT DUPUCH, Editor and Proprietor. OK KICK: Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte St Nassau, S. P., Bahamas •PHONK 200. P. O. BOX MB. PUBLISHED DAILY TES Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday— single copy \d Tndilay, and Thursday—single copy ul Saturday —single copy ... ild Weekly 5,1 Monthly i s. f>I Quarterly JS. 6d PialfYearly 9 s. Yearly l as. PAYABLK IN ADVANCK Advertising Rates : — Six pence per line for first insertion: three pence |*r line for second insertion ; and onepenny pe line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eiyht lines 4s. Zhe tribune TUESDAY. August 24. 1915. rr PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M. r We have been asked if this is Flag Day ? No, it is not .Flag, Tag, Bag or any other day it is just Tuesday. Jamaica had a Flag Day, rand it was a great success we kwill tell you about it later. We have had many enquiries to who is receiving contritions for the Bahamas Coningent Fund or to whom pntributions may be paid ? Lot course we know, that tributions are being left both The Royal Bank of ada and The Bank of ail. But we do not know who 1* collecting,and that is what the public wants to know. The Mail Strainer "Havana" arrived from New York early thia morning, and nfter transferring the following passenger^ to tinTender "Colonial proceeded to Havana with 117 passengers for that city. Misses Ruby M. Gardner, Susan C. < iodine, Mary G. Godine, and Mabel Stevenson; Sisters M Celestia F.agan i' ilons Mary McDonold, Carmela Roskamps, and Frances Clare Tyson; Mrs. Elizabeth G. Gardiner; Messrs Robert Nelson Musgrove, Kenneth Maclure, George A. Roberts and Robert J. Smith. Miss Louise Smith; Mrs. Victoria Smith. — :o:— Foreign Mails to be despatch ed per "Frances E." via Miami, Fla., will he made up and closed on Friday, the jyth inst. at 8 a.m "The "Frances F." left Miami this morning with mails and passengers. —:o: — BIMINI NOTES. Aug. nth.—The Schooner "Leaon stopped here today with a load of lumber from the wreck on the bank off Orange Cays; she took as passenger from this place for Nassau Misses Madeline Flowers, Anna B. Wcech, Sarah J. Rolle, and Olive Johnson; she will also stop at Great Isaac to remove Principal Keeper Rodgers to Sturrjips Cay. Capt. Webster arrived here on the night of the ioth from Miami and reported that a tug boat would be over on the 12th to take his ship, then on the bank off Orange Cay to Jacksonville, Fla. He left here on the 12th with his vessel in tow of a tug for Jacksonville, he took with him to assist the working of the vessel John Leverity, who, on reaching Jacksonville he will send back home. On Sunday August 15th at 4 p. m. the Z. B. Y. P. V. B. had a line meeting, various subjects were dealt with; and Solos and Duets were rendered by its young people. August 18th. — It is reported here today that Mr. Webster arrived from Florida for the purpose of taking over the ship "Anda" (?), now a total wreck in this neighbourhood, which he bought, but it appears that he got here too late as it was reported here yesterday that the ship had been burnt to the waters edge. SOMETHING UP. A Pin Club turned out yesterday, and today another club of the same name turned out from Porgee Town. Something funny! It reminds me of the Johnnie Canoe at Christmas time. Last night the Zion Baptist Young Peoples Home Mission met for praise meeting; not many attended but it went on all right. The Mail Schooner "Petrel' leaves tomorrow for Nassau. COMMUNICATED AN ENTERTAINMENT HELD AT ST. MATTHEWS BAPTIST CHAPEL, CLARENCE TOWN, LONG ISLAND. On the rath of August the children gathered at about 9 a.m. and after being arranged marched to chapel singing a very beautiful hymn. At the chapel they gave recitations and R few dialogues, one between a brother and a sister, and one between two sisters which afforded much fun, also three duets which wee sung very nicely, one between Miss Frances Major and her sister Miss Ida, and one between Miss Ida and her cousin Miss Alicia Edgecombe and one between Miss Frances Gibson and her sister Stella Gibson with their cousin Percival Gibson singing the tenor. On the whole it was creditably done and gave much satisfaction to the school teachers; then a short lecture was given by one of the J. Ps N. C. P. Major Fsq who was very much pleased with the way the children were trained to recite and sing, alter all was over refreshments were served to them and when all this was over, before going to the other enjoyments the National Anthem was sung. After a few other games were enjoyed we dispersed to our homes feeling very happy over the day's pleas >re. Thanking you for space allowed I beg to remain Yours faithfully, LLOYD H. MAJOR. LATEST War News. August 24th 1915. Lonpon, 23rd. Governor, Bahamas Official News:— The French government report small German attacks checked at various points. The Russian government reports that the German fleet has left the Gulf of Riga having lost in three days a dreadnought (Probably the MOLTKE) sunk by a British submarine; three cruisers, seven torpedo boats sunk or damaged. Four barges filled with soldiers in an attempt at landing at Pernau were captured and the soldiers taken prisoners. There are no important changes on land fronts. Italy has declared war on Turkey. The British submarine E. 13 was fired on and wrecked by a German destroyer whilst grounded on a Danish island. (Signed) BONAR LAW. Washington:— Official announcement was made from the White House today that as soon as all facts regarding the sink ing of the Arabic ore entertained our course of action will be determined. Petrograd:—In the naval battle in the Gulf of Riga which raged from August sixteenth to nineteenth the Russian fleet sunk two German cruisers eight torpedo boats. A British sub marine sunk the battle cruiser MOLTKE. The Russian gunboat Suvilch was lost but sunk a German lor |>edo boat while sinking. The German fleet has left Ihe (iulf of Riga. Paris;—Two French torpedo boats sunk a German dfstrover off Ostend last night. The French vessels were not damag ed. Sofia, Bulgaria: —A British submarine sunk Ihe Turkish collier Ispahan and the German steamer Budos, loadedwjjh munitions. \-^^^ • ^ Rome: —Several Italian troopships escorted by warships left Naples, Syracuse, and Brindisi.



