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THE TR.1BVNC, NASSAU. N P. AL OILBBKT DUPUOH, Editor and Propy. oui able the I louse of A ssell,. OFFM K Corner Shirley & Cho.rlotte Sis .Nassau, V. I'., Huhum i. "MIONK 2tl0. P. O. BOX lftt. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy Jd Tuesday, and Thursday—single copy id Satuiday—single copy ... ijd Weekly 5' 1 Monthly i s. fxi (Quarterly ... 4s. 6d HalfYeaily o s. Yearly 1 8s. | v I which is the outcomi nl the immediately alter the outbreak | very successful meeting held on of h stilities; private coutribu May iuth at the Guildhall; we ti.ms amounting to over £V>o tr 1st nevertheless that you will have been made to the Prince of give it youi very valuable sup Wales' National Relief Fund; port. and sifts of grape fruit ami %  1 enclose you a copy of the clothes have been forwarded | Guildhall programme and list through the National Chapter of if supporters, together with the the Daughters of the Empire. full text of the speeches dehv But the need for the organi zation of the whole of our 11a tional resources was never great PAYABLE IN ADVANOK Advertising Rates :—Six pence |>e/line tor first insertion: three pence per line for second insertion ; ai.il oiiepertny per line for subaquent insertions. Advertisements uudet eight lines 4s. X&be XLtibunc SATURDAY. July 24, 1915. **I'VBl.lSHr II AT 8 P. M. er than at present, while the de ma ml for money for the relief ol suffering, and the necessity for more men at the front, continue to grow day by day. In order to overcome the enemy it is imperative that every portion of the Empire must do its utmost, and that everv loyal and partiotic; subject of his Majesty must make a personal sacrifice in order that victory may be achieved. That we can do more than we have already done in this Colony is not to be gainsaid. I therefore summon a Public ered at the meeting. The following Resolution is suggested by the Committee for Submission at all meetings : "That, on this anniversary of "the declaration of a righteous "war, this meeting of the Citizens of records its in "flexible determination to con"tinue to a victorious end the "struggle in maintenance of "these ideals of Liberty and "Justice which are the common 'and sacred cause of the Allies." I have the honour to be, Sir, Your obedient Servant, (Sd ) HENRY CUST, Chairman. The Honourable Acting Attorney ieneral in conse Meeting at St Andrew's hail on We take very much pleasure Wednesday, August 4 th, at quence"of the absence from in publishing h. anothe. column ;," , l,,rk '" adopt .the above the Colony of the HonourResolution and to consider the able Harcourt Malcolm, K.L. appropriate formin which presented Mr. Culmer's petiwecan render further aid and i()n lQ t i leC(Hut and sai( l : assistance to the Mother Land at this crisis of our national existence Government House, Nassau, zz July, I'n 5. VV. L. ALLARDYCE. Governor THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE. the address of Hi-bxcelleiicy the Governor with referent e to a Public Meeting to be held on Wednesday 4th August the an niversary of England's declaration of war against Germany. We also publish a letter from The Central Committee, for National Patriotic Organizations with reference to the sam< subject. We have much pleasure in publishing below the speech) s in full delivered on the 00 asion of Mr. Timothy W. R. Culmer's admission as an attorney of the Supreme Court of tins Colony. —:o: — A fire occurred at about one o'clock this morning in the residence of Mr. Lewis D. Neely, near Port Fincastle. The fire it is said, originated within and destroved almost For .National Patriotic Organizations. Canadian Pacific Building, 62, Charing Cr< iss, London, W. C. 14th June, 191 s. Sir, The Central Committee are anxious that public meetings of a patriotic and imperial nature 1 am privileged on this occasion to present to you the Petition of Mr. Timothy W. R. Culmer, praying that he be admitted a Counsel and Attorney of the Supreme Court. I am gratified by the fact, that on two of the three asions when I have acted .1Attorney General, I have been selected to act as a kind of legal god father for candidates seeking admission to the Par, although, I am aware, that in the present instance my selection is due to the regrettable absence of Mr. H. G. Malcolm, in whose Office Mr. Culmer's period of —the aniiivekav of the Declaevery thing leaving little but a i ration of War against' Germaportion of the walls standing. „y. This was one of, if not, the Steps are being taken by us finest cottage homes in the island. The Ward Line Steamer "Robert Thompson" left New York at 3 o'clock this morning with 4400 bbls. of freight foi Nassau. We understand that Mr. Cul mer is acting for Mr. Malcolm during C Ins olony. Mr. Culmer will re-LCrow> ill be glad to part it 1 main in Mr. Malcolms Cham pate in this demonstration of bers for about three months] the solidarity and enthusiasm and in the meantime w ill select an office. To THE PEOPLE OF THE BAHAMAS. snould be held throughout t | ie jpup'lege was passed, and who Empire on August the 4 th next h as temporarily forsaken the balmy Bahamas for climates, probably less balmy, but more breezy. Mr. Culmer, whose petition, I now have the honour ol presenting, is the son of Mr. J. S. Culmer, who has rendered useful and honourable service for a number of irs, in the Public Service of this Colony as a Commissioner in the Out Islands. The petition shows that the Petitioner, has duly served live years as an Articled Clerk, from January 1910 to January 1915, and that on the 9th day of July last, he duly passed the examination held in accordance with Section 25 of the Supreme Court Act, 1806. During his student day*, if my recollection serves me, I have several times had tinpleasure of listening to Mr. to carry out this idea in Great Britain. The Secretary of State for the Colonies has given his approval and support, and the HighComniissionersand Agents General, who have taken up the suggestion with enthusiasm, are making the necessary arrangements for inviting the cooperation of the Dominions. The Committee fee.l sine that absence from the'the other Dependencies of the of the Empire in the Cause of the Allies, and its increasing determination to carry on the conflict, until a peace, honour able, durable and satisfactory, is assured I would ask you to be so good as to bring tins subject to 1 have been approached by the General Committee of the War Relief Fund on the sug "estion of the Chairman of the p.""" ... f v..; the (lovernor 111 the hope that Central Committee lor .Nation ,, , ,, ,. .,. %  • •/- • he will lend the proposal his a Patnotic Organizat s in I ' , 1. patronage and support. Eiitdaiid, and invitedto summon . ',' ,, 11 ii\i \v i >r,i^. S" IS roost desirable that a Public Meeting on Wednesday, .. .. ... : .7, .. the meetings shall onlv give August 4th, which is the anni ,. / h V .. ,. 1 .expression to the spontaneous vers^rv of I'.ngland s declaration '. , ..' . V 7 • ,• .1 outburst of die \ oice of the of war against dermanv, with n , ,. 1 •• r 1 11 People, and be entirely free theobAct of adopting a Keso lc r.1 • %  ,. J . i ,. K from Governmental inspiration, lutiorfin the following wore s:— ,, luuwiriii h [ vvould ask you to be so good "Tnat, on this anniver as to lay the proposal before the sary of the declaration of a Chambers of Commerce in the righteous war this meeting 1 hope that they will give as of the Citizens of Nassau | much publicity as possible to records its inflexible deter [the campaign and undertake mination to continue to a the arrangements of such devictorious end the struggle monstrations in the Capital of in maintenance of those the Colony and in such other towns as may appear to them to be expedient. We regtet that it has not been found possible to give 10,000 was voted by the lion earlier notice of this proposal, ideals of Liberty and Justice which are the common and sacred cause of the Allies." As you are aware a sum of the notice of His Excellency [Culmer, as a debater in St. Andrew's Hall, and I feel sure, that he will acquit himself with credit in Court. I am confident that if Your Honour sees fit to grant the prayer of his Petition^and admit Mr. Culmer to the Bar he will do nothing to dun its lustre, or tarnish its reputation, during what 1 hope, will be a long and successful career. After the Chief Justice had administered to Mr. Culmer the Oath of Allegiance and the oath prescribed for an applicant for admission as a legal practitioner, Mr. Culmer donned for the first time in public a Barrister's wig and gown and took bis place at the Bar-table when His Honour addressed him and said:— Mr. Culmer—In welcoming you on your admission to the Par 1 congratulate you on your present attainment and would express the hope that all your aspirations for future success may be realised in full measure. As Mr. Attorney has informed the Court you have had the valuable advantage of undergoing a live-years training in the Chambers of the Hon Harcourt Malcolm, K C. consequently you have been privileged to get an insight to one of tjiri largest legal practices in this Colony. YOJ are lobe congratulated, also, upon having completed your studentship and having qualified yourself to start on your professional careei at an early age—at an earlier age perhaps than anyone who may judge il simply from your physical appeal ance, :f you will pardon my making so pei %  11.11 and coiu[plimentarv an allusion to your ample physique. Alth< tugh, on the other hand, we, who are acquainted with your parentage, can scarcely believe thai you are so old as : j years of a ;e, having regard tO the enviable y outhful ness of your esteemed father who has sei\ed ins country for SO many years as a Commissioner in the Out-Islands To revert to the personal view 1 which 1 am em: oldened to mention as I regard it Mr. Culmer as one of bright augury for yourself) I recall the fact that, at the time when I was called to the Bar in E gland, the front ranks of the profession were adorned by an array of famous leading Counsel who were all of enormously large physical development; and I confess that some of us younger practitioners were almost inclined t< 1 entertain a superstitious belief that the weighty proportions of these learned and massive counsellors were to be accounted for by the soli dity of their profound learning and contributed additional weight to any legal opinion pronounced by them. I am referring, of course, in particular to that great Parliamentary Counsel Mr. Pope, o. C. also to Mr. Murphy, Q. C. and Mr. Murphy, Jr. and to Mr. DanckwertZ afterwards K. Call of whose names you have frequently seen mentioned in the Law Reports of many important cases which you have read during your legal studies. Whatever satisfaction, therefore, Mr. Culmer, you will extract from considering these notable coincidences, you are fully en titled to claim; and I have ventured to advert to this personal aspect of your cast; in the hope that you will take the same v'ew as I do and regard it as being peculiarly one of happy omen for your future at the Bar. You have passed a satisfactory examination in all the prescribed subjects according to your Examiners' report, and Mr. Attorney has al luded to your experience in public speaking and your skill in debate. You have this morning taken an oath to demean yourself truly and honestly as Counsel and Attorney; and in this connection, I would express my belief that you will have little or lessdifiieul tv in faithfully discharging that obligation so long as you constantly ben in mind, with justifiable pride, the noble traditions of the learned pro lession of which you are now a member, with a sedulous endeavour in all your transactions to emulate the exam pie of the many honoured men, whose signatures are to be found inscribed on the ancient Holl to which you have appended your name this morning those many honoured and distinguished men who have discharged and exercised their responsi bilities and pi ivil. gi s as Counsel with such good ef feet that this learned pn ifess ion is enabled tt the general community. To the Honourable Acting Attomej General Mr Strong* I desire to express my thanks for so ably and eloquently present Ing4ny Petition to the Court. I hope to see and have a more in tiniate knowledge of him in the Court below. I come now to the most difficult task in this morning's proceedings aid that difficulty is to express adequately my hearty appreciation of the valuable assistance my Honourable and learned friend Mr. Ma colm has given me. My stay in Mi Chambers and it has • T %  A!



