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L. QILBRRT DOPUOH, Editor ind Proprietor OFFIOK: Corner Shirley & Ch.vrl.-ite Sis A assau, .V. P., liahamas •I'HONK no, p. o. FOX 10:5. I'rill.lSHr.l) DAILY RATES Mon.lay, Wednesday and Fiiilay— single copy ... ... ... Jil TueMlay, an-l Thursil.iy tingle copy id Saturday—single copy ... l}d Weekly 5.1 Monthly i s. 6er line lorsccoii.l insertion ; and oaepenny pa line for subsqueul insertions. Advertisements under eight lines is. Zhe tribune THURSDAY. July 22. 1915. /*PUBLISHED Al 7 P.M. 1 he position of a policeman is by no means an enviable one, while lie is the legal guardian of the peace, and of property and of life, there seem always to be a spirit of antagonism towards him especially among the labble who look upon him as their natural enemy ; in short there are few people who seem to have any sympathy with the policeman and if there is any public servant who should have public support and sympathy it is he. A policeman is always called upon to exercise tact, discretion, and prudence, he should never lose his temper and should always keep a clear head, yet these are the qualifications he seldom seems to possess. A policeman should be taught how to handle men, if he is not so taught his training is not complete, he is not allowed to use his baton except in self defence otherwise he becomes an offender. We understand from reliable information that a case occurred yesterday where unfortunately a marked lack of these police virtues were displayed, and the police lost their heads and their tempers, for instead of arresting a man they severely beat him. It is said that while two policemen held the man six or eight others pounded him with their clubs and fists; surely eight men are not necessary to arrest or hold one man if they knew how to handle men at all, and beside a policeman's club in the hands of a man who has lost his temper and his head is a deadly weapon. We have heard a great deal of severe criticism of this unseemly occurrence and hope that the police will see that they do not appear to advantage when instead of arresting a man they resort to beating him. Foreign Mails to be despatched per "Frances E" will he made up and closed on Friday the 23rd inst at 8 a. m. — :o: — The Police Hand Concert will be given this evening at 8.15 p.m. Programme. 1. March — "With Sword and Lance." 2. Valse "Dollar Princess" 3. Overture—" Light CavI n ry. 4. Two Step"On Desert Sands." 5. Selection—"In Coonland." 6. Lancers — "Stars and Stripes." 7. Rag —"Yellow Jacket Girl." God Save The King. Corpl. H. ROACH, Acting Bandmaster. There will be a game of Cricket on the Eastern Parade tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock between the Eastern and Westem Junior Cricket Clubs. —:o: — IN THE MAGISTRATE'S COURTJuly 12 Zephaniah Hunter —One Alberta Kinlayson unlawfully did wound—Dismissed. Lawrence Rullard — Larceny of a boat value £3. 15s. the goods and chattels of Constance H. Lowe—6 months imprisonment. Leon Walton Young— Br. Street Traffic Rules-Dismissed. Charles Strachan — Using profane and indecent language in sight and hearing of persons in Dillet St.— 10s. or 8 clays. Chas. Haven—Using abusive language in an Alley in Grants Town tending to a breach of the peace—16s. or 12 days. 13 Edwin Basden—Assaulting and beating Melvin Johnson — 30s. or 1 month. Knowledge Pinder—Conveying Cattle through Bay Street in Contr. of sec. 1 (b) of the "Cattle Landing Act i8.,8" Gilbert Johnson and Fredk. Fountain—Fighting in Bay S t re e t —Johnson lined 8s. Fountain bound in his own recognizance in £5 to appear for sentence within 3 months if called upon. Julia Campbell — Using language in Grants Town towards Arabella Taylor tending to a breach of the peace—Dismissed. 14 Isaac Roach-Drunk in Bay Street —5s. or 4 days. Alfred Milton, Frederick Vanghan. Mary Marshall, Robert Curry, Julius Adderley—Breach Dog Licence Act —4s. each. James Boyd and Leviticus Ball—Fighting in publicstreet—Each fined (OS. or r4 days. James Boyd— Impeding and Assaulting District Constable Jeremiah Sandilands while in the execution of his duty—Fined 24s. or 20 days. Clarence Anderson—Impeding and assaulting D. C. J. Sandilands while in the execution of his duty—Dismissed. 15 Sarah Pinder—Using language in public Street of Sandilands Village towards Isadora Thompson tending to a breach of the peaceDismissed. John Johnson—Using language in street towards Jos. N. Walker tending to a breach of the peace 10s. and 3s. 6d. costs or 8 days. Reginald Owens, Weekly Smith, Ernest Russell, Robt. T a y 1 o r, Hesketh^Jjpgtice, Lawrence Bosfield^Rd McQueen (Boys)—Bathing from a public place to wit Rigby's Slip at the foot of Dorchester Street between the hours of 5 and 6 o'clock p.m. of 12th instant—Cautioned. 17 John Brown—Using profane and indecent language in Bay Street—12s. 6d. or 10 days. Beatrice Ramsey —Using profane and indecent language in Bay Street —10 days. II. Resisting P. C. No. 43 Charles Watson while in the execution of his duty—30 days. Ellen Brown Using profane and indecent language in Bay Street—12s. or 10 days. Fredk. Strachan — Breach Cattle Act—Dismissed. Theresa Pan/athrowing stones to the annoyance and danger of persons in Grants Town—16s. and 4s. costs or 14 days. Latest War News July 21st 1915. London:—A British War office statement tonight says that since the last communication of the 9th there has been no changein our front. Although there has been no engagement calling for special repoit there has been considerable activity in front of our lines several mines having been sprung both by the enemy and by ourselves and various position! <> %  > nur front having b.'en subjected to heavy bombirclment. On the 10th theene\. my developed a small attack %  " North of Arras and gained a footing on our front lines. Our local supports however captured what we had lost. On the 13th the enemy rushed an advance position on the YprcsMenin road but immediately were driven back again. Further north on the same night our line was shelled heavily and we lost a trench held by one company. Again the Germans were driven out at once by our bombing parties and the tfeWRwas re-occupied. A feature of this incident was the employment by the enemv of a large quantity of gas shell. r



