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L. OILBKHT DDPOCH, Editor and Proprittot. OFFIOK: Corner Shirley 6. Chivrl.nic Sis .Nassau, .V. /'., Hnhantas THONK 2(KI. P. O. BOX 163. I'llll.lSliHI DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Friday— single copy |il T UMday, and Thursday—single copy id Saturday—single copy ... i|d Weoklv 5 ,| Monthly i s. 6.1 R uarlerly 4 s. 6d allYearly 9 s. Yearly 1 8s. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE Advertising Rates:—Sis |*nce per line for first insertion: three pence per line For second Insertion ; and ooepennj pe line lor subsquent insertionsa Advertisements under eiht lines 4s. XLbc XLribune TUESDAY. July 20.1915. PUBLISHED AT 1 P. M If the news received by cablegrams of Saturday be true then the condition of England is a most regrettable one for she is in as much danger from foes within as well as foes without. The strike of the South Wales coal miners is really a blow at the nation, a lack of coal at this juncture places our navy practically at the mercy of the enemy, for without an unlimited and unrestricted supply of coal our navy is really helpless and any men or combination of men who by their actions bring about such a state of affairs arc playing into the hands of the enemy and their action might reasonably be considered treasonable. It is difficult to realize such a state of affairs in England, where then is the boasted! loyalty and patriotism of the I English woikingman, all unI dermiued by German Socialistic, influence ? The German has proven himself a past master in craftiness and seduction; they prepared in enormous quantities the Munition of war to fight England with, they also seduced the patriotism and loyalty that would inspire the resistance of the Britains. But if we stand aghast at the conduct of the working man, how are we to view the action of the Kings Ministers who at this critical period would jeopardise the interests of the state by untimely resignations. Who would suppose that men like Lloyd George and Kitchener would permit personal differences and private jealousies to stand in the way of their best service to their King and Country. There can be no question that the resignation of cither Lloyd George or Kitchener must have the effect of dislocating and throwing out of gear the machinery set in motion and guided to the present time by their own hands, and spells disaster to the nation ; added to this is the feud between Kitchener and French. What do these things mean ? Is there a hand-writing on the wall in the day of Englands trial ? And does this writing read MENE MENE TEKEL UPMARSIM ? A relentless and stubborn foe without, and Achans in the camp, how can the dear old country withstand. What a lamentable spectacle she must be in the eye of the nations. The General Committee of tleBahamas War Relief Fund met in the Council Chamber yesterday afternoo i in the absence of the Chairman the Hon. H. G. Malcolm, K. C. who is out of the Colony, W. C. 13. Johnson Esq. Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly was elected Acting Chairman. The reading and confirmation of the Minutes, and the reading of various reports, were the business dealt with. The Honoary Treasurer made the following state; meat. Of the subscription to the {War Relief Fund amounting to ^"3193. 12. 2. disposition was made as follows.— Remitted to England Cost of remittance £3000 o o Of 315 crates Grape fruit shipped t>> England, some were purchased at a cost of Freight packing, crates paper drayage etc B a la nce in hand 3010 o o 50 p 0 "73 5 1'77 .1 5 16 6 9 £3103122 The Treasurer also stated that he had received a further subscription of 30 guineas from the Hon. H. G. Malcolm, and other smaller amounts yet to be collected. The Hon. Col. Secretary read a letter from The Central Committee for National Patriotic Organizations suggesting the holding of a public meeting and patriotic demonstration on the 4th August the anniversary of the Declaration of War. It was Resolved that His Excellency the Governor be requested to summon such meeting. This meeting was remarkable for the smallness of the attendance. — :o: — We have felt it our duty before now to call attention to the undue harshness of taking persons, under charge for criminal offences, to trial in irons, we are pleased to see a change in this respect, though it he rather to the other extreme, a person under arrest for a capital offence taken to court not in irons. We hope to see this change continued. A confirmation service was held in St. Matthews Church last evening when 6 candidates (two females and four males) received the laying on of hands. — :o: — The Schr. "Fearless" arrived this morning from Miami with lumber and ice and the undernamed passengers.— Mesdames Annie Archer, Caroline Thompson and Dora Farrington; Mr. James Far-rington; Masters Randolph l Archer, Samuel O. Thompson and Alfred Archer (7) The Consular AgenJJWp France, acknowledges^wrth thanks, the follo\\*jn*)scriptions towards the French Red Cross Fund:— ^^^ C. Christofilis o tr^o A Friend 066 William Hilton 050 C. E. Albury 050 £130 Latest War News July 20th 1915. London 19th, Governor, itaha mas. Official new s:—G tneral French reports no change since last communique. On the 10th the enemy attacked noith of Ypres and gained a footing in our front line. The lost positions were immediately recaptured. On the 13th a post on the Ypres-Menin rear captured by the Germans was recaptured by us Also farther North on the same night a trench was captured by the Germans but recaptured by bombing. The French government report violent attack by the Germans between Calonne and Les Lparges succeeded only in gaining a footing in trench section captured on the 5th July. This Section was re raptured by counter attack and fiesh attack accomplished by jets of burning liquid, repulsed over a hundred prisoners taken in these engagements. The Russian government re ports German attacks on the whole front from Riga provinces to the Dneister. The Russians have gained successes in RigaShavli region and on the Dneister. The enemies offensive near Prasrnsz compelled the Russians to concentrate near Warsaw (Signed) BONAR LAW. Vi e n na:— An Austrian sub marine torpedoed the Italian cruiser Giuseppi Garibaldi which foundered in fifteen minutes south of Ragusa, Dal matia. The cruisers comple ment was 550 men Athens: —The Allies aro a tacking tl.e whole front in Gallipoli but no definite news v



