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/ • L. OILMKItT DUPUCH. Editor jnd Propritlor. OFFIOK: Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sta Nassau, N. P., Bahamas TI10NK 2(10. ]>. O. FOX 103. PUBLISHED DAILY RATES Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday— single copy j,] Tuesday, and Thursday— single copy id Saturday—tingle copy ... ijd Weekly 5 d Monthly s. t*l v lli,,|c, iy 4 s. 6d H.ilfYr.ulv ... ... YM| 'y 1 8s. PAYARLR IX ADVANCE Advertising Rate* :-Sii pence per line for lii-t insertion: three pence pre lint for second imertiua ; aou ooeuniny pa line for HllMqueiit insert s. Adwrtfr tm e n ti undei eiyht lines 4s. Zhe Zxibune THURSDAY. July 15. 1915. PUBLISHED AT 7 P.M. MAIL8 AND THE "FRAHCE8 E." 'Hie Government seldom affords us an opportunity of endorsing its action in any particular, the which we would always do unhesitatingly and gladly if we could, and wc have always regarded and keenly felt that we have been kept out of our own, because we are not Vicars of Bray, therefore are we abundantly gratified that we can now endorse the Government to theecho, and satisfied that tlie community is not to be left in the cold in the matter of the forwarding of our mails by ihe sine qua non the Fran ccs /•. at a time when the contract mail service is fortnightly. A weekly regular mail is of immense benefit to the Colony, and is much to the credit of local enterprise that the gap which would otherwise have been made but for the energy and enterprise of Mr. C. C. Sauiulcrs did not break through. Many a time and oft have our commercial interests been helped, and through them, the revenue, by the little messenger, to say nothing of the great convenience to private individuals, and the inestimable boon that we have for some time past been granted cannoi now be appreciated at its full value and would not except we were deprived of it. We might cite numerous cases in which the revenue has benefitted through the mail service of the Franca F. in the matter of merchandise orders having gone forward by it which had been omitted to be sent by the Contract Mail Steamers. En passant this is but one. We were in the office of a prominent Mer chant who was mailing letters for the Frances F. "See this," he said, "by Jingo, I would rather pay $10 than lose this chance—something I forgot to order by the Ward Line." What the revenue would have lost but for the Frances /*'. he alone knows. It would be instructive for us to know how much is paid by the Post Master for the conveyance and delivery of mails by the Frances I:, on each voyage. We do not wish to censure the action of the Administrator in Council for the Rule made on Ihe 14th June, 1915, but why such a rule was made is inexplicable. It did not need much "sabe" to see how injurious it might prove. We want to feel in this Colony that we have an Ex( cutive Department justly en|titled to our confidence, esteem, and respect, and whose judgment we may implicitly trust. The repeal made yesterday of the Order of the 14th June, and which restores the payjment of gratuities to the Status quo, has been thoroughly approved by. the community. It relieves a situation which had become intolerable, because any reasonable man could forsee the calamity that No Mail by "Frances F." would be, and we know that the masses were beconvi ing restless under the opera tion of the unwise rule. Let us hope that in future, nothing will occur which may jeopardize the confidence which wejshould have in Our executive department. The funeral of Mr. George R. Evans took place yesterday afternoon and was attended by a very large number of persons representing all classes of the community, the service in S. MatthewsChurch was held by the Rev. C. I). Dampen of Christ Church of which the deceased was a member. A short service was held at the house by the Rev. S. J. Bennett of St. Andrews Presbyterian Church of which Mrs. Evans is a member. TheG.UO. of OF. attended in large numbers and escorted the funeral procession from the house to the Church, members of the Patriarchie acting as pall bearers, the rites of the Order were performed at the grave. Notably among those present were the Hon. W. Hart Bennett, C. M. G., Colonial Secretary, and Chairman of the Hoard of Education; lion H. G. Malcolm K. C, Speaker of the Honourable Mouse of Assembly, YV. C. R. Johnson, Deputy Speaker; Hon. J. P. Sands of the Executive Council, Revd. J. W. Roberts and David Wilshere members of the House of Assembly, members of the Hoard cf Education, and members of the Masonic fraternity. Large numbers of people lined the route of the procession. All of the above indicative of the respect entertained by the community for Mr. Evan. c The Ward Line (Cuban) steamer "Yumuri" steamed for Cuban ports yesterd ty evening at 6 o'clock. 'Ihe Mail Steamer "Mexico" steamed for New York this afternoon with the following pas engers.— Misses May Malcolm, Viola C. U. Sands, Mae A. Gibson, Alice M. Hay, Laura Stedham, Elorrie Saunders and Effie G V. Adderlev; Mrs. C. II J. Adderlev; Sir Joseph and Lady Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. Tynes Smith, Hon. Hat court Malcolm; Messrs .. _. _,. — J Ralph H. Sands, Vincent Brown, John A. Mch^frnev, |. W. Dolsch, and B. W. Yeazel. Mrs. Margaret Evans; Messrs F. G. Williams, Frank Watson, Geo. F. Franks, John F. Fergurson, and John Muir; Capt. K. O. Busvig. (25) —o — The Motor Frances E arrived from Miami this afternoon. MAILS The time for closing Foreign Mails to be despatched per "Frances E" via Miami Ida. has been extended to Saturday, the 17th inst. at 8 a. m. "GOVERNMENT NOTICES" A proclamation by the Government re Trading with the enemy is published. T. E. D. Brace, Clerk Colonial Secretary's Department has been granted one months vacation leave. Chas. P. Bethel, 2nd Clerk Colonial Secretary's Department has been appointed acting Chief Clerk. R. N. Lightbourn has been appointed a member of the Development Board pro tern. An order in Council re Interinsular Mails is published. A Rule made by the Governor in Council re "Blind Literature Port is published. The Rule made by the Governor in Council (in the 14th June is repealed and a new rule, restoring the gratuity paid for the conveyance of mails to one penny per letter is published. Joseph Dorsett has been appointed District Constable for Gaitors Settlement Sa n Salvador. fflP Alfred Camplejohn Linesman Electrical Department has been granted 3 months vacation leave of absence.