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THE TR.IBUNE. NASSAU. N P. able pleasure to read law in the C him hers of one who is so veiv near and dear to me Mr. Malcolm is beyond the shadow of a doubt both profess lonallv and politically a star of the first magnitude and I feel confident that his assiduity, per servance and sincerity of pur pose in all things have been instrumental in securing for him such bistre I certainly hope to be able some day to discharge my great debt of gratitude to Mr. Malcolm for the lr failure of the Austro Ger 1 were told that it is necessary in lines and |K uns and > ct > { could place the interest o{ the StaIe tha j he adequate| Sr ,ould be at work tomorrow an 1 desire to express the hope that true and genuine profess lonal relationship will exist between the members of the bar and me and also that the same cordial relationship which at present exists between the bench and the bar of which I am a uuil will continue lii conclusion I desire t 1 assure your Honour that I shall to the best <>f my ability discfiai ge the obligation of my professional oath and shall endeavour to m.nut 1 ill the high noble and untarnished traditions of distinguished and honourable bai Again I thank your Hon. 1 our for kindly consenting to the xv prayer of my petition. be reluctant in commanding me. check upon the United States and a throwing ofl by Cuba the moral yoke of that naiii m as imposed by the Plait Amendment. Thus it is that t hi se two great sectii ins of the Cuban born while vi< ing the war from the selfsame standpoint of self interest, IMI ik eai nestly forward to a distinct issue. Hut unanimity is neither a virtue nor .'i CUStom in some latin republics, and the gold rf the Aman capitalist helps the "'. ls middle class. I he Spaniard bates Great 1 ne it is that Wellington cleared the PeIninsula of the French fighting my hand on supply of skilled workmen, the output of machine-guns could he doubled in a few days. It may happen that the German forces in the West will man operations. shortly be increased; it is there Apparently the Austro Ger 'Tore vital to our Army that every mans feel pretty certain of tin outcome for it is said that Em peror William at Posen has sent for the Empress in order to make a state entry into the Polish capital when it falls. I lungs are moving a little more quickly in Courland where the Germans claim that success tor,es we want ,c> skilled lab available machine gun shall be placed at its disposal with the ieast possible delay. He laid tre mendouS emphasis on the need for machine guns and on the ability of our skilled labour * State requirics. supply them. We want more workmen in the munition fac es along the them within • brought; 0 1 "" '" ,)e #,> thai town from the South. da J s| "" s w *want every work There is another battle in pro man to do lns ,J S| gress along the border of Bessa rabia but how this Is going of ficial communication do nol say The French have mad. an other bid for the Yalle.' of ,l l( for the sake Fecht in the Vosges where they! which is in < COMMUNICATED) forces 18 8-181^. True it is have delivered several partially thai Louis XIV in trying to WHAT WAR THEY THINK OF THE IN HAVANA. It ought to be interesting to readers of "TinTribune" to know what our neighbours of Havana, a city virtually ' door to us, think of the war now raging in Europe In a city with two thirds of its population hailing from Spam and the other third composed of the native-born and a mixed residue from every nation under the sun. opini in takes everv shade of difference I he middle (lass of Cuba are to a man in favour of England and her Allies : tins partiality is based wave asid< le the F vrenees had to count against "l'eriideous Albion." liut the Spaniard never forgives. And I ngland defeated the Spanish Xi'iiada. She holds her colonial empire whilst Spain has lost hers. Human nature is human nature in a nation as well. The Spaniard of Havana is not the onlv I (iei man wli i dec lines to view successful attacksand have cap Mr. Lloyd George admits the value and even the necessity of trade union restrictive rules in tunes of peace, but he begs the workmen to discard them now of their country, ire peril. Let them 111 Birmingham he would go without demur. It is the employer who more often objects to lose the labour that he has gathered around his factory. He warmly acknowdedged the helpful speeches of Labour M. P.'s (Mr. Hodge and Mr. Tootill). The immediate need of the Ministry of Munitions is for an army of voluntary workersready to go and work wherever the Railway fares will be paid and subsistence allowances for absence from home. The Munitions Bill will be circulated on Friday, and the debate on the second reading is fixed for Monday next. H.J. —The Daily Chronicle. put their whole strength into their work and help their bietured the heights dominating t,iern ' the 6>ld. 't >s not that valley from the East. About|* n u ,?!j.* suspend the written the same time the French air men dropped bombs on Colmar. Beyond this and a German at tacft in the Forest of Apremont, which the French assert were repulsed, only artillery engage menti have occurred in the West. The Italian offensive on the Isonzo continues and Home re ports further progress, particu the war with unprejudiced larlv on the Carso Plateau. eves. He glories in the 1)1>ws England has received and dares to hope that these blows herald defeat. They I >se sight of the fact that a doughty champion must re ceive a champion's blows and Jinng tint owing to the revolution upon the fact that < their Wat for independence^ [ n 'modern armaments thorn Greal llntain showed herself | tmj Mistress of the Sea what she alwavs has be< n the sea may bleed more freelv than in viz: the friend ol Libert) and r onner con flj of nations lighting for liberty: Her moral support of conmcts, 'her sceptre )c twisted from her the I uited States during the Spanish-American war. is recognized in Cuba todnv as one of the causes why no complications arose. The attitude ol Germany, then, canbe betti r understood, When viewed in the light of events ni >.v happening. The love ol the Cubans for France, the circumstance that the Frew h, a branch of the greal Latin rue, are engaged in a life and death struggle against the I eutons, helps t< 1 make "I iboi io" as the Cuban calls himself h partisan of the Allies. The Cuban is pi' aid to Style himself a Latin. Around the news board Washington: —President YVd son and Secretary Lansing ( mi ferring at the White House to night cnmpleted the new note to Germany warning her that a repetition of a disaster such as that of the Lusitania, or any other violation of American rights on the high seas resulting in loss of American lives will be regarded as unfriendly. The note will he despatched tomor row. It is in the nature of a fi nal statement by the United Stales of the interpretation that will be placed by this govern meiit cai further transgressions of American rights and repeats 4. 01 tner cantv it grasp. Key West, 34th.—Noon. A disturbance of moderate in tensitv off the Fast Coast „f | that the government will leave Florida will move \ T -rtheast, I nothing undone to stand by the the centre keeping of] the coast position it has previously des and causing fresh to strong I CTIbea. Northeast to North winds off; Genevar—Nedjemkden Effen the Atlantic Coast between I<• t he Turkish Minister of Justice, and FaSSUm Effendi are expected here tomorrow from Vi enna for the purpose, it is report ed, of opening separate peace negotiations with the Triple En tente. It is stated that the dele gates are invested with official powers. Berlin: —It was officially an nounced tonight that the Ger mans who are factory hands in neutral countries, as the United States, in making war supplies for Germany's enemies are liable to prosecution for treason. Cape Cod and Cape I latteras during the next 48 hours. Latest War News July 23rd 1915. London, 2:st:—Titanic hat ties which will seal the fate of Warsaw are being fought North, West, and South of that city. At hay on the rivers where thev are well thanked bv fortressregulations, for unwritten rules are often more restrictive in their operation. "We can in this matter only cast ourselves upon the honour of the workmen." (Labour cheers ) ".And I am confident that we shall not appeal to them in vain." Warm commendation was I passed on the trade union leaders!" 0 1 "hnd." 'for their willingness io suspend their rules during the war. He touched on the unwillingness of the mintrs to abandon then old opposition to compulsory arbi [ration. If they prefer their old ways, he will not greatly mind. I le is full of admiration for the 1 patriotism of the miners; there are 224,000 of them in our armies, and none of our soldiers have exhibited more desperate valour in trying conditions than some of our milling regiments. The speech ended with an eloquent peroration, which stirred the House like the sound of a trumpet. Germany has tricked her neighbours and fallen upuii them unawares. Until she was ready to strike she was on the best of terms with everbodv. During the Balkan crisis she was friendly, modest, unpreten tions; "she walked arm-in aim With England through the Chancellories of Europe." Yet at that moment she was forging her weapons and piling up her war stores. The whole basis of international goodwill will crumble to the dust if Germany wins in this war It is essential for the peace of the world that she should fail,and it is up to us to ensure her failure. SUNDAY, JULY 25TH. ST MATTHKWs PARISH CIII'HCH Church ami Shirley Si Rv. II". S. LOWU.RMI r ST. JAMBS' DAY TRIVITI VIII 10.15 a.m. Sunday School. 11 a. m Holy Eucharist 4 pan Junior Otechism (in church.) 4 p.m. Senior Catechism (in school.) 7.30 p.m. hvensonu ST. MAKGAKKI'S 715 a.m. Holy Communion. 7.30 p.m. Evensong Mr. John C. Bertram, Evangelist, will preach at the Gospel Hall, corner Dowdesvvell and Cluistie Streets on Sunday evening. Subject:—A beggars LOST A Gold Chain Bracelet. Reward on Return to "Tribune" Office. The A Hies" of the newspaper known as es the Russians have turned,nd the "Diano de la Marina night after night, hundreds are to be seen and heard and ed arguments often end Try J. C. Coakley's new Id. Cigars The AI lies —o — A blend of four fine tobaccos —o They are good to the end BOY WANTED I want a smart little bo (with good character) who can read and write to run errands. Wages will be from is. 6d. sterling to 2S. per week. For further information apply to SHEDRACHff. WOOD West Stseet South iood. I he Cu on the other ison why old are fighting desperately to stem the Vustro German onslaughts. To the North on the River N.irew the Russians yesterda) deliveo d three fierce counter attacks from the fortresses of Rnsan, Purtusk and Novogoer gievslc. The Germans who had July 24th 1915. London, -23rd. Governor, Bahamas. Official News: —G e n e r a 1 COMPULSIONIF NEEDED. • Replying to the dehn'e Mr. Lloyd George excused himself from replv ing to Sir A. Mark ham's speech on the plea that it was so full of explosive matter that he was afraid to h in lie it. He appealed to the House for generous help in the heavy burden he has undertaken. "The Every Monday SALE HERB FOR Boots, Shoes, Cellars, Notions, Hunt miss vonr hanct. Sold for small value. Come and SAVE MONEY.. J. K. AMOURY. i3ay Street.



