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L. clI.l'Kl'T DUTUCII. F.ditur and Proprietor. OFFIOK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sis NaUO, .V. /'., Bahamas P1IONK 980. P. O. BOX MB. PUBLISHED DAILV RATES Monday, Wednesday arul Friday— tingle ropy ... ... }il Tuesday, and Tliursduy tingle copy id Saturday tingle copy ijd Weeklv }d Monthly i s. 6d Quarteily ,.. ... .. •c-6d Half Yearly a t, Yearly 1 8s. I 'AY A 111.! IN ADVA.NCK Advertising Rates:—Sis peace per line for first insertion: three pence pei line l'i second insertion ; and onepenny pc line for subsequent insertion*. Advertisements under eii;lit lines 4s. Gbe Zxibune IHl'KSDAy, August 5. 1915. Mr PL'BLISHFD AT 6 P.M. THE 4TH DAY OF AUGUST. Silence fell upon the city. Business was suspended and the merchants and their clerks wended their way to the sanctuary (Christ Church Cathedral ) where His Excellency the Governor, many officials and the people in their hundreds had assembled for a simple solemn service of penitence and humiliation. The only distinctive organ i/ations present were the Daughters of the Empire, and the Hoy Scouts and a group of nurses from the hospital, and the only approach to de monstration was the displayed Union Jack of the Boy Srouts. It was gratifying to see in the congregation ministers of other denominations. Reverends II. F. Rleby, L. A. Simpson and S. I'". Hopps, Wesleyan Methodist-.. Reyd. S. J. Bennett, Presbyterian. Revd. Daniel Wilshere, Baptist. Revd. H. P. Dinn, Baptist Revd. John \V. Skerrett, African Methodist Episcopal Church. The Diocesan clergy [and the combined choirs of the Anglican Churches of the city and suburbs tilled the chancel. The service began with the singing of Hymn (A. and M.) 165. The Special Lesson read by the Rector of Christ Church was the 24th Chapter II Samuel. The Bishop of the Diocese thru delivered the following impressively interesting address : ADDRESS. Why are we gathered together herein tins the Cathedral Church of the Bahamas?—not all of us men and women who ordinarily would attend here for worship, Bui Christ. A Committee of the Hague Conference was sitting in Switzerland at the very moment of the outbreak of hostilities. The horror of this war, what nive to it its bitterness and frichtfulness is that it is Civil — Iratricidnl —war, within the family of Christ. Europe more or less covers the heart of Christendom, and there God suf fers Ihs Church to bleed for her Sins. Her sin? What is it? Pisobedicncc to the command of Jesus Christ to go forth and convert the world —to conquer the world for Jesus I hrist, and for all that the name of Jesus stands for. What a miracle of Divine power and protection was, and is exhibited by the peaceful march of Christians in that long battle of 300 all of us, I think, believers in God 1 years dating from the Ascension • 'in lather and in His only be-1 of our Blessed Lord till a Christian Rotten Son Jesus Christ our lirEmperor ruled over the twin capdcemer—and in the Holy Ghost, itals of the known woild — Home & proceeding horn both, Sanctifier of the Elect. Christ ian men and women! I thank you for your kind courtesy today, in that you hive put out of light for the moment your criticisms of the worship as ordinarily offered here, and instead have strengthened us with your presence and the spirit of prayer that is in you. For in union with the whole Empire—on this the Anniversary of its entry into the Great War— we here in the Isles are conscious, that we are kneeling side by side with our brothersacioss the seas. Kneeling, I say, because in the symbolism ofwoiship kneeling is the attitude of selMiumiliition, and the consciousness of sin. I think we must concentrate on that one thought today. We have sinned grievously through our fault, our own fault, our own mot grievous fault N ot thai we have not much to ask for —e g victory! Not that we have not much to be thankful for—a, g had thbattle of the Falkland Islands gone the Other way W4 might now be sub. ject to tli'* insolence of 1 German invader. The British Isles, the heart of the Empire is \et untrod. den hy an invader* fee'. Out Sin! We must not n irrow "in horizon. In the fust instance we—looking forth upon the Old World from our pi rch upon a ro fa in thi* Western Seaa—we notice Ih it th' Scourge of the sword, the p< stilence and the famine, which is m the hand of God, has fallen not merely on the British Empire Constantinople. Never since then has Jesus Christ been wholly loved and obeyed, with one heart and with one mind. NationsAi National Churches, one after the other fell away from the faith, and therefore the morals as taught by Christ and his first Apostles, and Nations and National Churches were blotted out by the fire and sword of the Infidel. Other Nations and Churches survived mainly in Europe, There the torch burnt fitfully. There have been revivals of faith, and God has been very patient through the centuriesuntil a year ago today, by the acression of Britain the whole of Christain Europe practically had become a blazing Hell of shot and shell and of burning pires of slain men too numerous to be buried. Choleia, Typhus, Enteric stalked abroad. Ships sunk in the depths with their living crews. Death came from beneath the sea. Battles were fought in the air itself. Even the purity of the heavens above taint ed by the sin of Christendom. Because we had forgotten—no! deliberately disiibeyed our marching orders "Go forth into all the world and make disciples of all nations." Instead we went forth to add field to field —to remove ourneiglibour's landmark. The fields of the world which we added to our worldly possessions we tilled and cultivated with forced labour for a time. We tore men, women and children f'om their homes across the seas that by the sweat of their bodies they might minister to our wealth but upon all Europe. Our own [ And the wealth of Europe brought dead are numbered by thousands, its curse. It was cuised and illsome of them when in life were I begotten at the l>eginning. The with us but a few months ago. more we had the more we thiisted But 'he losses in Europe have been j for more.And we hustled and crowd numbered by millions; millions of led one another as we rushed to the manhood of the nations: the I seize the vacant spaces of the young—the strong—the beautiful j wild, and wo Christian Nations —the brave, A year njjo they lived in rmlice, jenleusy and siispi. were our fnends, our broilers in cion one of another. And we decimated the native races of the lands which we annexed, by our heastl^ vices. And from the older races we leant new vices; and we improved upon them; and organized them. Till God's heavy hand in wroth was laid upon us a year ago and. He said—"Hitherto shalt thoif go. Now suffer the punishment of these years and centuries of evil deeds and of failure to correspond to the will of Got which you knew But why speak of the sin of the Churches and thMbtiont? The Holy Church cannoBffk. Nations have no soul It is the individuals that form the Churches and the Natiors, they have done the Miming. We look into our own heart and conscience —you and I must say "thou art the man I" With dear, faithful, sinful, repentant David, let us say "l.o I have sinned and I have done wicked I j ; but these sheep what have they done? Let thine hand I pray thee be against me, and against my father's house. Mea CUlpa Mea culpa Mea maxima (ulpa I It is in this spirit I would have you one and all to kneel to say the solemn and beautiful Litany of the Church, Surely the most perfect, Marching, reasonable and comprehensive in the English language, but oh I how stiange and unaccustomed to some of you. Ah my brothers ye did once run well. Who hath bewitched you ? What fruit have ye in those things of Which ye are now ashamed ? Ye have proved that the end of those things is death. Not the death of the Martyrs of the first three centuries, who faced the lion in the arena, or chanted God's praises as the flames crept round the slake to which they were bound. Not the death of the modern Marty, whose faces portrayed in the best illustrated papers bring tears to our eyes ; the men, who for love of their 'ountry and foi love of God —perhaps they would hardly dara to say that— but the love is there, although they arc too humble to utter the word—the mm who placed their lives at the disposal of their King, ar.d they have died, some of them in fearful agony ; but their death is fruitful, life-giving, the blood is not poured out in vain—it is precious to Jesus Cluist as His own Blood. It is pouied upon the great Altar of Burnt Offering. In the smoke and flnmesSf burning Cities and SanctiflHasl^t rises like incense to the Father's throne. So in the office of the Holy Communion we dare to say "and here we offer ourselves, 001 souls and bodies our reasonable service." Su is the death of the righteous I 1^ if we drift through life to ot death. If we take no share in the great war, either by shou'deiing a musket or preparing munitions of wai ; if wc do not even pray : if we take the Lord's Day itself and nooOT^^~