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I Washington:-All illegal efforts to injure the Allies will be Ji^eated by the United States Wrequest of the British government. The attack on the Orduna will be investigated, announces Secretary Lansing, though the matter is not officially before the department. July 22nd 1915. London, 21st. Governor, Bahamas. Official news:— General j tracts, it is said, with foreign French reports about 150 j governments for machinery yards of enemy trenches for manufacturing torpedo West of Chateau Hooge, j shells. grossing all along the line. The Germans are now under the guns of Novo Georggrevsky, the key to Warsaw on the North. New York.—Machinists in the plant of E. W. Bliss and Company threaten to strike for an eight hour day. The company has contracts for the manufacture of Whitehead torpedoes for the Ameri %  can navy. The company also has conEast of Ypres, raptured, with two machine guns. Elsewhere there is nothing! to report. kussian reJuly 22nd 1915. London:— The Austro-Ger mans continue to pound theRus sian front and military critics j say that nothing but a miracle can save Warsaw, the Polish capital. This seems to be the consensus of opinion even among those ther progress has been made in England who had heretofore on Carso Plateau where more hoped that the Russians would trenches and a further 500 turn and deliver a counter blow government ports further enemy progress in Riga-Shavli region and some other points. The Italian offensive on the Isonzo front continues. Furchief has issued orders through the civil governor that in case of a retreat the male population of Lublin is to attach itself to the retreating troops. There has been a flash of British activity in Flanders without any appreciable change in situation and the British pub lie is far more interested in the South Wales coal strike, which by virtue of David Lloyd Geo rges flying visit to Cardiff, seems to have been settled. It is understood that virtually all of the demands of the stri kers have been granted. The Serbian armies are being re equipped and re-oganized according to advices reaching London and soon will be ready to resume the offensive. Washington :-Prtsident Wilson and his cabinet decided to day on the general principles of the note to be sent to Germany. Members of rhe cabinet gener ally preserved secrecy regarding prisoners were taken. (Signed) BONAR LAW. London :—A British steamer carrying eight hundred emig.mts from London to Australia is afire in the Indian Ocean. The Welsh coal miners have returned to work after having gained an increase in wages. and the news of the evacuation of Warsaw followed by the tri umphant entry of the Germans amid such scenes as were enact ed at Przemysl and Lemberg would come as no surprise. German Official statement, beginning its recital at the North ern tip of the battle line, records the progress of the Germans to within about fifty miles of Riga, then, following the great battle are Southward, chronicles further successes Northeast of A Warsaw culminating in the capWashington:—The origin ture of Ostrolenka, one of the of the fire on the dreadnought I fortrWSS designed toshelter the Oklahoma has not yet been Polish capital. 1 he acute peril to Warsaw is determined. There will be an official inquiry. There were slight fires on the battleship New York and on the destroyer Wart accentuated by the Russian offi cial communication which says that German columns are within artillery range of the fortress of Novogeorgievsk, the kev to rmgton at the Brooklyn Navy ; the cap ital from the Northward Yard. I hey were accidental | and only about twenty miles and were easily extinguished, from it. Bayonne, New Jersey:— Immediately Southwest of the One rioter was killed and city and less than twenty miles fifty injured in strike rioting 'away Blonie has fallen and fur at the Standard oil plant. Paris:—All but fifty of the Italian cruiser G i u s s e p i uMbaldi which was sunk by an Austrian submarine have been reported safe. London.-The teutonic ;„ danger of falling. drive towards Warsaw is pro-' The Russian com ther South German cavalry are astride the important railway from Radom to Ivangorod. The Lublin Cliolm railway is still in Russian hands so far as is known but the town of Lub Hn has either been taken or is mander in the probable contents of the comunication but it was made clear however that it would not be an ultimatum or make threats an to the future purpose of the United States. At the same time they pointed out that it would probably have an air of finality curtailing the field of discussion and negotiat tions and placing squarely on Germany the responsibility for any actions that might subse quently endanger the friendly relations of the two countries. —o: — London Recruiting Rally. —o 50 Military Bands To Take part. — o Although London earlier in the year made an excellent response to a special appeal for recruits, her citizens are again to be asked to make an effort to supply large additional numbers of men. Arrangements have been made foi a special recruiting rally throughout the metropolitan area from next Sunday to July 11 inclusive. In this campaign more than 50 military bands will be engaged every night. Many Territorial Force bands are being specially brought back to London for what may be described as the metropolitan summer recruiting campaign The various districts will each be allotted a series of meetings, extending over at least three consecutive days. I A scene of great enthusiasm attended a recruiting meeting held yesterday at the Polytechnic Institute, Regent street, in connection with the 12th Battalion ("The Rangers") London Regiment. Miss Alice Lakin, the eminent contralto singer, who has been a most enthusiastic recruiting agent, sang the new soldiers' chorus, which has become popular both at home and at the. front, "Till the Boys Come Home." As rain was falling, Miss Lakin sang in the large entrance hall, which was packed with an enthusiastic audience that joined heartily in the refrain. Miss Carrie Lancely (soprano) also sang a recruiting song, and later the two ladies proceeded to Oxford circus, where another recruiting meeting was held. Here a pleasing incident took place. As Queen Alexandra's carriage approached both singers joined in a duet, specially written for Rose Day, and when the Royal Carriage reached the Circus, Miss Lakin presented her Majesty with a copy of the song printed in gold on silk, while Miss Lancely handed to the. Queen's Mother a copy of the programme printed in gold. —The Daily Chronicle. The "Motor "Fracnes E." arrived at 8 o'clock last night from Miami with ice and shingles, mails and passengers:— Misses Diana Smith, Florence B. Rnhming, Mary Holmes & Laura Hamilton; Mesdames Jemimah Taylor, Beatrice Lafleur, Kathlena Riley and infant; Eliza McKinney, and Justina Miller; Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Bostwick; Messrs. Edwin McDonald, George R. Fergurson, Orendal Sweeting, Aemilius Moss, Hezekiah Moss, John Stevens, Caleb Moncur, John Bannister, Fred Collie, Frank Knowles, Alexander Bethel, Ernest Knowles, Joseph Hall, Malachi Young, Cyrus Adderlev, Sam Hepburn, Gns Brown Charlie Grey, Daniel Miller, Glnnville Fergurson, John Smith, Charles Finley, Peter Swansen,Granvi1le Adderley, Sam Rahming, Win. Pratt, Austin Walsh, Gabriel Fergurson, and B. B. Blackeney. 'Repatriated. f 1