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ran be AbtAped on the extent of ground Trained. London. ru - total casual ties in the Dardanelles expedi tionar yjgr re in killed, wounded and iTn*Bjfc\s42. 434. Petrofjrad: — Huge AustroGerman forces are concentrated on a hundred mile front be tween the Vistula and Bug Rivers. Von Mackensen is opposing Grand Duke Nicholas. The latters army is declared to he the best that Russia can put in the field. London:—The South Wales colliery strike is believed to be approaching a settlement. Lloyd George will personally address the workers. Paris: —German attacks were repulsed in the vicinity of Sou die/, and in the region of St. Hubert, Argorine. "THERE LIES A GALLANT ENGLISH GENTLEMAN" SAID THE BAVARIAN. Under a Paris date t lieDaily Express publishes the following: — "There lies a gallant Eng lish gentleman," said the Bavarian officer. Lying in the British hospital at Versailles is a young city man, a clerk from a stockbroker's office, who joined a territorial battalion of the Bedfordshire regiment shortly after the outbreak of the war. Silting by his bedside I heard his poignant story, told in simple language 1 tale of a m.in who gave his life so that his friend might have a chance of returning to bis wife and child. A friendship that began at school," was continued in manhood. Two young men entered the same office, and sat on adjoining stools. One, my informant, married last July. "You can talk about shirk crs," he said; "we were both shirkers then. Why should we risk our lives, 1 asked my pal one morning as we came up from Surbiton together. Then came Belgium and the atrocities. We began to real izt^.^ugs more. My pal saiu ne was going to enlist, and I said I would, too. He tried to dissuade me, because I was married. His only relative is his mother. We argued the point. Then I spoke to my wife. She said, 'Go,' although there were tears in her eyes when she said it. "We were in the same company, and stood side by side in the ranks. Our period of training was tedious, we bad taken the plunge, and wanted to get -out as soon cs possible. Eventually we found ourselves at Boulogne, laughing and cheering and trying to believe we should soon be home again. After a week in billets we were sent into the trenches. "The regulars, who we relieved, had christened the trench 'Hell's Own,' and it was pretty hellish. I can't tell you what I felt like when the big shells came plugging into the trench. I saw chaps I had come to like go down without a word. ... It was hell. It seemed like eternity waiting for the beggars to charge. They threw grenades as th< y came, and these wiped out a few more of our (haps, My blood was up then, and I simply wanted to kill. It was hideous. I shot at an officer and saw him fall. My pal climbed out of the trench, walked toward the man I had dropped,pick* cd him up and carried him back to our trench. "1 was mad with him, I think we nearly quarrelled, but he said he couldn't see the devil lying there bleeding. "I set my teeth and went on firing. It was no use ; they simply wore us down. We were only twenty, and it was no good going on. They took us away and put us in a barn together. "In the middle of the night an officer (I learnt we had been opposed to the Bavarians) came to the barn and said we were going to be shot at dawn, all except my pal ; they would let him off because he had saved an olfieei \ life. I confess I felt a bit down. I thought of my wife and the baby 1 should never see. My pal said nothing at all, but all of a sudden he asked one of the guards if he could speak to the officer. They took him away, and in about an hour he came back. 'Where have you been ?' I asked. 'I have seefi a general,' he said. 'It's all fixed up; they're going to shoot me instead of you.' "I didn't know what he was talking about. He wouldn't explain, just sank down and went off to sleep. I slept fitfully. "At dawn they awoke us with kicks, 'Not you,' said one of the soldiers to me, 'you stay here; we don't want you.' They tried to keep me in the barn, but I pushed my way out with the others. It was only then that I realized what was going to happen. "My pal gripped my hand, 'fell the mater I've gone West,' he said. 'I never told you before, Jack, old man. . Your wife chose the better man .... Give her mv love.' "They didn't blindfold'em. They stood, nineteen of 'em, back to the wall, and fell at the first volley. 'There lies a gallant English gentleman,' said the Bavarian officer. He knew." FOR SALE, CHEAP One Motor Boat Mahogany Finish. 12 h.p. IATHROP ENGINE Heavy Duty, (New) EASY TERMS. Apply, A. C. CRAWFORD. July 15, 1915. (THE LINEN STORE.) and jp BO!) mjffipQe Have Received The Latest Spring Novelty THE HEW -LAVE" [NETS Guaranteed Untarnishable, and Washable. Suitable for Waists, Yokes* Dresses, Millinery. White and Black, White and Silver, Black and Silver. White and Gold Ecru and Gold, Heliotrope and Gold, Saxe Blue and Gold. Gold Silver and Crystal Tassels. White, Cream, and Ecru Bre tonne Nets, Shadow Nets, Lace Nets, Overalls, Point d'Esprit, Pleated Net Ruch ings. Washable Marquisettes. Black and White, Sand and White, -Double Width. Poplin. Black Poplin, White Poplin, double width. White Washing Silk. Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe. May 1 st, 1915. CHAS. C. UOHIBOLRN ARMSTRONG ST. H&wkin's Hill. E X PER I ENCED Paper Hanger. Ceiling Work, a specialty. All work carefully and Artistically performed. Absolute satisfaction guaran teed. The verv b< st referem 1 -TERMS MODERATE. GASOLINE In Drums Eleven pence per Gallon. Ten Gallon Cans One Shil ling per Gallon C. C. SAUNDERS East Bay Street Nas.au N. P. April, 13th I915, For Pale By Tender. The undersigned will re( eive lender for the following valuable property up 103rd day of August next. All that property situated in Bay Street and bounded on the East by property of John Lillet, on the West by property of Estate of John Alfred, on the South bv 0 e Burrows, on the North by Bay Stre< the same having two shops one Stone and wood, and several Buildings to rear, all on rent. The right is reserved of rejecting anv or all Tender. BY JOHN BUTLER.



