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L ODLBKBT DUPDCH, Editor tivi l'r prittor, iil'I'KK. Corner Shirley 6, Charlotte Sis Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas "PHONE 200. P. 0. BOX 188. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES %  'A aada) and Friday— single copy ... ... \>\ Tuesii.iy, iiii'i Ihui-Uv single copy id Saturday— single copy ij>l Weekly y\ Monthly is. '• i Quarterly ., is. 6d HalfYearly ,-. Yearly 1 8> PAYABLE EN ADVANCE Arfvn: • K'^^p^v |*nce per line [>'t liisl iiiM'if^rfrWir(c pence per line! forsecAdinaerflon ; aixiooepenny pe \ line foPsubsqnent insertion-. j Advertisements under eight lines 4>. Zhc tribune TUESDAY. August 17. 1915. •PUBLISHED AI 3 P.M. MORE MEN arc wanted for the BAHAM \S CONTINGENT FOR THE WAR. —:o:— Monday 16th day August 1915 will be considered 1 t the most eventful daw-, in the history of the Colony. At 7.30 last vening the • a of the Bahamas Continit for the War had been ted and had signed their reement and taken the >ath of Allegiance and the Kings shilling and so are de facto British Soldiers and distinctively the Bahamas unit ol the Jamaica Contingt nt. The Selection was made by the Medical Board and the agreement and the Oath of Allegiance was taken and signed in the presence of the Recruiting Committee; Mr. R. II. Crawford, Commandant, C li a i r in a n; Messrs. George M. Cole, S. Albert Dillel and I). S. I). M .seley and the medical Board Doctors J B. Albury, W. A. Pitl and j. \v. Culmer. 1 lie men who have come forward and offered their vices an: deservin 5 of all praise and we sympal with those who (no fault of th|irs)have been turned down by the Medi al Board, 36 in number and it is gratifying to find only two cases of what might be tinned backing out. We cannot say too much in praise and honour of those (27) who form the Contingent and will go forward in defence of the flag and (he nation, to the honoui 1 >f their coun t ry. The men who form the C< MII ingent an— 1. William Fletcher Albury, Nassau, Bank Clei k. 2. William Thompson, Andros, Labourer. 3. George R. Aranha, 1 [arbour Island, Machinist. 4. George M. Cole, Jr. Nassau, Hank Clerk.' 5. I ruin S Bain, Andros, Clerk Audit Office. 6. I lolbreton W Brown, Nassau, .Machinist. 7. Origen Hennas Mason, Nassau, Clerk Treas. Dept. 8. Ernest Albert Gliuton, Nassau, Painter. 9. Frederick Clement Cornelius Liglitbourn, Nassau, Clerk Col. Secretarys. Department. 10. Sydney Cuthbert Farrington, Nassau, Freight Supt. 11. James Roderick Taylor, Nassau, Sail maker. 12. Ilerschell Stanley Hall, Nassau, Hospital Attendant 13. Robert Livingston Atwell Nassau, I insmith. 14. Charles Bain, Nassau, Stonemason. 15. Matthew Arrabrister, Cat Isld. Sponge Fisherman 17. Artie Kemp, X issau, Ropemaker. 18. Reginald Waller Wood, N.i-s ui, Shoemaker. 19. Harold I). Bascome, Nassau, Tidewaiter Cus\ toms 1 department. 20. Frederick Flowers, Nassau, Porter, 21. Austin Vincent Roberts, Harbour Island, Tailor. 22. Arthur Henry fountain, Nassau, Boatman. 23. James Bain, Nassau, Shop assistant. 24. George Hubert Johnson, Nass iu, Police Constable. 25. Cha'rles Bethel, X iss a, Sponge Fisherman. 26. George Edward Virgil, Acklins Island, Seaman. 37. Alexander Patton, Watlings Island, Farmer. 28. Nathaniel Clark, Nassau, Seaman. The men took their first drill this morning and acquitted themselves very well. — :o: — {Communicated) SOME REMARKABLE STATUES IN THE WEST IHOIES IN THEIR RELATION TO THE GREAT WAR. 11 THE EMPRESS JOSEPHINE. That a Creole ;f the West Indies should rise to become one of tlit; most celebrated qui eus in history, if one of the most unfortunate, was the future (hat destiny had held in store for Josephine jleauharnais or to be more precise Marie Josephine I ascher de La Pagerie : and today her statue erected in the centre of a wide common abut ting on ali thoroughfares, is the crowning glory of Forl de France, the capital of Marti nique. Hers was a life in w huh light and shade fell in well de fined lines and there was no blend. Born the daughter of a sugar planter, she lived to see herself wearing the diadem of an empire carved out, with the swords of eight hundred thou sand men all of whom were at one time ready to draw them from their seal)bards to defend her honour. From this dizzy height she was Hung: down to linger and die from the effects of a so great a fall, the traces left by the extremes of fortune upon a sensitive spirit, speak el oquently even from the face of stone, which may well be described as representing the sad dest face on earth. For though it is evident that the copy has come dowii to us from a model of the original made when the latter was in the bloom of life, yet there lurks underneath all the seductive items of beaut) with which nature had dowered her,an expression of disappoint' ment, a foreboding that all would not be well. The inlui tion of woman, that overleaps logic, showed her the future l>\ a mystic light, Stealing her peace of mind and making en jovuient of the present nlmost imposiblc. Gentleness, Pride of ses, and of achievement, adroit Dess and more, all slumber there. The short upper lip so dear to the heart of Byron and the gazelle neck of which he has sung are not watUA^g. The lengtn nHn^^"wer limbs lends t^race and elegance ; and upon her brow sits the crown that made her head lie uneasy ; one of the scenes depicted upon the block at the base, being the ceremony of her coronation. The marble is flesh cohuued and tin figure strkes the beholder as being instinct with life. When the band plays ol an afternoon land society at fort de France turn out, it-is round the statue of their eminent countrywoman that they love to promenade. The work apart from the subject matter, is sculpture far above the ordinary and this is not to be wondered at inasmuch as it is from the chisel of Oupont It was presented