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y THE TR.1BWE. NASSAU. N P. Baby's Welfare THE 'ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible and closely resembling human milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound sleep and ensure vigorous health and development. Menbu and the 'ALLE'N'BU'R YS' FEEDER. Simplest and Best. MILK POOD No 1. Fron birth to 3 mooibs. MILK FOOD No. 2. From 3 lo fc> niooltii. MALTED FOOD No 3 From 6 months upwards TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS •UVD STORES. A Pamphlet on Infant Feeding '.oil Management Free. ALLEN & HANBURYS Ltd.. London. England. RAINCOATS 32/& 42/I 17.a Qold (ItO.Oa Gold). Fears "JILL WEATHER" Ready Co Wear Raincoat U a Tallor-nade garment upon which (lit jfreatfi! possible ear* haa been bestowed aa re^ardi Cut, Style and Finish. It ! w •• fr.nn CLOTH whk-ii in Shower Proof, Porous and Odourless, wi nil th.-w .iiiftiiti.-<* hnv.l-.n obtain.'! without the "so ot Rubber. Ktutra ALL WLA 1 HER '• Itnliu'ont Imboon *.--t--l In uii HlroatM, KiKliimliT thr* m wt trying climatic romhtlons hiprove l llaell In lthe I • %  i. nhlalnnlM %  It* light weight prevent* fatigue ami eon-. mt 1 phvaieal nMTfj. fhe t. MDiilati HI promotai health and proven*, over-h eating I be tuaraiite-d II utipn ol cloth Miwi IN I HIII! .in-r.(|ul'kiy afti-r a storm. Quality consult-ml our prices for Ready to Wear" Raincoat* are at least ONE THIRD leas than the prices usually charted by other Tailoring Houses In Kiu'land. OUR GUARANTEE ,r n "LL WEATHER" Raincoat Is not poriecll* ww\ yunnnn i EC w ttms"vos and beautifully cut shoulders tftve perfect T* %  *^*"""^ %  "we^. freedom of movement. The full skin fall* i.. w knees. Cuffs havisi,,-!ii MPM*Swirth Model has I'ruitsiiui Collar and buttons to the nook. Ma le In "had** ol Brnwn. Drab, Fawn, Oreen and Smoke. Sleeveo re lined poplin and bod> nui. i>laid LDt wetKht (melted .' lbs. 32 %  17.68 U our Low Pries for an' 4 ALL WEATHER" w— Raincoat, n< id.' from warrant. -r HO.OSyoii can havean"AII WEATHER" Raincoat made from the cedebr tted "Garblrcord." Rainproof matorlal. Noihm mat human Ingenuity can devlae, or expensive machinery produce h* omitted to mak. "Garbircord *' a rellabli' Rainproof mSti-rlsl Tlie Dyes Used are the fastest to light procurable. \ ft r u [h \ sal Isfactory Raincoat In even respect. I.. wear. No. 7-Price • 41 (SlO.Oe) Stock Slies-tl'xira Luge M tea 3 8 or 60 c. estrej Breast >i 37 to a u in. he*. length 41 45 aft #7 48 48 IN TAKING MEASUREMENTS '• • Measure should indrawn moderate! v e, never I Uie eoai ovjf whlob the Raincoat will ba Raincoats Made to Measure 26 r 80c. extra. SEND ONLY4 -SX" "!SrK thn be. !" i pal I -i Oflloa "Cuhon Delivery MrVtflf TTHI th" IIJI mi.-.' |IKI I ri i:. Ivei [| "' "i i lo !>• %  •• Made lo Meatur"<rd ed i^l ONfcUUARTr.n VHIIIIwith yourorilt-r. BPECIAL WAR GUARANTEE. WE GUARANTEE the iafe delivery of all our Goods daring tn. \\ u Nhnuld any Goods ba loat in 1mn.11 riai-.' IhiTi ahaohi'rlv Hi 1 Ien rll I KI'illlTS MODEL lor Conptrf wrar. FEARS LTD. (Established 1643), Hlgb-clBSS Tailors A Woollen Minhnnls 118, Bristol Bridge, BRISTOL. Fnijland. TOWN MODEL f 'i 'McUnary wear. SOLD BY SANITARY COOL RELIABLE M ADE FOR THE BEST RETAIL TRADE NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. INSTRUCTIONS have been received sutnmoniog nllFrenchmen bom in Martinique, Guadelope or French Guiana belonging to the classes i • i to 11)09 (born from 1870 to [889; to present themselves immediately at the Vice Consulate of France at Port-ofSi ain or at any of the twelve !" Consula. Vgenciesof the BriRUMSET'S PUMPS tish \\ est Indies to pass a medical examinal ion. H. r. AKMBRIST:R.. Consular A,n.i for France. Nassau, N. P., 211(1 July, I'M 5. HILTON 260 BAY STREET. FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgenth needed lor the above fund and all donations, howevei small, will be gratefully cepted, and will be acknowledged in the newspapers. H. F. AR.MBRISTFR. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915. For Sale By Tender. The undersigned will receive tenders for the folowing valuable property up to 3rd day of August next. All that property situated in Bay Street and bounded on the East by property of John Dillet, on the West by property of Estate of John Alfred, on the South by one Burrows, on the North by Bay Street the same having two shops one Stone and wood, and several Buildings to rear, all on rent. The right is reserved of rejecting any or all Tenders. BY JOHN BUTLER. H. DIGHTON PEARSON Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. is practicing as an Architect 6Surveyor in the Bahamas. Those who are interested in PUBLIC or PRIVATE Suilding schemes will be well advised to consult him as to Designing, Superintending of Building, Surveying, Dilap i'dations, and improvements of property generally. Address, ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY. Telephone No. IQI. (1 UK LINEN STORE.; and /rave Received The Latest Spri£ Novelty THE NEW -LAVE" [NETS Guaranteed Untarnishable, and Washable. Suitable for Waists, Yokes, Dresses, Millinei y. White and Black, While and Silver, Black and Silver, White and Gold Ecru and (iold, Heliotrope and Gold, Saxe Bine and Gold. Gold Silver and Crystal Tassels. White, Cream, and Ecru lire tonne Nets, Shadow Xets, Lace Nets, Overalls, Point d'Esprit, Pleated Net Rue!; ings. Washable Marquisettes. Black and White, Sand and White.— Double Width. Poplin. Black Poplin, White Poplin, double width. White Washing Silk. Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe. May 1st, 1915. For Results Advertise in The Tribune. W. A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESllvl.S lo inform his friends and the Public that I e lias just received ;i complete outfit of facilities for tlie luiisness of an undertaker, which places lum in a position to carry out Funertls that may be entrusted to his care with system and despatch ; and reSpd t ful)y solicits theii patronage (Jet tny Prices first and prove that these are the very lowest for the first class work. Shingles Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypresi Shingles at 89.60 per thous sand of 20 bundles Discounts on lots of over 5000 shingles. Special Price also on cheaper grades—also 5in. Cypress at $6.72 per thousand of 20 bundles. This price made possible by a very large purchase. Fresh stock arriving every week. C. C SAUNDERS. Johnson's Artistic Wood Finishes Johnaon'a Prepared Wa -• com plete finish and polish for all furniture Woodl "rk and Soon, Johnarn'a Wood Dye forth, artistic coloring of all woml. Baft or hard Johnaon'a Under Lac—a spirit linish, very much superior to shellac or vaiuish Johnaon'a Fla.t Wood Flnlah — for a beautiful, artistic, haul IUIIIHMI effect without the expense of rubbiftff. Johnson's Paiti' Wood tiller -? i tilling the grain and pores of wood, piepaiini.' i< for the finish Johnaon'a Powdered Wax—for bal ft 0111 Hoors. FOR. SALE BY Chas. E. Albury GASOLINE In Drums Mevcn pence per Gallon. Ten Gallon Cans One Shil ling per Gallon C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay Street Nassau X. P. April, 13th 1915. C ISTE RN Pumps, Well P u m p s. W i n d mill Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps, House Pumps, Pneumatic Systems, Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, Deep Well rumps. Elei ti ic Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, I riplex Power Pumps, Centrifugal Pumps, Waterworks Mai hinei y, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps, Air Compressors, Ship Pumps Pressure Pumps, Boiler Fei d Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, dto Installed under the dived supervision 0) 11. McPherson and Brother. Prices on Application. H. J. THOMPSON, Agent. For SALE ALL of the buildings (to be removed) situate on pro perty in Deveaux St. near Shirley St.. East. The buildings are now occupied by Mr. Jos T. Dean. For further partial lars. Apply L. GILBERT DUPUCH. FOR SUMMER SUITS Palm Beach Cloth at 3s. yd. WM. HILTON. PH OMi 201 %  Notice A Missionary's Reminiscences of Panama, or three years at the Scene of the Great Isthmus Canal, both under the French regime and under the American) will be the BUDl< ( t ol a lecture in the Union Baptist Church Parliament St. Wed. evening July 28th inst. Doors open at 7.30 lecture begin at 8 by the Rev. John Wesley Skerrett. Admission 6d. for adults Children half-price. USED STAMPS WANTED I WANT to buy all kinds of used jKBiajje and revenue stamps, espe cially those of the British and Danish West In'i-s I will pay from L' %  hilling! per lOO up. fur all kinds ol BaV hamas postage Stairi|is, except thecurrenJd. and Id. stamps for which I pay 5il per 100 Write or lend me your stamps. Prompt And fair settlement guaranteed J. EMORY REN0LL, Hanover, Pa. NOTICE. 1 H|S is tu inform my Patrons and tinPublic in General thai I Itai> '|" ned rm I'ublic hlaek Smith Shop; and am now res y to do art) ihinji in 1 • %  1 ne "t (ienf-1,,1 repair <" n<-\\ w -k I lorse Shoeing Suecially. \ll work done Mechanic %  llv P. A. HUYLER i T. M. Knowles 528 Bay Street. IS now prepared to supply Rubber I ires for Babies Cai 1 iagi s. also tO reset, and repaii them. Satisfaction Guarautc !. Mar. 20th, 1915. CHAS. C. LIGHTHOLRN ARMSTRONG ST. He.wkln'a Hill. E XPERIENCED Paper Hanger. Ceiling Work, a specialty. All work carefully and Artistically performed. Absolute satisfaction guaran teed. The verv best references. -TERMS MODERATE. Here's An Opportunity th f n J y" c ? nnot afford to lose. II Vou want to Economist. If vou want a hirst Class Lipht. ll you want to be recognized Use the Best Light tln:t money can buy. The Safest and the Cheapest. THE DC AI*AH KEROSENE MANTLE Dt AlfUll LAMPS AND BURNERS are recopnliod na th standard Incandescent oil lampa ot the* world. 100,000 -11INrt.il oaera. All ilriluhini. I'roducrs a powerful, brilliant whltn II: III Of 100 .-MM.II.power. liurna common coal-oil. Coaia only oae rent for ala konra. Brltrhtor than it. electricity or alz ordinary lamps at ooealzlk to uir-trnlb Iko coot. Made entirely of braaa. For use lr homes, stores, halla and churches. No odor, no noise; safe, simple and cleanThere la only oneBeason. Insist o n navlng ItHome Supply Co. KANSAS CITY, MO. For Sal* B, THOS. ENABBIE14 CHRISTIE ST., Nassau, N.P. Special Terms c'iven if requested. Write 01 see me and kn w all about this wonderful Lamp. Williams' Shoes Ape Better 1 a*\ aA



PAGE 1