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1 Good Morning! We Are Introducing Ann ricnn Bilk %  n r. HI Oashruera Ann ricao Cotton Lisle HOSIERY %  They have stocnl tlie teit. Give rea foot onnfort. No scams to ri|i. Never loose or bany. The shape is knit innot [tressed in GUARANTEED for fineness, style. superiority ..f material and workmanship. Absolutely stainless Will wear 6 months with"i't hole*, or new ones (ree. OUR. SPECIAL. OFFER to every one sen linu Ul •''I (Ml in currency or postal note, t<> covw adveitisiny and shipping charftea, sre will send post paid, with written gukraiitee, barked by a five million diill,o c< ni| any, eitl er 5 1'r.irs of o\ir 75c. v&luo American Silk I h -i< i v, 4 PRICK of our 50c. vn, l\ie American Cash mi re I losiery, 4 P*vlre of our 50c. Value. A ii i lie.in C"tton.Lisle Hosiery %  l'ivir %  of Children's Hosiery. PONT DBLATOffer expires when dealer in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A BUY SUPERIOR CIGARS At 4:;. per huncfrea. Also a Specialty of HAVANA CV^MRS of excellent quality combined with moderate prices, from J. B. GARDINER, Cor. West Street, and Petticoat Lane. C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent Corner George and King Sis. do, and with an immense amount <>f ammunition! sup plies, etc., was the first crushing blow lo the Boei cause in the South African campaign. There are some who attribute the merit of this particular vie lory to French, who, with his cavalry force of a couple of thous.uul men.cutofl the retreat of Cronje, who was retiring in the face of a large force of infantry under Kitchener. Others claim that General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien was largely responsible for the victory, in having, under the direction of Kitchener, won a posi tion with his force of Canadians and Gordon I Hollanders in a nightattack which enabled them on the following rooming to enfilade th most important Slretch of 11 > Boer defense*. Me this as it may. Kitchener was tht; officer in highest command in the operations that culmina ted iii the defeat of Cronje, and it was therefore to him that belonged the laurels of the vie tory. lie never claimed them himself. But his adherents did so for him. This was bitterly resented by French, who, although lie re. ceived a Knighthood of the Order of the Bath and promotion to the rank of Major General, always felt thai he had been in some way robbed i f the credit of this smashing blow to the Boer cause by Kitchener and Smith Dorrien. Anyhow, from that tiniefoith he developed a bitter enmity against Kitchener, which he made but little attempt to con ceal, and which among his par tisansfound us expression then, as today, in endeavoring to de preciate all of Kitchener's military achievements and prowesses, notably his conquest of the Soudan in the face of almost insuperable difficulties, his smashing victories of Atbara and Omdurman.and nissurcess ful direction of all those tire some operations in South Africa by means of which the guerilla warfare of the Boers, after the (all of Pretoria, was brought to a close. (to be continued.) NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. INSTRUCTIONS have been received summoning a II French men born in Martinique, Guadelope or French Guiana belonging to the classes l8qo to 1909 (born from 1S70 to 1889) to present themselves immediately at the Vice Consulate of Fiance at Port-ofSpainor at any of the twelve Consular Agencies of the British West Indies to pass a medical examination. H. F. ARMHR1M r K. • Consulnr Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915. FRENCH RED CROSS FUND. Every Monday SALE HERE FOR Boots, Shoes, Collars, Notions, Pont miss your chance. Sold for small value. Come and SAVE MONEY. J. K. AMOURY. Bay Street. SUBSCRIPTIONS are urgently needed tor the above fund and all donations, however small, will be gratefully accepted, and will be acknowledged in the newspapers. H. F. AR.MBR.ISTER. Consular Agent for France. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915. FOR SUMMER SUITS Palm Beach Cloth at 3s. yd. VV/W. HILTON. PHONE 201. White Lime I AM offering FON SALE my entile stork of White Lime of about Sou bushels at 6d. per bushel. Orders left at Mr. Solomon Finlnyson, Devenux St. or Phone 258 or "The Tribune" Office, JOSIAII RAIIMING June 30, 1915. RUMSEY'S PUMPS C ISTERN Pumps, Well P u m ps, W i n d mi I 1 Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps, House Pumps, Pneumatic Systems, Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Pumps, Deep Well Pumps, Electric Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Centrifugal Pumps, Waterworks Mai hineiy, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps, Air Compressors,Ship Pump-. Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed Pumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, c'tc. Installed under the direct supervision of II. McPhcrson and Brother. Prices on Application. H. J. THOMPSON, Agent. W. A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES to inform Ins friends anil the Public that le has just received a complete outfit of facilities for the huisnrss of an unilertiiker, which places him in a position to carry out Funerals that may he entrusted to his care with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage Get iny Prices first and prove that these arc the very lowest for the first class work. Williams' Shoes Are Better il