to the Colony of Martinique by Napoleon III the favourite grandson of Josephine and who like her, by one of those strokes of adverse fortune, that does not respect even Kings, came to realize that nothing fails like failure. The citizens of the second Empire dazzh d by the glamour of theexploits of the first thought to emulate them. Pclisseur of the Crimea had shown that French soldiers had lost none of their wonted brilliancy of dash and Napoleon III was the nephew of Napoleon I \\ ho in m< >re than a single battle hail humbled Prussia in a dayand given law from Berlin. Hut the Pi ussia of Jen i had not a Bismark&it was with bitter tears that Napoleon III handi d up Imsword at Sedan At Pans beneath an arch of s\\ i iids held high iu air by a victorious stall", the king of Prussia was proclaimed Empi mi of Germany. Bismark's scheme of unification wasrealized, Alsace Lorraine pass* ed to Germany as Schleswig, Hoistein had from Denmark. Austria had long before suffered defeat at the hands of the Tin tor-: England then remained. Then came forty yean of lapse for Europe and of veiled preparation for Germany. Throwing out her tentacles as fat %  a s *Jkle1igolnnd which a shortsighted policy on the part of British statesmen let pass from the posses sion of England, Germany recalled Von Tirpitz from the ll



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East and set him to work to rnce dojH^the two power standartKwTjreat Britain. The rot is current history and the upforseen has happened; that is to say that England, a purely naval Powi i, has within ,'i year, by deft manipulation of h< r tremendous innate resources surged up *as a formidable military power Hanked by allies and hurling defiance <>f the foe that now wishes to "I Overshadow Europe with his vvings, And barking for the throne of kings. That foe in Ins forward sweep to Paris has met with the lirst rude set back which, on both sides, is nothing more nor less tlinn the beginning of the end of the et>b of the tide of battle. Mr. W. U. Pashley, Comp. (roller of Customs lias oltere.i bis services to drill the Contin gent. The Lord Bishop of Nassau has kindly placed at the disposal of the Recruiting Committee his Yacht "The Message of Peace" to take the Contingent to Jamaica. — :o:— Mr. A. Kenneth Solomon has offered Ins professional servicefree oj charge, to the members ol tho Contingent for any docu innt-, and p ipen they may wish to make before their d. parture. — :o: — Dr Charles lib I y, Dentist has i.lb red ins professional ser vi es free ofch irge to the mem bi is of the Contingent during their s!a\ here. — :o:— No. i Private William P. AI bury, the Bahamas Contingent will be placed in charge "f lb" Contingent en route to Jamaica o; — Attention is directed to tl e Amti MI Sale of valuable property, situate on hay Street west of propei iv irf John Dillet, on 'I IILUS I.. \ at Noon. Particulars are given in tho advertisement which appears in The Motor "Frances E" arrived in Miami early this morning. DEATH. IU.UOTT— Died at 7.30 last evt ning Mrs. Marion Louise Elliott, wife of Edwin Elliott Funeral at Ebenezer Methodist Church at 5 o'clock this afternoon Friends arc invited to attend. advert iserneji4 w another cdbmn. -."o: The Schr. "Julia Elisabeth" f arrived yesterday afternoon from Miami with a cargo of, lumber and shingles. Latest War News August 16th 1915 I .oruli in: Affairs in the Dal leans are apparently at a crisis while diplomatic negotiations are proceeding to induce the states still neutral to cast their lot with one side or the other. The Tuetonic powers have massed troops on the Balkan frontiers. Their plan, it is supposed, is to lorce a way through to relieve Turkey, believed to be badly in need of shells. I'he concentration which has been followed by artillery at tai ks on Serbian positions is equally a menapic, and their friends, made a demonstration against the German ships. Berlin: A semi official denial wad issued today of the pre viously published reports that Germany sought through Denmark to make peace with h'us sia. London:— Von Buelow has begun a new offensive and is driving the Russians back. The Germans are taking prisoners but no artillery, showing that the retreat is orderly. Liverpool:—The demand for steamships for government pur poses has been so great as to force the shipping trade back to the long rejected sailing vessels. —:o: — August 17th 1915. London, iCth. Governor, Bahamas. Official Ni %  I he French govi 1 nment n poi I 1 m m\ attacks repulsed in Argonne, There was a sin 1 ssful raid by 19 aeroplanes on German park and adopt near St, Mihiel. Tl e Russian government reports that German attacks were repulsed between the Narew and Bug Rivers; and successful fighting in Gal i The enemy continue their bombardment of Nbvogeorgievsk forifications a The Italian government report progress, especially on Cadore front and in Sexten Villa. (Signed) BON AH LAW. London:—Pa torn, Harrington and Whitehaven, in Cumberland County, were bombarded by German submarines. Slight fires were caused but there were no casuali it s. AnolIn 1 submarine sunk the Norwegian steamet Alois. The crew were saved. The Canadian military contingent contain'2 1 Ann ricans, one hutulri ni have fa lit n inF landers, according to Canadian .Minster of Militia Hugh) s. Berlin: —Von Mackensi n is pursuing the Russians from the South towards Bn st 1 itovsk and have oci upied Ciale and Sluytyi ze Washington: -The Battleships New Hampshire ai:d 1.(luisiana have bl en ordered to Vera Ci uz. I wo mmines were washed from the d< ck ol t lie \< w Hampshire yesterday in the Gulf hurricane Their bodies _._. i w. re not recovered. Nod.ruage is reported to the ship. Galveston, Texas:At six p.m. tonight the wine was 70 miles per hour from th 1 North and water was Ig the city along the warf-front. Russell Town Grd. Bahama 2nd August r.915. Dear Mr. Editor: Allow me a littli 1 tee in your valuable colic ins to publish this follow in 1 in< idi nt. It began to rain in tins settli mi nt ^Mlfond y ,26th July and from tin n |nd upwards to Fridaj. 