I! >. /* TBD LATEST RADIOGRAMS NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. Subscribers to The Tribune Monthly ami upwards .-ire requested Dot to |>ay subscriptions ti the carriers but only at the Office, or t<> a Collector from the Office, also to report to the Office any MgltCt on the part of the carrieis to deliver thcil paper. M; ^ * Nulllvis a.ddlctus turnre I r\ verba mfilri. H-i r> bound toswrnr If) the U|mn of no M, vs ter "THE TRIBUNEWANTS ADVTS. FOR RESULT ADVERTISE IN "THE TRIBUNE" Special Ratee to Yearly Advertisers Vol. XII. No. Xi.H NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JULY 24. 1915 Price. THREE CENTS. Organising Victory In British Workshops. "We Must Organise Victory." Mr. Lloyd George. FROM OUR PARLIAMENTARY CORRESPONDENT. WESTMINSTER, Wi dnesday Evening. l^fTtt. Lloyd George fpoke %  %  witii nil cimquering sincerity in inlroducing the War Munitions Bill this afternoon. He rose exactly at 3.30, and re sumed his scat at five o'clock. The House was crowded, and he held it in rapt attention from the lust word to the last. He has in past times spoken more eloquently. A detailed business Statement does not lend itself to glow and colour; yet this was a unique and memorable utterance by reason of its Ian gU4KC of solemn enieieaty, its earnestness of appeal, its sense of the overwhelming gravity of the crisis confronting ihe country, and its accent of burning patriotism. It will be a repn to our people if it does not kindle a fire 'of potrfotic zeal in 1 verv workshop in the land. The t\ er recurring, note of the speech was an appeal to the working classes. On the output of our munition facto ries and on the devotion of those who man th-m in the next few months depends our victory perhaps the very fate of our Empire. The conviction explains the gave tone of Mr. I.lyod George's speech and its impress lvexhortation to Labour to [day its prut Although he speaks gravely, yet he does not takea gloomy view of the war, provided only we moboilise our immense industrial resources. But he evident* lv feels that without this it may drag 011 iugloriously for a long time to come nt a heavy cost in precious life and in money. This war is one of tho-e searching ordeals that try the mettle of men. Nobly has Mi. I.lyod George withstood the test. Listening to him to-day one felt that in moral and mental statue he is biggerI than ever before. None of our I Statesmen incarnates in the same degree the spirit, energy, and confidence of our people at this great crisis in our history. NO COMPULSION. There were no surprises in the I Bill outlined to the House. A week ago its salient features were announced 111 "The Dai'y Chronicle," viz., limitation of profits, abolition of trade union restrictions, compulsory arbitration in the event of industrial disputes; a munitions court with power to impose lines for bad nine, &c.; the recruitment ol a voluntary army of workers leady at the word of command t<> go to any workshop and do anything to accelerate the produ'e' iion of war material. Tins mobile force of skilled workers is to be recruited through the agency of the trade unions in the next seven days. I here can be little doubt that some schemes of compulsion have been under consideration by the Minister of Munitions, but he lias very wisely determined to appeal rather to the patriotism of the working class,-, and to rely on that free, volun tary spirit which is one of the characteristics of our lace. Liberal members heard with relief that compulsion was not an element in the scheme. Turning round to the benches behind him and addressing those whom he spoke of as "opposed 1 to compulsion," the right lion.' gentleman said : "The most effective service you can render to voluntaryism a success. If it does succeed, of course it is very much better that we should get the service of willing men." (Cheers.) HOW TIME WAS LOST. A refreshing feature of the speech was its candour. Mr. Lloyd George believes 111 taking the people into his confidence. 1 Itfrankly stated that our Army is very deficient in mat bine guns and high-explosive shells. No harm is done by tins admission, for, as he truly said, the fat ts have long been familiar to the Germans. "The professional mind," said the Minister ol Munitions, "is a very conservative one." He added that many competent soldiers were of opinion that trench warfare was only a passing phase. "Much time was lost owing to that obsession." The War Office also faffed to mobilise in time our industrial resources. As our Armies increased, and the need for more guns and ammunition expanded, the War Office chiefs decided, in increasing our available sources of supply, to work through the existing armament firms —these enlarging their own .establishment, and su-bconstracting to other engineers. This scheme of sub-contracting proved a failure. Mr. Lloyd George has preferred to decentralise and then to rely upon the business men in every suitable locality to organise themselves He gave one striking instance of the superiority of the new over the old method. In one district, where under the old sub-contracting method the output was 10,000 shells a month, it is now 130,001. shells a month, and it will soon be 250,000. Reviewing the military opi rations on the Continent, he remarked that, wherever the < HI in,ins were successful it was due to superiority of material. "We have undoubted superiority in men, not only in numbers but also in quality;" But val our cannot win the victory without material. At the pre sent time Germany and Austria between them are producing 250,000 shells a day, nearly 8,000,000 a month. France and ourselves can surpass even that tremendous production, but there must be 110 slackness here, no old prejudices, no indiscipline, to binder the full organisation of our resources. Such hindrances would postpone, and might jeopardise, victory. As to our own capacity ret the production of shells and machine guns, "we have only just crossed the threshold of our possibilities." The German preponderance in material has been most marked in heavy gins, high explosive shells, rifles, and [and machine guns. It was specially great in machine-guns, which, as the right lion, gentleman said, "have almost superseded the rifle." rot the purposes of the Department of Munitions, the 1 ountry has been divided into ten munition arears each of them under a committee of local businessmen. At the central office in each area specifications and samples of the Army's needs will be available. Mr. Lloyd George hinted that the state may find it necessary to assume complete control of the metal market. "There are indications in some quarters of a tendency to hold up supplies in order to obtain better prices. "Shame!"; In the vital interests of the na tion these practices must be brought to an end." (Loud cheers.) APPEAL TO LABOUR. Obviously time must elapse before the new source of supply will be available. In the mean time it is absolutely necessarv to increase the output of all the existing munition factories. This brought Mr. Lloyd Ge> to the question of labour. We are short of machine(continued on third page) C. L. LofttlOUSe=Company's Agent Corner Georgt: and King Sts. BUY SUPERIOR CIGARS At 4s. per hundred. Also a Specialty of HAVANA CIGARS of excellent quality combined with moderate prices, from J. B. GARDINER, Cor. West Street, and Petticoat Lane. White Lime I AM offering FOR SALE my entire stock of White Lime of about 800 bushels at od. per bushel. Orders left at Mr. Solomon Finlayson, DeVeaux St. or Phone 258 or "The Tribune" Office. j081 AH RAMMING June 30, 1915. an, ARROW COLLAR All Arrow collars are made of fabrics bleached and shrunk in our own plants. They always fit and sit correctly and are the most durable. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST EtETAILEBS CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., Inc. MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. I'.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. RUPTURE CURED by STUART'S* PLAPAO PADS me .n th*. V uU Oto "u "* .*.ty tin pftininl liuaa .ilt getter, JU Uity J' made to Cure rupture and MM Mmpit to tntd n ; bcum m* prmrn to > %  an imp'otla-it %  ^— ,, -_ r \ h.ld by (X-' %  f I-> / Straps. l\ %  Vt/fi DuoMles tVC.," ,_ 'J/mom %  S|>rin Vy-W LViJrRTSS" attached FOR SALE, CHEAP One Motor Boat Mahogany Finish. 12 h.p. -LATHROF ENGINE Heavy Duty. (New) EASY TERMS. Apply, A. C. CRAWFORD. July 15, IM v '•Mil .MwMrjr'VUi KTAAM-WM HfKiHW '-*• caanoi -P. 0 cannot tliafc •> % %  ; ftgftJntl the \> %  bout rUki u si thf 1 %  y of lb. I "o*t obttUMM uki ie; i.ured— no drlav from work. Soft u velvi I [fcov^'y 1% iflecwvdn mfortnuwi Awarded Oold Medal International exposition, Romo 1 Grand rl at Paris. Wnu • >'T wodnn 1R1AL I I v %  STUART PIASTER PAD CO., ITO %  Every Monday SALE HERE POR Boots, Shoes, Collars, Notions, Hunt miss your chance. Sold IW small value. Come and SAVE MONEY. J. K. AMOURY. i3ay Street. I { Wear 1 Arm brister's Av A Shoes A H


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02374
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Saturday, July 24, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
I!
!
>-
. /*
TBD
LATEST RADIOGRAMS
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS.
Subscribers to The Tribune
Monthly ami upwards .-ire
requested Dot to |>ay sub-
scriptions ti the carriers but
only at the Office, or t<> a
Collector from the Office,
also to report to the Office
any MgltCt on the part of
the carrieis to deliver thcil
paper. m; ^ *
Nulllvis a.ddlctus turnre I r\ verba mfilri.
H-i r> bound toswrnr If) the U|mn of no M,vster
"THE TRIBUNE-
WANTS ADVTS.
FOR RESULT
ADVERTISE IN
"THE TRIBUNE"
Special Ratee to Yearly
Advertisers
Vol. XII. No. Xi.H
NASSAU. N. P.. BAHAMAS. SATURDAY. JULY 24. 1915
Price. THREE CENTS.
Organising Victory
In British Workshops.
"We Must Organise Victory." _
Mr. Lloyd George.
FROM OUR PARLIAMENTARY
CORRESPONDENT.
WESTMINSTER,
Wi dnesday Evening.
l^fTtt. Lloyd George fpoke
witii nil cimquering sin-
cerity in inlroducing the War
Munitions Bill this afternoon.
He rose exactly at 3.30, and re
sumed his scat at five o'clock.
The House was crowded, and
he held it in rapt attention from
the lust word to the last. He
has in past times spoken more
eloquently. A detailed business
Statement does not lend itself
to glow and colour; yet this
was a unique and memorable
utterance by reason of its Ian
gU4KC of solemn enieieaty, its
earnestness of appeal, its sense
of the overwhelming gravity of
the crisis confronting ihe coun-
try, and its accent of burning
patriotism. It will be a repn
to our people if it does not
kindle a fire 'of potrfotic zeal
in 1 verv workshop in the land.
The t\ er recurring, note of
the speech was an appeal to
the working classes. On the
output of our munition facto
ries and on the devotion of
those who man th-m in the next
few months depends our victory
perhaps the very fate of our
Empire. The conviction expla-
ins the gave tone of Mr. I.lyod
George's speech and its impress
lvexhortation to Labour to [day
its prut
Although he speaks gravely, yet
he does not takea gloomy view
of the war, provided only we
moboilise our immense indus-
trial resources. But he evident*
lv feels that without this it
may drag 011 iugloriously for a
long time to come nt a heavy
cost in precious life and in
money. This war is one of
tho-e searching ordeals that try
the mettle of men. Nobly has
Mi. I.lyod George withstood
the test. Listening to him
to-day one felt that in moral
and mental statue he is biggerI
than ever before. None of our I
Statesmen incarnates in the same
degree the spirit, energy, and
confidence of our people at this
great crisis in our history.
NO COMPULSION.
There were no surprises in the
I Bill outlined to the House. A
week ago its salient features
were announced 111 "The Dai'y
Chronicle," viz., limitation of
profits, abolition of trade union
restrictions, compulsory arbitra-
tion in the event of industrial
disputes; a munitions court with
power to impose lines for bad
nine, &c.; the recruitment ol a
voluntary army of workers leady
at the word of command t<> go
to any workshop and do any-
thing to accelerate the produ'e-
' iion of war material.
Tins mobile force of skilled
workers is to be recruited
through the agency of the trade
unions in the next seven days.
I here can be little doubt that
some schemes of compulsion
have been under consideration
by the Minister of Munitions,
but he lias very wisely determin-
ed to appeal rather to the pa-
triotism of the working class,-,
and to rely on that free, volun
tary spirit which is one of the
characteristics of our lace. Lib-
eral members heard with relief
that compulsion was not an
element in the scheme.
Turning round to the benches
behind him and addressing those
whom he spoke of as "opposed 1
to compulsion," the right lion.'
gentleman said : "The most
effective service you can render
to voluntaryism a success. If
it does succeed, of course it is
very much better that we should
get the service of willing men."
(Cheers.)
HOW TIME WAS LOST.
A refreshing feature of the
speech was its candour. Mr.
Lloyd George believes 111 taking
the people into his confidence.