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add it to the six days of selfishness and-^ cowardly lethargy—Death wilTcome—a death of God in the soul. We may die in our beds, as the saying is, we may lie on a comfortable mattrass ; and friends around us: and the pain be southed by arcotics: and the flies waved away by fans, and— perhaps our minister may be sent for to say the pnyers which we could no longer have said for ourselves, even if we had not long ago forgotten tiiein in th^Sffopliytof the soul. m^ Bui that is no neath for us to look forward to in joy and hope, or for our friends to look b.ick on with resignation. One thing we hope will result from all the pair and agony of this war —whether by defeat or by victory. Repentance! Conversion a turning to God, an uplifting of the bauds in pr.iyer, a great confession of sin! and a greater forgiveness. This not to the Nations engaged in war, not the National Churches, but to you and me, and all the units who are built up into the great Church of God which is the Body of Christ. Then once more shall Christ go forth conquering and to con, And alienations shall hear the sound of 11 is Gospel, preached in word and deed \y the holy life, by the army of reall) Christflin men and women. Let us pray for one moment in silence and s • prepare to take pirt in the great supplication. The Litany was then sung. During the Offertory Hymn (A. and M.) 142 was sung. The singing of the National Anthem and the benediction concluded the service. The Offertory amounting to £17 was donated to the French Red Cross Fund. WEDNESDAY. 4th August 1915. Yesterday afternoon a large and representative audience assembled in St. Andrews Hall in response to the call "To the people of the Bahamas." Excellent arrangements His Excellency took the | ful celebration of momentous chair and was supported on anniversary the platform by Mrs E, T. Higgs, Mrs. T. H. C. l.ofthouse, Regent National (Sgd) HARCOURT MALCOLM The Governor announced his and Mrs AllardvcescontriChapterD.O. E. the Lord bution to the Bahamas ConBishop of Nassau, the Hon. I tingent Fund of roo guineas W. Hart Bennett Col. Sect.| Mr G M Cole announced 30 Hon. G. H. Gatnblin, M.S.C. guineas from the Honourable Hon. D. Tudor, Esq. K. C. II. G. and Mrs Malcolm MAILS. loreign Mails to be despatched per "Frances E" vi' Miami, Ha., will be made up and closed on FRIDAY the Oth inst., at 8 a.m. Chief Justice, W. C. B. Johnson Esq., Dep. Speaker, Actg. Chairman the Bahamas War Relief Committee, Frank Holmes Esq. Rev. S. J. Bennett, Dr. W. A. Pitt, George M. Cole Esq. M. H. A., Ghas. O. Anderson Esq. Postmaster, M.H.A. Stephen A. Dilld Esq. Rev. II. P. bleby, G. Weech, E*q M. II. A., J.M. Rae, Esq. Sti|>. and Cir. Magistrate, W. A. Mather, Esq. J. P. His Excellency made an earnest and inspirating address, which our limited space, we regret, compels us to defer the publication of until Saturday. The two following resolutions were unanimously carried.— rst RESOLUTION. "That on this the anniversary of the declaration of a righteous war, the Citizens of Nassau at this Meeting record their loyal sympathy with and fullest support to the Mother Country in its inflexible determination to continue to a victorious end the struggle in maintenance of those ideals of Liberty and Justice which are the common and sacred cause of the Allies." 2nd RESOLUTION. That, on this the anniversary of the declaration of a righteous war, tin's public meeting recommends that a Country : His Lordship the Bishop offered prayer And the meeting closed with the singing of the National Anthem led by the Band —o— There was seen yesterday in the vestibule of the Cathedral the Roll of Honour of the Bahamas, done by the ftevd. Bernard Langton. The names in pen craft are surrounded by an illuminated border in colours, surmounted by a picture of a wounded soldier lying at the foot of a hazy crucifix. The heading runs thus : Roll of Honour of the Bahamas. Maiorem Hac Dilectionem Nemo Habet Ut AnimamSuam Ponat Cjuis Pro Amicis Suis. On Active Service Cyril Edward Armbrister, Sydney Alexander BoddamWhetham, George Burnside, Robert Henry Campbell Crawford, Alfred Curry, Herbert Haddon-Smith, Stanley Higgs, William Corson Hoiden, Robert Otto Stewart, Johnstone, George Kemp, Frank Trenar Siblev Menendez, Fred Page, Edward Sears, Harold Sandal 1,George Burnside. Died in the Service of their were made and carried out for the seating, of the large audience, m^^ The Police Band was stationed outside of the building and played several selections before the beginn'V3M[ 'he meeting. "49!nJis Excellency the Governor W. L. Allardyce Esq. entering the hall the'audience rose to its feet and the band played the National Anthem. small contingent be raised in this Colony to go with the Jamaica force to England, and that the expenses be defrayed by public subscription The. following telegram was read by His Excellency Copy of telegram from Mr. Harcout Malcolm to the Governor. New York, August 3rd. Patriotic greetings and I'aiiioiic greetings aim 1 heartfealt wishes for success** on Walter Basil HaddonSmith, Alee Bailey, Harold Brown, John Know Irs, Roy Scars. In addition to the names is the rank and the corps to which they belong. o The yacht "Hanger left yes tcrclav Noon for Rum Cay and Waitings Islands, passengers Messrs T. Augustus Toote. Wil free! H. Toote and H. D. Pear Latest War News August 4th 1915. Washington, and:— Three notes from Great Bill tin and one from Berlin, all dealinj with the commercial right of Neutrals, were before Sec retary Lansing today. The British notes; bably will be given to the | :ess tomorrow and the German note on the following day. The British note denies c ffotts of the Allies to suppn trade between their 1 1 em and neutral countries even by the stoppage of abnormal commerce through neutral countries adjacent to the Teutonic allies. Precedents in international law established by the United States during the civil war and es| >e< iall} in the practical bloc! ade the Bahamas to cut "If supplies from the Confederate States are revived to -upport this assertion of right. There are also citations ol decisions by the United Sta Supreme Court. London:— While ti e Austro-Germans continue to tighten the wings of thi great eastern battle are with success at both extremit including the occupation ol Mitau, in the North, and further progress beyond Chelm in Southeast Poland, the situation before Warsaw proper remains unchanged and obscure. Few additional details have r< ached London con erning plans for abandoning the city. Apparently the time has not arrived for tl e Russians to relinquish their increasingly precarious lold, at least no word of the 1 apitals evacuation has come to London. New Oilcans:— The cotton Consumption is much less Hum last year and there is now the largest visible: supply in tin; history of the cotton trade.