1 in we've had showers ol. and on mosl every day; then about 8 >ck that same I 1 iday night, then 1 %  tinual down-pour, until morningand about 121 the same day Sunday ceased. ('I lenient being situated on the low pai t of the Island, I am the opinion that we fai worst.) 1 then survey d tl water finding it up as high ,1 ib inches in the kiti h< ns. I took a raft and went a<. the pond, to examine the plantations; casava an I swei i potato, pi us, beans ai d other veg( tabli s w< re all lost to sight under watt r. Th fa 1 ins that wi r< ted in low parts of the plat I on 1 mi nsun d a depth of 3 in I water! Mr. Editor think' of the condition of our plantations, which we arc li\ ing by, b, fore t hat wab r i dl dow n! I am of the pinion that we will be starved to de th: unless "l'ro\ idence" op n si mie favi 'in abl i r< 1 for us. I \\ as so 1 >er| lexi d I had to consult the inh. hints, and 1 m Sum 1. < %  1 ing >ugg< st that we gat up the women and s< me 1 if the children, and op< 1 up a watei W ay about a half ai in length from the b< rdei of the water, down the I 'fli h t 1 the s( ', \\ hich I belie vi will In lp vi iv well to 1 an 1 of the ater. Thau!.-for .pace i!h>^ d T. A. RUSSE I



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the drink habit lias laken liuM of them. Oh Mr. Editor, could I u a lithe of tin n ry <>f % thera o< this rj I ling, I until you >i i the drink fiom the cnnU ens. I feel I c in give my last son to i i id and His country, hut I cm t, no, I can not, contemplate ins b< < 01 drunkard, I le is but a lad, and so easil; led Why will not ihr> (1 ivernment do something to safi (uard the boy* who are gii ing their lives for tin ir country ? Who and what is [his snn< lei power that will n it lift ,i fj .>, i to help the laths k< ep straight and strong ? Looking I a %  !; ovei ll %  %  last nine 'months, I think been vt ^g^ VVe down to id • i, >g 0 f Death t<> i ing oufrliiltlicn forth, so only i ii d knows what it costs us :l, give them up, Why is it made hard for us to say "Go' to the boys that remain ? A MOTHER. Good Morning! We Are Introducing # American Silk American Oathmi American Cotton Lille HOSIERY They have stood the test. Give'rea f i comfort. No a Kevei bee me IOOM or baggy. Tin knit innut |,n ssenes ir*-e. OL'R. SI'KCIAL OFFK.R to every one'sen ling ns %\ 00 oi [o-i.il note, to covet advertising and ship| 11, we will paid, ritten gufcraotee, bai kc I I j iiiilli n dollai cor | any, either 5 Pairs of our 75c. value American Silk Hoi or 4 Palriof our 5()c. vnlue American Cashmere 11 ftirry, or H'.iiM i i %  VR|,I-, American O n n-Lisle II' sii or b l\v ii-•, of Children's Hosiery. D<)NT DELAY 01 iswheu dealer in your locality is M Ii 11 THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A GASOLINE In Drums Elevi n pence per (iallon, Ten Gallon Cans One Shil IIIIL,' per Gallon I C. SAUNDERS !{ Mast Bay Street [ Nassau X. P. April, 13II1 1915. To be had at all Grocers C. L. Lofthoiise-Company's Agent Coimr George and King Sts. •Look Out For "The Tribune" Motor Delivery Will Supply you with your Paper Daily. Promptly, and Regularly. Want a paper ? Why stop her anywhere. Bai k papers ? Why 1 ertainlycan be supplied anywhi re and at any lime. ALSO Frei and Dul) Entries, Sponging Articles, Ships Reports, (Inwards and (hit wauls) Warehouse Entries, McCabe's Curse and Answer to McCabe, (Nicely printed in two 1 1 lour> at a 1 U\, each.) Have you old Entries? Why condemn them when we can supply you with correi led slips, that can be -tui k on, at a vei y low cost. ; ALSO ORDERS or Business of any kind will be transacted anywhere. : : LOOK OUT: PUBLIC AUCTION. JOHN BUTLER will sell ON THURSDAY THE.IQ'H INST. AT MOIMMBL IN SPONGE EXCHANGE All that valuable freehold jroperty, situate oft Bay St. East, and hounded on the lasl by property ol John )illet, mi • he West !>v propi rty of the Estate 1 1 John Alfred, on the South by one Burrows, on tKe North by Bay St. I he same having a stone and wooden shop mi the front, and several buildings to rear. Anyone wishing information about same kindly %  1 1 Aucl ioneer. TERMS: 10 per cent of purchase money at time of sale, bai ance on delivery ol Titles. Here's An Opportunity "'"' y u c ,nn() t afford to lose. If You want to Economize. II \mi want a First Class Light If you want to be recognized. Usi; the lit si Light tln.'t money can buy. I he Safest and the Cln apest, T H F. DCAPAII ER0SENE MANTlE DMvUn LAMPS AND BURNERS are. reoOfJIktied as I ho .standard Incnmli sI cent oil lumps uf tho wurll. 100,000 Niill-.il,-,I UNIT-.. All ,1.-Hub ii-it. Produces it powerful, brilliant white light or i


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Nvilllvis BiddirliM |\jrare in verbs m-.\ iisit i. Hen\|' bound (oiwer to the Dogmas of no Master. VOL. XII. NfMMU, N. P.. Bahamas TUESDAY August. 17. 