1 It- frankly stated that our Army
is very deficient in mat bine
guns and high-explosive shells.
No harm is done by tins admiss-
ion, for, as he truly said, the
fat ts have long been familiar to
the Germans.
"The professional mind," said
the Minister ol Munitions, "is a
very conservative one." He add-
ed that many competent soldiers
were of opinion that trench
warfare was only a passing
phase. "Much time was lost
owing to that obsession." The
War Office also faffed to mobi-
lise in time our industrial re-
sources. As our Armies increas-
ed, and the need for more guns
and ammunition expanded, the
War Office chiefs decided, in in-
creasing our available sources
of supply, to work through the
existing armament firms these
enlarging their own .establish-
ment, and su-bconstracting to
other engineers. This scheme
of sub-contracting proved a
failure.
Mr. Lloyd George has preferr-
ed to decentralise and then to
rely upon the business men in
every suitable locality to orga-
nise themselves He gave one
striking instance of the superior-
ity of the new over the old
method. In one district, where
under the old sub-contracting
method the output was 10,000
shells a month, it is now 130,001.
shells a month, and it will soon
be 250,000.
Reviewing the military
opi rations on the Continent, he
remarked that, wherever the
< hi in,ins were successful it was
due to superiority of material.
"We have undoubted superiori-
ty in men, not only in numbers
but also in quality;" But val
our cannot win the victory
without material. At the pre
sent time Germany and Austria
between them are producing
250,000 shells a day, nearly
8,000,000 a month. France and
ourselves can surpass even that
tremendous production, but
there must be 110 slackness here,
no old prejudices, no indiscip-
line, to binder the full organi-
sation of our resources. Such
hindrances would postpone, and
might jeopardise, victory.
As to our own capacity ret
the production of shells and
machine guns, "we have only
just crossed the threshold of our
possibilities." The German
preponderance in material has
been most marked in heavy gins,
high explosive shells, rifles, and
[and machine guns. It was
specially great in machine-guns,
which, as the right lion, gentle-
man said, "have almost super-
seded the rifle."
rot the purposes of the De-
partment of Munitions, the
1 ountry has been divided into
ten munition arears each of them
under a committee of local
businessmen. At the central
office in each area specifications
and samples of the Army's needs
will be available. Mr. Lloyd
George hinted that the state
may find it necessary to assume
complete control of the metal
market. "There are indications
in some quarters of a tendency
to hold up supplies in order to
obtain better prices. "Shame!";
In the vital interests of the na
tion these practices must be
brought to an end." (Loud
cheers.)
APPEAL TO LABOUR.
Obviously time must elapse
before the new source of supply
will be available. In the mean
time it is absolutely necessarv
to increase the output of all the
existing munition factories.
This brought Mr. Lloyd Ge>
to the question of labour.
We are short of machine-
(continued on third page)
C. L. LofttlOUSe=Company's Agent
Corner Georgt: and King Sts.
BUY
SUPERIOR CIGARS
At 4s. per hundred.
Also a Specialty of
HAVANA CIGARS
of excellent quality combined
with moderate prices, from
J. B. GARDINER,
Cor. West Street,
and Petticoat Lane.
White Lime
I AM offering FOR SALE
my entire stock of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at od. per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
Finlayson, DeVeaux St. or
Phone 258 or "The Tribune"
Office.
j081 AH Ramming
June 30, 1915.
an,
ARROW
COLLAR
All Arrow collars are
made of fabrics bleached
and shrunk in our own
plants. They always
fit and sit correctly and
are the most durable.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST EtETAILEBS
CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., Inc.
MAKERS, TROY, N. Y. I'.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
RUPTURE CURED
by STUART'S* PLAPAO PADS me .n th*.
VuU Oto "u "* .*.ty tin pftininl liuaa .ilt getter, ju
Uity j' made to Cure rupture and MM Mmpit to
tntd n ; bcum m* th-y h .v-.jjrt. Torn, ulv> prmrn to > an imp'otla-it
^ ,, -_ r \ h.ld by .
(X- -' f I-> / Straps.
l\ 'Vt/fi DuoMles
tVC.," ,_ 'J/mom ' S|>rin
Vy-W LViJrRTSS" attached
FOR SALE, CHEAP
One Motor Boat
Mahogany Finish.
12 h.p. -LATHROF ENGINE
Heavy Duty. (New)
Easy Terms.
Apply,
A. C. CRAWFORD.
July 15, im v
'Mil .MwMrjr'VUi
KTAAM-WM
HfKiHW '
'-*
caanoi -p.
0 cannot
tliafc > ;
ftgftJntl the
\> bout
rUki u si
thf 1 y of lb. I "o*t obttUMM uki ie-
; i.ured no drlav from work. Soft u velvi
I [fcov^'y 1%
iflecwvdn mfortnuwi Award-
ed Oold Medal International expo-
sition, Romo 1 Grand rl at Paris.
Wnu >'T wodnn 1R1AL
I I v
STUART PIASTER PAD CO., ITO ,

Every Monday
SALE HERE POR
Boots, Shoes,
Collars, Notions,
Hunt miss your chance. Sold
IW small value. Come and
SAVE MONEY.
J. K. AMOURY.
i3ay Street.
I
{
Wear
, 1
Arm brister's
*
Av A
Shoes
A
H


THE TR.1BVNC, NASSAU. N P.
A-
L OILBBKT DUPUOH,
Editor and Propy.
oui able the I louse of A
ssell,.
OFFM K
Corner Shirley & Cho.rlotte Sis
.Nassau, V. I'., Huhum i.
"MIONK 2tl0. P. O. BOX lftt.
PUBLISHED DAILY
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Monday, Wednesday and Friday
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|v I which is the outcomi nl the
immediately alter the outbreak | very successful meeting held on
of h stilities; private coutribu May iuth at the Guildhall; we
ti.ms amounting to over V>o tr 1st nevertheless that you will
have been made to the Prince of give it youi very valuable sup
Wales' National Relief Fund; port.
and sifts of grape fruit ami 1 enclose you a copy of the
clothes have been forwarded | Guildhall programme and list
through the National Chapter of if supporters, together with the
the Daughters of the Empire. full text of the speeches dehv
But the need for the organi
zation of the whole of our 11a
tional resources was never great
PAYABLE IN ADVANOK
Advertising Rates :Six pence |>e/line
tor first insertion: three pence per line
for second insertion ; ai.il oiiepertny per
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Advertisements uudet eight lines 4s.
X&be XLtibunc
SATURDAY. July 24, 1915.
**- I'VBl.lSHr II AT 8 P. M.
er than at present, while the de
ma ml for money for the relief ol
suffering, and the necessity for
more men at the front, continue
to grow day by day. In order to
overcome the enemy it is impe-
rative that every portion of the
Empire must do its utmost, and
that everv loyal and partiotic;
subject of his Majesty must
make a personal sacrifice in
order that victory may be
achieved. That we can do
more than we have already done
in this Colony is not to be
gainsaid.
I therefore summon a Public
ered at the meeting.
The following Resolution is
suggested by the Committee for
Submission at all meetings :
"That, on this anniversary of
"the declaration of a righteous
"war, this meeting of the Citi-
zens of records its in
"flexible determination to con-
"tinue to a victorious end the
"struggle in maintenance of
"these ideals of Liberty and
"Justice which are the common
'and sacred cause of the Allies."
I have the honour to be, Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
(Sd ) HENRY CUST,
Chairman.
The Honourable Acting
Attorney ieneral in conse
- Meeting at St Andrew's hail on
We take very much pleasure Wednesday, August 4th, at quence"of the absence from
in publishing h. anothe. column ;," ,,l,,rk '" adopt .the above the Colony of the Honour-
Resolution and to consider the able Harcourt Malcolm, K.L.
appropriate formin which presented Mr. Culmer's peti-
wecan render further aid and ,i()n lQ tileC(Hut and sai(l:
assistance to the Mother Land
at this crisis of our national
existence
Government House,
Nassau,
zz July, I'n 5.
VV. L. ALLARDYCE.
Governor
THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE.
the address of Hi-- bxcelleiicy
the Governor with referent e to
a Public Meeting to be held on
Wednesday 4th August the an
niversary of England's declara-
tion of war against Germany.
We also publish a letter from
The Central Committee, for
National Patriotic Organiza-
tions with reference to the sam<
subject.
We have much pleasure in
publishing below the speech) s
in full delivered on the 00 a-
sion of Mr. Timothy W. R.
Culmer's admission as an at-
torney of the Supreme Court
of tins Colony.
:o:
A fire occurred at about one
o'clock this morning in the re-
sidence of Mr. Lewis D. Neely,
near Port Fincastle.
The fire it is said, originated
within and destroved almost
For .National Patriotic Organ-
izations.
Canadian Pacific Building,
62, Charing Cr< iss,
London, W. C.
14th June, 191 s.
Sir,
The Central Committee are
anxious that public meetings of
a patriotic and imperial nature
1 am privileged on this oc-
casion to present to you the
Petition of Mr. Timothy W.
R. Culmer, praying that he
be admitted a Counsel and
Attorney of the Supreme
Court. I am gratified by the
fact, that on two of the three
asions when I have acted
.1- Attorney General, I have
been selected to act as a kind
of legal god father for candi-
dates seeking admission to
the Par, although, I am
aware, that in the present in-
stance my selection is due to
the regrettable absence of
Mr. H. G. Malcolm, in whose
Office Mr. Culmer's period of
the aniiivekav of the Decla-
everything leaving little but a i ration of War against' Germa-
portion of the walls standing. y.
This was one of, if not, the Steps are being taken by us
finest cottage homes in the is-
land.
The Ward Line Steamer
"Robert Thompson" left New
York at 3 o'clock this morning
with 4400 bbls. of freight foi
Nassau.
We understand that Mr. Cul
mer is acting for Mr. Malcolm
during
C
Ins
olony. Mr. Culmer will re-LCrow> ill be glad to part it 1
main in Mr. Malcolms Cham pate in this demonstration of
bers for about three months] the solidarity and enthusiasm
and in the meantime w ill select
an office.
To The People Of The Bahamas.
snould be held throughout t|iejpup'lege was passed, and who
Empire on August the 4th next,has temporarily forsaken the
balmy Bahamas for climates,
probably less balmy, but
more breezy.
Mr. Culmer, whose peti-
tion, I now have the honour
ol presenting, is the son of
Mr. J. S. Culmer, who has
rendered useful and honour-
able service for a number of
irs, in the Public Service of
this Colony as a Commission-
er in the Out Islands.
The petition shows that the
Petitioner, has duly served
live years as an Articled Clerk,
from January 1910 to January
1915, and that on the 9th day
of July last, he duly passed the
examination held in accor-
dance with Section 25 of the
Supreme Court Act, 1806.
During his student day*, if
my recollection serves me, I
have several times had tin-
pleasure of listening to Mr.
to carry out this idea in Great
Britain. The Secretary of State
for the Colonies has given his
approval and support, and the
HighComniissionersand Agents
General, who have taken up
the suggestion with enthusiasm,
are making the necessary ar-
rangements for inviting the co-
operation of the Dominions.