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., T n The Magistrates Court. 5 Simon Russell—Drunk in public street—5s. or 4 days Charles Ash and Jeremiah Taylor—Fighting in public street of Sandilands Village— F.ach 5s. and 7s. Compensation to Polite. In default 8 days. Alice Barr—Detaining divers articles of clothing goods and chattels of James Fulford —Ordered to deliver said articles to Complainant. 6 Druscilla Roberts —Using profane and indecent language in Baillou Hill Road — 14 days. Joseph Russell — Breach Cattle Act—58. 8 Jos. Fernander— Drunk in Bay Street—5s. or 4 clays. Reuben Finlayson —Breach Dog Licence Act—2, 6d. Jos. Driggs—Assaulting Margaret Driggs— £1. or 14 days. Robert Rodgers— llltreating a cow—10s. or 8 days. Theophilus Thurston — Breach Dog Licence Act 2. 6d. 10 Estella Hinder, Victoria Knowlesand I'rescilla Weech —Drunk 'ind indecent behaviour in Fast Street -Each 1 os. or 8 days. Latest War News July 15th 1915. London, 14th, Governor, Bahamas. Official News: -I he French government report a successful air raid on German strategic railway in Woevre. In Argonne the crown prince's army attacked with asphyxiating shells but was defeated by vigorous counter attacks. German attacks on trenches captured by British Sou til > west of Pilken weie easily repulsed. (Signed) ?r* 1 ork:-— 1 he supreme court jury which has been trying the case of Harry Thaw have declared him sane The Judge has reserved until Friday his decision regarding what is to. be done with Thaw. Washington: —The organization of a mine-sweeping division of the Atlantic ileet has been announced by the navy department. It will consist of the cruisers Baltimore and San Francisco and a number of tugs. Geneva:—A Villach des patch says that the Italians have captured two miles of Austrian trenches in the Car* nic Alps near Roskofel, also two important points south of Cioriza. Berlin: —It is unofficially stated that during June German submarines sunk 42 merchant vessels. It is officially stated that in the Argonne the Germans took French positions on nearly a two mile front and two miles deep. Paris:—Official reports say that attacks in Argonne have been definitely stopped. London: —It is reported that German engineers are strengthening the defenses of Constantinople on a huge scale. London:—A second attempt is made by the Kaisers army to take the city of Verdun. German activity in the West is now in earnest with assaults both in the Argonne and Woevre. Bridgeport, ConnecticutStrikes in the Remington Arms Companys works here are said to be due to the work of German syrapathiz ers. * — :o:— OUR WEAKNESS FOR MEDICINE It is a fact and an undisptitablc one, too, that we Americans dote on taking medicine. Despite what has recently been written to the contrary, the actual state is almost as bad as it was some deracics ago—possibly with this difference, that, whereasI formerly we gulped down patent medicines with a courage that made the beatific joys of the early Christian martyrs pale into insignificance, we are today following the same tactics with drugs that are "recognized." Directly a man feels out of sorts his first thought is the drug store; that is, if he is a strictly moral man, or the saloon if he is inclined toward the im moral life in the efficacy of whisky to drive away the blues. But let us imagine we are dealing with an individual of the highest morality, with one who has a weakness for burning incense on the altar of a drug store. With what glee he enters the store, with what confidence lie takes the near patent medicine prescribed by I the druggist No matter which jit is, what he covets has been granted; some sort of medicine to put him in a happy frame of mind again by alleviating the general nervousness that obses ses him. And in case lie is too scientific to take what the drug gist wishes to give him, and resorls instead to his family doctor, it is the latter more chary of drugs ? No, indeed; the usual formula is prescribed, the patient is admonished not to fail to return in a week or so, and again is presented the de lightful spectacle of credulity magnifying the very ordinary qualities of a drug into the exaulted virtues of a Panacea — Editorial, Interstate Medical Journal, February, 191 5. FOR SALE, CHEAP One Motor Boat Mali' gaiiy Finish. 