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AS THE CAMEL is Indispensable to the Uswellrt crossing ihe African deserts, so also is SUNI.IOHI SOAP indispensable to a careful housewife. A Camel can go lot •everal .lays without drinking, but a good rjotne•i(e cannot afford to let a single day P a,s without putting Sunlight Soap to some use. The bit duty ol every housewife is to economise; the duty of SUNLIGHT SOAP is to help the housewife to economise. The daily use of SUNUOHT SOAP is prai tical economy, it does the most washing in the shortest lima, with least labour, and with no discomfort. L'se a piece in your next wash, and you will be convinced as to its value. I6 roan service in the Boei war, Swept out of exisU'iu-t\ and in their stead a so called territorial force, for the most part on paper. Literally out of nothing he lias brought into existence the present huge British Army, admirably equipped, armed and trained, which, all told, today numbers over 4,000,000 men, and which, in addition to hold ing the British lines in France and in Flanders, has been operating against the Turks on the banks of the Suez Canal, in Egypt, on the Peninsula of Gallipoli, in the valley of the Tigris a-id the Euphrates, and in Mesopotamia,and which shared with the Japanese the wresting of the colony Kiao-Chau, on the Eastern shores of China, from the Germans. At the outbreak of the pre sent war, the Germans, Emperor William first and foremost, referred to England's mili'ary forces as "that contemptible little army." Today they regard it with the utmost respect, and candidly admit that they were mistaken. That Great Hritain was able to put all these military forces into Hie field, and that she has been able to hold her OWO against Germany and her nl lies, is entirely and wholly owing to Kitchener's marvelous military resourcefulness and powers of organization, as wall as to the unlimited confidence which he enjoys among the vast majority of his fellow country men ; a confidence to which his sovereign gave sti iking expression when only the other day he invested him with the high est Order of Knighthood in his gift, that of the Garter, which has within the last two hundred vears been accorded to only three other great commanders— to the fust Duke of Marlborough, the victor of Blenheim; to the Iron Duke of Wellington, for his victory at Waterloo, and to Field Marshal Lord Woberts, the closing years of whose life were embittered by the covert and open attacks upon him by the French clique. Kitchener's adversaries have now been compelled to admit that as an organizer he is preeminent. But they are endeavoring to create doubts as to his gifts of military leadership. It is well to remember, however, in this connection that Gieat Britain owes to him the conquest of the huge Soudan.the preservation, of Egypt from DeiVl'sh invasion, and the final sup pression ol thy llocrs ind the testoraiion of peace in South Africa fourteen years ago. New York Times Magazine. July 4th, 1915. FOR SUMMER SUITS Palm Beach Cloth at 3s. yd. VV/M. HILTON. PHONE 201. IJL %  — Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk I American Cashmere American Cuttun I.isle HOSIERY They have Stood the test. Give rea f.x.t comfort. No seams to rip. Never becnm loose or baggy. The shape is knit inn..t pressed in 1 GUARANTEED for fineness, style. so, erlority ol material and workmanship. Absolutely Stainless Will wear 6 months without holes, or new ones free. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one sen linK s ?l-0 in currency or postal note, to cover advertising and I shipping Charges, we will send post paid. with written guarantee, backed by %  million dollar CO01| any, either 3 Po.ira of o\ir 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, or 4 Pa Ira of our 50c. value American Cashmere Hosiery, or 4 P*lre of our 50c. Value. Airerican Cotton-Lisle Hosiery or 6 Pe-ire of Children's Hosiery. DONT I) KI. AY--Offer expires when dealer in your locality is selected. v THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A NOTICE TO FRENCH IS. BUY SUPERIOR CIGARS At 4s. per hundred. Also a Specialty of HAVANA CIGARS of excellent quality combined with moderate prices, from J. B. GARDINER, Cor. West Street, and Petticoat Lane. White Lime I AM offering FOR SALE in\ entire stork of White Lime of about 800 bushels at 6d. per bushel. Orders left at Mr. Solomon Fiolayson, Deveaut St. or Phone 258 or "The Tribune" Office. JOSIAH RAMMING June 30, 1915. FRENCH RED CR088 FUND. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgently needed tot the above fund nnd all donations, however small, Will be gratefully accepted, and will be acknowledged in the newspapers. H. F. ARMBR.ISTE.R. Consular Atfent for France. Nassau, N. P., and July, 1915INSTRUCTIONS have ill'BII received summoning allFrenchmen born in Martinique, Cmadelope or Fn m hQjjpFha belonging to the clas^ri8qo to 1909 (born from 1870 to 1889) to present themselves immediately at the Vice Consulate of France at Port-ofSpainor at any of the twelve Consular Agencies of the British West Indies to pass a medical examination. H. F. ARMBRISTER. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915RUMSEYS PUMPS C ISTERN Pumps, Well Pumps, W i n d mill I Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps, I House Pumps, Pneumatic Systems, Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, Deep Well Pumps, Electric Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Centrifugal Pumps, Waterworks Mac binary, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps, Air Compressors, Ship Pumps Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, rite. Installed under the direct supervision of II. Mcl'herson and Brot her. Pricn on Application. H. J. THOMPSON, Agent Notice A Missionary's Reminiscences of Panama, or three yars at the Scene of the Great Isthmus Canal, both under the French regime and under the American, will be the sub•, ject of a lecture in the Union-* • Baptist Church Parliament St. Wed. evening July 28th • inst. Doors open at 7.30 lecture begin at 8 by the Rev. John Wesley Skerrett. Admission 6d. for adults, Children half-price. For Results Advertise irwThe Tribune. Williams' Shoes Are Better r



