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a L. OILBKRT DUPUCH, Editor ir.d I'r.-frritt'ir OPWCKi Corner Shliley 6. Chivrlolre His Sattaa, .V. /'., Bakanuu TIIONi: 2U0. l. O. HOX KB. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES M • I. iv. Wednesday and Fiiday— tingle ropy ... ... ... Jil luesday, and riun-l.iv singlecopy id Saturday—tingle copy i|d Weekly 5' 1 Monthly ^^^ i s. 6s and we< |>ing? What reason for the subdued demeanour of the sad ? Leave sadness to the d( feated, or to those who le. 1 that they tight in a bad cause : sadness is not for those who never doubt that right will triumph, who feel that deathless confidence in themselves and in their cause which in itself is a-,promise of victory. We of the British Empire know that, long and arduous though this struggle may he, it can have but one issue. We are confab nt that the Allies w ill crush the foe-, who Ii i\ e plunged Europe into a 1 ruel and devastating* war. We look to the future to vindi1 ate, as the past has always vindicated, the principle of national rights against any Power or group <>f Powers who would dominate the world from one Pole to the other. And we are convinced that the Allied nations are the instruments which the Genius ul the World will employ in the work of crushing an ambitious tyranny. Therefore we have every jus tiheution f o r rejoicing. I herefore we shall make every ellort in the Mlsfe 1 1 Cause with a holiday spirit —a spirit of gladnt ss informed by a high id< a. The flags that will be sold on Tuesday next will remind us vividly of the great alliance



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that exists between nations who 1ft p sympathetically working and fighting, not only for peace in our time, but for the better protection of the smaller as well as of the larger European countries Side by side with the English Flag will fly the Flag of Russia, and we shall honour that emblem of the Russian Empire as we have never honoured it before. We shall perhaps, however vaguely at first, begin to understand that this alliance of the Russian Autocracy with the Democracies of England, France and Italy m e.i rj s a ne w awakening of the Russian national consciousness, the dawn of a brighter future for the teeming millions of the vast Empire of the East. When we see the rricolourol France associated with the Union Jack "f Engl ind we shall realise that Frenchmen a n d Englishmen, placed geogra phically so near to one another, have come into contact spiritually; and we shall have every reason for believing that this is no mere temporary understanding, but the firm cementing of a friendship that shall endure through the generations to come, with the happiest of resiilis to the < i vilised world. And this to I is matter for rejoicing^ an in centive to gladness of heart. 1' lag 111\. indeed, lias a significance beyond tlie raising of moneV. It should have an ethii ally educational value. About its financial success there cannot lie possii.lv a doubt: financially it will be ;i wonderful success. Hut in oilier directions also it will be a success. And if it is a day of rejoicing, thai, rejoicing, sp nitaiK ous vet djgnified, sincere and harmonious, will be the rejoicing of a British Colony secure in the rightc ousiirss of the Empire's cause. confident of the victory of the Allies' arms. St^w Gleaner, Jamaica. In The Magistrate* Court. 9 Wm. Bethel Drunk and using profane and indecent language in Bay Street—I, 5s. or 4 davs II, 10s. and is. costs or 8 days. | Adolphns Adderley — Drunk in East Street —5s. or 4 days. Catherine Saunders -Larceny of 8s. moneys of Alfonzo Scavel la —Dismissed. David Lafleur — III treating a horse —Bound in his own recognizance in £5 to appear for sentence within 3 months if ailed upon. I 'mice Rahmiisg, Savalita Butler, Thomas Butler, Sarah Miller, Geo. Roberts-Breach Dog Licence Act—Each fined 2 1 I. M pectively. Ronald Francis—Deposit 1 ing mangoe skins on sidewalk [ in Bay Street —5s. or 4 days. I 10 Cecilia Bethel a child, — Depositing mangoe skins 1 on side walk —Cautioned. II Samuel Wood—Loud shouting and using profane language in Baillou Hill) Road Dismissed. .lust 111a Murphy--Breach Dog Licence ActDismissed 12 Chas. Thompson — Breach Dog Licence Act— Dismissed. Wm. Minns, Jane Elliot, John Major-Breach Cattle Act—fined 4s, 2s., 2s. respectively. Maud Gardiner —Assaulting and beating Druscilla Ai minister Dismissed. ; \ -Remilda Rolle— Br: I >> g Licence Act—48. Theophilus A d d erl ey — Malliciously destroying divers articles of wearing apparel, eat hen ware and one table all the value of £3. the goods and chattels of Elizabeth Adderley Ids wife) -Fined ros. and ordered to pay wife £2. as Compensation and is. costs Indefault 0 weeks imprisonment. Latest War News August 19th 1915. London 18th. ( i overnor, Bahamas. Official News:General Hamilton reports heavy attack on Australian New Zealand corps repulsed n the night of the 14th. Five hundred yards gained at Ruvulo on the 15th. Zeppelins raided Kastern counties last night. It is believed that one was hit. Some houses were damaged. Ten peis' -11s were killed and thirty six injured, all civilians. The Russian government reports desperate fighting at Kovno, the Germans capturing one fort and breaking in In lw< en others. Berlin reports tonight announce tinfall of Kovno. The Italians report SU ses in Tolmina /.one. prisoners and four machine guns were captured. (Signed) BONAR LAW. Bei lin:— It is officially announced that the Germans have captured Kovno despite tenacious resistance of the Russians. 400 cannon, muni tions and other war material was taken. Cap. Ilaitien: —Another detachment of American marines have been landed. The rebels refuse to disarm and show inclination to light the Americans. London:—Submarines sunk the Norwegian steamers Romulus and Mineral, Ibe But ish steamers Thornfield and Maggie Bany, and the Spanish steamer Isidoro Parts of the rreWS were lost. Petrograd:—German aeroplanes are persistently bom bnrding Vihia, 50 miles East <>l Kovno. Preliminary evacuation of Bielstock has begun. Rome:—An Austrian fleet <>f 21 ships bombarded the Island of Pelagosa in the Adriatic hut retired after killing an Italian %  •nicer and wounding three men. I louston, Texas: —Camp Fort Crockett was completely des troyed l>v the West Indian storm. The U. S.