12 h.p. LATHROP ENGINE Heavy Duty, (New) EASY TERMS. Apply, A. C. CRAWFORD. July 15, 10,15. "The intense heat niak them physically bad and the general relaxation makes them morally bad," says Father Belford. "Rest and change are good for every one, but when they entail dissipation and vice they become real evils. When we leave home let us bear in mind that we do not leave God. The Ten Commandments are not bounded by jcity limits. Propriety and I decorum are guardians of virtue and nothing should induce us to set them aside. "A visit to the beaches is quite enough to convince the most broad-minded that there prevails a degree of immorality that is absolutely inexcusable. No one will dispute the fact that a cer tain degree of undress is es sential for bathing, but whei that degree is used to spen the day or a large part of i on the sands where the scv mingle with a degree of In dom that would not be toler ated on the street or even in a ballroom it is time to cry out in protest." — New York Herald. LOST Between Rawson Square and Shirley St. along Parliament St. A Gold 3 Leaf Clover Brooch, a Diamond in the centre and a Sapphire, on each side. Return to TRIBUNE OFFICE. NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS. CONDEMNS BEACH CONDUCT. Falher'Belford Snys Summer Season Is tlio Worst Morally. The Key. John I.. Belford of the Roman Catholic Church of 1 tie Nativity, Brooklyn, in an article in The Mentor, his parish paper, yesterday expressed himI self as deeply shocked by the; looseness of morals among! pleasure seekersat the beachi es and in the public parkjs. He said the .Summer season was morally the worst of the year. INSTRUCTIONS have been received summoning all Frenchmen born in Martinique, Guadelope or French Guiana belonging to the classes 1800 to 1909 (born from 1870 to 1889) lo present themselves immediately at the Vice Con* sulate of France at I'ort-ofSpainor at any of the twi Ive Consular Agencies of the British West Indies to pass a medi< al examination, H. F. ARMBRISU:R, Consul u Aycil for Franco. Nassau, N. P., 2nd July, 1915.



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1 THE AMERICAN BISON 4 is fast becoming extinct, hut this fact need not trouble the housewife. Her interest is centred on the fact that, thanks to SUNLIGHT SOAP, the terrors of wash-day have become quite extinct. With SUNLIGHT SOAP as a helper the wash is quickly over. Labour is reduced by its use—time is saved and the clothes are preserved. SUNLIGHT SOAP does the work. It is made for that purpose. TRY IT AND SAVE YOUR *34i TIME AND MONKY. been known that all was not vrell at tlie British Headquarters in France. That there liave been serious dissensions between Kield Marshal French and his principal Generals is apparent from the fact that several of them, by way of ex pressing their disapproval and their unwillingness to serve un tier him an> longer, have taken the extreme step of asking to be relieved of their commands, and have returned home, most notable among them all being ( i eneral Sir II irace SmithI inrrien, u h >, on the outbreak of the war, wa placed at the In ad of one of the two army corps into which the British foices under Sir John French were divided. Smith Dorrii n has always been regarded as being one of the ablest commanders and cleverest stavj its of the British Army, and stands particularly high in the estimation of I lie rank and file. But he h is the disadvantage in French's eyes of being one of the most inti tiinate friends and trusted lieutenai.ts of Kitchener, under whom he served in Egypt, in South Arftca and in India. Moreover, he was associated W ith Kitchener in that defeat of Cionje, in the Moer war, which was the point of departure of French's feud against the conqueror of the Soudan and the victor of Khartoum. __ But the dissatisfaction with French, and with Ins methods, is unfotunat ly not restricted to the British commanders w ho have been serving uiidri him in Flanders mul in France. It has extended to the French mi Ha ry authorities, and even to the French Government, and the frequent visits win. h have been paid during the last three months to France by Prime Minister tsquitli, by Lord Kitchener,and by Lloyd George have ben for the purpose of smotthing away dill, rei.ces I ptween the British < leneralissimo and his Fren< ll 1 ollei pm s Field Marshal French puts forward an excuse foi h s fail ure to advance, and f. r the im mobilit) of his troops, the insuf ficiency of ammunition and his failure to receive proper supi ort from the French Ami) But all the reports of (iermaii prisoneis and of the militaiv experts "f the principal newspapers in Germany lay Stress oil the pin noini'iia I amount of ainniunili' n usd by the Ei glish, which docs not indicate any deficiency therefore in that branch of war supplies; while the Fn nch \< i v justl) point out that, win 1 their lines extend from the borders of Sw itzeiland north ward for considerably over 400 miles, (he British lines are re tricted to a bare tliiity miles, to operate from which Kield has Marshal French has under his command the largest, best equipped, and finest army that tjreat Biitttin has ever put into the field. It is an armv which, according to the most authoritative figures, numbers over 2,000.000! m n. I'or troops have been pour | ing iteadily across the Channel from England into France, with out a days interruption sine,* tie J beginning