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it? duties, which gave fire rein %  e insane passions of its peo and which now does not from throwing offitsown qr U ilt by meretricious | • | ; I i Ai my." \i\ en i mous amounl "I" tes i • I '• up laf ni' nt "I the i ., ; i i .n iioient. The %  .ew York '1 imi s Good Morning! We Are Introducing \ J A met i Vmei iton 1 HOSIERY N The tli t in n t | •' ised in. t.t'ARANTLKI) fot fiuen. i Will went 6 months %  t 11 • I i OUR. SPECIAL OFFER 1.00 %  rrency ad post paid, I .i five millii 'ii lollar coi %  %  %  ithei 3 Pairs of our Tic. value rioan Silk II ii< rv, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. yvlu \\ rican Ci shmi re Hi or 4 Pfkirs of our 50o. Vavluo, A %  vricao C M -1 < II liery or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery. I >ONT DK1 W 01 iwbeu dealer in your li calit) i sale) led. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 22-1 DAYTON. OHIO. U.S. A THE UNTIRING ENERGY of the Woi.i is proverbial. Practically no energy is required where SUNLIGH I S IAP is employed. SUNLIGH I SI \i' is energy itself. The Woll is the enemy of mankind ; SUNLIGHT SOAP is the enemy of all dirt. It is the friend of the housewife, and is made for her profit. To the housewife it means less labour, less dirt, more leisure, and time and money saved. SONLIGH I s IAP dues away with needless rubbing and scrubbing, andso preserves the clothes, OIVB IT A TRIAL. BUY SUPERIOR CIGARS At 4s. per hundred. Also a S y of HAVANA CIGARS of excellent quality combined with moderate prices, from J. B. GARDINER, Cor. West Street, and Petticoat Lane. W. A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESI ItKS i" inform his fi iiirls ;iinl tlie Public tli fed %  %  >m| racilil ies for the buisnei l H n un. I iker, which | lion to carr) may be entruste I to his < lysiern i rrsppcl rullj • (Jel wy rricf I M rtvp i li.it t f mr the rerj rlhi first cl is* work, in aid of the BELGIAN RELIEF FUND will be given in Government House Grounds ; (by the kind permission i if I liExcelli ii \ the Govern* c i ON FRIDAY NEXT, AUG. 6TH. at 4 p.m. Under the patronage <>f !lis Exi i Hi ii *y and Mrs. All aidyre. Tea, Ices, Cakes, Native Pie serves, Sweets, Pickles, Fruits, and Home Made Bread, will be offi red for! The !' %  lice I3;ind will be in attend inci and Mi. Lamont \\ ill perfiimi iin the Bag-pipe. ADMISSION, ADULTS 6D. CHILDREN, 3D NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. INS I RUC i IONS have moning nllFn nchmen born in Martin Gi or F I'M 1 li ( i uinna lil ning t" tin flat ses : tn i mi from 1870 to ; nt tin i 1 • 1 lie Vu Consulate ni Kran 1 al Port of Spain ni al am of tin I ( msula s of tho British W lies to pa .1 medical pxaminal ion. H. F. AK.MBRISTr.K. Consular Agent for I i. : %  <-(-. Nassau, N. I 1 2nd fuly, 1915. FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. SUBS< Rin IONS are urgently led lor the above fund and all donations, however small, will be gratefully ac1 epti d, and will he acknowed in the newspapere. II. F. ARMBKISTKR, Consular A|>enl for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915. Here's An Opportunity tnitt y u i-tinnot ,uu "' afford to lose. II You want t<> Ecorffct'iize. If \ou want a First Class I i nt. II \vei 1 hingles. Special Price 1 HI cheapi 1 gi i i'ii-also -,in. Cypn ss al $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles, This price made possible by a 1*1 1 large pun hase. I resh sto k ai 1 iving 1 very week. C. C SAUNDERS. Try J. C. Coakley's new Id. Cigars The Allies A 1-1' nd of four fine tobaccos — o — They are good to the end FOR SUMMER SUITS' Palm Beach Cloth at 3s. yd. WM. HILTON PHONE 201. CHAS CUUtllliOlRt; An.^r+rt$j.)N<, si II iwkin's Hill. E X PER IENCED Paper I langer, Ceiling Work, a specialty. Al! work ruefully and Artistically pcii^-ird. Absolute satisfaction f?nW!r?i teed, The yary best references. -TERMS MODERATE. Williams' Shoes Are Better /r



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Nulllua a.d4iclus in .if in verka mi*Hitr< Hi-mi: bound to swear lo Ihe Dogmas o( no Mnlr. VOL. XII. Na-. 0 u. N. P.. Bahamas THURSDAY August. 3, 1915 NO. M* (Germany's Reply To Bryce Report On Atrocities. [CONTINUED FROM TUESDAY'S ISSUE AUGUST 3RD-] "There is no doubt but that mission a matter for diplomi the Belgian Government was complaints. grievously to blame for the at"This attempt to twist the fai U in the i ase into the exact opposite of the truth has utterlj titude of the population toward tli German Army. For, aside from the fact that a government failed. The German Army is is under all circumstances re ; accustomed to make war on sponsible for such acts i hostile armies, not on peaceful si HI the universal expression of inhabitants The irrefragable the national will, the Belgian fa t that from the verj first a (Sovecnment must hear the adddefensive batth was fon d uped heavy reproach of not stop ping this gueirrilla warfare when it could have done so. Si en depositions attest this fact. on the German troops in Bi I gium as a matter of th< h s< I! preservation cannot be r< futed bj any investigati ns by any D immission w hal soevei "The Btorii I of the Bi li surely would have be-,, Commissioili patched ,,.. an easy thing for Belgium to from lhe narratives of fugitives, give the necessary instructions afe [abeled he llf t ,, f tohrpubh. instruments, such ..,,,,^,..,1^1.