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Nvjltlus uddictua |\jrare in verbs m&glMrl. Being bound to iwear to the Dogma.* of no Mmler. VOL. XII. NMM, N. P.. Bahama. THURSDAY July. 22.1915 NO. 506 SIR JOHN FRENCH UNDER A CLOUD. Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be Widely Discussed in Paris and London. (Continued from Tuesday's Issue.) F rench virtually headed that military cabal at tha War Department which resulted in the shelving of Held Marshal Lord Roberts, depriving him of the office of Commander in Chief of the miltary force* of the British Empire, in the most unjustifiable elimination of Field Marshal the Duke of Connaught from that army to which he bad devoted his lifetime, and in the attempt to exclude Kitchener from every military office and command. Before French could interfere, however, Kitchener had, at the close of the Boer war, accepted tlie office of Commander in Chief of the British forces in India,intrusted with the task of reorganizing the British army there, as well ;is the military defenses of England's mighty' Oriental empire. But during his seven years of hard labor in accomplishing this mission, he was continually r hampered by obstructions from home, instigated by the mili W „ tary t abalat Whitehall of which li French was the bright particular ^W star, and which led, among ^B." other things, to Kitcheners meB morable quarrel with Lord Cur |H^ son, culminating in the latter's 9 resignation of the Viceroyalty ^ of India. When Kitchener completed jiis term of command and re tuMcd to England, via Ameri -{•STartcr having reorganised the British forces in India in such a manner as to arouse the most enthusiastic admiration of all the military experts at Berlin, Paris, Vienna, I'etrograd and Tokio, he found the French ca bal at the War Office in London so strong against him that even with the warm friendship and support of Edward VII of Queen Alexandra, and of King Cieorgs, there was no prospect of any military command for him. Accordingly, he prepared to retire permanently from military life, and had even accepted a number of railroad Directorships, b> way of keeping himself occupied, when, at the instance of Lord Cromer, he was invited by the Foreign Oflice to become British Plenipotentiary in Egypt, in order to repair the mistakes of which the late Sir Fldon Gorst had rendered himself guilty, and so as to restore British prestige & predominance on the banks of the Nile. Lord Kitchener remained at Cario during the four succeeding yenr, in a diplomatic and administrative capacity and when the present war broke out in August last, was actually on his way back to Egypt to resume hit post at Cario, when •topped, as he was stepping on 'board the trans Channel steamer at Dover, by a message from the Prime Minister, who had been forced by popular sentiment and by the irresistible demands of the entire nation, to intrust him with the secretaryship of State for War. The War Department in London has been the grave of the reputation of almost even statesman who has ever been intrusted with its control as Secretary of State. Honeycombed with inefficiency, corruption, and favoritism, with abuses of every kind, tangled up in every direction by means of miles upon miles of red tape, it has been for a hundred years past the object of every species of satire, ridicule, and reproach, and that English soldiers should in the past have been able to accomplish anything in spite of their War Department speaks volumes for their character and fighting qualities. The barnacled officials of the department always dreaded the possible advent of Kitchener. It was their nightmare. That is why they supported Sir John French so strongly against him. What Kitchener has accomplished since then at the War Department, in spite of the ob stacles placed in his way by hostile officials, civilian as well as military, all the world knows. He found the army disorgan ized, discouraged, and in a state of almost open mutiny, in COLLAR If you will give these collars a trial and keep traek of their many trips to the laundry you will soon appreeiah their worth. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RET ULERS CLIKTT, I'KAllODY MA K KKS. TROY, N fll CO., Inc. Y. V.. S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. For Sale By Tender. The undersigned will receive tenders for the folowing valuable property up to 3rd day of August next. All that property situated in Hay Street and bounded on tin: East by property of John Dillet, on the West by property of Estate of John Alfred, on the South by or.e Burrows, on the North by Bay Street connection with theUIstercrisis, I t he s me lliiv "^ twoshuj-s th troops without proper equipment, the arsensals empty df ammunition and gun*, the old militia and volunteer forces, which had done such yeo continued on fourth pogt. one Stone and wood, and several Buildings to rear, all on rent. The right is reserved of rejecting any or all Tenders. BY JOHN BUTLER. Wear Armbrister's Shoes y\


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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02372
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Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, July 22, 1915
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Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Full Text
Nvjltlus uddictua |\jrare in verbs m&glMrl.
Being bound to iwear to the Dogma.* of no Mmler.
VOL. XII.
Nmm, N. P.. Bahama. THURSDAY July. 22.1915
NO. 506
SIR JOHN FRENCH UNDER A CLOUD.
Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be
Widely Discussed in Paris and London.
(Continued from Tuesday's Issue.)
French virtually headed that
military cabal at tha War
Department which resulted in
the shelving of Held Marshal
Lord Roberts, depriving him of
the office of Commander in
Chief of the miltary force* of
the British Empire, in the most
unjustifiable elimination of
Field Marshal the Duke of
Connaught from that army to
which he bad devoted his
lifetime, and in the attempt to
exclude Kitchener from every
military office and command.
Before French could interfere,
however, Kitchener had, at the
close of the Boer war, accepted
tlie office of Commander in Chief
of the British forces in India,in-
trusted with the task of reorgan-
izing the British army there,
as well ;is the military defenses
of England's mighty' Oriental
empire.