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It is generally supposed that their destination is the Dardanelles. London:—German snbmarines sunk the British steamer Diomede. The Captain, quartermaster and steward were killed from shell fire during a fourhours pursuit. A small boat was swamped and two Knglish sailors and five Chinese stokers were drowned. Tokio: — It is reported that Japan will supply Russia great quantities of ammunition. Berlin:—German forces have occpuied Ossowetz fortress evacuated by the Russians. It is reported that Bulgaria and Turkey have signed a new treaty giving Bulgaria railway connection to the sea. Bulgaria is to observe benevolent neu trali tv. It is reported that Serbia has given way to Italy regarding Albania, a move favourable to the Kutente Allies. New Orleans:—The United Fruit Company steamer Marcnv ijne with 93 persons aboard has not been heard from since the Gulf hurricane. Some Berlin papers, moved by the Pope's peace, declare that Germany would be glad to accept reasonable conditions and end tlie war. That nii^ht well be. The trouble is that no power concerned on the other side suffered enough yet to make it think that anything Germany could propose would be reasonable. —" The Gazette" Montreal. The official report that come from the Dardanelles may not be frequent or lengthy enough to satisfy a news-hungry public, but when they are given out they are satisfactory. For they tell of advance.—"Ibid." — :o: — The notable increases in the foreign trade of the United Slates reported of late, coupled with the activity in many lines of production due to the slate of affairs^jn Juirope, has led some to flak tmW fcjre war will make the country rich. Perhaps this is putting the case too strongly, because whilst the war increases the demand of the JOHN BULL'S STRONG ARM. A Patriotic Sentimental Souvenir Song. (By J. B. SMITH.) "Tune :—Marching through Georgia." i. John Bull's Navy, mighty grand, Is Mistress of the Sea— And here I wish to express My gratitude to thee For the glorious deeds you've done— With your strong arm at Sea. Your strong arm is our protection. CHORUS : Hurrah Hurrah you are mistress of the sea Hurrah Hurrah you set all captives free, We all should sing your praises, Forever unto thee Your strong arm is our protection. 2. • Wherever the weak are sore oppressed By tyrant's cruel hand, You are there with sure relief, Full justice to demand. Ever since your Hag has waved Over sea or land— Your strong arm is our protection. Long your glorious banner wave, Long your sons endure, Who fights for our mankind's rights And liberty insure, All the world proclaim your praise, You keep the whole world pure, While your strong arm is our protection. hour for destructive materialr it curtails the call for those required for constructive and reproductive services, which are the sound basis of prosperity. The war, however, will give the United States as an industrial Community such an opportunity for gaining a foothold in markets heretofore possessed largely by the helligc rents that the way to great wealth may he opened to it. Of all the great countries in llie world the United States stands to make more than it will lose by what is now going on on the otiierside of the world — Ibid DOINQ HER FULL SHARE NEWFOUNDLANDS EFF0RT8 AFTER ONE YEAR OF WAR St. John's, Nfd., August 4. — The war's anniversary was observed here as a public: holiday with services in the churches and various patriotic functions for the securing of funds for machine guns, a naval hospital, etc. A patriotic rally lakes place tomorrow night under the presidency of the Governor, when the formal announcement will be made of the result of the fund started in July to present two airships to the Imperial authorities. So far enough has been subscribed to present three airships and twenty machine "iins, while the fund will probably be continued to secure a still larger number later. ONE RESULT OF WAR. DOMINIONS TO SHARE IN GOVERNINQ BRITISH EMPIRE. London, August 4:— Andrew Ronar Law, secretary for the colonies, speaking at Folkestone tonight, said he belie. >^pj|^tt as a result of the war tlie^rmfe would soon come when the whole self governing dominions in proportion to their population and resources, would take their part in the duties of governing the British Lmpire. It was already understood, he added, that when the time came for peace negotiations, the dominions would have their say in those negotiations. NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. INSTRUCTIONS have been received summoning all Frenchmen born in Martinique, Guadelope or French Guiana belonging to the classes i8qo to 1909 (born from rSjo to 1889) to present themseh immediately at the Vice Consulate of France at Port-ofSpain o'r at any of the twelve Consular Agencies of the British West Indies to pass a medical examination. H. F. ARMBR1STER. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915. FRENCH RED CROSSFUND. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgently needed tor the above fund and all donations, howevei small, will be gratefully accepted, and will be acknowledged in the newspapers. H. F. ARMBR.ISIKR. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., jnd July, 1915. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepared Wax —a Com l>lctc finish and nolith for all Furniture woodwork and floon, Johnson's Wood Dye — for (he ar|ji< coloring of all wood, toft or hru^ Johnson's Under Lac a ipirtl finish, very mrcli Superioi t<> ihellai Varnish Johnson's FIBLI Wood Flnlsh-fora beautiful, artistic, haml-rubbed effect without the Bxpcnta ol rubbmi:. Johnson's Peste Wood Filler— foi filling the grain a| "l pore* of wood luepnrinu i< for the finish. Johnson's Powdered Wax Tor bal room Hoors. FOR. SALE BV Chas. E. Albury