-, impart,.,l invest! as the Burgomasters, the sob inn Tliev boar „„. st .nd members of the MuSf incredibility, if not of m mcipal Guard in order to revoJen| digtortion Becai strain the passionate emotionsL be condUion 1)f ,,„,,,, h < of the people; which had 1 artificially fanned into Bame. full responsibility for the e n o 1 m 0 u s blood-euiltini ss commission is in no wise able to prove the correctness of the rumors present) d to it and to : p the 1 onnection of ev< I whiH, weigh* upon Belgium ,,,.„ accusalion8 agains the must be borne bj the Belgian German Armv are therefore, Uovernment. "This Government has made the attempt to divest itself of such responsibility by attributing 'he blame for even this tn the destructive tage) of the Ger m.in^Mkklt*'. who, quite without reason, were supposed to have Committt d deeds of violl nee. lhe 3elgian Government hada are, nothing more than vulgai slanders whii h, without further ef fort, will be invalidated by the doi umentary e\ idence now at hand. "in Aerschol the battle of the German troops with the Belgian civilian population did not arise, as the Belgians hint, he. cause German officers besmirchJft commission appointed toinves> ed the family honor ol the Bur. tignte the atrocities which pregomaster The battle began because tinpopulation ventured pie tendedly had been committed by the German tioopsand had made the findings of this com a thoroughly planned surprise attach on the Commander in Chi. I al V oti nd mind. r< d him from behind. "In Dinant it was not innocent, peaceful citizens who fell victims to Gi rmaii swords, but murderers who had treacherously waylaid German sol di rand thus compelled the tioops to fight a battle that annihilated the cit "In Lowen the battle with the civilian population did not break oul b fl< emu German troo| s through 1 ,<-, me ig igi d with th< ir c n les ing tow. 'I I %  ci use a blinded population misjudgi d the cca 1 n and ught that without danger to themselvi s tin j could mow down the returning German troops, "The ton h was a| plii d in Lowen and m other Belgian ci ties only when bitter n essity demand) d it. The plan ol the tion of Lowen, with h ears in this ofiici.il rep show rly that the tn mtei led vitli raa ing only ihost 'ions of the city where the inhabitants treacherously and with murderous intent mad li;' ir .it tabs "What is more, it was I %  < r man troops who took care to -. i\ 1 -ii i'.ii as possible art tn asures not alone of Lowen but of oilier cities. A special mmissii m of Germans I ns determined in how gn at a degn e lhe works "I art in Belgium were presen 1 d bj German troops, "The Imperial German Gov If \< .11 v collars a trial and keep track of their man) trips to the laund will soon app their worth. NASSAU'S BES CLUETT, PEABOD' Inc. MAKERS, l ROY, i S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Aflon ernment bi li< vi that bj publication of th< pn nl 1 terial it hasconvin in that the measun German troo| ihe Belgian ,'ilian | were .11 warfare, whi< h tional law, and v the ne it; I the nthei hai I, the Impi rial I m a n G o v 1 emphai ic and 51 I mn | against a po| waged a dish< notable \ the most i" 1 againi l the Gen in "An pmpbalic 1 ol must lie again 1 .-• Go' rni which omplet.U mi Conllnu. -i %  lonrth Wear Armbrister's Shoes %


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02384
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, August 05, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Full Text


Nulllua a.d4iclus in .if in verka mi*Hitr<
Hi-mi: bound to swear lo Ihe Dogmas o( no Mnlr.
VOL. XII.
Na-.0u. N. P.. Bahamas THURSDAY August. 3, 1915
NO. M*
(Germany's Reply To
Bryce Report On Atrocities.
[Continued From Tuesday's Issue August 3rd-]
"There is no doubt but that mission a matter for diplomi
the Belgian Government was complaints.
grievously to blame for the at- "This attempt to twist the
fai U in the i ase into the exact
opposite of the truth has utterlj
titude of the population toward
tli German Army. For, aside
from the fact that a government failed. The German Army is
is under all circumstances re ;accustomed to make war on
sponsible for such acts i hostile armies, not on peaceful
si hi the universal expression of inhabitants The irrefragable
the national will, the Belgian fa t that from the verj first a
(Sovecnment must hear the add- defensive batth was fon d up-
ed heavy reproach of not stop
ping this gueirrilla warfare
when it could have done so.
Si en depositions attest this
fact.
on the German troops in Bi I
gium as a matter of th< h s< I!
preservation cannot be r< futed
bj any investigati ns by any
d immission w hal soevei
"The Btorii I of the Bi
li surely would have be-,, Commissioili patched ,,..
an easy thing for Belgium to from lhe narratives of fugitives,
give the necessary instructions afe [abeled .he ,llf.t ,,f
tohrpubh. instruments, such ..,,,,^,..,1^1.-, impart,.,l invest!
as the Burgomasters, the sob inn Tliev boar . st
.nd members of the Mu- Sf incredibility, if not of m
mcipal Guard in order to re- voJen| digtortion. Becai
strain the passionate emotionsLbe condUion 1)f ,,,,,, ,h<
of the people; which had 1
artificially fanned into Bame.
full responsibility for the
e n o 1 m 0 u s blood-euiltini ss
commission is in no wise able
to prove the correctness of the
rumors present) d to it and to
: p the 1 onnection of ev< I
whiH, weigh* upon Belgium ,,,. accusalion8 agains, the
must be borne bj the Belgian German Armv are, therefore,
Uovernment.