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II <> Nulllua a.ddlcius (urare In verbs m.\|isiri. Belnii bound to sweivr to th Dogmtwa of no Master. VOL. XII. NUMV, N.P.. Btih&mns TUESDAY July. 20.1915 NO. 304 SIR JQUM£REN£H UNDER A CLOUD. Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be Widely Discussed in Pans and London. {Continued from Thursday's Issue.) W in', then, docs lie liold back, refrain from taking the of frnsive, and be content to reni.-iin within his lines, while the French everywhere are pushing the Germans back, especially in the south ? It is no use mincing matters. The fact remains that the French feel that Ihey are not receiving the amount of military assistance from Field Marshal French's troops which they had been led to expect, and the pro-English enthusiasm which reigned among all classes in Frame in the early stages of the conflict has distinctly waned. There is just aj much liking and admiration on the part of the French for the individual British "Tommy," and for his officer, as ever, But not for his Commander in Chief, and not for the British Army generally. It is intimated that the British force regards its obligations as allies somewhat lightly ; that it docs not appreciate the importance of the task by which it is confronted, nor the strain to which the long line of French troops is subjected. The French complain that they have to hear the brunt of the fighting, with the Russians so far away and the English Army doing so lit tie. True, they admit that (he loss of life continues heavy in the British ranks. But what English allies is tliat there should be something to show for this wastage of human life, service, has not been altogether himself for the past three years. Son nf a country parson, he de some offensive movement, the veloped, after the Boer war. adoption of a more aggressive when he had reached a General military policy. The failure of ( command, predilection for the Field Marshal French to adopt aristocracy which is the beset this has led to a very serious| ting weakness of the British "bourgeoisie," and which in his case found its expression in his invariably selecting the mem bers of his staff with a greater to have : tv%au\ for their**wMnl miik tlinn Marshal 1 for their cleverness of military ve restrain in his relations with Generalissimo J>>ffic and the other French commanders. Kitchener and Premier As quith also are said pressed upon Field capacity. Designing people were quick to catch on to this vulnerable id to French the necessity of action, but thus far without avail, and the impression has gained ground that he has lost his grip, point in his character, an_ and that his removal from the: take advantage thereof in every chief command of the troops in possible way, especially when France has become a matter of hs was appointed to the Presidency of the Board of Selection for Promotion, from which, to don and in I'ai is, and in spiteof the disgust of the armv, the mi the very strict censorship exeriversally pqpular Duke of Concised over the press on both naught had been ousted with sides of the Channel the newsscant ceremony, by means of a papi rshave been allu ling to the discreditable intrigue, in order urgent necessity. Little else is talked of in Lon matter in a sort of guarded way. It is the universal topic of con venation, a matter of grave concern and of fears for the future, and the absence of any military censorship in the United States enables me to write more freely about this condition of affairs in THE NEW YORK TIMES than in England or France, though much MI nst necessarily be left unsaid. The fact of the matter is that "Jackie" French, BS the British > --' want on the part of lhetr|Generalissimo is known in the Armbrister's to make way for him. Two years ago, he developed that much-discussed intimacy with his great American crony ami friend, George Gordon Moore of Detroit, Mich and of England, who arrived in New York a fortnight ago, on board the St. Paul, and who, during his Stay at the Manhattan Hotel, was freely interviewed by representative* of the press. On tne occasion of French's periodical visits to London, since the beginning of the war, he has always stayed at Moore's house, and during the intervals Moore has been an almost constant guest of the Field Marshal at British Headquarters in France. There Moore has been accorded privileges and perogatives denied to all British visitors, even to members of Hie Government administration, and to peers of the realm, as well as to distinguished Frenchmen of official rank. In fact, be has been treated by tin British Generalissimo, at his headquarters, as if he had no secrets whatsoever from himofficial, military, or otherwise. This naturally has excited all sorts of unfavorable comment and invidious criticisms; Ihe more so as George Gordon Mi ore has been charged, not only in IhenAmerican press but even in London newspapers, notably in The London World, with being BflSOUalld with a naturalized German of the name of Loewenfeld, in a London concern known as the Investment Registi j Company. Quite naturally this asso< ia tion of the British Geueralissi mo in France with an American promoter known for his German business affiliation-, and the. x traordinary privileges accorded to him at British Headquarters, has given rise to much unfavorable comment and criticism in English as well as in French circles. It has served to estrange I Sir John from many of his for liner English and French friends and admirers, who find it difficult to understand why he (should select in this time of dan! ger to the British Empire, as I his principal confident, a Mich; igander promoter As mentioned above, the feud between French and Kitchonei had itsorigin in the Boer war 'and in the defeat of Cronje. It may be recalh d that the latter's surrender, with all his com man(continued on fourth page) Wear Shoes


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02370
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, July 20, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
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General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
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oclc - 9994850
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Full Text
II
'
<>
Nulllua a.ddlcius (urare In verbs m.\|isiri.
Belnii bound to sweivr to th Dogmtwa of no Master.
VOL. XII.
Numv, N.P.. Btih&mns TUESDAY July. 20.1915
NO. 304
SIR JQUMRENH UNDER A CLOUD.
Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be
Widely Discussed in Pans and London.
{Continued from Thursday's Issue.)
Win', then, docs lie
liold back, refrain
from taking the of
frnsive, and be content to re-
ni.-iin within his lines, while the
French everywhere are pushing
the Germans back, especially
in the south ? It is no use
mincing matters. The fact re-
mains that the French feel that
Ihey are not receiving the
amount of military assistance
from Field Marshal French's
troops which they had been led
to expect, and the pro-English
enthusiasm which reigned
among all classes in Frame in
the early stages of the conflict
has distinctly waned.