But during his seven years of
hard labor in accomplishing this
mission, he was continually
r hampered by obstructions from
. home, instigated by the mili
W tary t abalat Whitehall of which
li French was the bright particular
^W star, and which led, among
^B." other things, to Kitcheners me-
B morable quarrel with Lord Cur
|H^ son, culminating in the latter's
9 resignation of the Viceroyalty
^ of India.
When Kitchener completed
jiis term of command and re
tuMcd to England, via Ameri
-{STartcr having reorganised the
British forces in India in such a
manner as to arouse the most
enthusiastic admiration of all
the military experts at Berlin,
Paris, Vienna, I'etrograd and
Tokio, he found the French ca
bal at the War Office in Lon-
don so strong against him that
even with the warm friendship
and support of Edward VII of
Queen Alexandra, and of King
Cieorgs, there was no prospect
of any military command for
him.
Accordingly, he prepared to
retire permanently from milita-
ry life, and had even accepted
a number of railroad Director-
ships, b> way of keeping him-
self occupied, when, at the
instance of Lord Cromer, he was
invited by the Foreign Oflice to
become British Plenipotentiary
in Egypt, in order to repair the
mistakes of which the late
Sir Fldon Gorst had rendered
himself guilty, and so as to re-
store British prestige & predom-
inance on the banks of the Nile.
Lord Kitchener remained
at Cario during the four suc-
ceeding yenr, in a diplomatic
and administrative capacity and
when the present war broke out
in August last, was actually on
his way back to Egypt to
resume hit post at Cario, when
topped, as he was stepping on
'board the trans Channel
steamer at Dover, by a message
from the Prime Minister, who
had been forced by popular
sentiment and by the irresistible
demands of the entire nation, to
intrust him with the secretary-
ship of State for War. The War
Department in London has been
the grave of the reputation of
almost even statesman who has
ever been intrusted with its
control as Secretary of State.
Honeycombed with inefficiency,
corruption, and favoritism, with
abuses of every kind, tangled up
in every direction by means of
miles upon miles of red tape, it
has been for a hundred years
past the object of every species
of satire, ridicule, and reproach,
and that English soldiers should
in the past have been able to
accomplish anything in spite of
their War Department speaks
volumes for their character and
fighting qualities.
The barnacled officials of the
department always dreaded the
possible advent of Kitchener.
It was their nightmare. That
is why they supported Sir John
French so strongly against him.
What Kitchener has accom-
plished since then at the War
Department, in spite of the ob
stacles placed in his way by
hostile officials, civilian as well
as military, all the world knows.
He found the army disorgan
ized, discouraged, and in a
state of almost open mutiny, in
COLLAR
If you will give these
collars a trial and keep
traek of their many
trips to the laundry you
will soon appreeiah
their worth.
ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RET ULERS
CLIKTT, I'KAllODY
MA K KKS. TROY, N
fll CO., Inc.
Y. V.. S. A.
C. L. LOFTHOUSE
Exclusive Agent.
For Sale By Tender.
The undersigned will re-
ceive tenders for the folowing
valuable property up to 3rd
day of August next. All that
property situated in Hay
Street and bounded on tin:
East by property of John
Dillet, on the West by prop-
erty of Estate of John Alfred,
on the South by or.e Burrows,
on the North by Bay Street
connection with theUIstercrisis, Ithe s*me lliiv"^ twoshuj-s
th troops without proper
equipment, the arsensals empty
df ammunition and gun*, the
old militia and volunteer for-
ces, which had done such yeo
continued on fourth pogt.
one Stone and wood, and
several Buildings to rear, all
on rent. The right is reserv-
ed of rejecting any or all
Tenders.
BY JOHN BUTLER.
Wear Armbrister's Shoes
y\


L. QILBRRT DOPUOH,
Editor ind Proprietor
OFFIOK:
Corner Shirley & Ch.vrl.-ite Sis
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Half Yearly... ... ... ... 9s.
Yearly ............18s.
I'AYAHI.i: IN ADVANCK
Advertising Watrs :Six |-ence per line
(tor not insertion; three pence |>er line
lorsccoii.l insertion ; and oaepenny pa
line for subsqueul insertions.
Advertisements under eight lines is.
Zhe tribune
THURSDAY. July 22. 1915.
/*- PUBLISHED Al 7 P.M.
1 he position of a police-
man is by no means an envi-
able one, while lie is the legal
guardian of the peace, and of
property and of life, there
seem always to be a spirit of
antagonism towards him es-
pecially among the labble
who look upon him as their
natural enemy ; in short
there are few people who seem
to have any sympathy with
the policeman and if there is
any public servant who
should have public support
and sympathy it is he.
A policeman is always call-
ed upon to exercise tact, dis-
cretion, and prudence, he
should never lose his temper
and should always keep a
clear head, yet these are the
qualifications he seldom
seems to possess.
A policeman should be
taught how to handle men, if
he is not so taught his train-
ing is not complete, he is not
allowed to use his baton ex-
cept in self defence otherwise
he becomes an offender.
We understand from relia-
ble information that a case
occurred yesterday where un-
fortunately a marked lack of
these police virtues were dis-
played, and the police lost
their heads and their tempers,
for instead of arresting a man
they severely beat him.
It is said that while two
policemen held the man six
or eight others pounded him
with their clubs and fists;
surely eight men are not ne-
cessary to arrest or hold one
man if they knew how to
handle men at all, and beside
a policeman's club in the
hands of a man who has lost
his temper and his head is a
deadly weapon.
We have heard a great deal
of severe criticism of this un-
seemly occurrence and hope
that the police will see that
they do not appear to advan-
tage when instead of arrest-
ing a man they resort to beat-
ing him.
Foreign Mails to be des-
patched per "Frances E" will
he made up and closed on
Friday the 23rd inst at 8 a.
m.