of the war. The men are by common consent of a far superior class to the former P.ritisll "Tommy" alike in physique ioid intelligence, being drawn fiom the educated and more or less well-to do element of the I population; men who, instead of enlisting in the army as a last resource, when they had failed m everything else, had .... the contrary givi n up lucrative employment, abandoned money making professions, or mrren ,l ''"' 1 a life devoted to healthful sport and adventure to' do ih< ir bit" foi ()l.1 England,prompted thereto by patriotism, and also, 1' must be admitted, by an inherent love of fighting. Known as "Kitchener's men." they have bi en trained to the top notch of efficiency and en durance. Their equipment and the wonderful organization de vised by Kitchener f..r ihcii be. mg clothed and fed have aroused the admiration and amaze men! of military rxperU throughout the world, even of the Germans, and it may safelj be uprated once more that "' vet has a British General had so fine an armv under his command as I'.ehl Marshal French. RUMSEY'S PUMPS C ISTE RN Pumps, Well Pumps, Windmill I'umps, I>iaphragm jftbrnps, House Pumps, pfrttimntic Systems, Spray Pumps, Hydraulic Rams, Mine Tumps, Deep Well Pumps, Electric Pumps, Cylinder and Valves, Triplex Power Pumps, Centrifugal Pumps, Waterworks M.11 hinery, Rotary Pumps, Sump Pumps, Fiie Lumps, Air Compressors,Ship Lumps Pressure Lumps, Boiler Feed Lumps, Irrigation Pumps, Hydrants, etc. Installed under the direct supervision "f II. MePht^on 11 ml Jirnllier. Priws mi Application. II. J. THOMPSON, Agent. Position Wanted. {to he continued ) Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Oaahmera Amarican Cott. n I.isle HOSIERY TIK-V have st,„„i u„teat Give rea [""' c "'"f"'t No atamato rip. N< re. -, rii r lone ... bary. The >h..i.e is knit in not 1 i.ssr.l m GUARANTEED f.,r (inen.'ss, stvlo, ifity of malarial and workmanship. Vb* li tefv st ijnlaai Will weai < %  month* willi il hole*, "r TOW (Hies fie* OUR SPECIAL OFFER t" rKn: .ne -t 11 ling u -si IKI in currency "' noital 1. ite, to cttvm advertising and sl"i'pi.-<-i'I-1 .. ur will anid p -t paid, with written gtihraiitee, backed by a five million dollar cnni| any, either 5 Fivirs of our 75c. value American SilkHnrierr, or 4 1'n.irn of our 50c'. vn Hi* American Caahmen Hosiery, or 4 P%Jrof our 50c. Value. Airerkan C. .It..11.Lisle Hi*iery or 6 Ptvirs of CKildren'a Hosiery I'ONT DBLAY-Offerespinewhcu rtaalei in your locality is selected THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO P. O. Box 224 DAYTON. OHIO. US.A RY A YOUNG MAN'who, is willing to work, has experience in tlie (irorery business, can ride a wheel, and drive u horse ; alao has ability in office work and read) for all kinds of work that is honourable. I will be satisfied with a .sinuH salary to begin with; give me a trial arid if after a sjH,. c iiiod time I do not suit, I will not expect to be paid. 1 am a Bahamian by birth, a resident in Miami for over a year and can furnish best uf references. CABLE OH WiuTr -re HERBERT E. MUNMNOg, r )l7 Avenue I. Miami, 1'la. (are W. E. FROST, Manager. .1. C McCRORY'S Sets, and 10CK stme, 12th St. Miami, Fla. NOTICE. I "* 111 S is in in (or 111 my Patrons .HMI the Public in General il'ii I have opened my Public Blnck Suiilli "^11 %  • [>; and am now ready i" .In finyihinx i" > e line ,>i Cieuetal repair 01 iiew k Horse S11 r •* n, •_• --in (i;illv. \|l work done Mechanically P. A. HUYLEB ClIAS. C. LIGHT BObRN ARMSTRONG ST. Hawkine. Hill. E X PER ir. NCR I) Paper Hanger. Ceiling Work, a specialty. Al! workcarefully nnd Artistically performed. Absolute s.'ilisf.irtion utjur.in li'cd The v< 1 v besl 1 rl^k^u %  ,. TERMS MODERATE. Williams' Shoes Are Better \



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': Nulllvie e.ddlctua |urar in verbs ma.glMrl. Being bound to iwe&r to the Dogm&a of no Me^ater. VOL. XII. N.-.,v,,N.!'..B R hMimi THURSDAY July. 15. 1915 NO. 501 • • SIR JOHN FRENCH UNDER A CLOUD. Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be Widely Discussed in Paris and London. M ILITARY and naval feuds play havoc with discipline in limes of peac. In times of war they constitute a rave peril to tlie State, and in the past have, on a number of occasions, spelled disaster. If in the Crimean war the Light Brigade was almost wiped out of existence in that heroic but altogether futile cavalry charge at Balaclava which forms the theme of one of Tennyson's finest poems, it was the result of a mistake brought about by a feud between two of the English commanding offi cers As stated by the bard, in his ringing verse, "some one had blundered." The blunder was due to the fart that Lord Cardigan and Lord Lucan were not oirspeaking terms. Some six or seven years ago the feud between Admiral of the fleet Lord Fisher and Admiral Lord Charles Beresford—a feud which