There is just aj much liking
and admiration on the part of
the French for the individual
British "Tommy," and for his
officer, as ever, But not for his
Commander in Chief, and not
for the British Army generally.
It is intimated that the British
force regards its obligations as
allies somewhat lightly ; that
it docs not appreciate the im-
portance of the task by which
it is confronted, nor the strain
to which the long line of French
troops is subjected. The French
complain that they have to hear
the brunt of the fighting, with
the Russians so far away and
the English Army doing so lit
tie.
True, they admit that (he
loss of life continues heavy in
the British ranks. But what
English allies is tliat there
should be something to show
for this wastage of human life,
service, has not been altogether
himself for the past three years.
Son nf a country parson, he de
some offensive movement, the veloped, after the Boer war.
adoption of a more aggressive when he had reached a General
military policy. The failure of (command, predilection for the
Field Marshal French to adopt aristocracy which is the beset
this has led to a very serious| ting weakness of the British
"bourgeoisie," and which in his
case found its expression in his
invariably selecting the mem
bers of his staff with a greater
to have : tv%au\ for their**wMnl miik tlinn
Marshal1 for their cleverness of military
ve re-
strain in his relations with
Generalissimo J>>ffic and the
other French commanders.
Kitchener and Premier As
quith also are said
pressed upon Field
capacity.
Designing people were quick
to catch on to this vulnerable
id to
French the necessity of action,
but thus far without avail, and
the impression has gained
ground that he has lost his grip, point in his character, an_
and that his removal from the: take advantage thereof in every
chief command of the troops in possible way, especially when
France has become a matter of hs was appointed to the Presi-
dency of the Board of Selection
for Promotion, from which, to
don and in I'ai is, and in spiteof the disgust of the armv, the mi -
the very strict censorship exer- iversally pqpular Duke of Con-
cised over the press on both naught had been ousted with
sides of the Channel the news- scant ceremony, by means of a
papi rshave been allu ling to the discreditable intrigue, in order
urgent necessity.
Little else is talked of in Lon
matter in a sort of guarded way.
It is the universal topic of con
venation, a matter of grave con-
cern and of fears for the future,
and the absence of any military
censorship in the United States
enables me to write more freely
about this condition of affairs in
The New York Times than in
England or France, though
much minst necessarily be left
unsaid.
The fact of the matter is that
"Jackie" French, BS the British
>
--' want on the part of lhetr|Generalissimo is known in the
Armbrister's
to make way for him.
Two years ago, he developed
that much-discussed intimacy
with his great American crony
ami friend, George Gordon
Moore of Detroit, Mich and of
England, who arrived in New
York a fortnight ago, on board
the St. Paul, and who, during
his Stay at the Manhattan Hotel,
was freely interviewed by rep-
resentative* of the press.
On tne occasion of French's
periodical visits to London,
since the beginning of the war,
he has always stayed at Moore's
house, and during the intervals
Moore has been an almost con-
stant guest of the Field Marshal
at British Headquarters in
France.
There Moore has been accord-
ed privileges and perogatives
denied to all British visitors,
even to members of Hie Govern-
ment administration, and to
peers of the realm, as well as
to distinguished Frenchmen of
official rank. In fact, be has
been treated by tin British Gen-
eralissimo, at his headquarters,
as if he had no secrets whatso-
ever from him- official, milita-
ry, or otherwise.
This naturally has excited all
sorts of unfavorable comment
and invidious criticisms; Ihe
more so as George Gordon
Mi ore has been charged, not
only in IhenAmerican press but
even in London newspapers, no-
tably in The London World,
with being BflSOUalld with a
naturalized German of the name
of Loewenfeld, in a London
concern known as the Invest-
ment Registi j Company.
Quite naturally this asso< ia
tion of the British Geueralissi
mo in France with an American
promoter known for his German
business affiliation-, and the. x
traordinary privileges accorded
to him at British Headquarters,
has given rise to much unfavor-
able comment and criticism in
English as well as in French cir-
cles. It has served to estrange
I Sir John from many of his for
liner English and French friends
and admirers, who find it diffi-
cult to understand why he
(should select in this time of dan-
! ger to the British Empire, as
I his principal confident, a Mich-
; igander promoter
As mentioned above, the feud
between French and Kitchonei
had itsorigin in the Boer war
'and in the defeat of Cronje. It
may be recalh d that the latter's
surrender, with all his com man-
(continued on fourth page)
Wear
Shoes


L. OILBKHT DDPOCH,
Editor and Proprittot.
OFFIOK:
Corner Shirley 6. Chivrl.nic Sis
.Nassau, .V. /'., Hnhantas
THONK 2(KI. P. O. BOX 163.
I'llll.lSliHI DAILY
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XLbc XLribune
TUESDAY. July 20.1915.
PUBLISHED AT 1 P. M
If the news received by
cablegrams of Saturday be
true then the condition of
England is a most regrettable
one for she is in as much
danger from foes within as
well as foes without.
The strike of the South
Wales coal miners is really a
blow at the nation, a lack of
coal at this juncture places
our navy practically at the
mercy of the enemy, for with-
out an unlimited and unres-
tricted supply of coal our
navy is really helpless and
any men or combination of
men who by their actions
bring about such a state of
affairs arc playing into the
hands of the enemy and their
action might reasonably be
considered treasonable.