1911 NO. y?.n U.S.Attache Gives War Facts Skilled Observer Tells Exactly How Bayonet, Rifle, Field Piece and Aeroplane Are Being Used. [Continued from Saturday, August Nth With no artillery of am nationality did I see any gun intrencliment oilier than a slight mound of earth coming up to the bottom of the shield. All Huns that I have seen were in a line except in cases where there was some peculiar rising of terrain. I have several times seen a "group" together in one line ,tt intervals of!about twenty yards. In practice the French tend to extend the intervals to about twenty live yards, while tha German either decrease them to about fifteen yards to have the guns quite isolated, seventyfive or one hundred yards apart. The famous French "seventyfive" is declared by Mr. Wood to be the only field piece which under practical field conditions does not "jump." This gives a huge advantage to the French iu such duels as often occur in battles where there is rapid movement. The French pieces can fire twenty five shots a ntinute, and iii such duels "seem to be able to fire accurately with nearly twice the rapidity of the (,( i mans." At the beginning of the wai the French carried about equal quantities of shell and sbrapnt I The shells explode with a time fuse, just as do the sharpnel, and from several sources Wood learned that the. French shells are loaded v^\> a new explosive introduced Wnly about three months before the outbreak of the war. The trenches of the western front are made to fit so perfectly into the landscape that an observer can be within 150 yards of thousands of French and Gcr mans, and yet see nothing what ever unusual about the ground across which he is looking. Mr. Wood says: "There was a little village called Erches to the northwest of these places. Here were the French advance trenches. I was in this village during the height of operations, and was told that we were then only 150 or 200 yards from the German trenches Standing behind a house corner in this village of Erches, I could see nothing unusual in any direction. I could see no signs of French or German activity nor of life of any kind, although the Freneh infantry trenches extended to our right and /eft and the Germans were directly in front of us. The landscape which spread away in all directions looked perfectly normal and unbroken except for a few shell craters. The only mani festatinns of activity were the distant ruinbli-ig of guns and the shrapnel bursting over our heads. Although 1 stayed here for more than an hour the only Frenchman I saw were a few who joined me behind the house; they came from trenches hidden within it, or from an under ground trench the opening of which was behind the house. 1 recount this to accent the concealment of all troops in this war. Trenches are made to resemble the landscape in which they are placed. If they are in a brown, mowed field, hay is scattered over all fresh earth, and if they are made in pasture land all the earth is carefully carried away or is spread out and sodded over". In the main body of his book Mr. Wood has a detailed and illuminating analysis of the 1 Battle of the Maine'. In summing up that brilliant French \ i lory, the author has this to say: The French won the battle because their artillery was superior and because, man for man they outfought the Germans. Having silked the fate of their families and of their beloved jpatrie upon a single throw, the French gained one of the most desperate battles in the world's historj by the coolness and dogged determination of their chit/s and by the sublime tenaci ty and self sacrifice of their soldiers. On that field a new France was born. Let no German ever again say that she is effete. It was purely a French victory. This is no aspersion upon the Belgians and the British; the slight part which they played in this battle is explained by their small numbers. At Liege and Namur, at Muns and St. Ouentin they helped win for 1 ranee a fighiing chance behind the Marne. All hail to them for that!" Forth* United States .this American observer finds one lesson written acros s Europe in seven letters oMMsji an 1 name: Prepare. a The New York TimM. [ConcludedJ A MOTHER'S LETTER. [Extract's from a Mother's Letter to the Editor ol Public Opinion, June 4th, 19:5.[ Mr. Editor, I am a widow with two sons at the front. , My msband died four months ago. T sons threw up good posts I September and enlisted. V\ let tiiem go proudly and ? lingly, although our hearts broke at the thought

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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02393
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, August 17, 1915
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Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
Nvilllvis BiddirliM |\jrare in verbs m-.\ iisit i.
Hen\|' bound (oiwer to the Dogmas of no Master.
VOL. XII.
NfMMU, N. P.. Bahamas TUESDAY August. 17. 1911
NO. y?.n
U.S.Attache Gives War Facts
Skilled Observer Tells Exactly How Bayonet,
Rifle, Field Piece and Aeroplane Are Being Used.
[Continued from Saturday, August Nth
With no artillery of am na-
tionality did I see any gun in-
trencliment oilier than a slight
mound of earth coming up to
the bottom of the shield. All
Huns that I have seen were in a
line except in cases where there
was some peculiar rising of
terrain. I have several times
seen a "group" together in one
line ,tt intervals of!about twenty
yards. In practice the French
tend to extend the intervals to
about twenty live yards, while
tha German either decrease them
to about fifteen yards to have
the guns quite isolated, seventy-
five or one hundred yards apart.
The famous French "seventy-
five" is declared by Mr. Wood
to be the only field piece which
under practical field conditions
does not "jump." This gives a
huge advantage to the French
iu such duels as often occur in
battles where there is rapid
movement. The French pieces
can fire twenty five shots a
ntinute, and iii such duels "seem
to be able to fire accurately
with nearly twice the rapidity
of the (,( i mans."
At the beginning of the wai
the French carried about equal
quantities of shell and sbrapnt I
The shells explode with a time
fuse, just as do the sharpnel,
and from several sources Wood
learned that the. French shells
are loaded v^\> a new explosive
introduced Wnly about three
months before the outbreak of
the war.
The trenches of the western
front are made to fit so perfect-
ly into the landscape that an
observer can be within 150 yards
of thousands of French and Gcr
mans, and yet see nothing what
ever unusual about the ground
across which he is looking. Mr.