had its origin in a silly feminine quarrel between their respective wives at Malta—cul mine ted in a condition of affairs that attracted the attention of the entiie civilized world, form ed the theme of endless discus sion, in print on both sides of die Atlantic-, and led the Paris Temps to comment editorial!) upon the matter as follows: "In discipline in the rank and file of a navy is a very grave danger. There, is only one that is still more serious, namely indiscipMoi ong the officers. British officers of every rank 10 the navy took sides with the i i vnl Admirals to such an extent that most of the old time spirit ol cameraderis disappeared foi the nonce. Those who had es pouted the Beresford cause insisted that they were subjected in consequence thereof to re lenlless persecution by the Fish er clique, which was then in power at Whitehall. The newspapers were filled with bitter recriminations by the warring factions, and matters reached such a pass that Hear Admiral Sir Percy Scott actually rendered himsi If guilty of hoisting a signal indicating to the ves sels of his squadron his contempt and derision for the di rections just received Irom his commanding officer, Lord Charles Beresford. Fisher, who was First Sea Charles were relieved of their commands and shelved, while Fisher quitted the Admiralty and went on the retiied list, making way at Whitehall for Sir Arthur Knyvett Wilson, under whom the discipline of the British Navy was restored to its former pre eminence, the l/isher-Beresford feud fading away into a mere disagreeable memory. The I-'eud of Fisher and Beresford in the navy has had its counterpart in the feud between Field Marshals Lord Kitchener and Sir John French in the ar my—with this difference: that all the hostility and animosity have come from French and his partisans ; manifestations of illwill which have always been treated by Kitchener with sipugning not onh his services as War Secretary but also his capacity as a commander, have been definitely traced to their source at the headquarters of Sir John French in France. They have signally failed in their avowed efforts to oust him from office, and to retire him from the army, as incompetent and past use ; have, on the contrary had the effect of increasing his prestige, his power, and his hold upon the imagination and regard of his countrymen. This being the case, i[ one of the two men has to go—and this is inevitable—it will not be Kitchener, but French. For some time past it has {continued on fourth page) Lord of the Admiralty, declined i 'cut contempt. Indeed, he has to iimove Scott from his com always affected to ignore them, mand of one of the divisions ol and his disdained to accord the Beiesford's fleet or even to perslightest notice to the various "Elgin >> intrigues and attacks. The feud which, originating mit him to be otherwise pun ished for this particularly gross exhibition of insubordination, in the Boer war, and continued 15? !" !?*. \JH ear U> Lord throughout the subsequent four teen years of peace, lias now in this present international conflagration reached such a pass, throuch no fault of Kitchener's, Charles' protests. This enraged Beresford so much that a few weeks later, at a Levee in St. James' Palace, he refused the proffered hand of it must be admitted, as to ren Fisher, his superior officer, in the Throne Room, in the pre sence of King Edward, of tingreat dignitaries of the r dm, and of the foreign Ambassadors, who were all witnesses of the affront. This brought matters to a climax, and not long afler ward Sir I'ercv Scott and Lord der further cooperation be tween the two men, the one as Secretary of Stale for War and the olher as Generalissimo of the British fores in France and Flanders, extremely difficult, if not impossible. All the recent attacks upon Kitchener, in the newspapers and even in Parliament, im ARROW COLLAR Made of a fine white Moire Madras—an attractive novelty that is in good form. ON SALE AT NASSAU'S BEST RETAILERS CU'ETT, PEA BODY & CO., Inc. MAKERS. TROY, N. Y. U., S. A. C. L. LOFTHOUSE Exclusive Agent. Wear Ar-mbrister's Shoes I;


The Tribune.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02366
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Thursday, July 15, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02366

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Full Text
':
Nulllvie e.ddlctua |urar in verbs ma.glMrl.
Being bound to iwe&r to the Dogm&a of no Me^ater.
VOL. XII.
N.-.,v,,N.!'..BRhMimi THURSDAY July. 15. 1915
NO. 501

SIR JOHN FRENCH UNDER A CLOUD.
Feud With Kitchener Causes Peculiar Facts About Him to be
Widely Discussed in Paris and London.
MILITARY and naval
feuds play havoc with
discipline in limes of
peac. In times of war they
constitute a rave peril to tlie
State, and in the past have, on a
number of occasions, spelled
disaster.