It is difficult to realize such
a state of affairs in England,
where then is the boasted!
loyalty and patriotism of the I
English woikingman, all un- I
dermiued by German Socia-
listic, influence ? The German
has proven himself a past
master in craftiness and se-
duction; they prepared in
enormous quantities the Mu-
nition of war to fight Eng-
land with, they also seduced
the patriotism and loyalty
that would inspire the resis-
tance of the Britains.
But if we stand aghast at
the conduct of the working
man, how are we to view the
action of the Kings Ministers
who at this critical period
would jeopardise the interests
of the state by untimely re-
signations.
Who would suppose that
men like Lloyd George and
Kitchener would permit per-
sonal differences and private
jealousies to stand in the way
of their best service to their
King and Country.
There can be no question
that the resignation of cither
Lloyd George or Kitchener
must have the effect of dis-
locating and throwing out of
gear the machinery set in
motion and guided to the
present time by their own
hands, and spells disaster to
the nation ; added to this is
the feud between Kitchener
and French.
What do these things
mean ? Is there a hand-writ-
ing on the wall in the day of
Englands trial ? And does
this writing read MENE ME-
NE TEKEL UPMARSIM ?
A relentless and stubborn
foe without, and Achans in
the camp, how can the dear
old country withstand.
What a lamentable specta-
cle she must be in the eye of
the nations.
The General Committee of
tleBahamas War Relief Fund
met in the Council Chamber
yesterday afternoo i in the ab-
sence of the Chairman the
Hon. H. G. Malcolm, K. C.
who is out of the Colony, W.
C. 13. Johnson Esq. Deputy
Speaker of the House of As-
sembly was elected Acting
Chairman.
The reading and confirma-
tion of the Minutes, and the
reading of various reports,
were the business dealt with.
The Honoary Treasurer
made the following state-
; meat.
Of the subscription to the
{War Relief Fund amounting
, to ^"3193. 12. 2. disposition
was made as follows.
Remitted to England
Cost of remittance
3000 o o
Of 315 crates Grape fruit
shipped t>> England, some were
purchased at a cost of
Freight packing, crates paper
drayage etc
Balance in hand
3010 o o
50 p 0
"73 5
1'77 .1 5
16 6 9
3103122
The Treasurer also stated
that he had received a further
subscription of 30 guineas
from the Hon. H. G. Malcolm,
and other smaller amounts
yet to be collected.
The Hon. Col. Secretary
read a letter from The Cen-
tral Committee for National
Patriotic Organizations sug-
gesting the holding of a pub-
lic meeting and patriotic de-
monstration on the 4th Au-
gust the anniversary of the
Declaration of War.
It was Resolved that His
Excellency the Governor be
requested to summon such
meeting.
This meeting was remark-
able for the smallness of the
attendance.
:o:
We have felt it our duty
before now to call attention
to the undue harshness of
taking persons, under charge
for criminal offences, to trial
in irons, we are pleased to see
a change in this respect,
though it he rather to the
other extreme, a person under
arrest for a capital offence
taken to court not in irons.
We hope to see this change
continued.
A confirmation service was
held in St. Matthews Church
last evening when 6 candi-
dates (two females and four
males) received the laying on
of hands.
:o:
The Schr. "Fearless" arriv-
ed this morning from Miami
with lumber and ice and the
undernamed passengers.
Mesdames Annie Archer,
Caroline Thompson and Dora
Farrington; Mr. James Far-
-rington; Masters Randolph
l Archer, Samuel O. Thompson
and Alfred Archer (7)
The Consular AgenJJWp
France, acknowledges^wrth
thanks, the follo\\*jn*)-
scriptions towards the French
Red Cross Fund: ^^^
C. Christofilis o tr^o
A Friend 066
William Hilton 050
C. E. Albury 050
130
Latest War News
July 20th 1915.
London 19th,
Governor,
itaha mas.
Official new s:G tneral
French reports no change since
last communique. On the 10th
the enemy attacked noith of
Ypres and gained a footing in
our front line. The lost posi-
tions were immediately recap-
tured.
On the 13th a post on the
Ypres-Menin rear captured by
the Germans was recaptured by
us Also farther North on the
same night a trench was cap-
tured by the Germans but re-
captured by bombing.
The French government re-
port violent attack by the Ger-
mans between Calonne and
Les Lparges succeeded only
in gaining a footing in
trench section captured on the
5th July.
This Section was re raptured
by counter attack and fiesh
attack accomplished by jets of
burning liquid, repulsed over a
hundred prisoners taken in these
engagements.
The Russian government re
ports German attacks on the
whole front from Riga provinces
to the Dneister. The Russians
have gained successes in Riga-
Shavli region and on the Dne-
ister.
The enemies offensive near
Prasrnsz compelled the Rus-
sians to concentrate near War-
saw
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
Vi e n na: An Austrian sub
marine torpedoed the Italian
cruiser Giuseppi Garibaldi
which foundered in fifteen
minutes south of Ragusa, Dal
matia. The cruisers comple
ment was 550 men
Athens: The Allies aro a
tacking tl.e whole front in
Gallipoli but no definite news
v .


ran be AbtAped on the extent
of ground Trained.
London. *ru - total casual
ties in the Dardanelles expedi
tionaryjgrre in killed, wounded
and iTn*Bjfc\s42. 434.
Petrofjrad: Huge Austro-
German forces are concentrated
on a hundred mile front be
tween the Vistula and Bug
Rivers. Von Mackensen is
opposing Grand Duke Nicholas.
The latters army is declared to
he the best that Russia can put
in the field.
London:The South Wales
colliery strike is believed to be
approaching a settlement.