-Shi;> McCell an is aground, the Boo was also damaged. The Kilpatrick and the Crushing art safe Galves ton is under martial law. At Beaufort _\ li\eswre lost; at Virginia Point, 18 and at several iitln r towns a sn'all number of dead arc reported. The l< i% at I louston is rep 11> d :<> I e from llnee In five i|iil|l> 1) d>| lars. Ai Port Arthur Ihe w ind blew at the rate of 90 miles an hour. 300 feet of the causeway at Galveston was destroyed. A BLOW TO GERMAN PRIDE. The successful termii ation of the campaign against SouthWest Africa gives us especial pleasure, and the "moral and intellectual" mortification to Germany must be proportionately as great. Next to KiaoChau, South.West^Aiiica was the ovcisea "place^rWllt: sun' which Germany took the greatest pride. The colony was rf garded as a valuable possession because of its proximi to British South Africa. The Dutch in the union (so the calculation rani would rebel when Great Britain was in difficulties, and with the kindly help of their German neighbours would be able to get rid of the Union Jack. But General BOTHA happens to look upon the Treat) of Vereenigina not as "just a scrap of paper." The Germans put their money on the wrong Boer. Tlicv counted on Dr. Win, tl ( y 1 had to recken with BOTHA; an the fate of the Union Jack 1 that its ample fidds now cov German South-West Africa well. We cannot help re gietting that Sir HKNRY CAMP DELLDANNBRMKN did not live to see the splendid vindication of the policy with w lii( h lus Prime Ministership will always be associated• a poli j ; 1 rsondied in General BOTHA, Prime Minister and Commander-in Chief. The lattei has b splendidly helped bj D I like G< neral SMU I S ai d Eng lishmrn like the lateStl < IEORGF. FARRAR and Sir Dl SCAN MACKl-.N/ii.; but it is the name of Louis Boi MA hi< li • %  • ill he linked with the storj of I crushed rebellion and the cap tuied German colony. —Tin: Westminster Ga: White Lime I AM offering FOK SALE my entire stock of White Lime "f about 800 bushels at 6d. per bushel. Orders 1Tt at Mr. Alomon Finlavson, Devenux St. 01 Phone 3 58 or "The Tt ib Office. ]0SIAH RAHMINC June 30, 191 5.



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and hours are tliose of Serbian workmen. Their trades arc known, to e Government, and they are Riven (heir own line of work as I ir as possible, some of llie trained men receiving remuneration. Their great terror has been typhus, which started among them and made fearful ravages. For a time it seemed that then would be no survivors from the scourge, which spread rapidly to tlie Serbian Army and ran through the military ipitala at a frightful rate"; but k'r e it,e fforts were made, timelj^fl^Kirriv in^ from out side; English, American, and Ifench hospitals were established, and the coming of the warm weather gave the epidemic its coup de grace. The prisoners are a strange mixture of race and language. A large proportion are from the Southern Austrian provinces and speak only Serbian. Many of the rest arc Czech or liohe mian, and, their various dialects being kindred to Serbian, they have nearly all learned to speak Serbian f inly well by this time. Among them all, the man who speaks fluent German is the exception. There are also many Hungarians, who generally know only their own bewildering tongue and seem very slow at learning another. I hese prisoners seem to take very little interest in the course of the war in general and none in international politics, having lit conversation on tlie subject beyond vague speculation on the possible duration of their captivity. One has the itn sion that tiny were all hus' I off to fight without its ev< r having occurred (<> them to ask why, and OIKbegins to und< r stand h..w it was possible for little Serbia to have overcome such hordes of them — The New York Times. -4 THE CHAMOIS is possibly the most sure-footed of all animals, and it is tamed tor its remarkable agility. SUNLIGHT SOAP is the sure friend of every caretul housewife and it is famed all over the world for the remarkable east with which it dispels dirt from the clothes in the wash. The Chamois is to be found only on the loftiest mountain ridges, but ScMKiiii SOAP is found in all parts of the civilized world. W A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRKS In inform his. friends and the Public thajfe has jn-t received .1 complete outfit i f I icilitios f"i the buisness <>l an imdertaker, \\ l.ich placet lum in a it ion to rmiy u! Fun< rala that j ho en mi' led to hie rare with I tcli; and resiiect fully -1 a^ 1 11 |> iironage (ii t irty Prii ri'si 1 rfp MVP tint \Ur-~p %  1 the vei\ I rwi -1 .1 in ii,.i cl. months without holes, or new ones free. OUR SPECIAL OFFER to every one ten ing u* SI.00 in currency or postal m te, ti 0 \>i advertising and shipping charges, we will 1 |>aid, witli written guarantee, backed i> a five million dollar Com| anv. cither 3 Pairs of our 75c. VBIVIO American Silk Hosiery, or 4 Pairs of o\jr 50c. vulue American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 Pilre of our 50c. Vrvlue. An eri( an Cottnn•Lille IT Mrrv or 6 Pairs of CKildren's Hosiery. DONT DELAY Ofl • ex| ire whan dealei in four locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON OHIO U S.A Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnson's Prepnred Wax—a com i to finish and polish for all furniture wood w< >rk and flo4iis Johnson's Wood Dye foi the irtistii loring ol all wood, soft or hard Johnson's Under Lac %  spirit finish, very much luperloi to shellac or varnish Johnson's Flat Wood Finish lora beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effect without the expense of rubbin i Johnson's Paste Wood Filler—for filling the grain and pores of wood preparing \ >i th< finish Jnhnson'i PonJernd Wx for bal loom Doors, FOR SALE BY Chas. E. W)$ voeae (THE LINEN STORE.) and Have Received The. Latest Spring Novelty THE HEW -LAVE' \NETS Guaranteed Untarnishsble, and Washable. Suitable for Waists, Yokes, Dresses, Millinery, White and Black, While and Silver, Black and Silver, \\ lute and Gold Ecru and Gold, Heliotrope and Gold, Saxe Ml no and Gold. Gold Silver and Crystal Tasst Is. White, Cream, and Ecru lire tonne Nets, Shadow Nets, l.aee Nets, Overalls, Point d'Esprit, Pleated Net Ruch ings. Washable Marquisettes. Black and White, Sand and White, Double Width. Poplin. Black Poplin, White Poplin, double width. White Washing Silk. Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe, May ist, 1915 Albury NOTICE During my absence from the Colony I appoint J Samuel Knowles to act as my Attorney. G. T KNOWLES Nassau N. P. August 15th 1915 RUMSET'S PUMPS C ISTERN Pumps, Well P u m p s, Win d m i 1 1 Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps, House Pumps Pneumatic Systems. Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, Deep Well Pumps, Electric Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Ccns trifugal Pumps, Waterwork, Machinery, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps, Air Compressors, Ship Pumps Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, etc. Installed under the direct supervision of H. McPhcrson and Brother. Prices on Application. II. J. THOMPSON, Agent. For Results Advertise in The Tribune. Here's An Opportunity Ia/ y u cannot luimj affQrd iQ l(Jse If You want to Economize. If you want a First Class Eight. If you want to be recognized. Use the Best Light tln:t money can buy. The Safest and the Cheapest. THE DC AMU KEROSENE MANTLE DCAUUN LAMPS AND BURNERS arc recopnlzed an tho HtandHrd Incandesccnt oil lami'H of the world. 100,000 Hiill-llril users. All delinked. Prodtici-B u powerful, I.Ill, .HI whit* light of KM) candlepower. Iturna com. mon roal-nli. < o.ts only one cent for i kouri. 1:111 11 • %  r thnn fr 1". electricity or six ordinary lamps at onesixth to one-tenth the cost. Made entirely of bra**. For uso In homos, Htnrpn. halls I and churches. No odor, no noise; sure, • Rlmplo and clean. There Is only ono 1 Beacon. Insist o a Mvliir It. Home Supply Co. KANSAS CITY, MO. For Sale By THOS. E NiiM^c14 CHRISTIE ST., Nassau! N.P. Special Terms givenif requested. Write 01 sec me and know all about this WOO derfol Lamp. Williams' Shoes Ape Better }



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Nulllua cviidic Ilia |urnir in verb* mi\|>iNlri Beln bound lo iwttr to the Dogmns of no Master !" W VOL. XII. Nrtvmvi.S.I'..lli>hnrn..s THURSDAY August. 19. I9IS NO. 330 American Tells Of Serb Army. (BY CECIL HOWARD.) O N' first acquaintance the salient feature of the Serbian Army is its mot ley appearance. The young troops, it is true, have a regular uniform, but the reserves dress according to their own sweet will, and consider honoi satisfied as long as they wear the regulation forage cap All this is very confusing to the foreign visitor, who finds it hard to distinguish soldier from civilian unless the soldier be on ac live service, when his accoutre ment and military swagger mark him as surely as any urnfqrm, You meet a convoy of bid lock carts on the road. Look at the guard. The first man is in peasant COStumc—coarse, brown homespun stuff, with coat, vest, and trousers curious ly cut and braided, the vest worn outside the coat and the trousers very baggy in the seat and tight in the leg. His sash, socks, and the square, flat cloth bag he wears slung over one shoulder would show up gaudily at two miles. 11 is gun hangs on his shoulder by a bit of rope and his belt bristles with small arms and ammunition. lie walks well, and his sandaled feet arc as tireless as the wheels of his ox cart. The next man is more origi nal. Coming from a different district, his clothes are white, with black braid in strange patterns, and he wears a huge black sheepskin hat. which lool^like the natural wool of a Ua4^^i raIian binhman. The nextman is rather like the fir--t, but even more warlike. His 11fie is the small bore Serbian type. I le seems to have a plen tiful supply of ammunition for it in great boxes, but he also wears an imposing belt full of beautiful shiny cartridges which might fit an unusually heavy elephant gun or a small cannon. The next man has a gray Aus trian coat and carries two rifles. There are not two alike in the whole outfit. If you lake a train you will perhaps see some of the young troops. These have a very neat and practise] uniform of warm brownish gray, at least most of them do, though you will find a fair sprinkling of Russian and Austrian uniforms as well. Nearly all the passenger trains have box-cars and trucks on behind, filled with soldiers armed to the teeth and in bois terous spirits. As the train rat ties along through the charming Serbian valleys, these war riors swarm over the tops of the carriages, singing songs of bat tie and firing off their rifles, right, left, and in the air, to the great indignation of their officers, who travel inside the pas senger cars and get off at the stations to go back and curse them. With luck you will meet some of the coramitadji. These are volunteer corps, recruited from the brains and aristocracy of the country. Their officers are recognized by the regular army, but they carry on a guerrilla warfare of their own, choosing the most difficult and dangerous posts foi themselves. Serbia lias some 10,000 of these, and they are a most formidable pro position for an invading enemy. Their discipline is even more seveie than that of the regular army and at the slightest diso bedience an officer will shoot his man with his own revolver. These fellows are naturally the cream of the army and one hears great tales of their daring. Their favorite weapon is the Serbian hand grenade—a thing