The Committee fee.l sine that
absence from the'the other Dependencies of the
of the Empire in the Cause of
the Allies, and its increasing
determination to carry on the
conflict, until a peace, honour
able, durable and satisfactory,
is assured
I would ask you to be so
good as to bring tins subject to
1 have been approached by
the General Committee of the
War Relief Fund on the sug
"estion of the Chairman of the ,
p.""" ... f v..; the (lovernor 111 the hope that
Central Committee lor .Nation ,, ,, ,.
.,. /- he will lend the proposal his
a Patnotic Organizat.....s in I '
' 1. patronage and support.
Eiitdaiid, and invitedto summon ',' ,, .
11 ii- \i \v i >r,i^. S" IS roost desirable that
a Public Meeting on Wednesday, .. .. ... .
: .7, .. the meetings shall onlv give
August 4th, which is the anni ,. /
h V .. ,. 1 .- expression to the spontaneous
vers^rv of I'.ngland s declaration '. ..' .
V 7 , .1 outburst of die \ oice of the
of war against dermanv, with n ,. ,
. 1 r 1 11 People, and be entirely free
theobAct of adopting a Keso lc r- .1 .
,. 'J. i ,. K from Governmental inspiration,
lutiorfin the following wore s: ,, ,
luuwiriii h [ vvould ask you to be so good
"Tnat, on this anniver as to lay the proposal before the
sary of the declaration of a Chambers of Commerce in the
righteous war this meeting 1 hope that they will give as
of the Citizens of Nassau | much publicity as possible to
records its inflexible deter [the campaign and undertake
mination to continue to a the arrangements of such de-
victorious end the struggle monstrations in the Capital of
in maintenance of those the Colony and in such other
towns as may appear to them
to be expedient.
We regtet that it has not
been found possible to give
10,000 was voted by the lion earlier notice of this proposal,
ideals of Liberty and Justice
which are the common and
sacred cause of the Allies."
As you are aware a sum of
the notice of His Excellency [Culmer, as a debater in St.
Andrew's Hall, and I feel sure,
that he will acquit himself
with credit in Court. I am
confident that if Your Hon-
our sees fit to grant the prayer
of his Petition^and admit Mr.
Culmer to the Bar he will do
nothing to dun its lustre, or
tarnish its reputation, during
what 1 hope, will be a long
and successful career.
After the Chief Justice had
administered to Mr. Culmer
the Oath of Allegiance and
the oath prescribed for an
applicant for admission as a
legal practitioner, Mr. Culmer
donned for the first time in
public a Barrister's wig and
gown and took bis place at
the Bar-table when His Hon-
our addressed him and said:
Mr. CulmerIn welcoming
you on your admission to the
Par 1 congratulate you on
your present attainment and
would express the hope that
all your aspirations for future
success may be realised in full
measure.
As Mr. Attorney has in-
formed the Court you have
had the valuable advantage
of undergoing a live-years
training in the Chambers of
the Hon Harcourt Malcolm,
K C. consequently you have
been privileged to get an in-
sight to one of tjiri largest
legal practices in this Colony.
Yoj are lobe congratulat-
ed, also, upon having com-
pleted your studentship and
having qualified yourself to
start on your professional
careei at an early ageat an
earlier age perhaps than any-
one who may judge il simply
from your physical appeal
ance, :f you will pardon my
making so pei 11.11 and coiu-
[plimentarv an allusion to
your ample physique. Al-
th< tugh, on the other hand,
we, who are acquainted with
your parentage, can scarcely
believe thai you are so old as
: j years of a ;e, having re-
gard tO the enviableyouthful
ness of your esteemed father
who has sei\ed ins country
for SO many years as a Com-
missioner in the Out-Islands
To revert to the personal
view 1 which 1 am em: olden-
ed to mention as I regard it
Mr. Culmer as one of bright
augury for yourself) I recall
the fact that, at the time
when I was called to the Bar
in E gland, the front ranks of
the profession were adorned
by an array of famous lead-
ing Counsel who were all of
enormously large physical
development; and I confess
that some of us younger prac-
titioners were almost inclined
t< 1 entertain a superstitious
belief that the weighty pro-
portions of these learned and
massive counsellors were to
be accounted for by the soli
dity of their profound learn-
ing and contributed additi-
onal weight to any legal
opinion pronounced by them.
I am referring, of course, in
particular to that great Par-
liamentary Counsel Mr. Pope,
o. C. also to Mr. Murphy, Q.
C. and Mr. Murphy, Jr. and to
Mr. DanckwertZ afterwards
K. Call of whose names you
have frequently seen men-
tioned in the Law Reports of
many important cases which
you have read during your
legal studies. Whatever satis-
faction, therefore, Mr. Cul-
mer, you will extract from
considering these notable co-
incidences, you are fully en
titled to claim; and I have
ventured to advert to this
personal aspect of your cast;
in the hope that you will take
the same v'ew as I do and
regard it as being peculiarly
one of happy omen for your
future at the Bar.
You have passed a satisfac-
tory examination in all the
prescribed subjects according
to your Examiners' report,
and Mr. Attorney has al
luded to your experience in
public speaking and your
skill in debate.
You have this morning
taken an oath to demean
yourself truly and honestly as
Counsel and Attorney; and
in this connection, I would
express my belief that you
will have little or lessdifiieul
tv in faithfully discharging
that obligation so long as you
constantly ben in mind, with
justifiable pride, the noble
traditions of the learned pro
lession of which you are now
a member, with a sedulous
endeavour in all your trans-
actions to emulate the exam
pie of the many honoured
men, whose signatures are to
be found inscribed on the
ancient Holl to which you
have appended your name
this morning those many
honoured and distinguished
men who have discharged
and exercised their responsi
bilities and pi ivil. gi s as
Counsel with such good ef
feet that this learned pn ifess
ion is enabled t<- claim its
maintenance in tins Colony
of that same pre eminent
place iii public estimation
and respect as the profession
proudly holds in Great Bri
tain and other [Mils of His
Majesty's dominions.
Mr. Timothy \Y. R. Culmei
addressed the Court as follows:
During my father's adminis-
tration as Magistrate al Tarpum
Hay 1 usually attended the silt
ingsof Court. It was not long
before I became lpe< ially inter-
ested m tli<- various legal pro
ceedings. Later I was impress
ed to read some of our local laws
and in doing so obtained much
pleasure and my desire for lavs
!) came greater.
rhis yearning desire < ontinu
ed and having finally de< id ,1
to take up the law as a profess
ion I entered into Articles with
my Honourable and learned
friend Mr. Malcolm in the early
part of Januai) of 1910 and
seived him for five years con-
tinuously (with the exception of
six months in lo.t2 with Mr.
Solomon during Mr. Malcolm's
absence from the Colony) in ac
cordance with the provisions of
my Articles.
()n the expiration of my Ar-
ticles I sat for my legal exan 1
nations and having passed the
; res* ribed subjects satisfactori-
ly, I find myself addressing the
Court this morning foi the first
time. I can assure, Your Hon-
our, that I consider it a great
privilege and pleasure to be
called to this liar by one whose
exemplary life and career are
ample evidences to lemind us
"That we too can make our lives
sublime."
I must thank Your Honour
for your very kind and congra-
tulatory remarks and for kindly
consenting to the prayer of my
petition. While I shall be
pleased to hear of any promo-
tion youi Honour may receive
set I trust that sou will remain
for some lime in your, present
lofty position and continue to
administer justice and equity
to the entire satisfaction <>t the
general community.
To the Honourable Acting
Attomej General Mr Strong* I
desire to express my thanks for
so ably and eloquently present
Ing4ny Petition to the Court. I
hope to see and have a more in
tiniate knowledge of him in the
Court below.
I come now to the most diffi-
cult task in this morning's pro-
ceedings aid that difficulty is to
express adequately my hearty
appreciation of the valuable
assistance my Honourable and
learned friend Mr. Ma colm has
given me.
My stay in Mi
Chambers
and it has

T


A!



THE TR.IBUNE. NASSAU. N P.
able pleasure to read law in
the C him hers of one who is so
veiv near and dear to me
Mr. Malcolm is beyond the
shadow of a doubt both profess
lonallv and politically a star of
the first magnitude and I feel
confident that his assiduity, per
servance and sincerity of pur
pose in all things have been
instrumental in securing for him
such bistre
I certainly hope to be able
some day to discharge my great
debt of gratitude to Mr. Malcolm
for the l Ways taken and continues to
tal To my Examiners in the per
sonages of Mr. Solomon and
Mr. Ca I lender I (eel deeply in
debt for their kind services so
gratuitously and faithfully ren
dared ill connection with mv
recent examinations. If I can
be of assistance to them at am
time I tmst that thev will not
England, the Ally-in-Chief
of Europe, should not fall.
What matters it to them
that, three distinct times in
history she has saved the old
continent from the haughty
aggressions that threatened
universal liberty? They ar-
gue that her motive was one
of self preservation. Thev
eht
taken one out work of U07.au
repulsed these attacks, accord
ing to Berlin reports, but ap
parently have not made progress
Southward.
Immediately West of Warsaw
on what is known as the Blonn
Groject line the Russians have
suffered a reverse and are retreat
ing toward the Vistula.
I'urther South General Von
Hamilton reports successful lives of very gallant men are at
minor operations in Gallipoli. stake."
OW Sight of the incalculableIMoryschs army is making pro
and far-reaching benefits that gress toward the San River
have accrued to the world as which has been reached at one
the results of tlie motive they point.
allege. They admit that it South of [vangorod Field
showed good common sense' Marshal Von Mackensen who is
in the English not to have|dire'f,"K Hie offensive between
sat With folded arms before t,,e Vistula and the Bug has
Philip II of Spain, reached ",e Russia
Gaini on the 12th 13th were
consolidated and extended. An
anti-aircraft gun wasdestroved.
Turkish attacks on the French
section were easily repulsed.
The French Government re-
port the occupation of the
summit of Linge.
The Russian government re
port further severe fighting es
cially on the
front.
(Signed)
ISO.VAR LAW
to have
before
before
Louis XIV and before Napo
leon, and in the same breath
thev applaud the Kaiser and
are with Germany heart and
son I. They think thev see
in the triumph ol Germany a
Continued From Firm Pn.gr
Answering Mr. Pease, he dis-
avowed any idea of "threatening
labour. Let the House not
nourish dark suspicions. He had,
no ulterior motives. He thinks/
that he will obtain the met'
voluntarily.
"If we can't get labour by
voluntary means we must
use the means which every
Lublin Cholm State has to use in the ultimate
resort to saveita life.*' (cheers.)
Compulsion is more likely to
be necessary over a reluctant
employer t/ian over a working
man. If a London workman
here the greatest of the battles
is being fought forthe possession
of the Lublin Choln railway.
On the resistance the Russians
offer probably depends the sue
cess <>r failure of the Austro Ger
1 were told that it is necessary in
lines and |Kuns' ,and. >ct >{ could place the interest o{ the StaIe thaj he
adequate|Sr,ould be at work tomorrow
an
1 desire to express the hope
that true and genuine profess
lonal relationship will exist be-
tween the members of the bar
and me and also that the same
cordial relationship which at
present exists between the
bench and the bar of which I
am a uuil will continue
lii conclusion I desire t 1 assure
your Honour that I shall to the
best <>f my ability discfiai ge the
obligation of my professional
oath and shall endeavour to
m.nut 1 ill the high noble and
untarnished traditions of
distinguished and honourable
bai Again I thank your Hon. 1
our for kindly consenting to the xv
prayer of my petition.
be reluctant in commanding me. check upon the United States
and a throwing ofl by Cuba
the moral yoke of that na-
iiim as imposed by the Plait
Amendment. Thus it is that
t hi se two great sectii ins of
the Cuban born while vi< .
ing the war from the selfsame
standpoint of self interest,
Imi ik eai nestly forward to a
distinct issue. Hut unanim-
ity is neither a virtue nor .'i
CUStom in some latin repub-
lics, and the gold rf the Am-
an capitalist helps the
"'.ls middle class.