Wood says:
"There was a little village
called Erches to the northwest
of these places. Here were the
French advance trenches. I was
in this village during the height
of operations, and was told that
we were then only 150 or 200
yards from the German trenches
Standing behind a house cor-
ner in this village of Erches, I
could see nothing unusual in any
direction. I could see no signs
of French or German activity
nor of life of any kind, although
the Freneh infantry trenches
extended to our right and /eft
and the Germans were directly
in front of us. The landscape
which spread away in all direc-
tions looked perfectly normal
and unbroken except for a few
shell craters. The only mani
festatinns of activity were the
distant ruinbli-ig of guns and
the shrapnel bursting over our
heads.
Although 1 stayed here for
more than an hour the only
Frenchman I saw were a few
who joined me behind the house;
they came from trenches hidden
within it, or from an under
ground trench the opening of
which was behind the house.
1 recount this to accent the
concealment of all troops in this
war. Trenches are made to re-
semble the landscape in which
they are placed. If they are in
a brown, mowed field, hay is
scattered over all fresh earth,
and if they are made in pasture
land all the earth is carefully
carried away or is spread out
and sodded over".
In the main body of his book
Mr. Wood has a detailed and
illuminating analysis of the
1 Battle of the Maine'. In summ-
ing up that brilliant French
\ i lory, the author has this to
say:
The French won the battle
because their artillery was su-
perior and because, man for man
they outfought the Germans.
Having silked the fate of their
families and of their beloved
jpatrie upon a single throw, the
French gained one of the most
desperate battles in the world's
historj by the coolness and
dogged determination of their
chit/s and by the sublime tenaci
ty and self sacrifice of their
soldiers.
On that field a new France
was born. Let no German ever
again say that she is effete. It
was purely a French victory.
This is no aspersion upon the
Belgians and the British; the
slight part which they played
in this battle is explained by
their small numbers. At Liege
and Namur, at Muns and St.
Ouentin they helped win for
1 ranee a fighiing chance behind
the Marne. All hail to them for
that!"
Forth* United States .this
American observer finds one les-
son written across Europe in
seven letters oMMsji an 1 name:
Prepare. a
The New York TimM.
[ConcludedJ
A MOTHER'S LETTER.
[Extract's from a Mother's Let-
ter to the Editor ol Public
Opinion, June 4th, 19:5.[
Mr. Editor,
I am a widow with two sons
at the front. My msband
died four months ago. T
sons threw up good posts I
September and enlisted. V\
let tiiem go proudly and ?
lingly, although our hearts
broke at the thought la) before them. The onlj
child left, a son, will be eigh-
teen next month, and when his
brothers enlisted, I promised to
consent to his joining also when
he was old enough, if he still
wished to do so. The boy is
. simply aching to join.
Sp* aking at a recruiting
! meeting last weel;, Loul Derby
1 said, "One thing that kept men
back was the reluctance of mo-
thers to let their sons join."
Yes he was correct; mothers
are keeping their sonsl ick,but
not for the reason Lord I)crb\
assigned.
I have discussed this matter
with many mothers, thoughtful,
earnest women, and we all
agree that while we are willing
to give our sons to our Kill;
and country, we trembl at the
uunecessary temptations thai
surround them while in train
ing. The beer flows like watt 1
in the canteens, and hundreds
of boys who left home sober
and clean-living aie to day nei
ther one or the oilier, because
Continued on Fourth Page.
Wear
Apmbrister's
<
Shoes


L ODLBKBT DUPDCH,
Editor tivi l'r prittor,
iil'I'KK.
Corner Shirley 6, Charlotte Sis
Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas
"PHONE 200. P. 0. BOX 188.
PUBLISHED DAILY
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Tuesii.iy, iiii'i Ihui-Uv single copy id
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Quarterly ...... ., is. 6d
HalfYearly............,-.
Yearly ..........18> !
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Arfvn: K'^^p^v |*nce per line
[>'t liisl iiiM'if^rfrWir(c pence per line!
forsecAdinaerflon ; aixiooepenny pe \
line foPsubsqnent insertion-. j
Advertisements under eight lines 4>.
Zhc tribune
TUESDAY. August 17. 1915.
- PUBLISHED AI 3 P.M.
MORE MEN arc wanted
for the BAHAM \S CON-
TINGENT FOR THE WAR.
:o:
Monday 16th day August
1915 will be considered
1 t the most eventful daw-, in
the history of the Colony.
At 7.30 last vening the
a of the Bahamas Contin-
it for the War had been
ted and had signed their
reement and taken the
' >ath of Allegiance and the
Kings shilling and so are de
facto British Soldiers and dis-
tinctively the Bahamas unit
ol the Jamaica Contingt nt.
The Selection was made by
the Medical Board and the
agreement and the Oath of
Allegiance was taken and
signed in the presence of the
Recruiting Committee; Mr.
R. II. Crawford, Comman-
dant, C li a i r in a n; Messrs.
George M. Cole, S. Albert
Dillel and I). S. I). M .seley
and the medical Board Doc-
tors J B. Albury, W. A. Pitl
and j. \v. Culmer.
1 lie men who have come
forward and offered their
vices an: deservin 5 of all
praise and we sympal
with those who (no fault of
th|irs)have been turned down
by the Medi al Board, 36 in
number and it is gratifying to
find only two cases of what
might be tinned backing
out.
We cannot say too much in
praise and honour of those
(27) who form the Contingent
and will go forward in de-
fence of the flag and (he na-
tion, to the honoui 1 >f their
coun t ry.
The men who form the
C< mii ingent an
1. William Fletcher Albury,
Nassau, Bank Clei k.
2. William Thompson,
Andros, Labourer.
3. George R. Aranha,
1 [arbour Island, Machinist.
4. George M. Cole, Jr.
Nassau, Hank Clerk.'
5. I ruin S Bain,
Andros, Clerk Audit Office.
6. I lolbreton W Brown,
Nassau, .Machinist.
7. Origen Hennas Mason,
Nassau, Clerk Treas. Dept.
8. Ernest Albert Gliuton,
Nassau, Painter.