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Buyjx MECHANICS MAGAZINE For Father and Son AND ALL THE FAMILY Two and a half million readers find it of absorbing interest Everything in it is Written So You Can Understand It We sell 400.000 copirs every month without K-.vinn premiums and have no solicitors. Any newsdealer will show you a copy; or write the publisher for free sample a postal will do. J2.50 A YEAR 2ScA COPY Popular Mechanics Magazine • No. Michigan Ava., CHICAGO EUMSEY'S PUMPS C ISTE R N Pumps, Well P u in p s, Windmill I uinps Diaphragm Pumps, House Pumps, Pneumatic Systems, Spray Pump--, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, I i ep Well Pumps, Eh i Iric Pumps, CylindV r and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Cens trifugal Pumps, Waterwork, Machinery, Rotary Pumps, SumpPumps, Fire Pumps, A r Compre >ors,Ship Pumps I ssure Pumps, Boiler Feed ips, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, etc, Installed under the direct supervision of II. McPher n an i Brother. Prices on Application. Jl. J. THOMPSON, Agent. I To be had at all Grocers C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent Corner George and King Sts. >>.> % % % %  • %  > % %  •••< Look Out For %  lllllMIMUIIll White Lime I AM offering FOR SALE n#i 'iitirtstock of White Lime of about 800 bushels a 1 6d. per bushel. ()rdcrs left at Mr. Solomon 1 inlayson, Deveaux St. or Phone 258 or "The Tribune" Office. I (Mi RAMMING June jo, 1915. "The Tribune" Motor Delivery Will Supply you with your Paper Daily, Promptly, and Regularly. Want a paper ? Why stop lift anywhere. I5.uk papers ? Why certainly—can be supplied anywhere and at any lime. ALSO I'M 1 and Duty Entries, Sponging Articles, Ship-, Reports, [Inwards and Outwards) Warehouse Entries, McCabe's Curse and Answer to MeCabe, (Nicely printed in two colours at a 1 hi. each.) Have'you old Entries? Why condemn them when we can supply you with corrected slips, thai 1 an be stuck on, at a very low cost. %  ALSO ORDERS or Business of any kind will be transacted anywhere. : : LOOK OUT: %  IHIIIUINIUIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIUIHH, — f Good Morning! We Are Introducing American S.I; American Csslnnere Amend*" ^isffc.ii Lisle HOSIERY They have (food the teat. Give tea 1 foot comfort. No ie>mt to rip. Never become loose or baggy. The ibapa is knit in n'1 0(1 m cunency or postal note, to cover advertising and shipping charges, we will tend post paid, with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar coni| any. either 3 Pivlis of our 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, Or 4 1'sirscilnvii 'illi viilun American C.islumre Hosiery, or 4 P-vIrs of our 10c. Vrtlne, Air erica n C I ton.1, isle Hosiery or 6 Pa.irs of Children's Hosiery. HOST DELAY Oftei expire*when dealer in your locality iselected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO.U.S.A Shingles Best No. I Heart 5m. Cypress Shingles at $9.bo per thous sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price i also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.73 per %  thousand of 20 bundles. This j price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNDERS. Just Received by This Steamer Fresh American Fruit. Peaches, Pears, Plums, etc. etc. J. K. AMQURY. • lay Street. "The Allies Try J. C. Coakley's new Id. Cigars The Allies A blend of f%rHfne tJsWiccos —o — They are good to the end Williams' Shoes Are Better \



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Nulllua ivililn ms |umre In verbs mnnmn Huini' bound to swear to the Dogmrn of no MMISI VOL. XII. \KIIMI, N. P.. BfthMnm TL'F.SDAY August. 24. 1915 NO. 334 Blockades and Neutral Ports. T HE controversy between the governments ol Great Bri tain ;ind the United States, to which Sir Edward Grey lias made the latest contribution, will be interesting and it can be expected that it will be concluded without becoming menacing. The subject is an old one. The neutral nation de sires that the disturbance of its trade caused by a war shall be limited as far as may be possible. The belligerant, anxious to harm its enemy, seeks to stretch as far as it can its pow ers of keeping supplies away from him. There has been con siderable interference with U. S ships and with cargoes on other neutial ships loaded in .