If in the Crimean war the
Light Brigade was almost
wiped out of existence in that
heroic but altogether futile cav-
alry charge at Balaclava which
forms the theme of one of Ten-
nyson's finest poems, it was the
result of a mistake brought
about by a feud between two of
the English commanding offi
cers As stated by the bard, in
his ringing verse, "some one had
blundered." The blunder was
due to the fart that Lord Car-
digan and Lord Lucan were not
oirspeaking terms.
Some six or seven years ago
the feud between Admiral of the
fleet Lord Fisher and Admiral
Lord Charles Beresforda feud
which had its origin in a silly
feminine quarrel between their
respective wives at Maltacul
mine ted in a condition of affairs
that attracted the attention of
the entiie civilized world, form
' ed the theme of endless discus
sion, in print on both sides of die
Atlantic-, and led the Paris
Temps to comment editorial!)
upon the matter as follows: "In
discipline in the rank and file of
a navy is a very grave danger.
There, is only one that is still
more serious, namely indiscip-
Moi ong the officers.
British officers of every rank
10 the navy took sides with the
i i vnl Admirals to such an extent
that most of the old time spirit
ol cameraderis disappeared foi
the nonce. Those who had es
pouted the Beresford cause in-
sisted that they were subjected
in consequence thereof to re
lenlless persecution by the Fish
er clique, which was then in
power at Whitehall. The news-
papers were filled with bitter
recriminations by the warring
factions, and matters reached
such a pass that Hear Admiral
Sir Percy Scott actually ren-
dered himsi If guilty of hoisting
a signal indicating to the ves
sels of his squadron his con-
tempt and derision for the di
rections just received Irom his
commanding officer, Lord
Charles Beresford.
Fisher, who was First Sea
Charles were relieved of their
commands and shelved, while
Fisher quitted the Admiralty
and went on the retiied list,
making way at Whitehall for
Sir Arthur Knyvett Wilson, un-
der whom the discipline of the
British Navy was restored to
its former pre eminence, the
l/isher-Beresford feud fading
away into a mere disagreeable
memory.
The I-'eud of Fisher and Beres-
ford in the navy has had its
counterpart in the feud between
Field Marshals Lord Kitchener
and Sir John French in the ar
mywith this difference: that
all the hostility and animosity
have come from French and his
partisans ; manifestations of ill-
will which have always been
treated by Kitchener with si-
pugning not onh his servic-
es as War Secretary but also
his capacity as a commander,
have been definitely traced to
their source at the headquarters
of Sir John French in France.
They have signally failed in
their avowed efforts to oust him
from office, and to retire him
from the army, as incompetent
and past use ; have, on the con-
trary had the effect of increas-
ing his prestige, his power, and
his hold upon the imagination
and regard of his countrymen.
This being the case, i[ one of
the two men has to goand
this is inevitableit will not
be Kitchener, but French.
For some time past it has
{continued on fourth page)
Lord of the Admiralty, declined i 'cut contempt. Indeed, he has
to iimove Scott from his com always affected to ignore them,
mand of one of the divisions ol and his disdained to accord the
Beiesford's fleet or even to per- slightest notice to the various
"Elgin
>>
intrigues and attacks.
The feud which, originating
mit him to be otherwise pun
ished for this particularly gross
exhibition of insubordination, in the Boer war, and continued
15?!?*. \JH ear U> Lord throughout the subsequent four
teen years of peace, lias now in
this present international con-
flagration reached such a pass,
throuch no fault of Kitchener's,
Charles' protests.
This enraged Beresford so
much that a few weeks later, at
a Levee in St. James' Palace,
he refused the proffered hand of it must be admitted, as to ren
Fisher, his superior officer, in
the Throne Room, in the pre
sence of King Edward, of tin-
great dignitaries of the r dm,
and of the foreign Ambassadors,
who were all witnesses of the
affront.
This brought matters to a
climax, and not long afler
ward Sir I'ercv Scott and Lord
der further cooperation be
tween the two men, the one as
Secretary of Stale for War and
the olher as Generalissimo of
the British fores in France and
Flanders, extremely difficult, if
not impossible.
All the recent attacks upon
Kitchener, in the newspapers
and even in Parliament, im
ARROW
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ON SALE AT
NASSAU'S
BEST RETAILERS
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I;


/
L. OILMKItT DUPUCH.
Editor jnd Propritlor.
OFFIOK:
Corner Shirley & Charlotte Sta
Nassau, N. P., Bahamas
TI10NK 2(10. ]>. O. FOX 103.
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
Monday, Wednesday and Fiiday
single copy ......... j,]
Tuesday, and Thursdaysingle copy id
Saturdaytingle copy ... ijd
Weekly ............ 5d
Monthly ............,s. t*l
vlli,,|c,iy..........4s. 6d
H.ilfYr.ulv... ...
YM|'y ............18s.
PAYARLR IX ADVANCE
Advertising Rate* :-Sii pence per line
for lii-t insertion: three pence pre lint
for second imertiua ; aou ooeuniny pa
line for HllMqueiit insert.....s.