9. Frederick Clement Cor-
nelius Liglitbourn,
Nassau, Clerk Col. Sec-
retarys. Department.
10. Sydney Cuthbert Far-
rington,
Nassau, Freight Supt.
11. James Roderick Taylor,
Nassau, Sail maker.
12. Ilerschell Stanley Hall,
Nassau, Hospital Attendant
13. Robert Livingston Atwell
Nassau, I insmith.
14. Charles Bain,
Nassau, Stonemason.
15. Matthew Arrabrister,
Cat Isld. Sponge Fisherman
17. Artie Kemp,
X issau, Ropemaker.
18. Reginald Waller Wood,
N.i-s ui, Shoemaker.
19. Harold I). Bascome,
Nassau, Tidewaiter Cus- \
toms 1 department.
20. Frederick Flowers,
Nassau, Porter,
21. Austin Vincent Roberts,
Harbour Island, Tailor.
22. Arthur Henry fountain,
Nassau, Boatman.
23. James Bain,
Nassau, Shop assistant.
24. George Hubert Johnson,
Nass iu, Police Constable.
25. Cha'rles Bethel,
X iss a, Sponge Fisherman.
26. George Edward Virgil,
Acklins Island, Seaman.
37. Alexander Patton,
Watlings Island, Farmer.
28. Nathaniel Clark,
Nassau, Seaman.
The men took their first drill
this morning and acquitted
themselves very well.
:o:
{Communicated)
Some Remarkable Statues In
The West Ihoies
In Their Relation To The
Great War.
11
THE EMPRESS JOSEPHINE.
That a Creole ;f the West In-
dies should rise to become one
of tlit; most celebrated qui eus in
history, if one of the most un-
fortunate, was the future (hat
destiny had held in store for
Josephine jleauharnais or to be
more precise Marie Josephine
I ascher de La Pagerie : and to-
day her statue erected in the
centre of a wide common abut
ting on ali thoroughfares, is the
crowning glory of Forl de
France, the capital of Marti
nique. Hers was a life in w huh
light and shade fell in well de
fined lines and there was no
blend. Born the daughter of a
sugar planter, she lived to see
herself wearing the diadem of
an empire carved out, with the
swords of eight hundred thou
sand men all of whom were at
one time ready to draw them
from their seal)bards to defend
her honour. From this dizzy
height she was Hung: down to
linger and die from the effects
of a so great a fall, the traces
left by the extremes of fortune
upon a sensitive spirit, speak el
oquently even from the face of
stone, which may well be des-
cribed as representing the sad
dest face on earth. For though
it is evident that the copy has
come dowii to us from a model
of the original made when the
latter was in the bloom of life,
yet there lurks underneath all
the seductive items of beaut)
with which nature had dowered
her,an expression of disappoint'
ment, a foreboding that all
would not be well. The inlui
tion of woman, that overleaps
logic, showed her the future l>\
a mystic light, Stealing her
peace of mind and making en
jovuient of the present nlmost
imposiblc. Gentleness, Pride of
ses, and of achievement, adroit
Dess and more, all slumber
there. The short upper lip so
dear to the heart of Byron and
the gazelle neck of which he has
sung are not watUA^g.
The lengtn nHn^^"wer limbs
lends t^race and elegance ; and
upon her brow sits the crown
that made her head lie uneasy ;
one of the scenes depicted upon
the block at the base, being the
ceremony of her coronation.
The marble is flesh cohuued and
tin figure strkes the beholder as
being instinct with life. When
the band plays ol an afternoon
land society at fort de France
turn out, it-is round the statue
of their eminent countrywoman
that they love to promenade.
The work apart from the sub-
ject matter, is sculpture far
above the ordinary and this is
not to be wondered at inasmuch
as it is from the chisel of Oupont
It was presented to the Colony
of Martinique by Napoleon III
the favourite grandson of Jose-
phine and who like her, by one
of those strokes of adverse for-
tune, that does not respect even
Kings, came to realize that
nothing fails like failure.
The citizens of the second
Empire dazzh d by the glam-
our of theexploits of the first
thought to emulate them.
Pclisseur of the Crimea had
shown that French soldiers
had lost none of their wonted
brilliancy of dash and Na-
poleon III was the nephew
of Napoleon I \\ ho in m< >re
than a single battle hail hum-
bled Prussia in a dayand giv-
en law from Berlin. Hut the
Pi ussia of Jen i had not a Bis-
mark&it was with bitter tears
that Napoleon III handi d
up Im- sword at Sedan At
Pans beneath an arch of
s\\ i iids held high iu air by a
victorious stall", the king of
Prussia was proclaimed Em-
pi mi of Germany. Bismark's
scheme of unification wasre-
alized, Alsace Lorraine pass*
ed to Germany as Schleswig,
Hoistein had from Denmark.
Austria had long before suf-
fered defeat at the hands of
the Tin tor-: England then
remained. Then came forty
yean of lapse for Europe and
of veiled preparation for Ger-
many. Throwing out her
tentacles as fat as*Jkle1igolnnd
which a shortsighted policy
on the part of British states-
men let pass from the posses
sion of England, Germany
recalled Von Tirpitz from the

ll


East and set him to work to
rnce dojH^the two power
standartKwTjreat Britain.
The rot is current history
and the upforseen has hap-
pened; that is to say that
England, a purely naval
Powi i, has within ,'i year, by
deft manipulation of h< r
tremendous innate resources
surged up *as a formidable
military power Hanked by
allies and hurling defiance
<>f the foe that now wishes to
"I Overshadow Europe with his
vvings,
And barking for the throne of
kings.
That foe in Ins forward sweep
to Paris has met with the lirst
rude set back which, on both
sides, is nothing more nor less
tlinn the beginning of the end of
the et>b of the tide of battle.
Mr. W. U. Pashley, Comp.