^ the United States, especially since the German submarine blockade was inaugurated. Not only vessels destined to German ports, but those bound for ports in Holland, Denmark and Sue den have been detained on the ground that their cargoes, reg irdless of the nominal consignee, were intended for Germany and if allowed to go through would sir ngthen that country in its war against Great Bri tain and its allies. To this the Government at Washington objected in a dispatch sent in March and delivered by Mr. Page, the ambassador in Lon don. The point of tlie U S. contention is contained in the following : "It is confidently assumed that His Majesty's Government will not deny that it is a rule sanctioned by general practice that, even though a blockade should exist and the doctrine of con,*pband as to unblockaded tcfW.orvnfr ni^idly enforced, in nocent shipments may be freely transported to and from the United States through neutral countries to belligerent territory without being subject to the penalties of contraband traflic | or breach of blockade, much less to detention, requisition or con fiscation." That seems exceeding fair, and if in the end it should pre vail the gain to Great Britain might be more than compensa tion for the present loss. The case of the United States in the connection, however, is weakened by the position its Govnmnt. and jurists have taken in the past, when it was engaged in war, and when British ships were held and detained. Some of these are alluded to by Sir Edward Grey in his note. Some! have been the subject of recent | reference in the leading journals of the United States. One typical case was tiiat of the Bermuda, sailing during the U. S. Civil War from Liverpool for Bermuda, but, as it appeared, with Nassau, in the Bahamas,! as its destination. Nassau was a resort for blockade runners, whose cargoes weie transferred from its harbor to the harbors of the southern states, then at war with the North. The is sues were brought before the Supreme Court at Washington, whose members laid down the following doctrine : "It makes no difference whether the destination to the rebel port was ulterior or direct ; nor could the question of destina J tion be affected by trans shipment at Nassau, if trans-ship ment was intended, for that' could not break the continuity of transportation of the cargo. The interposition of a neutral port between neutral departure and belligerant destination has always been a favorite resort of contraband carriers and blockade runners. But it never avails them when the ultimate distillation is ascertained. A transportation from one point to another remains continuous so long as intent remains unchanged, n > matter what stop pages or trans shipments inter vene." In another case on which judgment was pronounced by the United States Supreme Court, that of the Peterhoff, bound from London for Matamoras in Mexico, across the boundary river from a place in Texas, held by southern soldiers, the doctrine was laid down that "neutral trade to or "from a blockaded country by "inland navigation or transportation" is lawful, and "trade "between London and Matamo"ros, even with intent to supply "from Matamorosgoods to Tex"as, violated no blockade and "cannot be dn Ian d unlawful." !t was added th it "sue h trade "with unrestricted inland com"merce between such port and "the enemy's territory impairs "undoubtedly, and very serious"lv impairs, the value of the "blockade of the enemv'scoast. j "But in cases such as that now j "in judgment wc administer "the public law of nations and "are not at liberty to inquire "what is for the particular ad "vantage or disadvantage of "our own or another country." Some of the CdrRO was contraband, however, bt ing goods intended for military use. In regard to tli se it was rjei lared that if really intended for sale in the market of Matamoros they would be free of liability, "for contraband may be trans "ported by neutrals toa neutral "port if intended to make part "of its general stock in trade." Nothing in the evidence convinced the court that Matamoros was the intended m uketfoi this contraband, all the circumstances showed the real destination to be Brownsville, the place held bj the Confederates; therefore the portion of the cargo so designated was condemned, though the restitution of the ship was ordered. There is therefore in practical support of Sir Edward Grey's position the action of U. S. naval officers during a time of war, which action was uph( Id b\ the highest U. S. inbuna'J So there is good precedent for Sir Edward Grey's contention that in stopping vessels bound for Holland and Swedish ports, among others, for the purj of stopping German trade, Gre Britain is acting in accord will the principle that has obtaine universal recognition, that b "a blockade a belligerent is entitled to "cut off by effective means the sea "borne commerce of his enemy So Sir Edward Grey holds it is impossible fo maintain that the right ol a belligerent to in ten pt the commerce of his enemy can bi limited in the waj si ggesti I in the quotation from the I). S note. The moral force of the U. position can be ap| reciatet without its practical weaknj in view of U. S. pa si pracl being improi • d. sit Edward [Grey intimates thai ll action of the British < lov( mm nt will not I)1 changed, thougl it ill be sought to lessen the amourrl I of inconvenii p< e i aua d b; Tl e suggestion has bet n made that iMi< rnatiotial ti ibi tal i I e railed on to decide^fee q tion raised. Such a tribunal [disposed of other a akward questions in which the two countries were concerned, and may well be agreed upon in this instance, if correspondence does not bring about a n utually satisfactory understanding. '—"The Gazette" Montieal. t 1 Wear Armbrister's Shoes


The Tribune.