Lloyd George will personally
address the workers.
Paris: German attacks were
repulsed in the vicinity of Sou
die/, and in the region of St.
Hubert, Argorine.
"There Lies a
Gallant English
Gentleman" Said
The Bavarian.
Under a Paris date t lie-
Daily Express publishes the
following:
"There lies a gallant Eng
lish gentleman," said the
Bavarian officer.
Lying in the British hos-
pital at Versailles is a young
city man, a clerk from a
stockbroker's office, who
joined a territorial battalion
of the Bedfordshire regiment
shortly after the outbreak of
the war. Silting by his bed-
side I heard his poignant
story, told in simple language
1 tale of a m.in who gave his
life so that his friend might
have a chance of returning
to bis wife and child.
A friendship that began at
school," was continued in
manhood. Two young men
entered the same office, and
sat on adjoining stools.
One, my informant, married
last July.
"You can talk about shirk
crs," he said; "we were both
shirkers then. Why should
we risk our lives, 1 asked my
pal one morning as we came
up from Surbiton together.
Then came Belgium and the
atrocities. We began to re-
al izt^.^ugs more. My pal
saiu ne was going to enlist,
and I said I would, too. He
tried to dissuade me, because
I was married. His only
relative is his mother.
" We argued the point.
Then I spoke to my wife. She
said, 'Go,' although there
were tears in her eyes when
she said it.
"We were in the same com-
pany, and stood side by side
in the ranks. Our period of
training was tedious, we bad
taken the plunge, and want-
ed to get -out as soon cs pos-
sible. Eventually we found
ourselves at Boulogne, laugh-
ing and cheering and trying
to believe we should soon be
home again. After a week in
billets we were sent into the
trenches.
"The regulars, who we re-
lieved, had christened the
trench 'Hell's Own,' and it
was pretty hellish. I can't
tell you what I felt like when
the big shells came plugging
into the trench. I saw chaps
I had come to like go down
without a word. ... It
was hell. It seemed like eter-
nity waiting for the beggars
to charge.
They threw grenades as th< y
came, and these wiped out a
few more of our (haps, My
blood was up then, and I sim-
ply wanted to kill. It was
hideous.
I shot at an officer and saw
him fall. My pal climbed out
of the trench, walked toward
the man I had dropped,pick*
cd him up and carried him
back to our trench.
"1 was mad with him, I think
we nearly quarrelled, but he
said he couldn't see the devil
lying there bleeding.
"I set my teeth and went
on firing. It was no use ;
they simply wore us down.
We were only twenty, and it
was no good going on. They
took us away and put us in
a barn together.
"In the middle of the night
an officer (I learnt we had
been opposed to the Bava-
rians) came to the barn and
said we were going to be shot
at dawn, all except my pal ;
they would let him off be-
cause he had saved an olfieei \
life. I confess I felt a bit
down. I thought of my wife
and the baby 1 should never
see. My pal said nothing at
all, but all of a sudden he
asked one of the guards if he
could speak to the officer.
They took him away, and in
about an hour he came back.
" 'Where have you been ?'
I asked. 'I have seefi a gen-
eral,' he said. 'It's all fixed
up; they're going to shoot
me instead of you.'
"I didn't know what he
was talking about. He
wouldn't explain, just sank
down and went off to sleep.
I slept fitfully.
"At dawn they awoke us
with kicks, 'Not you,' said
one of the soldiers to me, 'you
stay here; we don't want you.'
They tried to keep me in the
barn, but I pushed my way
out with the others. It was
only then that I realized
what was going to happen.
"My pal gripped my hand,
'fell the mater I've gone
West,' he said. 'I never told
you before, Jack, old man.
. . Your wife chose the
better man .... Give
her mv love.'
"They didn't blindfold'em.
They stood, nineteen of 'em,
back to the wall, and fell at
the first volley.
" 'There lies a gallant Eng-
lish gentleman,' said the Ba-
varian officer. He knew."
FOR SALE, CHEAP
One Motor Boat
Mahogany Finish.
12 h.p. IATHROP ENGINE
Heavy Duty, (New)
Easy Terms.
Apply,
A. C. CRAWFORD.
July 15, 1915.
(THE LINEN STORE.)
and
jp bo!) mjffipQe
Have Received
The Latest Spring Novelty
THE HEW -LAVE" [NETS
Guaranteed Untarnishable,
and Washable.
Suitable for Waists, Yokes*
Dresses, Millinery.
White and Black, White and
Silver, Black and Silver.
! White and Gold Ecru and
Gold, Heliotrope and Gold,
Saxe Blue and Gold. Gold
Silver and Crystal Tassels.
White, Cream, and Ecru Bre
tonne Nets, Shadow Nets,
Lace Nets, Overalls, Point
d'Esprit, Pleated Net Ruch
ings.
Washable Marquisettes.
Black and White, Sand and
White, -Double Width.
Poplin.
Black Poplin, White Poplin,
double width.
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe.
May 1 st, 1915.
CHAS. C. UOHIBOLRN
ARMSTRONG ST.
H&wkin's Hill.
EX PER I ENCED Paper
Hanger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. All work careful-
ly and Artistically performed.
Absolute satisfaction guaran
teed. The verv b< st referem 1 -

-TERMS MODERATE.
GASOLINE
In Drums Eleven pence
per Gallon.
Ten Gallon Cans One Shil
ling per Gallon
C. C. SAUNDERS
East Bay Street
Nas.au N. P.
April, 13th I915,
For Pale By Tender.