(roller of Customs lias oltere.i
bis services to drill the Contin
gent.
The Lord Bishop of Nassau
has kindly placed at the dispo-
sal of the Recruiting Committee
his Yacht "The Message of
Peace" to take the Contingent
to Jamaica.
:o:
Mr. A. Kenneth Solomon has
offered Ins professional service-
free oj charge, to the members ol
tho Contingent for any docu
in- nt-, and p ipen they may
wish to make before their d.
parture.
:o:
Dr Charles lib I y, Dentist
has i.lb red ins professional ser
vi es free ofch irge to the mem
bi is of the Contingent during
their s!a\ here.
:o:
No. i Private William P.
AI bury, the Bahamas Contin-
gent will be placed in charge
"f lb" Contingent en route to
Jamaica
' o;
Attention is directed to tl e
Amti mi Sale of valuable prop-
erty, situate on hay Street west
of propei iv irf John Dillet, on
'I Iilus I..\ at Noon.
Particulars are given in tho
advertisement which appears in
The Motor "Frances E"
arrived in Miami early this
morning.
DEATH.
Iu.uottDied at 7.30 last
evt ning Mrs. Marion Louise
Elliott, wife of Edwin Elliott
Funeral at Ebenezer Me-
thodist Church at 5 o'clock
this afternoon Friends arc in-
vited to attend.
advert iserneji4 w
another cdbmn.
-."o: -
The Schr. "Julia Elisabeth" f
arrived yesterday afternoon
from Miami with a cargo of,
lumber and shingles.
Latest War News
August 16th 1915
I .oruli in: Affairs in the Dal
leans are apparently at a crisis
while diplomatic negotiations
are proceeding to induce the
states still neutral to cast their
lot with one side or the other.
The Tuetonic powers have
massed troops on the Balkan
frontiers. Their plan, it is sup-
posed, is to lorce a way through
to relieve Turkey, believed to be
badly in need of shells.
I'he concentration which has
been followed by artillery at
tai ks on Serbian positions is
equally a mena which again has refused to per
mit shells to pass through her
territory to Turkey.
The Roumanian army already
is partly mobilized and four
new divisions of reserves have
been called out.
Peking: W. K. Bemis, Vice
President of the Standard ( hi
Company of New York depart-
ed for the United States todaj
having failed toconclude a per-
manent contract with the Chi'
nese government for the exploi-
tation of the oil fields of China.
A preliminary agreement en
tered into with China last year
expires this year. The Ameri-
can Legation will continue ef
foits to adjust the difference be-
tween the Chinese government
and the company.
Bosh n: Several seamen were
injured d y aboard the Ger
man steamers Amerika and
Cincinnati bj sticks and stones
when 1300 Italian reservists
prepai inn to sail tonight aboard
the Can >pic, and their friends,
made a demonstration against
the German ships.
Berlin: A semi official deni-
al wad issued today of the pre
viously published reports that
Germany sought through Den-
mark to make peace with h'us
sia.
London: Von Buelow has
begun a new offensive and is
driving the Russians back. The
Germans are taking prisoners
but no artillery, showing that
the retreat is orderly.
Liverpool:The demand for
steamships for government pur
poses has been so great as to
force the shipping trade back to
the long rejected sailing vessels.
:o:
August 17th 1915.
London, iCth.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official Ni I he French
govi 1 nment n poi I 1 m m\
attacks repulsed in Argonne,
There was a sin 1 ssful raid
by 19 aeroplanes on German
park and adopt near St,
Mihiel.
Tl e Russian government
reports that German attacks
were repulsed between the
Narew and Bug Rivers; and
successful fighting in Gal i
The enemy continue their
bombardment of Nbvogeor-
gievsk forificationsa
The Italian government re-
port progress, especially on
Cadore front and in Sexten
Villa.
(Signed)
BON AH LAW.
London:Pa torn, Harring-
ton and Whitehaven, in
Cumberland County, were
bombarded by German sub-
marines. Slight fires were
caused but there were no
casuali it s.
AnolIn 1 submarine sunk
the Norwegian steamet Alois.
The crew were saved.
The Canadian military
contingent contain'- 21
Ann ricans, one hutulri \\ h>ni have fa lit n inF landers,
according to Canadian .Min-
ster of Militia Hugh) s.
Berlin: Von Mackensi n is
pursuing the Russians from
the South towards Bn st 1 i-
tovsk and have oci upied
Ciale and Sluytyi ze
Washington: -The Battle-
ships New Hampshire ai:d
1.(luisiana have bl en ordered
to Vera Ci uz.
I wo mmines were washed
from the d< ck ol t lie \< w
Hampshire yesterday in the
Gulf hurricane Their bodies
--------- _._._____i
w. re not recovered. Nod.ru-
age is reported to the ship.
Galveston, Texas:- At six
p.m. tonight the wine was 70
miles per hour from th 1 North
and water was Ig the
city along the warf-front.
Russell Town Grd. Bahama
2nd August r.915.
Dear Mr. Editor:
Allow me a littli 1 tee in
your valuable colic ins to
publish this follow in 1 in< i-
di nt. It began to rain in tins
settli mi nt ^Mlfond y ,26th
July and from tin n |nd up-
wards to Fridaj. 1 in
we've had showers ol. and on
mosl every day; then about 8
>ck that same I 1 iday
night, then 1 tinual
down-pour, until
morningand about 121
the same day Sunday
ceased. ('I lenient be-
ing situated on the low
pai t of the Island, I am
the opinion that we fai
worst.) 1 then survey d tl
water finding it up as high ,1
ib inches in the kiti h< ns. I
took a raft and went a<.
the pond, to examine the
plantations; casava an I swei i
potato, pi us, beans ai d other
veg( tabli s w< re all lost to
sight under watt r. Th
fa 1 ins that wi r< ted in
low parts of the plat I on 1
mi nsun d a depth of 3 in I
water! Mr. Editor think' of
the condition of our planta-
tions, which we arc li\ ing by,
b, fore t hat wab r i dl
dow n! I am of the pinion
that we will be starved to
de th: unless "l'ro\ idence"
op n si mie favi 'in abl i r< 1
for us. I \\ as so 1 >er| lexi d I
had to consult the inh.
hints, and 1 m Sum 1. < 1
ing >ugg< st that we gat
up the women and s< me 1 if
the children, and op< 1 up a
watei W ay about a half ai
in length from the b< rdei of
the water, down the I 'fli h t 1
the s( ', \\ hich I belie vi will
In lp vi iv well to 1 an 1
of the ater.