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 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, August 24, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
Nulllua ivililn ms |umre In verbs mnnmn
Huini' bound to swear to the Dogmrn of no MmIsi
VOL. XII.
\kiimi, N. P.. BfthMnm TL'F.SDAY August. 24. 1915
NO. 334
Blockades and Neutral Ports.
THE controversy between the
governments ol Great Bri
tain ;ind the United States, to
which Sir Edward Grey lias
made the latest contribution,
will be interesting and it can
be expected that it will be con-
cluded without becoming men-
acing. The subject is an old
one. The neutral nation de
sires that the disturbance of its
trade caused by a war shall be
limited as far as may be possi-
ble. The belligerant, anxious
to harm its enemy, seeks to
stretch as far as it can its pow
ers of keeping supplies away
from him. There has been con
siderable interference with U.
S ships and with cargoes on
other neutial ships loaded in
.^ the United States, especially
since the German submarine
blockade was inaugurated. Not
only vessels destined to German
ports, but those bound for ports
in Holland, Denmark and Sue
den have been detained on the
ground that their cargoes, re-
g irdless of the nominal consig-
nee, were intended for Germa-
ny and if allowed to go through
would sir ngthen that country
in its war against Great Bri
tain and its allies. To this the
Government at Washington
objected in a dispatch sent in
March and delivered by Mr.
Page, the ambassador in Lon
don. The point of tlie U S.
contention is contained in the
following :
"It is confidently assumed
that His Majesty's Government
will not deny that it is a rule
sanctioned by general practice
that, even though a blockade
should exist and the doctrine of
con,*pband as to unblockaded
tcfW.orvnfr ni^idly enforced, in
nocent shipments may be freely
transported to and from the
United States through neutral
countries to belligerent territory
without being subject to the
penalties of contraband traflic
| or breach of blockade, much less
to detention, requisition or con
fiscation."
That seems exceeding fair,
and if in the end it should pre
vail the gain to Great Britain
might be more than compensa
tion for the present loss. The
case of the United States in the
connection, however, is weaken-
ed by the position its Govnmnt.
and jurists have taken in the
past, when it was engaged in
war, and when British ships
were held and detained. Some
of these are alluded to by Sir
Edward Grey in his note. Some!
have been the subject of recent |
reference in the leading journals
of the United States. One typ-
ical case was tiiat of the Ber-
muda, sailing during the U. S.
Civil War from Liverpool for
Bermuda, but, as it appeared,
with Nassau, in the Bahamas,!
as its destination. Nassau was
a resort for blockade runners,
whose cargoes weie transferred
from its harbor to the harbors
of the southern states, then at
war with the North. The is
sues were brought before the
Supreme Court at Washington,
whose members laid down the
following doctrine :
"It makes no difference whe-
ther the destination to the rebel
port was ulterior or direct ; nor
could the question of destina J
tion be affected by trans ship-
ment at Nassau, if trans-ship
ment was intended, for that'
could not break the continuity
of transportation of the cargo.
The interposition of a neutral
port between neutral departure
and belligerant destination has
always been a favorite resort of
contraband carriers and block-
ade runners. But it never
avails them when the ultimate
distillation is ascertained. A
transportation from one point
to another remains continuous
so long as intent remains un-
changed, n > matter what stop
pages or trans shipments inter
vene."
In another case on which
judgment was pronounced by
the United States Supreme
Court, that of the Peterhoff,
bound from London for Mata-
moras in Mexico, across the
boundary river from a place in
Texas, held by southern sol-
diers, the doctrine was laid
down that "neutral trade to or
"from a blockaded country by
"inland navigation or transpor-
tation" is lawful, and "trade
"between London and Matamo-
"ros, even with intent to supply
"from Matamorosgoods to Tex-
"as, violated no blockade and
"cannot be dn Ian d unlawful."
!t was added th it "sue h trade
"with unrestricted inland com-
"merce between such port and
"the enemy's territory impairs
"undoubtedly, and very serious-
"lv impairs, the value of the
"blockade of the enemv'scoast. j
"But in cases such as that now j
"in judgment wc administer
"the public law of nations and
"are not at liberty to inquire
"what is for the particular ad
"vantage or disadvantage of
"our own or another country."
Some of the CdrRO was contra-
band, however, bt ing goods in-
tended for military use. In re-
gard to tli se it was rjei lared
that if really intended for sale
in the market of Matamoros
they would be free of liability,
"for contraband may be trans
"ported by neutrals toa neutral
"port if intended to make part
"of its general stock in trade."
Nothing in the evidence con-
vinced the court that Matamo-
ros was the intended m uketfoi
this contraband, all the circum-
stances showed the real desti-
nation to be Brownsville, the
place held bj the Confederates;
therefore the portion of the car-
go so designated was condemn-
ed, though the restitution of
the ship was ordered.