I he Spaniard bates Great
1 ne it is that
Wellington cleared the Pe-
Ininsula of the French fighting
my hand on
supply of skilled workmen, the
output of machine-guns could
he doubled in a few days.
It may happen that the Ger-
man forces in the West will
man operations. shortly be increased; it is there
Apparently the Austro Ger 'Tore vital to our Army that every
mans feel pretty certain of tin
outcome for it is said that Em
peror William at Posen has sent
for the Empress in order to make
a state entry into the Polish
capital when it falls.
I lungs are moving a little
more quickly in Courland where
the Germans claim that success tor,es! we want ",c> skilled lab
available machine gun shall be
placed at its disposal with the
ieast possible delay. He laid tre
mendouS emphasis on the need
for machine guns and on the
ability of our skilled labour
* State requirics.
supply them. We want more
workmen in the munition fac
es along the
them within
brought;01"" '" ,)e #, striking distancePr f*ma'e labour; we want night
of Riga, and roads which supply *h,fts where th*re are now "">>
thai town from the South. daJ s|""s w*want every work
There is another battle in pro man to do lns ,JS|
gress along the border of Bessa
rabia but how this Is going of
ficial communication do nol
say
The French have mad. an
other bid for the Yalle.' of

,ll(. for the sake
Fecht in the Vosges where they! which is in <
COMMUNICATED) forces 18 8-181^. True it is have delivered several partially
thai Louis XIV in trying to
What
War
they think of the
in Havana.
It ought to be interesting
to readers of "Tin- Tribune"
to know what our neighbours
of Havana, a city virtually
' door to us, think of the
war now raging in Europe
In a city with two thirds of
its population hailing from
Spam and the other third
composed of the native-born
and a mixed residue from
every nation under the sun.
opini in takes everv shade of
difference I he middle (lass
of Cuba are to a man in fa-
vour of England and her Al-
lies : tins partiality is based
wave asid<
le the F
vrenees
had to count against "l'erii-
deous Albion." liut the
Spaniard never forgives. And
I ngland defeated the Spanish
Xi'iiada. She holds her co-
lonial empire whilst Spain
has lost hers. Human nature
is human nature in a nation
as well. The Spaniard of
Havana is not the onlv I
(iei man wli i dec lines to view
successful attacksand have cap
Mr. Lloyd George admits the
value and even the necessity of
trade union restrictive rules in
tunes of peace, but he begs the
workmen to discard them now
of their country,
ire peril. Let them
111 Birmingham he would go
without demur. It is the em-
ployer who more often objects
to lose the labour that he has
gathered around his factory. He
warmly acknowdedged the help-
ful speeches of Labour M. P.'s
(Mr. Hodge and Mr. Tootill).
The immediate need of the
Ministry of Munitions is for an
army of voluntary workersready
to go and work wherever the
Railway fares
will be paid and subsistence
allowances for absence from
home.
The Munitions Bill will be
circulated on Friday, and the
debate on the second reading is
fixed for Monday next.
H.J.
The Daily Chronicle.
put their whole strength into
their work and help their bie-
tured the heights dominating t,iern ' the 6>ld. 't >s not
that valley from the East. About|*nu,?!j.* suspend the written
the same time the French air
men dropped bombs on Colmar.
Beyond this and a German at
tacft in the Forest of Apremont,
which the French assert were
repulsed, only artillery engage
menti have occurred in the
West.
The Italian offensive on the
Isonzo continues and Home re
ports further progress, particu
the war with unprejudiced larlv on the Carso Plateau.
eves. He glories in the 1)1- >ws
England has received and
dares to hope that these
blows herald defeat. They
I >se sight of the fact that a
doughty champion must re
ceive a champion's blows and
Jinng tint owing to the revolution
upon the fact that <
their Wat for independence^ [n'modern armaments thorn
Greal llntain showed herself |tmj Mistress of the Sea
what she alwavs has be< n
the sea may
bleed more freelv than in
viz: the friend ol Libert) and ronner conflj
of nations lighting for liber-
ty: Her moral support of
conmcts, 'her sceptre
)c twisted from her
the I uited States during the
Spanish-American war. is re-
cognized in Cuba todnv as
one of the causes why no
complications arose. The
attitude ol Germany, then,
can- be betti r understood,
When viewed in the light of
events ni >.v happening. The
love ol the Cubans for France,
the circumstance that the
Frew h, a branch of the greal
Latin rue, are engaged in a
life and death struggle
against the I eutons, helps t< 1
make "I iboi io" as the Cu-
ban calls himself h partisan
of the Allies. The Cuban is
pi' aid to Style himself a La-
tin. Around the news board
Washington: President YVd
son and Secretary Lansing ( mi
ferring at the White House to
night cnmpleted the new note
to Germany warning her that a
repetition of a disaster such as
that of the Lusitania, or any
other violation of American
rights on the high seas resulting
in loss of American lives will be
regarded as unfriendly. The
note will he despatched tomor
row. It is in the nature of a fi
nal statement by the United
Stales of the interpretation that
will be placed by this govern
meiit cai further transgressions
of American rights and repeats
4.
01 tner
cantv it
grasp.
Key West, 34th.Noon.
A disturbance of moderate in
tensitv off the Fast Coast f | that the government will leave
Florida will move \T. -rtheast, I nothing undone to stand by the
the centre keeping of] the coast position it has previously des
and causing fresh to strong I CTIbea.
Northeast to North winds off; GenevarNedjemkden Effen
the Atlantic Coast between I tice, and FaSSUm Effendi are ex-
pected here tomorrow from Vi
enna for the purpose, it is report
ed, of opening separate peace
negotiations with the Triple En
tente. It is stated that the dele
gates are invested with official
powers.
Berlin:It was officially an
nounced tonight that the Ger
mans who are factory hands in
neutral countries, as the United
States, in making war supplies
for Germany's enemies are liable
to prosecution for treason.
Cape Cod and Cape I latteras
during the next 48 hours.
Latest War News
July 23rd 1915.
London, 2:st:Titanic hat
ties which will seal the fate of
Warsaw are being fought North,
West, and South of that city.
At hay on the rivers where
thev are well thanked bv fortress-
regulations, for unwritten rules
are often more restrictive in
their operation. "We can in
this matter only cast ourselves
upon the honour of the work-
men." (Labour cheers ) ".And
I am confident that we shall not
appeal to them in vain."
Warm commendation was
I passed on the trade union leaders!"0*1 "hnd."
'for their willingness io suspend
their rules during the war. He
! touched on the unwillingness of
the mintrs to abandon then old
opposition to compulsory arbi
[ration. If they prefer their old
ways, he will not greatly mind.
I le is full of admiration for the
1 patriotism of the miners; there
are 224,000 of them in our ar-
mies, and none of our soldiers
have exhibited more desperate
valour in trying conditions than
some of our milling regiments.
The speech ended with an
eloquent peroration, which
stirred the House like the sound
of a trumpet. Germany has
tricked her neighbours and fallen
upuii them unawares. Until she
was ready to strike she was on
the best of terms with everbodv.
During the Balkan crisis she
was friendly, modest, unpreten
tions; "she walked arm-in aim
With England through the
Chancellories of Europe." Yet
at that moment she was forging
her weapons and piling up her
war stores. The whole basis of
international goodwill will
crumble to the dust if Germany
wins in this war It is essential
for the peace of the world that
she should fail,and it is up to us
to ensure her failure.
Sunday, July 25th.
ST MATTHKWs PARISH CIII'HCH
Church ami Shirley Si
Rv. II". S. LowU.RmI r
St. Jambs' Day Triviti VIII
10.15 a.m. Sunday School. 11 a. m Holy
Eucharist 4 pan Junior Otechism (in
church.) 4 p.m. Senior Catechism (in
school.) 7.30 p.m. hvensonu
ST. MAKGAKKI'S
715 a.m. Holy Communion. 7.30 p.m.
Evensong
Mr. John C. Bertram, Evan-
gelist, will preach at the Gos-
pel Hall, corner Dowdesvvell
and Cluistie Streets on Sunday
evening. Subject:A beggars
LOST
A Gold Chain Bracelet.
Reward on
Return to "Tribune" Office.
The A Hies"
of the newspaper known as es the Russians have turned,nd
the "Diano de la Marina .
night after night, hundreds
are to be seen and heard and
ed arguments often end
Try J. C. Coakley's
new Id. Cigars
The AI lies
o
A blend of four fine tobaccos
o -
They are good to the end
BOY WANTED
I want a smart little bo
(with good character) who
can read and write to run
errands.
Wages will be from is. 6d.
sterling to 2S. per week.
For further information
apply to
SHEDRACHff. WOOD
West Stseet South
iood. I he Cu
on the other
ison why old
are fighting desperately to stem
the Vustro German onslaughts.
To the North on the River
N.irew the Russians yesterda)
deliveo d three fierce counter
attacks from the fortresses of
Rnsan, Purtusk and Novogoer
gievslc. The Germans who had
July 24th 1915.
London, -23rd.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News: G e n e r a 1
COMPULSION- IF NEEDED.
Replying to the dehn'e Mr.
Lloyd George excused himself
from replv ing to Sir A. Mark
ham's speech on the plea that
it was so full of explosive matter
that he was afraid to h in lie it.
He appealed to the House for
generous help in the heavy bur-
den he has undertaken. "The
Every Monday
SALE HERB FOR
Boots, Shoes,
Cellars, Notions,
Hunt miss vonr hanct. Sold
for small value. Come and
SAVE MONEY..
J. K. AMOURY.
i3ay Street.


y
THE TR.1BWE. NASSAU. N P.
Baby's Welfare
THE 'ALLENBURYS' FOODS being perfectly digestible and closely resem-
bling human milk, give freedom from digestive ailments, promote sound
sleep and ensure vigorous health and development.
Menbu
and the 'ALLE'N'BU'R YS' FEEDER. Simplest and Best.
MILK POOD No 1.
Fron birth to 3 mooibs.
MILK FOOD No. 2.
From 3 lo fc> niooltii.
MALTED FOOD No 3
From 6 months upwards
TO BE OBTAINED FROM ALL CHEMISTS UVD STORES.
A Pamphlet on Infant Feeding '.oil Management Free.
ALLEN & HANBURYS Ltd.. London. England.
RAINCOATS 32/- & 42/-
I17.a Qold .
(ItO.Oa Gold).
Fears "JILL WEATHER" Ready Co Wear Raincoat U a Tallor-nade garment upon which
(lit jfreatfi! possible ear* haa been bestowed aa re^ardi Cut, Style and Finish. It !- w
fr.nn CLOTH whk-ii in Shower Proof, Porous and Odourless, wi nil th.-w .iiiftiiti.-<* hnv.- l-.n
obtain.'! without the "so ot Rubber. Ktutra ALL WLA 1 HER ' Itnliu'ont Im- boon *.--t--l In
uii HlroatM, KiKliimliT thr* m wt trying climatic romhtlons hi- prove l llaell In l- the I i.
nhlalnnlM . It* light weight prevent* fatigue ami eon-. mt1 phvaieal nMTfj. fhe t.