Thau!.-- for .pace i!h>^ d
T. A. RUSSE I



the drink habit lias laken liuM
of them.
Oh Mr. Editor, could I
u a lithe of tin n ry <>f
?thera o< this rj I ling,
' I until you
>i i the drink fiom
the cnnU ens. I feel I c in give
my last son to i i id and His
country, hut I cm.....t, no, I can
not, contemplate ins b< < 01
drunkard, I le is but a lad,
and so easil; led.....
Why will not ihr> (1 ivern-
ment do something to safi (uard
the boy* who are gii ing their
lives for tin ir country ? Who
and what is [his snn< lei power
that will n it lift ,i fj .>, i to
help the laths k< ep straight and
strong ?
Looking I a !; ovei ll ' last
nine 'months, I think
been vt ^g^ VVe
down to id i, >g 0f Death t<>
! i ing oufrliiltlicn forth, so only
i ii d knows what it costs us :l,
give them up, Why is it made
hard for us to say "Go' to
the boys that remain ?
A MOTHER.
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
# American Silk
American Oathmi
American Cotton Lille
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give'rea
f i comfort. No a Kevei
bee me Ioom or baggy. Tin
knit in- nut |,n sse CUARANTtKI) for fine
ii /nix '.if n I workmanship.
Aluniutelv stainless Will
les, "i new i >nes ir*-e.
OL'R. SI'KCIAL OFFK.R
to every one'sen ling ns %\ 00 .
oi [o-i.il note, to covet advertising and
ship| 11, we will paid,
ritten gufcraotee, bai kc I I j
iiiilli n dollai cor | any, either
5 Pairs of our 75c. value
American Silk Hoi
or 4 Palriof our 5()c. vnlue
American Cashmere 11 ftirry,
or H'.iiM i i..... Vr|,i-,
American O n n-Lisle II' sii
or b l\v ii-, of Children's Hosiery.
D<)NT DELAY 01 iswheu
dealer in your locality is m Ii 11
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A
GASOLINE
In Drums Elevi n pence
per (iallon,
Ten Gallon Cans One Shil
Iiiil,' per Gallon
I C. SAUNDERS !{
Mast Bay Street [
Nassau X. P.
April, 13II1 1915.
To be had at all Grocers
C. L. Lofthoiise-Company's Agent
Coimr George and King Sts.
Look Out For
"The Tribune" Motor Delivery
Will Supply you with your Paper
Daily. Promptly, and Regularly.
Want a paper ? Why stop her anywhere.
Bai k papers ? Why 1 ertainly- can be supplied
anywhi re and at any lime.
ALSO
Frei and Dul) Entries, Sponging Articles,
Ships Reports, (Inwards and (hit wauls)
Warehouse Entries, McCabe's Curse and
Answer to McCabe, (Nicely printed in two
1 1 lour> at a 1 U\, each.) Have you old
Entries? Why condemn them when we can
supply you with correi led slips, that can be
-tui k on, at a vei y low cost. ;
ALSO
ORDERS or Business of any kind
will be transacted anywhere. : :
LOOK OUT:
PUBLIC AUCTION.
JOHN BUTLER
will sell
ON THURSDAY THE.IQ'H INST.
AT MOIMMBl
In Sponge Exchange
All that valuable freehold
jroperty, situate oft Bay St.
East, and hounded on the
lasl by property ol John
)illet, mi he West !>v pro-
pi rty of the Estate 1 1 John
Alfred, on the South by one
Burrows, on tKe North by
Bay St.
I he same having a stone
and wooden shop mi the
front, and several buildings
to rear.
Anyone wishing informa-
tion about same kindly 1 1
Aucl ioneer.
TERMS:
10 per cent of purchase
money at time of sale, bai -
ance on delivery ol Titles.
Here's An Oppor-
tunity "'"' yu c*,nn()t
afford to lose.
If You want to Economize.
II \mi want a First Class
Light
If you want to be recog-
nized. Usi; the lit si Light
tln.'t money can buy. I he
Safest and the Cln apest,
T H F.
DCAPAII *ER0SENE MANTlE
DMvUn LAMPS and BURNERS
are. reoOfJIktied as I ho
.standard Incnmli s-
I cent oil lumps uf tho
' wurll.
100,000 Niill-.il,-,I
unit-.. All ,1.-Hub ii-it.
Produces it power-
ful, brilliant white
light or i ponrr. Burns i on*
mini coal-" Costa
only nor rrat (or
kMHi
HrlKhtfr thnn ri.
electricity or nix or-
dinary lamps al one-
Ills In oiic-li-nlli Ike
cost.
Ma.lc entirely of
hrass. For use In
homes. stores, halls
atid churches. No
odor, no noise; .-.,f,'.
slmplo anil rlca n.
There It) only 'ne
Ii, ion. Insist ti
Having It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E Nabbie-
14 Christie St., Nassau, N.P.
Special TenM given if requested. Write
M MW me and know nil boat tliii wwn-
ileiful I..imp.
3
For Results
Advertise "in
The Tribune.
Williams' Shoes Are Better
N

ll


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