that looks like a flat brandyflask with a brass screw top. When they attack a trench, for instance, they creep up as near as possible without being seen. Then each man takes his grenade, of which he has half a dozen in his belt, and, unscrewing the stopper, hits the percussion cap a sharp blow against his rifle or some hard object. If lie throws it now it might lie unexploded on the ground long enough for the enemy to pick it up and hurl it back, but the crafty Serb knows the length of his fuse to a nicety and swings his bomb back and forth like a baseball pitcher, counting the seconds and estimating the distance of his mark. At the last instant he lands his grenade in the trench of the Austrians, where it explodes instantly with devastating effect. Imagine sev eral hundred of these arriving simultaneously in a crowded trench. The great ad\antage of these commitadji is their great mobility and independence. They forage for themselvi >. and in their own country could go on lighting for years after a regular army would be broken up. The Serbs, w ith theexception of the more educated and traveled, have very vague ideas about the war. One soldier asked me: "How is it that Prance, England] and Russia can't beat Germany when we Serbs beat Austria all by ourselves? If you tell them of the great strength of Germany, they say it is a pity a couple of DUO ARROW COLLAR If you will give those collars a trial and keep track of their main trips to the laundry you will soon app ecial their worth. ON BALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILS] S cl.rr.1T, PEABOOY A to.. Inc. MAKKH.S, TROY, \\ Y. I.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive AiU'ii dred thousand Seihian sold cannot be spared to drive the Germans out of Belgium. That the Seibians ha\ e a high opinion of their army is natural when one realizes that theic no 600.000 Austrian prison taken In the course of ten days, in Serbia. They have becoi part of the life of the country now, and are to be seen everj where at all sorts of worl Exce| I when they are statioi d Vi near the frontier they are allow ed great liberty, and on I whole it must be said that ti are well treated. Ti''ir food is the same as that oPthe Ser bian soldiers, and their work (Continued on fourth page.) Wear Ar-mbpister's Shoes % 


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02395
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, August 19, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02395

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Full Text
Nulllua cviidic Ilia |urnir in verb* mi\|>iNlri
Beln bound lo iwttr to the Dogmns of no Master
W
VOL. XII.
Nrtvmvi.S.I'..lli>hnrn..s THURSDAY August. 19. I9IS
NO. 330
American Tells Of Serb Army.
(By Cecil Howard.)
ON' first acquaintance the
salient feature of the
Serbian Army is its mot
ley appearance. The young
troops, it is true, have a regu-
lar uniform, but the reserves
dress according to their own
sweet will, and consider honoi
satisfied as long as they wear
the regulation forage cap All
this is very confusing to the
foreign visitor, who finds it hard ,
to distinguish soldier from civi-
lian unless the soldier be on ac
live service, when his accoutre
ment and military swagger
mark him as surely as any urn-
fqrm,
You meet a convoy of bid
lock carts on the road. Look
at the guard. The first man is
in peasant COStumccoarse,
brown homespun stuff, with
coat, vest, and trousers curious
ly cut and braided, the vest
worn outside the coat and the
trousers very baggy in the seat
and tight in the leg. His sash,
socks, and the square, flat cloth
bag he wears slung over one
shoulder would show up gaudi-
ly at two miles. 11 is gun hangs
on his shoulder by a bit of rope
and his belt bristles with small
arms and ammunition. lie
walks well, and his sandaled
feet arc as tireless as the wheels
of his ox cart.
The next man is more origi
nal. Coming from a different
district, his clothes are white,
with black braid in strange
patterns, and he wears a huge
black sheepskin hat. which
lool^like the natural wool of
a Ua4^^i raIian binhman. The
nextman is rather like the fir--t,
but even more warlike. His
11fie is the small bore Serbian
type. I le seems to have a plen
tiful supply of ammunition for
it in great boxes, but he also
wears an imposing belt full of
beautiful shiny cartridges which
might fit an unusually heavy
elephant gun or a small cannon.
The next man has a gray Aus
trian coat and carries two
rifles. There are not two alike
in the whole outfit.
If you lake a train you will
perhaps see some of the young
troops. These have a very neat
and practise] uniform of warm
brownish gray, at least most of
them do, though you will find
a fair sprinkling of Russian and
Austrian uniforms as well.
Nearly all the passenger
trains have box-cars and trucks
on behind, filled with soldiers
armed to the teeth and in bois
terous spirits. As the train rat
ties along through the charm-
ing Serbian valleys, these war
riors swarm over the tops of the
carriages, singing songs of bat
tie and firing off their rifles,
right, left, and in the air, to the
great indignation of their offi-
cers, who travel inside the pas
senger cars and get off at the
stations to go back and curse
them.
With luck you will meet some
of the coramitadji. These are
volunteer corps, recruited from
the brains and aristocracy of
the country. Their officers are
recognized by the regular army,
but they carry on a guerrilla
warfare of their own, choosing
the most difficult and dangerous
posts foi themselves. Serbia
lias some 10,000 of these, and
they are a most formidable pro
position for an invading enemy.
Their discipline is even more
seveie than that of the regular
army and at the slightest diso
bedience an officer will shoot
his man with his own revolver.
These fellows are naturally
the cream of the army and one
hears great tales of their daring.
Their favorite weapon is the
Serbian hand grenadea thing
that looks like a flat brandy-
flask with a brass screw top.