The undersigned will re-
( eive lender for the following
valuable property up 103rd
day of August next. All that
property situated in Bay
Street and bounded on the
East by property of John
Lillet, on the West by prop-
erty of Estate of John Alfred,
on the South bv 0 e Burrows,
on the North by Bay Stre<
the same having two shops
one Stone and wood, and
several Buildings to rear, all
on rent. The right is reserv-
ed of rejecting anv or all
Tender.
BY JOHN BUTLER.


1
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
Ann ricnn Bilk
nr.hi Oashruera
Ann ricao Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stocnl tlie teit. Give rea '
foot onnfort. No scams to ri|i. Never
....... loose or bany. The shape is
knit in- not [tressed in
GUARANTEED for fineness, style.
superiority ..f material and workmanship.
Absolutely stainless Will wear 6 months
with"i't hole*, or new ones (ree.
OUR. SPECIAL. OFFER
to every one sen linu Ul ''I (Ml in currency
or postal note, t<> covw adveitisiny and
shipping charftea, sre will send post paid,
with written gukraiitee, barked by a five
million diill,o c< ni| any, eitl er
5 1'r.irs of o\ir 75c. v&luo
American Silk I h -i< i v,
4 Prick of our 50c. vn, l\ie
American Cash mi re I losiery,
4 P*vlre of our 50c. Value.
A ii i lie.in C"tton.Lisle Hosiery
' l'ivir . of Children's Hosiery.
PONT DBLAT- Offer expires when
dealer in your locality is selected.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. U.S.A
BUY
SUPERIOR CIGARS
At 4:;. per huncfrea.
Also a Specialty of
HAVANA CV^MRS
of excellent quality combined
with moderate prices, from
J. B. GARDINER,
Cor. West Street,
and Petticoat Lane.
C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's Agent
Corner George and King Sis.
do, and with an immense
amount <>f ammunition! sup
plies, etc., was the first crush-
ing blow lo the Boei cause in
the South African campaign.
There are some who attribute
the merit of this particular vie
lory to French, who, with his
cavalry force of a couple of
thous.uul men.cutofl the retreat
of Cronje, who was retiring in
the face of a large force of in-
fantry under Kitchener.
Others claim that General
Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien was
largely responsible for the vic-
tory, in having, under the direc-
tion of Kitchener, won a posi
tion with his force of Canadians
and Gordon I Hollanders in a
nightattack which enabled them
on the following rooming to
enfilade th most important
Slretch of 11 > Boer defense*. Me
this as it may. Kitchener was
tht; officer in highest command
in the operations that culmina
ted iii the defeat of Cronje, and
it was therefore to him that
belonged the laurels of the vie
tory. lie never claimed them
himself. But his adherents did
so for him.
This was bitterly resented by
French, who, although lie re.
ceived a Knighthood of the Or-
der of the Bath and promotion
to the rank of Major General,
always felt thai he had been in
some way robbed i f the credit
of this smashing blow to the
Boer cause by Kitchener and
Smith Dorrien.
Anyhow, from that tiniefoith
he developed a bitter enmity
against Kitchener, which he
made but little attempt to con
ceal, and which among his par
tisansfound us expression then,
as today, in endeavoring to de
preciate all of Kitchener's mili-
tary achievements and prowess-
es, notably his conquest of the
Soudan in the face of almost
insuperable difficulties, his
smashing victories of Atbara
and Omdurman.and nissurcess
ful direction of all those tire
some operations in South Africa
by means of which the guerilla
warfare of the Boers, after the
(all of Pretoria, was brought to
a close.
(to be continued.)
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
Instructions have been re-
ceived summoning a II French -
men born in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes l8qo
to 1909 (born from 1S70 to
1889) to present themselves
immediately at the Vice Con-
sulate of Fiance at Port-of-
Spainor at any of the twelve
Consular Agencies of the Bri-
tish West Indies to pass a
medical examination.
H. F. ARMHR1M r. K..
Consulnr Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
FRENCH RED CROSS FUND.
Every Monday
SALE HERE FOR
Boots, Shoes,
Collars, Notions,
Pont miss your chance. Sold
for small value. Come and
SAVE MONEY.
J. K. AMOURY.
Bay Street.
Subscriptions are urgently
needed tor the above fund
and all donations, however
small, will be gratefully ac-
cepted, and will be acknow-
ledged in the newspapers.
H. F. AR.MBR.ISTER.
Consular Agent for France.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.
FOR
SUMMER SUITS
Palm Beach Cloth
at 3s. yd.
VV/W. HILTON.
Phone 201.
White Lime
I AM offering FON SALE
my entile stork of White
Lime of about Sou bushels
at 6d. per bushel.
Orders left at Mr. Solomon
Finlnyson, Devenux St. or
Phone 258 or "The Tribune"
Office,
Josiaii Raiiming
June 30, 1915.
RUMSEY'S PUMPS
CISTERN Pumps, Well
P u m ps, W i n d mi I 1
Pumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
Mai hineiy, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors,Ship Pump-.
Pressure Pumps, Boiler Feed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, c'tc.
Installed under the direct
supervision of II. McPhcrson
and Brother.
Prices on Application.
H. J. THOMPSON,
Agent.
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform Ins friends
anil the Public that le has
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for the huisnrss of an un-
ilertiiker, which places him in a
position to carry out Funerals that
may he entrusted to his care with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage Get
iny Prices first and prove that these
arc the very lowest for the first class
work.
Williams' Shoes Are Better
il


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