Adwrtfrtmenti undei eiyht lines 4s.
Zhe Zxibune
THURSDAY. July 15. 1915.
PUBLISHED AT 7 P.M.
MAIL8 AND THE "FRAHCE8 E."
'Hie Government seldom af-
fords us an opportunity of
endorsing its action in any
particular, the which we
would always do unhesitat-
ingly and gladly if we could,
and wc have always regarded
and keenly felt that we have
been kept out of our own, be-
cause we are not Vicars of
Bray, therefore are we abun-
dantly gratified that we can
now endorse the Government
to theecho, and satisfied that
tlie community is not to be
left in the cold in the matter
of the forwarding of our mails
by ihe sine qua non the Fran
ccs /. at a time when the
contract mail service is fort-
nightly. A weekly regular
mail is of immense benefit to
the Colony, and is much to
the credit of local enterprise
that the gap which would
otherwise have been made
but for the energy and enter-
prise of Mr. C. C. Sauiulcrs
did not break through.
Many a time and oft have
our commercial interests been
helped, and through them,
the revenue, by the little mes-
senger, to say nothing of the
great convenience to private
individuals, and the inesti-
mable boon that we have for
some time past been granted
cannoi now be appreciated
at its full value and would
not except we were deprived
of it.
We might cite numerous
cases in which the revenue
has benefitted through the
mail service of the Franca F.
in the matter of merchandise
orders having gone forward
by it which had been omitted
to be sent by the Contract
Mail Steamers. En passant
this is but one. We were in
the office of a prominent Mer
chant who was mailing let-
ters for the Frances F. "See
this," he said, "by Jingo, I
would rather pay $10 than
lose this chancesomething
I forgot to order by the Ward
Line." What the revenue
would have lost but for the
Frances /*'. he alone knows.
It would be instructive for us
to know how much is paid by
the Post Master for the con-
veyance and delivery of mails
by the Frances I:, on each
voyage.
We do not wish to censure
the action of the Administra-
tor in Council for the Rule
made on Ihe 14th June, 1915,
but why such a rule was
made is inexplicable. It did
not need much "sabe" to see
how injurious it might prove.
We want to feel in this
Colony that we have an Ex-
( cutive Department justly en-
|titled to our confidence, es-
teem, and respect, and whose
judgment we may implicitly
trust.
The repeal made yesterday
of the Order of the 14th June,
and which restores the pay-
jment of gratuities to the
Status quo, has been thorough-
ly approved by. the commu-
nity. It relieves a situation
which had become intolera-
ble, because any reasonable
man could forsee the calami-
ty that No Mail by "Frances
F." would be, and we know
that the masses were beconvi
ing restless under the opera
tion of the unwise rule. Let
us hope that in future, noth-
ing will occur which may
jeopardize the confidence
which wejshould have in Our
executive department.
The funeral of Mr. George
R. Evans took place yesterday
afternoon and was attended
by a very large number of
persons representing all
classes of the community, the
service in S. MatthewsChurch
was held by the Rev. C. I).
Dampen of Christ Church of
which the deceased was a
member. A short service was
held at the house by the Rev.
S. J. Bennett of St. Andrews
Presbyterian Church of which
Mrs. Evans is a member.
TheG.UO. of OF. attend-
ed in large numbers and es-
corted the funeral procession
from the house to the Church,
members of the Patriarchie
acting as pall bearers, the
rites of the Order were per-
formed at the grave.
Notably among those pre-
sent were the Hon. W. Hart
Bennett, C. M. G., Colonial
Secretary, and Chairman of
the Hoard of Education; lion
H. G. Malcolm K. C, Speak-
er of the Honourable Mouse
of Assembly, YV. C. R. John-
son, Deputy Speaker; Hon. J.
P. Sands of the Executive
Council, Revd. J. W. Roberts
and David Wilshere members
of the House of Assembly,
members of the Hoard cf
Education, and members of
the Masonic fraternity.
Large numbers of people
lined the route of the process-
ion.
All of the above indicative
of the respect entertained by
the community for Mr. Evan.c.
The Ward Line (Cuban)
steamer "Yumuri" steamed
for Cuban ports yesterd ty
evening at 6 o'clock.
'Ihe Mail Steamer "Mexi-
co" steamed for New York
this afternoon with the fol-
lowing pas engers.
Misses May Malcolm, Viola
C. U. Sands, Mae A. Gibson,
Alice M. Hay, Laura Sted-
ham, Elorrie Saunders and
Effie G V. Adderlev; Mrs. C.
II J. Adderlev; Sir Joseph
and Lady Brown, Mr. and
Mrs. R. Tynes Smith, Hon.
Hat court Malcolm; Messrs
.. _. _,. _________ J
Ralph H. Sands, Vincent
Brown, John A. Mch^frnev,
|. W. Dolsch, and B. W. Yea-
zel.