When they attack a trench,
for instance, they creep up as
near as possible without being
seen. Then each man takes
his grenade, of which he has
half a dozen in his belt, and,
unscrewing the stopper, hits the
percussion cap a sharp blow
against his rifle or some hard
object. If lie throws it now it
might lie unexploded on the
ground long enough for the
enemy to pick it up and hurl it
back, but the crafty Serb knows
the length of his fuse to a
nicety and swings his bomb
back and forth like a baseball
pitcher, counting the seconds
and estimating the distance of
his mark. At the last instant
he lands his grenade in the
trench of the Austrians, where
it explodes instantly with de-
vastating effect. Imagine sev
eral hundred of these arriving
simultaneously in a crowded
trench.
The great ad\antage of these
commitadji is their great mo-
bility and independence. They
forage for themselvi >. and in
their own country could go on
lighting for years after a regular
army would be broken up.
The Serbs, w ith theexception
of the more educated and trav-
eled, have very vague ideas
about the war. One soldier
asked me: "How is it that
Prance, England] and Russia
can't beat Germany when we
Serbs beat Austria all by our-
selves? If you tell them of the
great strength of Germany, they
say it is a pity a couple of DUO
ARROW
COLLAR
If you will give those
collars a trial and keep
track of their main
trips to the laundry you
will soon app ecial
their worth.
ON BALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILS] S
cl.rr.1T, PEABOOY A to.. Inc.
MAKKH.S, TROY, \\ Y. I.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive AiU'ii .
dred thousand Seihian sold
cannot be spared to drive the
Germans out of Belgium.
That the Seibians ha\ e a high
opinion of their army is natural
when one realizes that theic no
600.000 Austrian prison
taken In the course of ten days,
in Serbia. They have becoi
part of the life of the country
now, and are to be seen everj
where at all sorts of worl Exce| I
when they are statioi d Vi
near the frontier they are allow
ed great liberty, and on I
whole it must be said that ti
are well treated. Ti''ir food
is the same as that oPthe Ser
bian soldiers, and their work
(Continued on fourth page.)
Wear
Ar-mbpister's
Shoes


a
L. OILBKRT DUPUCH,
Editor ir.d I'r.-frritt'ir
OPWCKi
Corner Shliley 6. Chivrlolre His
Sattaa, .V. /'., Bakanuu
TIIONi: 2U0. l. O. HOX KB.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
M I.iv. Wednesday and Fiiday
tingle ropy ... ... ... Jil
luesday, and riun-l.iv singlecopy id
Saturdaytingle copy i|d
Weekly 5'1
Monthly ^^^ .....is. 6 alfYearly............ Y.-JIv ............18s.
l'AYAISI.K IN ADVANCi;
Advertising Rates:Six penc e liiu
(or first insertion; three pence i*-i line
for second insertion ; aod one peon) pe
line for subsqiieut insertion".
Advertisements under eiuht lines .is.
Zhc tribune
THURSDAY. August 19. 1915.
" PfBLlSHKD AT 5 P.M.
MAILS.
Foreign Mails to be des-
patched per "Frances E" via
Miami Fla. will be made "up
and dosed on Saturday the
21st inst. at 8 a. m.
:o:
Bahamas Contingent
For The War
[6. Charles Percival Bethell,
Nassau, Clerk Col. Sec.
Office.
29. Bruce Marshall Maura,
Nassau, Clerk.
30. Janice ii. Knowles,
.Nassau, Clerk Board of
Wo.ks
:o; -
1 lure was a full muster of
The Bahamas Contingent at
drill this morning.
Every one of the thirty men '
bi ing in line at the'Tall in."
The Bahamas Contingent for
Hi'- War has been recruited to
full Strength 1 viz: 30 rank and I
file.
The Recruiting Committee
however are prepared lo enroll
A few more men without enlist -
ing thriskp and to have them
taught drill along with the
Contingent.
These men would to he the
I lace ol any of the men now en-
listed who were found "not like-
ly to become efficient" or for any
unforeseen reason struck off be-
fore the Contingent leaves
Nassau
Apply at the Commandant's
office for further particulars.
Police Band Concert 19th
August 1915.
PROGRAMME.
i. Manh Bahamas Con-
tingent"
2. Valse 'Under the Spell'
j. Overture "1 Madem"
4. Two Step "Laughing
Sam"
5. Selection "National Airs j
of Allied Forces"
6. Aigrette "Caprice"
1 Wag "Hashed Brown"
GOD BLESS THE
PRINCE OK WALES
GODSAVK THE KING.
Corpl. II. Roa< h,
Actg. Bandmaster.
:o:
The horse which was adver-
tised by us yesterday as being
lost was found dead yesterday
in the drain on Maekey Street.
What might have been a seri-
ous accident occurred yesterday
aflernoon, when a boy put him-
self in the way of an automo-
bile that was driving out east-
waid near the Eastern Police
Station.
The car came so near the bos
that he threw himself Hat on the
ground ami the car passed ovei
Rim without touching him but
only caught Ins sleeve.
This foolish pracice of
youngsters in \\\e suburbs put
ting themselves in the way of
automobiles and other vehicles
for the fun of humbugging the
driver will some day result in a
erious, or perhaps fatal acci-
dent for which some driver will
br blamed when it is the fault of
the little fools 111 our streets
who find fun in a dangerous
practice.