There is therefore in practical
support of Sir Edward Grey's
position the action of U. S.
naval officers during a time of
war, which action was uph( Id
b\ the highest U. S. inbuna'J
So there is good precedent for
Sir Edward Grey's contention
that in stopping vessels bound
for Holland and Swedish ports, .
among others, for the purj
of stopping German trade, Gre
Britain is acting in accord will
the principle that has obtaine
universal recognition, that b
"a blockade a belligerent is
entitled to "cut off by effective
means the sea "borne commerce
of his enemy So Sir Edward
Grey holds it is impossible fo
maintain that the right ol
a belligerent to in ten pt the
commerce of his enemy can bi
limited in the waj si ggesti I
in the quotation from the I). S
note.
The moral force of the U.
position can be ap| reciatet
without its practical weaknj
in view of U. S. pa si pracl
being improi d. sit Edward
[Grey intimates thai ll action
of the British < lov( mm nt will
not I)-1 changed, thougl it ill
be sought to lessen the amourrl
I of inconvenii p< e i aua d b;
Tl e suggestion has bet n made
that iMi< rnatiotial ti ibi tal i
I e railed on to decide^fee q
tion raised. Such a tribunal
[disposed of other a akward
questions in which the two
countries were concerned, and
may well be agreed upon in
this instance, if correspondence
does not bring about a n utually
satisfactory understanding.
'"The Gazette" Montieal.
t
1
Wear
Armbrister's
Shoes


L. GILBKRT DUPUCH,
Editor and Proprietor.
OK KICK:
Corner Shirley 6. Charlotte St
Nassau, S. P., Bahamas
PHONK 200. P. O. BOX MB.
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Zhe tribune
TUESDAY. August 24. 1915.
rr PUBLISHED AT 5 P.M.
r
We have been asked if this
is Flag Day ?
No, it is not .Flag, Tag,
Bag or any other day it is
just Tuesday.
Jamaica had a Flag Day,
rand it was a great success we
kwill tell you about it later.
We have had many enquiries
to who is receiving contri-
tions for the Bahamas Con-
ingent Fund or to whom
pntributions may be paid ?
Lot course we know, that
tributions are being left
both The Royal Bank of
ada and The Bank of
ail. But we do not know
who 1* collecting,and that is
what the public wants to
know.
The Mail Strainer "Hava-
na" arrived from New York
early thia morning, and nfter
transferring the following
passenger^ to tin- Tender
"Colonial proceeded to Ha-
vana with 117 passengers for
that city.
Misses Ruby M. Gardner,
Susan C. < iodine, Mary G.
Godine, and Mabel Steven-
son; Sisters M Celestia F.agan
i' ilons Mary McDonold, Car-
mela Roskamps, and Frances
Clare Tyson; Mrs. Elizabeth
G. Gardiner; Messrs Robert
Nelson Musgrove, Kenneth
Maclure, George A. Roberts
and Robert J. Smith.
Miss Louise Smith; Mrs.
Victoria Smith.
:o:
Foreign Mails to be despatch
ed per "Frances E." via Miami,
Fla., will he made up and clos-
ed on Friday, the jyth inst. at 8
a.m
"The "Frances F." left Miami
this morning with mails and
passengers.
:o:
BIMINI NOTES.
Aug. nth.The Schooner
"Leaon stopped here today
with a load of lumber from
the wreck on the bank off
Orange Cays; she took as pas-
senger from this place for Nas-
sau Misses Madeline Flowers,
Anna B. Wcech, Sarah J.
Rolle, and Olive Johnson; she
will also stop at Great Isaac
to remove Principal Keeper
Rodgers to Sturrjips Cay.
Capt. Webster arrived here
on the night of the ioth from
Miami and reported that a
tug boat would be over on
the 12th to take his ship,
then on the bank off Orange
Cay to Jacksonville, Fla.
He left here on the 12th
with his vessel in tow of a
tug for Jacksonville, he took
with him to assist the work-
ing of the vessel John Leveri-
ty, who, on reaching Jackson-
ville he will send back home.
On Sunday August 15th at
4 p. m. the Z. B. Y. P. V. B.
had a line meeting, various
subjects were dealt with; and
Solos and Duets were ren-
dered by its young people.
August 18th. It is report-
ed here today that Mr. Web-
ster arrived from Florida for
the purpose of taking over
the ship "Anda" (?), now a
total wreck in this neighbour-
hood, which he bought, but
it appears that he got here
too late as it was reported
here yesterday that the ship
had been burnt to the waters
edge.
SOMETHING UP.
A Pin Club turned out yes-
terday, and today another
club of the same name turn-
ed out from Porgee Town.
Something funny! It reminds
me of the Johnnie Canoe at
Christmas time.
Last night the Zion Bap-
tist Young Peoples Home
Mission met for praise meet-
ing; not many attended but
it went on all right.