:o:
The Police Hand Concert
will be given this evening at
8.15 p.m.
Programme.
1. March "With Sword
and Lance."
2. Valse "Dollar Princess"
3. Overture" Light Cav-
In
ry.
4. Two Step- "On Desert
Sands."
5. Selection"In Coon-
land."
6. Lancers "Stars and
Stripes."
7. Rag "Yellow Jacket
Girl."
God Save The King.
Corpl. H. ROACH,
Acting Bandmaster.
There will be a game of
Cricket on the Eastern Parade
tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock
between the Eastern and West-
em Junior Cricket Clubs.
:o:
In The Magistrate's
Court-
July 12 Zephaniah Hunter
One Alberta Kinlayson un-
lawfully did woundDis-
missed.
Lawrence Rullard Lar-
ceny of a boat value 3. 15s.
the goods and chattels of
Constance H. Lowe6
months imprisonment.
Leon Walton Young Br.
Street Traffic Rules-Dis-
missed.
Charles Strachan Using
profane and indecent langu-
age in sight and hearing of
persons in Dillet St. 10s. or
8 clays.
Chas. HavenUsing abu-
sive language in an Alley in
Grants Town tending to a
breach of the peace16s. or
12 days.
13 Edwin BasdenAs-
saulting and beating Melvin
Johnson 30s. or 1 month.
Knowledge PinderCon-
veying Cattle through Bay
Street in Contr. of sec. 1 (b)
of the "Cattle Landing Act
i8.,8"
Gilbert Johnson and Fredk.
FountainFighting in Bay
S t re e t Johnson lined 8s.
Fountain bound in his own
recognizance in 5 to appear
for sentence within 3 months
if called upon.
Julia Campbell Using
language in Grants Town
towards Arabella Taylor
tending to a breach of the
peaceDismissed.
14 Isaac Roach-Drunk in
Bay Street 5s. or 4 days.
Alfred Milton, Frederick
Vanghan. Mary Marshall,
Robert Curry, Julius Adder-
leyBreach Dog Licence Act
4s. each.
James Boyd and Leviticus
BallFighting in public-
streetEach fined (OS. or r4
days.
James Boyd Impeding and
Assaulting District Consta-
ble Jeremiah Sandilands
while in the execution of his
dutyFined 24s. or 20 days.
Clarence AndersonIm-
peding and assaulting D. C.
J. Sandilands while in the
execution of his dutyDis-
missed.
15 Sarah PinderUsing
language in public Street of
Sandilands Village towards
Isadora Thompson tending
to a breach of the peace-
Dismissed.
John JohnsonUsing lan-
guage in street towards Jos.
N. Walker tending to a
breach of the peace 10s. and
3s. 6d. costs or 8 days.
Reginald Owens, Weekly
Smith, Ernest Russell, Robt.
T a y 1 o r, Hesketh^Jjpgtice,
Lawrence Bosfield^Rd Mc-
Queen (Boys)Bathing from
a public place to wit Rigby's
Slip at the foot of Dorchester
Street between the hours of 5
and 6 o'clock p.m. of 12th
instantCautioned.
17 John BrownUsing
profane and indecent langu-
age in Bay Street12s. 6d.
or 10 days.
Beatrice Ramsey Using
profane and indecent langu-
age in Bay Street 10 days.
II. Resisting P. C. No. 43
Charles Watson while in the
execution of his duty30
days.
Ellen Brown Using pro-
fane and indecent language
in Bay Street12s. or 10
days.
Fredk. Strachan Breach
Cattle ActDismissed.
Theresa Pan/a- throwing
stones to the annoyance and
danger of persons in Grants
Town16s. and 4s. costs or
14 days.
Latest War News
July 21st 1915.
London:A British War of-
fice statement tonight says that
since the last communication of
the 9th there has been no change-
in our front. Although there
has been no engagement calling
for special repoit there has been
considerable activity in front
of our lines several mines having
been sprung both by the enemy
and by ourselves and various
position! <>> nur front having
b.'en subjected to heavy bom-
birclment. On the 10th theene- \.
my developed a small attack "
North of Arras and gained a
footing on our front lines. Our
local supports however captur-
ed what we had lost. On the
13th the enemy rushed an ad-
vance position on the Yprcs-
Menin road but immediately
were driven back again. Further
north on the same night our
line was shelled heavily and we
lost a trench held by one com-
pany. Again the Germans were
driven out at once by our
bombing parties and the tfeWR-
was re-occupied. A feature of
this incident was the employ-
ment by the enemv of a large
quantity of gas shell.
!
r


I
Washington:-- All illegal ef-
forts to injure the Allies will be
Ji^eated by the United States
Wrequest of the British
government.
The attack on the Orduna
will be investigated, announces
Secretary Lansing, though the
matter is not officially before
the department.
July 22nd 1915.
London, 21st.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official news: General j tracts, it is said, with foreign
French reports about 150 j governments for machinery
yards of enemy trenches for manufacturing torpedo
West of Chateau Hooge, j shells.
grossing all along the line.
The Germans are now under
the guns of Novo Georggrev-
sky, the key to Warsaw on
the North.
New York.Machinists in
the plant of E. W. Bliss and
Company threaten to strike
for an eight hour day. The
company has contracts for
the manufacture of White-
head torpedoes for the Ameri
can navy.
The company also has con-
East of Ypres, raptured, with
two machine guns.
Elsewhere there is nothing!
to report.
kussian
re-
July 22nd 1915.
London: The Austro-Ger
mans continue to pound theRus
sian front and military critics
j say that nothing but a miracle
can save Warsaw, the Polish
capital.
This seems to be the consen-
sus of opinion even among those
ther progress has been made in England who had heretofore
on Carso Plateau where more hoped that the Russians would
trenches and a further 500 turn and deliver a counter blow
government
ports further enemy progress
in Riga-Shavli region and
some other points.