"This Government has made
the attempt to divest itself of
such responsibility by attribut-
ing 'he blame for even this tn
the destructive tage) of the Ger
m.in^Mkklt*'. who, quite without
reason, were supposed to have
Committt d deeds of violl nee.
lhe 3elgian Government hada
are,
nothing more than vulgai slan-
ders whii h, without further ef
fort, will be invalidated by the
doi umentary e\ idence now at
hand.
"in Aerschol the battle of the
German troops with the Belgian
civilian population did not
arise, as the Belgians hint, he.
cause German officers besmirch-
Jft
commission appointed toinves> ed the family honor ol the Bur.
tignte the atrocities which pre- gomaster The battle began
because tin- population ventured
pie
tendedly had been committed
by the German tioopsand had
made the findings of this com
a thoroughly planned surprise
attach on the Commander in
Chi. I al V oti nd mind. r< d
him from behind.
"In Dinant it was not inno-
cent, peaceful citizens who fell
victims to Gi rmaii swords, but
murderers who had treach-
erously waylaid German sol
di r- and thus compelled the
tioops to fight a battle that an-
nihilated the cit
"In Lowen the battle with
the civilian population did not
break oul b fl< emu Ger-
man troo| s through 1
! ,<-, me ig igi d with th< ir
c n les ing
tow. 'I
I ci use a blinded population
misjudgi d the cca 1 n and
ught that without danger to
themselvi s tin j could mow
down the returning German
troops,
"The ton h was a| plii d in
Lowen and m other Belgian ci
ties only when bitter n essity
demand) d it. The plan ol the
tion of Lowen, with h
ears in this ofiici.il rep
show rly that the tn
, mtei led vitli raa
ing only ihost 'ions of the
city where the inhabitants
treacherously and with murder-
ous intent mad li;' ir .it tabs
"What is more, it was I < r
man troops who took care to
-. i\ 1 -ii i'.ii as possible
art tn asures not alone of Lowen
but of oilier cities. A special
. mmissii m of Germans I ns de-
termined in how gn at a degn e
lhe works "I art in Belgium
were presen 1 d bj German
troops,
"The Imperial German Gov
If \< .11 v.
collars a trial and keep
track of their man)
trips to the laund
will soon app
their worth.
NASSAU'S
BES
CLUETT, PEABOD' Inc.
MAKERS, l ROY, i S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Aflon .
ernment bi li< vi that bj
publication of th< pn nl 1
terial it hasconvin in
that the measun
German troo|
ihe Belgian ,'ilian |
were .11
warfare, whi< h
tional law, and
! v the ne it; I '
the nthei hai I, the Impi rial
I m a n G o v 1
emphai ic and 51 I mn |
against a po|
waged a dish< notable \
the most i"1 '
againi l the Gen in
"An pmpbalic 1 ol '
must lie again 1 .- Go' rni
which omplet.U mi
Conllnu. -i lonrth
Wear Armbrister's Shoes %


L. clI.l'Kl'T DUTUCII.
F.ditur and Proprietor.
OFFIOK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sis
NaUO, .V. /'., Bahamas
P1IONK 980. P. O. BOX MB.
PUBLISHED DAILV
RATES
Monday, Wednesday arul Friday
tingle ropy ... ... }il
Tuesday, and Tliursduy tingle copy id
Saturday tingle copy ijd
Weeklv...... }d
Monthly ............is. 6d
Quarteily ,.. ... .. c-- 6d
Half Yearly..........at,
Yearly ............18s.
I 'AY A 111.! IN ADVA.NCK
Advertising Rates:Sis peace per line
for first insertion: three pence pei line
l'i second insertion ; and onepenny pc
line for subsequent insertion*.
Advertisements under eii;lit lines 4s.
Gbe Zxibune
IHl'KSDAy, August 5. 1915.
Mr PL'BLISHFD AT 6 P.M.
THE 4TH DAY OF AUGUST.
Silence fell upon the city.
Business was suspended and
the merchants and their
clerks wended their way to
the sanctuary (Christ Church
Cathedral) where His Excel-
lency the Governor, many of-
ficials and the people in their
hundreds had assembled for
a simple solemn service of
penitence and humiliation.
The only distinctive organ
i/ations present were the
Daughters of the Empire, and
the Hoy Scouts and a group
of nurses from the hospital,
and the only approach to de
monstration was the display-
ed Union Jack of the Boy
Srouts. It was gratifying to
see in the congregation min-
isters of other denominations.
Reverends II. F. Rleby, L.
A. Simpson and S. I'". Hopps,
Wesleyan Methodist-..
Reyd. S. J. Bennett, Pres-
byterian.
Revd. Daniel Wilshere,
Baptist.
Revd. H. P. Dinn, Baptist
Revd. John \V. Skerrett,
African Methodist Episcopal
Church.
The Diocesan clergy [and
the combined choirs of the
Anglican Churches of the city
and suburbs tilled the chan-
cel.
The service began with the
singing of Hymn (A. and M.)
165.
The Special Lesson read
by the Rector of Christ
Church was the 24th Chapter
II Samuel.
The Bishop of the Diocese
thru delivered the following
impressively interesting ad-
dress :
Address.
Why are we gathered together
herein tins the Cathedral Church
of the Bahamas?not all of us
men and women who ordinarily
would attend here for worship, Bui
Christ. A Committee of the Hague
Conference was sitting in Switzer-
land at the very moment of the
outbreak of hostilities. The horror
of this war, what nive to it its
bitterness and frichtfulness is that
it is CivilIratricidnlwar, with-
in the family of Christ. Europe
more or less covers the heart of
Christendom, and there God suf
fers Ihs Church to bleed for her
Sins.
Her sin? What is it? Pisobedicncc
to the command of Jesus Christ to
go forth and convert the world to
conquer the world for Jesus I hrist,
and for all that the name of Jesus
stands for.
What a miracle of Divine power
and protection was, and is exhibit-
ed by the peaceful march of Chris-
tians in that long battle of 300
all of us, I think, believers in God 1 years dating from the Ascension
'in lather-and in His only be-1 of our Blessed Lord till a Christian
Rotten Son Jesus Christ our lir-
Emperor ruled over the twin cap-
dcemerand in the Holy Ghost, itals of the known woild Home &
proceeding horn both, Sanctifier
of the Elect.