"FlagllDay"
On Tuesday next the flags
of the nations now engaged
in waging war against Cier- i
many, Austria and Turkey;
will be sold in every part of
the island by the hundred
and the thousand, and every-
one will be given an oppor-
tunity in this way of contri-
buting to the War Contin-
gent Kund. It may with con-
fidence be expected that a
very large sum of money will
be raised by this means : peo-
ple with but threepence or
sixpence to give at any one
moment to a deserving cause
will often find difficulty in
getting that money to those
in charge of a fund devoted
to that cause: they will not
send a few pence by post, and
it is only here and there that
a collector may come ail'
them. But organise some
general movement to take
place on a day specified, and
have assistants everywhere,
who, willing, eager, enthusi-
astic, will spread themselvi -
out like an enveloping army
to encircle ami capture the
givers, and you at once pos-
sess a means of reaching ev-
erybody. Of course if the
people did not want to he
reached, did not care to con-
tribute to tin 1 ause they were
asked to support, your efforts
would bear little fruit. In
this particular instance, how-
ever, all Jamaica is glad to
contribute towards the de-
fence of the common cause,
and the selling of llags not
only puts it in our people's
way to give what they can,
but should he a potent means
of further awakening tie ii
enthusiasm.
Tuesday the 271I1 may he
regarded as a holiday in tin
older and deeper sense of that
woul. I|iilidays \\ere 01 igi-
nally religious festivals: in a
way they were regard'd as
holy daj s. There may he re-
joicing on such occasions, but
it is rejoicing based upon an
idea, informed with a serious
sentiment. One can scarcely
rejoice and he exceeding glad
over nothing ; hut one may
rej ice over s< imelhing purely
trivial. The higher tlie rea
son that leads to rejoicing,
that awakens enthusiasm, the
liner and .ruer the rejoicing
b comes, and the more justi-
fiable. In ceh biating a na-
tional anniversary, wnich is
not one of shame and disas-
ter, a nation is righteously
glad. In celebrating an event
of the fust importance to its
continued life and greatness,
a people is justified in rais-
ing paeans of praise and ho-
sannahs of thanksgiving.
We have every light to take
pleasure in an act well and
finely done, in a great ellort
for a worthy cause. When
the troops leave for the front
in England or Frame, they
are cheered by enthusiastic
thousands, and the stirring
strains of martial airs cause
the heart to beat quickly
j with national pride. I hose
1 men may be going to death,
I but they are going to some-
thing more and greater than
death. Tiny are going to
strike a blow for the ideals
of nationality, of human
freedom; the) are going to
light for their country, and
they march with the [aide of
heroes. What call is there
here for sadnc>s and we< |>-
ing? What reason for the
subdued demeanour of the
sad ? Leave sadness to the
d( feated, or to those who
le. 1 that they tight in a bad
cause : sadness is not for
those who never doubt that
right will triumph, who feel
that deathless confidence in
themselves and in their cause
which in itself is a-,promise
of victory. We of the Bri-
tish Empire know that, long
and arduous though this
struggle may he, it can have
but one issue. We are con-
fab nt that the Allies w ill
crush the foe-, who Ii i\ e
plunged Europe into a 1 ruel
and devastating* war. We
look to the future to vindi-
1 ate, as the past has always
vindicated, the principle of
national rights against any
Power or group <>f Powers
who would dominate the
world from one Pole to the
other. And we are convinc-
ed that the Allied nations
are the instruments which
the Genius ul the World will
employ in the work of crush-
ing an ambitious tyranny.
Therefore we have every jus
tiheution f o r rejoicing.
I herefore we shall make eve-
ry ellort in the Mlsfe1'1'
Cause with a holiday spirit
a spirit of gladnt ss inform-
ed by a high id< a.
The flags that will be sold
on Tuesday next will remind
us vividly of the great alliance


that exists between nations
who 1ft p sympathetically
working and fighting, not on-
ly for peace in our time, but
for the better protection of
the smaller as well as of the
larger European countries
Side by side with the English
Flag will fly the Flag of
Russia, and we shall honour
that emblem of the Russian
Empire as we have never
honoured it before. We shall
perhaps, however vaguely at
first, begin to understand
that this alliance of the Rus-
sian Autocracy with the De-
mocracies of England, France
and Italy m e.i rj s a ne w
awakening of the Russian
national consciousness, the
dawn of a brighter future for
the teeming millions of the
vast Empire of the East. When
we see the rricolourol France
associated with the Union
Jack "f Engl ind we shall re-
alise that Frenchmen a n d
Englishmen, placed geogra
phically so near to one an-
other, have come into contact
spiritually; and we shall have
every reason for believing that
this is no mere temporary un-
derstanding, but the firm
cementing of a friendship
that shall endure through the
generations to come, with the
happiest of resiilis to the < i
vilised world. And this to I
is matter for rejoicing^ an in
centive to gladness of heart.
1' lag 111\. indeed, lias a sig-
nificance beyond tlie raising
of moneV. It should have an
ethii ally educational value.
About its financial success
there cannot lie possii.lv a
doubt: financially it will be ;i
wonderful success. Hut in
oilier directions also it will be
a success. And if it is a day
of rejoicing, thai, rejoicing,
sp nitaiK ous vet djgnified,
sincere and harmonious, will
be the rejoicing of a British
Colony secure in the rightc
ousiirss of the Empire's cause.
confident of the victory of the
Allies' arms.
St^w Gleaner, Jamaica.
In The Magistrate* Court.
9 Wm. Bethel Drunk and
using profane and indecent
language in Bay StreetI, 5s.
or 4 davs II, 10s. and is. costs
or 8 days. |
Adolphns Adderley Drunk
in East Street 5s. or 4 days.
Catherine Saunders -Lar-
ceny of 8s. moneys of Alfonzo
Scavel la Dismissed.
David Lafleur III treating
a horse Bound in his own
recognizance in 5 to appear
for sentence within 3 months
if ailed upon.
I 'mice Rahmiisg, Savalita
Butler, Thomas Butler, Sarah
Miller, Geo. Roberts- -Breach
Dog Licence ActEach fined
2 1 I. M pectively.
Ronald FrancisDeposit1
ing mangoe skins on sidewalk [
in Bay Street 5s. or 4 days. I
10 Cecilia Bethel a child,
Depositing mangoe skins1
on side walk Cautioned.