The Italian offensive on the
Isonzo front continues. Fur-
chief has issued orders through
the civil governor that in case
of a retreat the male population
of Lublin is to attach itself to
the retreating troops.
There has been a flash of Bri-
tish activity in Flanders with-
out any appreciable change in
situation and the British pub
lie is far more interested in the
South Wales coal strike, which
by virtue of David Lloyd Geo
rges flying visit to Cardiff,
seems to have been settled.
It is understood that virtually
all of the demands of the stri
kers have been granted.
The Serbian armies are being
re equipped and re-oganized
according to advices reaching
London and soon will be ready
to resume the offensive.
Washington :-Prtsident Wil-
son and his cabinet decided to
day on the general principles of
the note to be sent to Germany.
Members of rhe cabinet gener
ally preserved secrecy regarding
prisoners were taken.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
London :A British
steamer carrying eight hun-
dred emig.mts from London
to Australia is afire in the
Indian Ocean.
The Welsh coal miners
have returned to work after
having gained an increase in
wages.
and the news of the evacuation
of Warsaw followed by the tri
umphant entry of the Germans
amid such scenes as were enact
ed at Przemysl and Lemberg
would come as no surprise.
German Official statement, be-
ginning its recital at the North
ern tip of the battle line, records
the progress of the Germans to
within about fifty miles of Riga,
then, following the great battle
are Southward, chronicles fur-
ther successes Northeast of
A
Warsaw culminating in the cap-
Washington:The origin ture of Ostrolenka, one of the
of the fire on the dreadnought I fortrWSS designed toshelter the
Oklahoma has not yet been Polish capital.
1 he acute peril to Warsaw is
determined. There will be
* an official inquiry.
There were slight fires on
the battleship New York
and on the destroyer War-
t
accentuated by the Russian offi
cial communication which says
that German columns are with-
in artillery range of the fortress
of Novogeorgievsk, the kev to
rmgton at the Brooklyn Navy ; the capital from the Northward
Yard. I hey were accidental | and only about twenty miles
and were easily extinguished, from it.
Bayonne, New Jersey: Immediately Southwest of the
One rioter was killed and city and less than twenty miles
fifty injured in strike rioting 'away Blonie has fallen and fur
at the Standard oil plant.
Paris:All but fifty of the
Italian cruiser G i u s s e p i
uMbaldi which was sunk
by an Austrian submarine
have been reported safe.
London.-The teutonic ; danger of falling.
drive towards Warsaw is pro-' The Russian com
ther South German cavalry are
astride the important railway
from Radom to Ivangorod.
The Lublin Cliolm railway is
still in Russian hands so far as
is known but the town of Lub
Hn has either been taken or is
mander in
the probable contents of the
comunication but it was made
clear however that it would not
be an ultimatum or make threats
an to the future purpose of the
United States.
At the same time they pointed
out that it would probably have
an air of finality curtailing the
field of discussion and negotiat
tions and placing squarely on
Germany the responsibility for
any actions that might subse
quently endanger the friendly
relations of the two countries.
o:
London Recruiting Rally.
o---
50 Military Bands To
Take part.
o---
Although London earlier in
the year made an excellent re-
sponse to a special appeal for
recruits, her citizens are again
to be asked to make an effort to
supply large additional num-
bers of men.
Arrangements have been made
foi a special recruiting rally
throughout the metropolitan
area from next Sunday to July
11 inclusive. In this campaign
more than 50 military bands
will be engaged every night.
Many Territorial Force bands
are being specially brought
back to London for what may
be described as the metropoli-
tan summer recruiting campaign
The various districts will each
be allotted a series of meetings,
extending over at least three
consecutive days. I
A scene of great enthusiasm
attended a recruiting meeting
held yesterday at the Polytech-
nic Institute, Regent street, in
connection with the 12th Batta-
lion ("The Rangers") London
Regiment.
Miss Alice Lakin, the eminent
contralto singer, who has been a
most enthusiastic recruiting
agent, sang the new soldiers'
chorus, which has become popu-
lar both at home and at the.
front, "Till the Boys Come
Home."
As rain was falling, Miss La-
kin sang in the large entrance
hall, which was packed with an
enthusiastic audience that join-
ed heartily in the refrain. Miss
Carrie Lancely (soprano) also
sang a recruiting song, and later
the two ladies proceeded to Ox-
ford circus, where another re-
cruiting meeting was held.
Here a pleasing incident took
place. As Queen Alexandra's
carriage approached both sing-
ers joined in a duet, specially
written for Rose Day, and when
the Royal Carriage reached the
Circus, Miss Lakin presented her
Majesty with a copy of the song
printed in gold on silk, while
Miss Lancely handed to the.
Queen's Mother a copy of the
programme printed in gold.
The Daily Chronicle.
The "Motor "Fracnes E."
arrived at 8 o'clock last night
from Miami with ice and
shingles, mails and passen-
gers:
Misses Diana Smith, Flor-
ence B. Rnhming, Mary
Holmes & Laura Hamilton;
Mesdames Jemimah Taylor,
Beatrice Lafleur, Kathlena
Riley and infant; Eliza Mc-
Kinney, and Justina Miller;
Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Bost-
wick; Messrs. Edwin McDon-
ald, George R. Fergurson,
Orendal Sweeting, Aemilius
Moss, Hezekiah Moss, John
Stevens, Caleb Moncur, John
Bannister, Fred Collie, Frank
Knowles, Alexander Bethel,
Ernest Knowles, Joseph Hall,
Malachi Young, Cyrus Adder-
lev, Sam Hepburn, Gns Brown
Charlie Grey, Daniel Miller,
Glnnville Fergurson, John
Smith, Charles Finley, Peter
Swansen,Granvi1le Adderley,
Sam Rahming, Win. Pratt,
Austin Walsh, Gabriel Fer-
gurson, and B. B. Blackeney.