Christ ian men and women! I
thank you for your kind courtesy
today, in that you hive put out of
light for the moment your criti-
cisms of the worship as ordinarily
offered here, and instead have
strengthened us with your presence
and the spirit of prayer that is in
you.
For in union with the whole
Empireon this the Anniversary
of its entry into the Great War
we here in the Isles are conscious,
that we are kneeling side by side
with our brothersacioss the seas.
Kneeling, I say, because in the
symbolism ofwoiship kneeling is
the attitude of selMiumiliition,
and the consciousness of sin. I
think we must concentrate on that
one thought today. We have sinn-
ed grievously through our fault,
our own fault, our own mot griev-
ous fault-----Not thai we have not
much to ask for e g victory!
Not that we have not much to be
thankful fora, g had th- battle
of the Falkland Islands gone the
Other way W4 might now be sub.
ject to tli'* insolence of 1 German
invader. The British Isles, the
heart of the Empire is \et untrod.
den hy an invader* fee'.
Out Sin! We must not n irrow
"in horizon. In the fust instance
welooking forth upon the Old
World from our pi rch upon a ro fa
in thi* Western Seaawe notice
Ih it th' Scourge of the sword, the
p< stilence and the famine, which
is m the hand of God, has fallen
not merely on the British Empire
Constantinople. Never since then
has Jesus Christ been wholly loved
and obeyed, with one heart and
with one mind. NationsAi National
Churches, one after the other fell
away from the faith, and therefore
the morals as taught by Christ
and his first Apostles, and Nations
and National Churches were
blotted out by the fire and sword
of the Infidel.
Other Nations and Churches
survived mainly in Europe, There
the torch burnt fitfully. There
have been revivals of faith, and
God has been very patient through
the centuries- until a year ago to-
day, by the acression of Britain
the whole of Christain Europe
practically had become a blazing
Hell of shot and shell and of
burning pires of slain men too nu-
merous to be buried. Choleia,
Typhus, Enteric stalked abroad.
Ships sunk in the depths with their
living crews. Death came from
beneath the sea. Battles were
fought in the air itself. Even the
purity of the heavens above taint
ed by the sin of Christendom. Be-
cause we had forgottenno! de-
liberately disiibeyed our marching
orders "Go forth into all the world
and make disciples of all nations."
Instead we went forth to add field
to field to remove ourneiglibour's
landmark. The fields of the world
which we added to our worldly
possessions we tilled and cultivated
with forced labour for a time. We
tore men, women and children
f'om their homes across the seas
that by the sweat of their bodies
they might minister to our wealth
but upon all Europe. Our own [ And the wealth of Europe brought
dead are numbered by thousands, its curse. It was cuised and ill-
some of them when in life were I begotten at the l>eginning. The
with us but a few months ago. more we had the more we thiisted
But 'he losses in Europe have been j for more.And we hustled and crowd
numbered by millions; millions of led one another as we rushed to
the manhood of the nations: the I seize the vacant spaces of the
youngthe strongthe beautiful j wild, and wo Christian Nations
the brave, A year njjo they lived in rmlice, jenleusy and siispi- .
were our fnends, our broilers in cion one of another. And we deci-
mated the native races of the lands
which we annexed, by our heastl^
vices. And from the older races we
leant new vices; and we improved
upon them; and organized them.
Till God's heavy hand in wroth
was laid upon us a year ago and.
He said"Hitherto shalt thoif go.
Now suffer the punishment of these
years and centuries of evil deeds
and of failure to correspond to the
will of Got which you knew "
But why speak of the sin of the
Churches and thMbtiont? The
Holy Church cannoBffk. Nations
have no soul It is the indivi-
duals that form the Churches and
the Natiors, they have done the
Miming. We look into our own
heart and conscience you and I
must say "thou art the man I"
With dear, faithful, sinful, repent-
ant David, let us say "l.o I have
sinned and I have done wicked I j ;
but these sheep what have they
done? Let thine hand I pray
thee be against me, and against
my father's house. Mea CUlpa !
Mea culpa Mea maxima (ulpa I
It is in this spirit I would have
you one and all to kneel to say the
solemn and beautiful Litany of
the Church, Surely the most per-
fect, Marching, reasonable and
comprehensive in the English lan-
guage, but oh I how stiange and
unaccustomed to some of you.
Ah my brothers ye did once run
well. Who hath bewitched you ?
What fruit have ye in those things
of Which ye are now ashamed ?
Ye have proved that the end of
those things is death. Not the
death of the Martyrs of the first
three centuries, who faced the lion
in the arena, or chanted God's
praises as the flames crept round
the slake to which they were
bound. Not the death of the mo-
dern Marty, whose faces portray-
ed in the best illustrated papers
bring tears to our eyes ; the men,
who for love of their 'ountry and
foi love of God perhaps they
would hardly dara to say that
but the love is there, although
they arc too humble to utter the
wordthe mm who placed their
lives at the disposal of their King,
ar.d they have died, some of them
in fearful agony ; but their death
is fruitful, life-giving, the blood
is not poured out in vainit is
precious to Jesus Cluist as His
own Blood. It is pouied upon the
great Altar of Burnt Offering. In
the smoke and flnmesSf burning
Cities and SanctiflHasl^t rises like
incense to the Father's throne. So
in the office of the Holy Commu-
nion we dare to say "and here we
offer ourselves, 001 souls and bo-
dies our reasonable service." Su
is the death of the righteous I 1^
if we drift through life to ot
death. If we take no share in the
great war, either by shou'deiing a
musket or preparing munitions of
wai ; if wc do not even pray : if
we take the Lord's Day itself and

no-
oOT^^~


add it to the six days of selfishness
and-^ cowardly lethargyDeath
wilTcomea death of God in the
soul. We may die in our beds, as
the saying is, we may lie on a
comfortable mattrass ; and friends
around us: and the pain be south-
ed by arcotics: and the flies
waved away by fans, andperhaps
our minister may be sent for to
say the pnyers which we could
no longer have said for ourselves,
even if we had not long ago for-
gotten tiiein in th^Sffopliytof the
soul. m^
Bui that is no neath for us to
look forward to in joy and hope,
or for our friends to look b.ick on
with resignation.