II Samuel WoodLoud
shouting and using profane
language in Baillou Hill)
Road Dismissed.
.lust 111a Murphy--Breach
Dog Licence Act- Dismissed
12 Chas. Thompson
Breach Dog Licence Act
Dismissed.
Wm. Minns, Jane Elliot,
John Major-Breach Cattle
Actfined 4s, 2s., 2s. res-
pectively.
Maud Gardiner Assault-
ing and beating Druscilla
Ai minister Dismissed.
; \ -Remilda Rolle Br:
I >> g Licence Act48.
Theophilus A d d erl ey
Malliciously destroying divers
articles of wearing apparel,
eat hen ware and one table all
the value of 3. the goods
and chattels of Elizabeth Ad-
derley Ids wife) -Fined ros.
and ordered to pay wife 2.
as Compensation and is.
costs Indefault 0 weeks im-
prisonment.
Latest War News
August 19th 1915.
London 18th.
(iovernor,
Bahamas.
Official News:- General
Hamilton reports heavy at-
tack on Australian New Zea-
land corps repulsed n the
night of the 14th.
Five hundred yards gained
at Ruvulo on the 15th.
Zeppelins raided Kastern
counties last night. It is be-
lieved that one was hit.
Some houses were dam-
aged. Ten peis' -11s were kill-
ed and thirty six injured, all
civilians.
The Russian government
reports desperate fighting at
Kovno, the Germans captur-
ing one fort and breaking in
In lw< en others.
Berlin reports tonight an-
nounce tin- fall of Kovno.
The Italians report SU
ses in Tolmina /.one.
prisoners and four machine
guns were captured.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
Bei lin: It is officially an-
nounced that the Germans
have captured Kovno despite
tenacious resistance of the
Russians. 400 cannon, muni
tions and other war material
was taken.
Cap. Ilaitien:Another de-
tachment of American ma-
rines have been landed. The
rebels refuse to disarm and
show inclination to light the
Americans.
London:Submarines sunk
the Norwegian steamers Ro-
mulus and Mineral, Ibe But
ish steamers Thornfield and
Maggie Bany, and the Span-
ish steamer Isidoro Parts of
the rreWS were lost.
Petrograd:German aero-
planes are persistently bom
bnrding Vihia, 50 miles East <>l
Kovno. Preliminary evacuation
of Bielstock has begun.
Rome:An Austrian fleet <>f
21 ships bombarded the Island
of Pelagosa in the Adriatic hut
retired after killing an Italian
nicer and wounding three
men.
I louston, Texas: Camp Fort
Crockett was completely des
troyed l>v the West Indian
storm. The U. S.-Shi;> McCell
an is aground, the Boo was also
damaged. The Kilpatrick and
the Crushing art safe Galves
ton is under martial law. At
Beaufort _\ li\eswre lost; at
Virginia Point, 18 and at sev-
eral iitln r towns a sn'all number
of dead arc reported. The l< i%
at I louston is rep 11> d :<> I e
from llnee In five i|iil|l> 1) d>|
lars. Ai Port Arthur Ihe w ind
blew at the rate of 90 miles an
hour.
300 feet of the causeway at
Galveston was destroyed.
A BLOW TO GERMAN PRIDE.
The successful termii ation of
the campaign against South-
West Africa gives us especial
pleasure, and the "moral and
intellectual" mortification to
Germany must be proportion-
ately as great. Next to Kiao-
Chau, South.West^Aiiica was
the ovcisea "place^rWllt: sun'
which Germany took the great-
est pride. The colony was rf
garded as a valuable possession
because of its proximi to Bri-
tish South Africa. The Dutch
in the union (so the calculation
rani would rebel when Great
Britain was in difficulties, and
with the kindly help of their
German neighbours would be
able to get rid of the Union Jack.
But General Botha happens to
look upon the Treat) of Ve-
reenigina not as "just a scrap of
paper." The Germans put their
money on the wrong Boer. Tlicv
counted on Dr. Win, tl ( y 1
had to recken with Botha; an
the fate of the Union Jack 1
that its ample fidds now cov
German South-West Africa .
well. We cannot help re
gietting that Sir Hknry CAMP
DELL- DANNBRMKN did not live
to see the splendid vindication
of the policy with w lii( h lus
Prime Ministership will always
be associated- a poli j ; 1 rson-
died in General BOTHA, Prime
Minister and Commander-in
Chief. The lattei has b
splendidly helped bj D I
like G< neral Smu i s ai d Eng
lishmrn like the lateStl < iEORGF.
FARRAR and Sir Dl scan MACK-
l-.N/ii.; but it is the name of
Louis Boi ma hi< li ill he
linked with the storj of I
crushed rebellion and the cap
tuied German colony.
Tin: Westminster Ga:
White Lime
I AM offering FOK SALE
my entire stock of White
Lime "f about 800 bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders 1Tt at Mr. Alomon
Finlavson, Devenux St. 01
Phone 3 58 or "The Tt ib
Office.
]0SIAH RAHMINC
June 30, 191 5.


and hours are tliose of Serbian
workmen.
Their trades arc known, to
e Government, and they are
Riven (heir own line of work as
I ir as possible, some of llie
trained men receiving remuner-
ation. Their great terror has
been typhus, which started
among them and made fearful
ravages. For a time it seemed
that then would be no survivors
from the scourge, which spread
rapidly to tlie Serbian Army
and ran through the military
ipitala at a frightful rate";
but k're it,efforts were made,
timelj^fl^Kirriv in^ from out
side; English, American, and
Ifench hospitals were estab-
lished, and the coming of the
warm weather gave the epidem-
ic its coup de grace.
The prisoners are a strange
mixture of race and language.