'Repatriated.
f

1


AS THE CAMEL
is Indispensable to the Uswellrt crossing ihe African deserts, so
also is Suni.iohi Soap indispensable to a careful housewife. A
Camel can go lot everal .lays without drinking, but a good rjotne-
i(e cannot afford to let a single day Pa,s without putting
Sunlight Soap
to some use. The bit duty ol every housewife is to economise;
the duty of SUNLIGHT Soap is to
help the housewife to economise.
The daily use of SUNUOHT Soap
is prai tical economy, it does the
most washing in the shortest
lima, with least labour, and
with no discomfort. L'se a piece
in your next wash, and you will
be convinced as to its value.
I6
roan service in the Boei war,
Swept out of exisU'iu-t\ and in
their stead a so called territo-
rial force, for the most part on
paper.
Literally out of nothing he
lias brought into existence the
present huge British Army, ad-
mirably equipped, armed and
trained, which, all told, today
numbers over 4,000,000 men,
and which, in addition to hold
ing the British lines in France
and in Flanders, has been oper-
ating against the Turks on the
banks of the Suez Canal, in
Egypt, on the Peninsula of Gal-
lipoli, in the valley of the Ti-
gris a-id the Euphrates, and in
Mesopotamia,and which shared
with the Japanese the wresting
of the colony Kiao-Chau, on
the Eastern shores of China,
from the Germans.
At the outbreak of the pre
sent war, the Germans, Emper-
or William first and foremost,
referred to England's mili'ary
forces as "that contemptible
little army." Today they re-
gard it with the utmost respect,
and candidly admit that they
were mistaken.
That Great Hritain was able
to put all these military forces
into Hie field, and that she has
been able to hold her OWO
against Germany and her nl
lies, is entirely and wholly ow-
ing to Kitchener's marvelous
military resourcefulness and
powers of organization, as wall
as to the unlimited confidence
which he enjoys among the vast
majority of his fellow country
men ; a confidence to which his
sovereign gave stiiking expres-
sion when only the other day
he invested him with the high
est Order of Knighthood in his
gift, that of the Garter, which
has within the last two hundred
vears been accorded to only
three other great commanders
to the fust Duke of Marlborough,
the victor of Blenheim; to the
Iron Duke of Wellington, for
his victory at Waterloo, and to
Field Marshal Lord Woberts,
the closing years of whose life
were embittered by the covert
and open attacks upon him by
the French clique.
Kitchener's adversaries have
now been compelled to admit
that as an organizer he is pre-
eminent. But they are en-
deavoring to create doubts as to
his gifts of military leadership.
It is well to remember, how-
ever, in this connection that
Gieat Britain owes to him the
conquest of the huge Soudan.the
preservation, of Egypt from Dei-
Vl'sh invasion, and the final sup
pression ol thy llocrs ind the
testoraiion of peace in South
Africa fourteen years ago.
New York Times Magazine.
July 4th, 1915.
FOR
SUMMER SUITS
Palm Beach Cloth
at 3s. yd.
VV/M. HILTON.
Phone 201.
__________IJL
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
I American Cashmere
American Cuttun I.isle
HOSIERY
They have Stood the test. Give rea
f.x.t comfort. No seams to rip. Never
becnm loose or baggy. The shape is
knit in- n..t pressed in
1 GUARANTEED for fineness, style.
so, erlority ol material and workmanship.
Absolutely Stainless Will wear 6 months
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sen linK s ?l-0 in currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
I shipping Charges, we will send post paid.
with written guarantee, backed by
million dollar CO01| any, either
3 Po.ira of o\ir 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pa Ira of our 50c. value
American Cashmere Hosiery,
or 4 P*lre of our 50c. Value.
Airerican Cotton-Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Pe-ire of Children's Hosiery.
DONT I) KI. AY--Offer expires when
dealer in your locality is selected. v
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A
NOTICE TO FRENCH
IS.
BUY
SUPERIOR CIGARS
At 4s. per hundred.
Also a Specialty of
HAVANA CIGARS
of excellent quality combined
with moderate prices, from
J. B. GARDINER,
Cor. West Street,
and Petticoat Lane.
White Lime
I AM offering FOR SALE
in\ entire stork of White
Lime of about 800 bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
Fiolayson, Deveaut St. or
Phone 258 or "The Tribune"
Office.
Josiah Ramming
June 30, 1915.
FRENCH RED CR088 FUND.
Subscriptions are urgently
needed tot the above fund
nnd all donations, however
small, Will be gratefully ac-
cepted, and will be acknow-
ledged in the newspapers.
H. F. ARMBR.ISTE.R.
Consular Atfent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
and July, 1915-
Instructions have ill'BII re-
ceived summoning allFrench-
men born in Martinique,
Cmadelope or Fn m hQjjpFha
belonging to the clas^ri8qo
to 1909 (born from 1870 to
1889) to present themselves
immediately at the Vice Con-
sulate of France at Port-of-
Spainor at any of the twelve
Consular Agencies of the Bri-
tish West Indies to pass a
medical examination.
H. F. ARMBRISTER.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915-
RUMSEYS PUMPS
CISTERN Pumps, Well
Pumps, W i n d mill
I Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
I House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
' Mac binary, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors, Ship Pumps
Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, rite.
Installed under the direct
supervision of II. Mcl'herson
and Brot her.
Pricn on Application.
H. J. THOMPSON,
Agent
Notice
A Missionary's Reminis-
cences of Panama, or three
yars at the Scene of the Great
Isthmus Canal, both under
the French regime and under
the American, will be the sub- ,
ject of a lecture in the Union-*
Baptist Church Parliament
St. Wed. evening July 28th
inst. Doors open at 7.30 lec-
ture begin at 8 by the Rev.
John Wesley Skerrett.
Admission 6d. for adults,
Children half-price.
For Results
Advertise irw-
The Tribune.
Williams' Shoes Are Better



r


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