The Mail Schooner "Petrel'
leaves tomorrow for Nassau.
COMMUNICATED
AN ENTERTAINMENT
HELD AT ST. MATTHEWS
BAPTIST CHAPEL,
CLARENCE TOWN, LONG
ISLAND.
On the rath of August the
children gathered at about 9
a.m. and after being arranged
marched to chapel singing a
very beautiful hymn.
At the chapel they gave reci-
tations and R few dialogues,
one between a brother and a
sister, and one between two
sisters which afforded much
fun, also three duets which wee
sung very nicely, one between
Miss Frances Major and her sis-
ter Miss Ida, and one between
Miss Ida and her cousin Miss
Alicia Edgecombe and one be-
tween Miss Frances Gibson and
her sister Stella Gibson with
their cousin Percival Gibson
singing the tenor.
On the whole it was credi-
tably done and gave much
satisfaction to the school
teachers; then a short lecture
was given by one of the J. Ps ,
N. C. P. Major Fsq who was
very much pleased with the
way the children were train-
ed to recite and sing, alter all
was over refreshments were
served to them and when all
this was over, before going
to the other enjoyments the
National Anthem was sung.
After a few other games
were enjoyed we dispersed to
our homes feeling very
happy over the day's pleas >re.
Thanking you for space al-
lowed I beg to remain
Yours faithfully,
LLOYD H. MAJOR.
LATEST
War News.
August 24th 1915.
Lonpon, 23rd.
Governor,
Bahamas
Official News: The French
government report small Ger-
man attacks checked at various
points.
The Russian government re-
ports that the German fleet has
left the Gulf of Riga having lost
in three days a dreadnought
(Probably the MOLTKE) sunk
by a British submarine; three
cruisers, seven torpedo boats
sunk or damaged.
Four barges filled with sol-
diers in an attempt at landing
at Pernau were captured and the
soldiers taken prisoners.
There are no important
changes on land fronts.
Italy has declared war on
Turkey.
The British submarine E. 13
was fired on and wrecked by a
German destroyer whilst
grounded on a Danish island.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
Washington: Official an-
nouncement was made from the
White House today that as soon
as all facts regarding the sink
ing of the Arabic ore entertain-
ed our course of action will be
determined.
Petrograd:In the naval bat-
tle in the Gulf of Riga which
raged from August sixteenth to
nineteenth the Russian fleet
sunk two German cruisers eight
torpedo boats. A British sub
marine sunk the battle cruiser
MOLTKE.
The Russian gunboat Suvilch
was lost but sunk a German lor
|>edo boat while sinking. The
German fleet has left Ihe (iulf
of Riga.
Paris;Two French torpedo
boats sunk a German dfstrover
off Ostend last night. The
French vessels were not damag
ed.
Sofia, Bulgaria: A British
submarine sunk Ihe Turkish
collier Ispahan and the German
steamer Budos, loaded- wjjh
munitions. \-^^^ ^
Rome: Several Italian troop-
ships escorted by warships left
Naples, Syracuse, and Brindisi.


It is generally supposed that
their destination is the Darda-
nelles.
London:German snbmarines
sunk the British steamer Dio-
mede. The Captain, quarter-
master and steward were killed
from shell fire during a four-
hours pursuit. A small boat was
swamped and two Knglish
sailors and five Chinese stokers
were drowned.
Tokio: It is reported that
Japan will supply Russia great
quantities of ammunition.
Berlin:German forces have
occpuied Ossowetz fortress
evacuated by the Russians.
It is reported that Bulgaria
and Turkey have signed a new
treaty giving Bulgaria railway
connection to the sea. Bulgaria
is to observe benevolent neu
trali tv.
It is reported that Serbia has
given way to Italy regarding
Albania, a move favourable to
the Kutente Allies.
New Orleans:The United
Fruit Company steamer Marcnv
ijne with 93 persons aboard has
not been heard from since the
Gulf hurricane.
Some Berlin papers, moved
by the Pope's peace, declare
that Germany would be glad
to accept reasonable condi-
tions and end tlie war. That
nii^ht well be. The trouble
is that no power concerned
on the other side suffered
enough yet to make it think
that anything Germany could
propose would be reasonable.
" The Gazette" Montreal.
The official report that
come from the Dardanelles
may not be frequent or
lengthy enough to satisfy a
news-hungry public, but
when they are given out they
are satisfactory. For they tell
of advance."Ibid."
:o:
The notable increases in the
foreign trade of the United
Slates reported of late, coupled
with the activity in many lines
of production due to the slate
of affairs^jn Juirope, has led
some to flak tmW fcjre war will
make the country rich. Perhaps
this is putting the case too
strongly, because whilst the war
increases the demand of the
JOHN BULL'S STRONG ARM.
A Patriotic Sentimental Souvenir Song.
(By J. B. SMITH.)
"Tune :Marching through Georgia."
i.
John Bull's Navy, mighty grand,
Is Mistress of the Sea
And here I wish to express
My gratitude to thee
For the glorious deeds you've done
With your strong arm at Sea.