MDiilati hi promotai health and proven*, over-h eating I be tuaraiite-d II utipn ol cloth
Miwi In i hiii! .in-r.(|ul'kiy afti-r a storm. Quality consult-ml our prices for Ready to Wear"
Raincoat* are at least ONE THIRD leas than the prices usually charted by other Tailoring
Houses In Kiu'land.
OUR GUARANTEE ,r *n "LL WEATHER" Raincoat Is not poriecll*
ww\ yunnnn i EC wttms oornpon**, miuwfwiii ri'lumymr money in (uil Including \M. po-tage chart** yuu have paid out.
DESCRIPTION. Lh* Ra*ln ->"vos and beautifully cut shoulders tftve perfect
T**^*"""^ "we^. freedom of movement. The full skin fall* i.. w knees. Cuffs
havi- si,,-!ii mpm*- Swirth Model has I'ruitsiiui Collar and buttons to the nook. Ma le In "had** ol
Brnwn. Drab, Fawn, Oreen and Smoke. Sleeveo re lined poplin and bod> nui. i>laid LDt
wetKht (melted .' lbs.
32 17.68 U our Low Pries for an'4 ALL WEATHER"
w' Raincoat, n< id.' from warrant. miarant,-, I | l*e aatlsfacUon. Ready to wear
RO.TOSB Prlosi 32 (17.68)
For *lf> -r HO.OSyoii can havean"AII WEATHER"
Raincoat made from the cedebr tted "Gar-
blrcord." Rainproof matorlal. Noihm mat
human Ingenuity can devlae, or expensive ma-
chinery produce h* omitted to mak. "Garbircord *'
a rellabli' Rainproof mSti-rlsl Tlie Dyes Used are
the fastest to light procurable. \ ft r u [h \ sal
Isfactory Raincoat In even respect. I..
wear. No. 7-Price 41 (SlO.Oe)
Stock Slies-tl'xira Luge M tea 3 8 or 60 c. estrej
Breast >i 37 to a u in. he*.
length 41 45 aft #7 48 48
IN TAKING MEASUREMENTS ' Measure
should indrawn moderate! v - e, never I
Uie eoai ovjf whlob the Raincoat will ba
Raincoats Made to Measure 26 r 80c. extra.
SEND ONLY4 -SX" "!SrK
thn be.i pal I -i Oflloa "Cuhon Delivery "
MrVtflf tthI th" Iiji mi.-.' |iki I ri i:. Ivei [|
"'......"i i lo !> Made lo Meatur"< '..... I" >rd ed i^l ONfcUUARTr.n
vhIiii- with yourorilt-r.
BPECIAL WAR GUARANTEE.
WE GUARANTEE the iafe delivery of all
our Goods daring tn. \\ u Nhnuld any
Goods ba loat in 1mn.11
riai-.' IhiTi ahaohi'rlv Hi1 I- en rll I
KI'illlTS MODEL
lor Conptrf wrar.
FEARS LTD. (Established 1643),
Hlgb-clBSS Tailors A Woollen Minhnnls
118, Bristol Bridge, BRISTOL. Fnijland.
TOWN MODEL
f 'i 'McUnary wear.
SOLD BY
SANITARY
COOL
RELIABLE
MADE FOR THE
BEST RETAIL TRADE
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Instructions have been re-
ceived sutnmoniog nllFrench-
men bom in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes i i
to 11)09 (born from 1870 to
[889; to present themselves
immediately at the Vice Con-
sulate of France at Port-of-
Si ain or at any of the twelve "
Consula. Vgenciesof the Bri- RUMSET'S PUMPS
tish \\ est Indies to pass a
medical examinal ion.
h. r. akmbrist:r..
Consular A,n.i for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
211(1 July, I'M 5.
HILTON
260
BAY STREET.
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Subscriptions are urgenth
needed lor the above fund
and all donations, howevei
small, will be gratefully
cepted, and will be acknow-
ledged in the newspapers.
H. F. AR.MBRISTFR.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
For Sale By Tender.
The undersigned will re-
ceive tenders for the folowing
valuable property up to 3rd
day of August next. All that
property situated in Bay
Street and bounded on the
East by property of John
Dillet, on the West by prop-
erty of Estate of John Alfred,
on the South by one Burrows,
on the North by Bay Street
the same having two shops
one Stone and wood, and
several Buildings to rear, all
on rent. The right is reserv-
ed of rejecting any or all
Tenders.
BY JOHN BUTLER.
H. Dighton Pearson
Fellow of the Royal Institute
of British Architects.
is practicing as an
Architect 6- Surveyor
in the Bahamas.
Those who are interested in
PUBLIC or PRIVATE
Suilding schemes will be well
advised to consult him as to
Designing, Superintending
of Building, Surveying, Dilap
i'dations, and improvements
of property generally.
Address,
ST. MATTHEW'S RECTORY.
Telephone No. IQI.
(1 UK LINEN STORE.;
and
/rave Received
The Latest Spri Novelty
THE NEW -LAVE" [NETS
Guaranteed Untarnishable,
and Washable.
Suitable for Waists, Yokes,
Dresses, Millinei y.
White and Black, While and
Silver, Black and Silver,
White and Gold Ecru and
(iold, Heliotrope and Gold,
Saxe Bine and Gold. Gold
Silver and Crystal Tassels.
White, Cream, and Ecru lire
tonne Nets, Shadow Xets,
Lace Nets, Overalls, Point
d'Esprit, Pleated Net Rue!;
ings.
Washable Marquisettes.
Black and White, Sand and
White.Double Width.
Poplin.
Black Poplin, White Poplin,
double width.
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe.
May 1st, 1915.
For Results
Advertise in
The Tribune.
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESllvl.S lo inform his friends
and the Public that I e lias
just received ;i complete outfit of
facilities for tlie luiisness of an un-
dertaker, which places lum in a
position to carry out Funertls that
may be entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and reSpd t
ful)y solicits theii patronage (Jet
tny Prices first and prove that these
are the very lowest for the first class
work.
Shingles
Best No. 1 Heart 5in. Cypresi
Shingles at 89.60 per thous
sand of 20 bundles
Discounts on lots of over
5000 shingles.
Special Price
also on cheaper gradesalso
5in. Cypress at $6.72 per
thousand of 20 bundles. This
price made possible by a very
large purchase.
Fresh stock arriving every
week.
C. C SAUNDERS.
Johnson's
Artistic Wood
Finishes
Johnaon'a Prepared Wa - com
plete finish and polish for all furniture
Woodl "rk and Soon,
Johnarn'a Wood Dye forth, artistic
coloring of all woml. Baft or hard
Johnaon'a Under Laca spirit
linish, very much superior to shellac or
vaiuish
Johnaon'a Fla.t Wood Flnlah for a
beautiful, artistic, haul iuIiIhmI effect
without the expense of rubbiftff.
Johnson's Paiti' Wood tiller -? i
tilling the grain and pores of wood,
piepaiini.' i< for the finish
Johnaon'a Powdered Waxfor bal
ft 0111 Hoors.
FOR. SALE BY
Chas. E. Albury
GASOLINE
In Drums Mevcn pence
per Gallon.
Ten Gallon Cans One Shil
ling per Gallon
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay Street
Nassau X. P.
April, 13th 1915.
CISTE RN Pumps, Well
P u m p s. W i n d mill
Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well rumps. Elei ti ic
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
I riplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
Mai hinei y, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors, Ship Pumps
Pressure Pumps, Boiler Fei d
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, dto .
Installed under the dived
supervision 0) 11. McPherson
and Brother.
Prices on Application.
H. J. THOMPSON,
Agent.
For SALE
ALL of the buildings (to be
removed) situate on pro
perty in Deveaux St. near Shir-
ley St.. East. The buildings
are now occupied by Mr. Jos
T. Dean. For further partial
lars.
Apply
L. GILBERT DUPUCH.
FOR
SUMMER SUITS
Palm Beach Cloth
at 3s. yd.
WM. HILTON.
PHOMi 201 ______________
Notice
A Missionary's Reminis-
cences of Panama, or three
years at the Scene of the Great
Isthmus Canal, both under
the French regime and under
the American) will be the bud-
l< ( t ol a lecture in the Union
Baptist Church Parliament
St. Wed. evening July 28th
inst. Doors open at 7.30 lec-
ture begin at 8 by the Rev.
John Wesley Skerrett.
Admission 6d. for adults
Children half-price.
USED STAMPS WANTED
I WANT to buy all kinds of used
jKBiajje and revenue stamps, espe
cially those of the British and Da-
nish West In'i-s I will pay from L'
hilling! per lOO up. fur all kinds ol BaV
hamas postage Stairi|is, except thecurren-
Jd. and Id. stamps for which I pay 5il
per 100 Write or lend me your stamps.
Prompt And fair settlement guaranteed
J. EMORY REN0LL, Hanover, Pa.
Notice.
1H|S is tu inform my Patrons
and tin- Public in General
thai I Itai> '|" ned rm I'ublic
hlaek Smith Shop; and am now
res y to do art) ihinji in 1 1 ne "t
(ienf-1,,1 repair <" n<-\\ w -k I lorse
Shoeing Suecially. \ll work done
Mechanic llv
P. A. HUYLER
i T. M. Knowles
528 Bay Street.
IS now prepared to supply
Rubber I ires for Babies
Cai 1 iagi s. also tO reset, and
repaii them.
Satisfaction Guarautc !.
Mar. 20th, 1915.
CHAS. C. LIGHTHOLRN
ARMSTRONG ST.
He.wkln'a Hill.
EXPERIENCED Paper
Hanger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. All work careful-
ly and Artistically performed.
Absolute satisfaction guaran
teed. The verv best references.
-TERMS MODERATE.
Here's An Oppor-
tunity thfnJ y" c?nnot
afford to lose.
II Vou want to Economist.
If vou want a hirst Class
Lipht.
ll you want to be recog-
nized Use the Best Light
tln:t money can buy. The
Safest and the Cheapest.
THE
DC AI*AH KEROSENE MANTLE
Dt AlfUll LAMPS and BURNERS
are recopnliod na th
standard Incandes-
cent oil lampa ot the*
world.
100,000 -11INrt.il
oaera. All ilriluhini.
I'roducrs a power-
ful, brilliant whltn
II: III Of 100 .-MM.II.-
power. liurna com-
mon coal-oil. Coaia
only oae rent for ala
konra.
Brltrhtor than it.
electricity or alz or-
dinary lamps at ooe-
alzlk to uir-trnlb Iko
coot.
Made entirely of
braaa. For use lr
homes, stores, halla
and churches. No
odor, no noise; safe,
simple and clean-
There la only one-
Beason. Insist o n
navlng It-
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sal* B,
Thos. E- Nabbie-
14 Christie St., Nassau, N.P.
Special Terms c'iven if requested. Write
01 see me and kn w all about this won-
derful Lamp.

Williams' Shoes Ape Better
1
a*\ a- A


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