One thing we hope will result
from all the pair and agony of
this war whether by defeat or
by victory. Repentance! Conver-
sion a turning to God, an uplifting
of the bauds in pr.iyer, a great
confession of sin! and a greater
forgiveness. This not to the
Nations engaged in war, not the
National Churches, but to you and
me, and all the units who are
built up into the great Church of
God which is the Body of Christ.
Then once more shall Christ go
forth conquering and to con,
And alienations shall hear the
sound of 11 is Gospel, preached in
word and deed \y the holy life, by
the army of reall) Christflin men
and women.
Let us pray for one moment in
silence and s prepare to take
pirt in the great supplication.
The Litany was then sung.
During the Offertory Hymn
(A. and M.) 142 was sung.
The singing of the Nation-
al Anthem and the benedic-
tion concluded the service.
The Offertory amounting
to 17 was donated to the
French Red Cross Fund.
WEDNESDAY. 4th August 1915.
Yesterday afternoon a large
and representative audience
assembled in St. Andrews
Hall in response to the call
"To the people of the Baha-
mas."
Excellent arrangements
His Excellency took the | ful celebration of momentous
chair and was supported on anniversary
the platform by Mrs E, T.
Higgs, Mrs. T. H. C. l.oft-
house, Regent National
(Sgd) HARCOURT MALCOLM
The Governor announced
his and Mrs Allardvcescontri-
ChapterD.O. E. the Lord bution to the Bahamas Con-
Bishop of Nassau, the Hon. I tingent Fund of roo guineas
W. Hart Bennett Col. Sect.| Mr G M Cole announced 30
Hon. G. H. Gatnblin, M.S.C. guineas from the Honourable
Hon. D. Tudor, Esq. K. C. II. G. and Mrs Malcolm
Mails.
loreign Mails to be des-
patched per "Frances E" vi'
Miami, Ha., will be made up
and closed on FRIDAY the
Oth inst., at 8 a.m.
Chief Justice, W. C. B. John-
son Esq., Dep. Speaker, Actg.
Chairman the Bahamas War
Relief Committee, Frank
Holmes Esq. Rev. S. J. Ben-
nett, Dr. W. A. Pitt, George
M. Cole Esq. M. H. A., Ghas.
O. Anderson Esq. Postmaster,
M.H.A. Stephen A. Dilld Esq.
Rev. II. P. bleby, G. Weech,
E*q M. II. A., J.M. Rae, Esq.
Sti|>. and Cir. Magistrate, W.
A. Mather, Esq. J. P.
His Excellency made an
earnest and inspirating ad-
dress, which our limited
space, we regret, compels us
to defer the publication of
until Saturday.
The two following resolu-
tions were unanimously car-
ried.
rst RESOLUTION.
"That on this the anniver-
sary of the declaration of a
righteous war, the Citizens of
Nassau at this Meeting record
their loyal sympathy with
and fullest support to the
Mother Country in its inflexi-
ble determination to continue
to a victorious end the strug-
gle in maintenance of those
ideals of Liberty and Justice
which are the common and
sacred cause of the Allies."
2nd RESOLUTION.
That, on this the anniver-
sary of the declaration of a
righteous war, tin's public
meeting recommends that a Country :
His Lordship the Bishop
offered prayer
And the meeting closed
with the singing of the Na-
tional Anthem led by the
Band
o
There was seen yesterday
in the vestibule of the Cathe-
dral the Roll of Honour of
the Bahamas, done by the
ftevd. Bernard Langton.
The names in pen craft are
surrounded by an illuminated
border in colours, surmount-
ed by a picture of a wound-
ed soldier lying at the foot
of a hazy crucifix.
The heading runs thus :
Roll of Honour of the Ba-
hamas.
Maiorem Hac Dilectionem
Nemo Habet Ut AnimamSu-
am Ponat Cjuis Pro Amicis
Suis.
On Active Service
Cyril Edward Armbrister,
Sydney Alexander Boddam-
Whetham, George Burnside,
Robert Henry Campbell
Crawford, Alfred Curry, Her-
bert Haddon-Smith, Stanley
Higgs, William Corson Hoi-
den, Robert Otto Stewart,
Johnstone, George Kemp,
Frank Trenar Siblev Menen-
dez, Fred Page, Edward
Sears, Harold Sandal 1,George
Burnside.
Died in the Service of their
were made and carried out for
the seating, of the large audi-
ence, m^^
The Police Band was
stationed outside of the
building and played several
selections before the beginn-
'V3m[ 'he meeting.
"49!nJis Excellency the Gov-
ernor W. L. Allardyce Esq.
entering the hall the'audience
rose to its feet and the band
played the National Anthem.
small contingent be raised in
this Colony to go with the
Jamaica force to England,
and that the expenses be de-
frayed by public subscription
The. following telegram
was read by His Excel-
lency
Copy of telegram from Mr.
Harcout Malcolm to the Gov-
ernor.
New York, August 3rd.
Patriotic greetings and
I'aiiioiic greetings aim 1
heartfealt wishes for success- **on'
Walter Basil Haddon-
Smith, Alee Bailey, Harold
Brown, John Know Irs, Roy
Scars.
In addition to the names
is the rank and the corps to
which they belong.
----o------
The yacht "Hanger left yes
tcrclav Noon for Rum Cay and
Waitings Islands, passengers
Messrs T. Augustus Toote. Wil
free! H. Toote and H. D. Pear
Latest War News
August 4th 1915.
Washington, and: Three
notes from Great Bill tin and
one from Berlin, all dealinj
with the commercial right
of Neutrals, were before Sec
retary Lansing today.
The British notes; bably
will be given to the | :ess to-
morrow and the German note
on the following day.
The British note denies c f-
fotts of the Allies to suppn
trade between their 1 1 em
and neutral countries even by
the stoppage of abnormal
commerce through neutral
countries adjacent to the Teu-
tonic allies. Precedents in
international law established
by the United States during
the civil war and es| >e< iall}
in the practical bloc! ade
the Bahamas to cut "If sup-
plies from the Confederate
States are revived to -upport
this assertion of right.
There are also citations ol
decisions by the United Sta
Supreme Court.
London: While ti e Aus-
tro-Germans continue to
tighten the wings of thi
great eastern battle are with
success at both extremit
including the occupation ol
Mitau, in the North, and fur-
ther progress beyond Chelm
in Southeast Poland, the sit-
uation before Warsaw proper
remains unchanged and ob-
scure.