Your strong arm is our protection.
Chorus :
Hurrah Hurrah you are mistress of the sea
Hurrah Hurrah you set all captives free,
We all should sing your praises,
Forever unto thee
Your strong arm is our protection.
2.

Wherever the weak are sore oppressed
By tyrant's cruel hand,
You are there with sure relief,
Full justice to demand.
Ever since your Hag has waved
Over sea or land
Your strong arm is our protection.
Long your glorious banner wave,
Long your sons endure,
Who fights for our mankind's rights
And liberty insure,
All the world proclaim your praise,
You keep the whole world pure,
While your strong arm is our protection.
hour for destructive materialr
it curtails the call for those re-
quired for constructive and re-
productive services, which are
the sound basis of prosperity.
The war, however, will give the
United States as an industrial
Community such an opportunity
for gaining a foothold in mar-
kets heretofore possessed largely
by the helligc rents that the way
to great wealth may he opened
to it. Of all the great countries
in llie world the United States
stands to make more than it will
lose by what is now going on on
the otiierside of the world Ibid
DOINQ HER FULL SHARE
NEWFOUNDLANDS EFF0RT8
AFTER ONE YEAR OF WAR
St. John's, Nfd., August 4.
The war's anniversary was
observed here as a public:
holiday with services in the
churches and various patrio-
tic functions for the securing
of funds for machine guns, a
naval hospital, etc.
A patriotic rally lakes
place tomorrow night under
the presidency of the Gover-
nor, when the formal an-
nouncement will be made of
the result of the fund started
in July to present two air-
ships to the Imperial authori-
ties. So far enough has been
subscribed to present three
airships and twenty machine
"iins, while the fund will
probably be continued to se-
cure a still larger number la-
ter.
ONE RESULT OF WAR.
DOMINIONS TO SHARE IN GOVERN-
INQ BRITISH EMPIRE.
London, August 4: Andrew
Ronar Law, secretary for the
colonies, speaking at Folkestone
tonight, said he belie. >^pj|^tt
as a result of the war tlie^rmfe
would soon come when the
whole self governing dominions *
in proportion to their popula-
tion and resources, would take
their part in the duties of gov-
erning the British Lmpire.
It was already understood, he
added, that when the time came
for peace negotiations, the do-
minions would have their say in
those negotiations.
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Instructions have been re-
ceived summoning all French-
men born in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes i8qo
to 1909 (born from rSjo to
1889) to present themseh -
immediately at the Vice Con-
sulate of France at Port-of-
Spain o'r at any of the twelve
Consular Agencies of the Bri-
tish West Indies to pass a
medical examination.
H. F. ARMBR1STER.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
FRENCH RED CROSSFUND.
Subscriptions are urgently
needed tor the above fund
and all donations, howevei
small, will be gratefully ac-
cepted, and will be acknow-
ledged in the newspapers.
H. F. ARMBR.ISIKR.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
jnd July, 1915.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepared Wax a Com
l>lctc finish and nolith for all Furniture
woodwork and floon,
Johnson's Wood Dye for (he ar|ji<
coloring of all wood, toft or hru^
Johnson's Under Lac a ipirtl
finish, very mrcli Superioi t<> ihellai
Varnish
Johnson's FIblI Wood Flnlsh-fora
beautiful, artistic, haml-rubbed effect
without the Bxpcnta ol rubbmi:.
Johnson's Peste Wood Fillerfoi
filling the grain a|"l pore* of wood
luepnrinu i< for the finish.
Johnson's Powdered Wax Tor bal
room Hoors.
FOR. SALE BV
Chas. E. Albury


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I
To be had at all Grocers
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Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American S.I;
American Csslnnere
Amend*" ^isffc.ii Lisle
HOSIERY
They have (food the teat. Give tea
1 foot comfort. No ie>mt to rip. Never
become loose or baggy. The ibapa is
knit in n GUARANTCF.I) for fineness, style,
superiority of material ami workmanship.
Absolutely st,unless Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPF.CIAL OFFER
to every one sen 'nit; us >'1 0(1 m cunency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shipping charges, we will tend post paid,
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar coni| any. either
3 Pivlis of our 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
Or 4 1'sirscilnvii 'illi viilun
American C.islumre Hosiery,
or 4 P-vIrs of our 10c. Vrtlne,
Air erica n C I ton.1, isle Hosiery
or 6 Pa.irs of Children's Hosiery.
HOST DELAY Oftei expire*when
dealer in your locality i- selected.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO.U.S.A
Shingles
Best No. I Heart 5m. Cypress
Shingles at $9.bo per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
i also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.73 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
j price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Just Received by
This Steamer
Fresh American
Fruit.
Peaches, Pears,
Plums, etc. etc.
J. K. AMQURY.
lay Street.
"The Allies

Try J. C. Coakley's
new Id. Cigars
The Allies
A blend of f%rHfne tJsWiccos
o
They are good to the end
Williams' Shoes Are Better
\


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