A large proportion are from the
Southern Austrian provinces
and speak only Serbian. Many
of the rest arc Czech or liohe
mian, and, their various dialects
being kindred to Serbian, they
have nearly all learned to speak
Serbian f inly well by this time.
Among them all, the man who
speaks fluent German is the ex-
ception. There are also many
Hungarians, who generally
know only their own bewilder-
ing tongue and seem very slow
at learning another.
I hese prisoners seem to take
very little interest in the course
of the war in general and none
in international politics, having
lit conversation on tlie sub-
ject beyond vague speculation
on the possible duration of their
captivity. One has the itn
sion that tiny were all hus-
' I off to fight without its ev< r
having occurred (<> them to ask
why, and oik- begins to und< r
stand h..w it was possible for
little Serbia to have overcome
such hordes of them
The New York Times.
-4
THE CHAMOIS
is possibly the most sure-footed of all animals,
and it is tamed tor its remarkable agility.
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is the sure friend of every
caretul housewife and it is
famed all over the world
for the remarkable east
with which it dispels dirt
from the clothes in the
wash. The Chamois is to
be found only on the
loftiest mountain ridges,
but ScMKiiii Soap is
found in all parts of the
civilized world.
W A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRKS In inform his. friends
and the Public thajfe has
jn-t received .1 complete outfit i f
I icilitios f"i the buisness <>l an im-
dertaker, \\ l.ich placet lum in a
it ion to rmiy u! Fun< rala that
j ho en mi' led to hie rare with
I tcli; and resiiect
fully -1 a^ 1 11 |> iironage (ii t
irty Prii ri'si 1 rfp mvp tint \Ur-~p
1 the vei\ I rwi -1 .1 in ii,.i cl. Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Sill<
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test, dive rea
I foot comfort No scams to dip. Never
become loose or bagsjr. The shape is
knit in- not pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness, style.
itiperi irity of material and workmanship.
Ab* luti-lv stninlcss Will wear (> months
' without holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one ten ing u* SI.00 in currency
or postal m te, ti 0 \>i advertising and
shipping charges, we will 1 |>aid,
witli written guarantee, backed i> a five
million dollar Com| anv. cither
3 Pairs of our 75c. vbIvio
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of o\jr 50c. vulue
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 Pilre of our 50c. Vrvlue.
An eri( an CottnnLille IT Mrrv
or 6 Pairs of CKildren's Hosiery.
DONT DELAY Ofl ex| ire whan
dealei in four locality is selected.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON OHIO U S.A
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnson's Prepnred Waxa com
i to finish and polish for all furniture
wood w< >rk and flo4iis
Johnson's Wood Dye foi the irtistii
loring ol all wood, soft or hard
Johnson's Under Lac spirit
finish, very much luperloi to shellac or
varnish
Johnson's Flat Wood Finish lora
beautiful, artistic, hand-rubbed effect
without the expense of rubbin i
Johnson's Paste Wood Fillerfor
filling the grain and pores of wood
preparing \ >i th< finish
Jnhnson'i PonJernd Wx for bal
loom Doors,
FOR SALE BY
Chas. E.
W)$ voeae
(THE LINEN STORE.)
and
Have Received
The. Latest Spring Novelty
THE HEW -LAVE' \NETS
Guaranteed Untarnishsble,
and Washable.
Suitable for Waists, Yokes,
Dresses, Millinery,
White and Black, While and
Silver, Black and Silver,
\\ lute and Gold Ecru and
Gold, Heliotrope and Gold,
Saxe Ml no and Gold. Gold
Silver and Crystal Tasst Is.
White, Cream, and Ecru lire
tonne Nets, Shadow Nets,
l.aee Nets, Overalls, Point
d'Esprit, Pleated Net Ruch
ings.
Washable Marquisettes.
Black and White, Sand and
White, Double Width.
Poplin.
Black Poplin, White Poplin,
double width.
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe,
May ist, 1915
Albury
NOTICE
During my absence from
the Colony I appoint J Samuel
Knowles to act as my Attor-
ney.
G. T KNOWLES
Nassau N. P.
August 15th 1915
RUMSET'S PUMPS
CISTERN Pumps, Well
P u m p s, Win d m i 1 1
Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps Pneumatic
Systems. Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Ccns
trifugal Pumps, Waterwork,
Machinery, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors, Ship Pumps
Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, etc.
Installed under the direct
supervision of H. McPhcrson
and Brother.
Prices on Application.
II. J. THOMPSON,
Agent.
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune.
Here's An Oppor-
tunity "Ia/ yu cannot
luimj affQrd iQ l(Jse
If You want to Economize.
If you want a First Class
Eight.
If you want to be recog-
nized. Use the Best Light
tln:t money can buy. The
Safest and the Cheapest.
THE
DC AMU KEROSENE MANTLE
DCAUUN LAMPS and BURNERS
arc recopnlzed an tho
HtandHrd Incandes-
ccnt oil lami'H of the
world.
100,000 Hiill-llril
users. All delinked.
Prodtici-B u power-
ful, I.Ill, .hi whit*
light of KM) candle-
power. Iturna com.
mon roal-nli. < o.ts
only one cent for i
kouri.
1:111 11 r thnn fr 1".
electricity or six or-
dinary lamps at one-
sixth to one-tenth the
cost.
Made entirely of
bra**. For uso In
homos, Htnrpn. halls
I and churches. No
odor, no noise; sure,
Rlmplo and clean.
There Is only ono
1 Beacon. Insist o a
Mvliir It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E NiiM^c-
14 Christie St., Nassau! N.P.
Special Terms givenif requested. Write
01 sec me and know all about this WOO
derfol Lamp.
Williams' Shoes Ape Better
}


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