Few additional details have
r< ached London con erning
plans for abandoning the
city. Apparently the time
has not arrived for tl e Rus-
sians to relinquish their in-
creasingly precarious lold, at
least no word of the 1 apitals
evacuation has come to Lon-
don.
New Oilcans:The cotton
Consumption is much less Hum
last year and there is now the
largest visible: supply in tin;
history of the cotton trade.


it? duties, which gave fire rein
e insane passions of its peo
and which now does not
from throwing offitsown
qrUilt by meretricious
| | ; I i Ai my."
\i\ en i mous amounl "I" tes
i I ' up
laf ni' nt "I the
i ., ; i i .n iioient.
The .ew York '1 imi s
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
\ j
A met i '
Vmei iton 1
HOSIERY
N
. The tli
t in n t | ' ised in.
t.t'ARANTLKI) fot fiuen.
i
Will went 6 months
t 11 I i
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
1.00 rrency
ad post paid,
I .i five
millii 'ii lollar coi . , ithei
3 Pairs of our Tic. value
rioan Silk II ii< rv,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. yvlu
\\ rican Ci shmi re Hi
or 4 Pfkirs of our 50o. Vavluo,
A vricao C M -1 < II liery
or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery.
I >ONT DK1 W 01 iwbeu
dealer in your li calit) i sale) led.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 22-1
DAYTON. OHIO. U.S. A
THE UNTIRING ENERGY
of the Woi.i is proverbial. Practically no energy is
required where Sunligh i S iap is employed. Sunligh i
Si \i' is energy itself. The Woll is the enemy of
mankind ;
SUNLIGHT SOAP
is the enemy of all dirt. It is the friend of the house-
wife, and is made for her
profit. To the housewife it
means less labour, less dirt,
more leisure, and time and
money saved. Sonligh i
s iap dues away with need-
less rubbing and scrubbing,
andso preserves the clothes,
OIVB IT A TRIAL.
BUY
SUPERIOR CIGARS
At 4s. per hundred.
Also a S y of
HAVANA CIGARS
of excellent quality combined
with moderate prices, from
J. B. GARDINER,
Cor. West Street,
and Petticoat Lane.
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESI ItKS i" inform his fi iiirls
;iinl tlie Public tli
fed '' >m|
racilil ies for the buisnei l h n un.
I iker, which |
lion to carr)
may be entruste I to his <
lysiern i rrsppcl
rullj (Jel
wy rricf I m rtvp i li.it t f
mr the rerj rlhi first cl is*
work,
in aid of the
Belgian Relief Fund
will be given in
Government House Grounds
; (by the kind permission i if
I li- Excelli ii \ the Govern* c i
ON FRIDAY NEXT, AUG. 6TH.
at 4 p.m.
Under the patronage <>f !lis
Exi i Hi ii *y and Mrs.
All aidyre.
Tea, Ices, Cakes, Native Pie
serves, Sweets, Pickles, Fruits,
and Home Made Bread, will
be offi red for!
The !' lice I3;ind will be
in attend inci and Mi. La-
mont \\ ill perfiimi iin the
Bag-pipe.
ADMISSION, ADULTS 6D.
_________CHILDREN, 3D.
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Ins i ruc i ions have
moning nllFn nch-
men born in Martin
Gi or F I'M1 li (iuinna
lil ning t" tin flat ses : .
tn i mi from 1870 to
; nt tin i 1
1 lie Vu Con-
sulate ni Kran 1 al Port of
Spain ni al am of tin I
( msula s of tho Bri-
tish W lies to pa .1
medical pxaminal ion.
H. F. AK.MBRISTr.K.
Consular Agent for I i. :<-(-.
Nassau, N. I1 .
2nd fuly, 1915.
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Subs< Rin ions are urgently
led lor the above fund
and all donations, however
small, will be gratefully ac-
1 epti d, and will he acknow-
ed in the newspapere.
II. F. ARMBKISTKR,
Consular A|>enl for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
Here's An Oppor-
tunity tnitt yu i-tinnot
,uu"' afford to lose.
II You want t<> Ecorffct'iize.
If \ou want a First Class
I i nt.
II \ nized Use the EJest Eight
tliL-t money ran Duy. The
Safest and the Cheapest.
THE
KEROSENE MANTLE
LAMPS and BUHNERS
nro rccornlaed n" Uw
.-t.iri-ii-.i Incandea-
cent bll lampn of tho
iroi id.
10.1,000 p.nllflr*
n. r- All flrlluhtrd.
Produces .1 power-
ful, brilliant whlto
llKht ur KM* .-un.iii-
power. Hums mm.
iimon coal-olL (oats
only oar cent for al*
1 In.11 -
Brighter than ?.
electricity or six or-
dinal;.' I unpfl al imp-
alxlh to imr 11 I. .1 1 in-
com.
Made entirely of
braBH. For use In
homes, storea, hall*
and churches. No
odor, no noise; safe,
simple and clean-
There la only ona
1SJ KeiMon. Insist on
iiavln,; It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E Nabbie-
1.1 Chrisi n St., Nassau, N.P.
iven if requested. Writ!
"i ' mi and know all aboul this won-
derful Lamp.
FOR SALE, CHEAP The A1Hes
One Motor Boat
Ma hi igany ! inish.
12 h.p. LATHROP ENGINE
Heavy Duty, (New
Easy Terms.
Apply,
A. C. CRAWFORD.
July 15, 191
Shingles
l'i si No. l Hi .ni /an. C) pn SI
Shingles at $9.1 per llious
sand ol 20 bundli
Disci unit' on I' its if' >vei
1 hingles.
Special Price
1 hi cheapi 1 giii'ii-- also
-,in. Cypn ss al $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles, This
price made possible by a 1*1 1 .
large pun hase.
I resh sto k ai 1 iving 1 very
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Try J. C. Coakley's
new Id. Cigars
The Allies
A 1-1' nd of four fine tobaccos
o
They are good to the end
FOR
SUMMER SUITS'
Palm Beach Cloth
at 3s. yd.
WM. HILTON
Phone 201.
CHAS CUUtllliOlRt;
An.^r+rt$j.)N<, si
II iwkin's Hill.
EX PER IENCED Paper
I langer, Ceiling Work,
a specialty. Al! work rueful-
ly and Artistically pcii^-ird.
Absolute satisfaction f?nW!r?i
teed, The yary best references.
-Terms moderate.
Williams' Shoes Are Better
/r-


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