Mrs. Margaret Evans;
Messrs F. G. Williams, Frank
Watson, Geo. F. Franks, John
F. Fergurson, and John Muir;
Capt. K. O. Busvig. (25)
o
The Motor Frances E ar-
rived from Miami this after-
noon.
MAILS
The time for closing For-
eign Mails to be despatched
per "Frances E" via Miami
Ida. has been extended to
Saturday, the 17th inst. at 8
a. m.
"GOVERNMENT NOTICES"
A proclamation by the Gov-
ernment re Trading with the
enemy is published.
T. E. D. Brace, Clerk Co-
lonial Secretary's Department
has been granted one months
vacation leave.
Chas. P. Bethel, 2nd Clerk
Colonial Secretary's Depart-
ment has been appointed
acting Chief Clerk.
R. N. Lightbourn has been
appointed a member of the
Development Board pro tern.
An order in Council re In-
terinsular Mails is published.
A Rule made by the Gov-
ernor in Council re "Blind
Literature Port is published.
The Rule made by the
Governor in Council (in the
14th June is repealed and a
new rule, restoring the gratui-
ty paid for the conveyance of
mails to one penny per letter
is published.
Joseph Dorsett has been
appointed District Constable
for Gaitors Settlement San
Salvador. fflP
Alfred Camplejohn Lines-
man Electrical Department
has been granted 3 months
vacation leave of absence.


., Tn The Magistrates Court.
5 Simon RussellDrunk
in public street5s. or 4 days
Charles Ash and Jeremiah
TaylorFighting in public
street of Sandilands Village
F.ach 5s. and 7s. Compensa-
tion to Polite. In default 8
days.
Alice BarrDetaining div-
ers articles of clothing goods
and chattels of James Fulford
Ordered to deliver said ar-
ticles to Complainant.
6 Druscilla Roberts Us-
ing profane and indecent lan-
guage in Baillou Hill Road
14 days.
Joseph Russell Breach
Cattle Act58.
8 Jos. Fernander Drunk
in Bay Street5s. or 4 clays.
Reuben Finlayson Breach
Dog Licence Act2, 6d.
Jos. DriggsAssaulting
Margaret Driggs 1. or 14
days.
Robert Rodgersllltreat-
ing a cow10s. or 8 days.
Theophilus Thurston
Breach Dog Licence Act 2.
6d.
10 Estella Hinder, Victoria
Knowlesand I'rescilla Weech
Drunk 'ind indecent beha-
viour in Fast Street -Each
1 os. or 8 days.
Latest War News
July 15th 1915.
London, 14th,
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News: -I he French
government report a success-
ful air raid on German strat-
egic railway in Woevre.
In Argonne the crown
prince's army attacked with
asphyxiating shells but was
defeated by vigorous counter
attacks.
German attacks on trench-
es captured by British Sou til >
west of Pilken weie easily re-
pulsed.
(Signed)
.> ?r* 1 ork:- 1 he supreme
court jury which has been
trying the case of Harry
Thaw have declared him sane
The Judge has reserved until
Friday his decision regarding
what is to. be done with
Thaw.
Washington: The organ-
ization of a mine-sweeping
division of the Atlantic ileet
has been announced by the
navy department. It will con-
sist of the cruisers Baltimore
and San Francisco and a
number of tugs.
Geneva:A Villach des
patch says that the Italians
have captured two miles of
Austrian trenches in the Car*
nic Alps near Roskofel, also
two important points south
of Cioriza.
Berlin: It is unofficially
stated that during June Ger-
man submarines sunk 42 mer-
chant vessels.
It is officially stated that in
the Argonne the Germans
took French positions on
nearly a two mile front and
two miles deep.
Paris:Official reports say
that attacks in Argonne have
been definitely stopped.
London: It is reported
that German engineers are
strengthening the defenses of
Constantinople on a huge
scale.
London:A second at-
tempt is made by the Kaisers
army to take the city of Ver-
dun. German activity in the
West is now in earnest with
assaults both in the Argonne
and Woevre.
Bridgeport, Connecticut-
Strikes in the Remington
Arms Companys works here
are said to be due to the
work of German syrapathiz
ers.
* :o:
Our Weakness for Medicine
It is a fact and an undis-
ptitablc one, too, that we
Americans dote on taking
medicine. Despite what has
recently been written to the
contrary, the actual state is
almost as bad as it was some
deracics agopossibly with
this difference, that, whereasI
formerly we gulped down
patent medicines with a cour-
age that made the beatific
joys of the early Christian
martyrs pale into insignifi-
cance, we are today following
the same tactics with drugs
that are "recognized." Di-
rectly a man feels out of sorts
his first thought is the drug
store; that is, if he is a strictly
moral man, or the saloon if
he is inclined toward the im
moral life in the efficacy of
whisky to drive away the
blues. But let us imagine we
are dealing with an individual
of the highest morality, with
one who has a weakness for
burning incense on the altar of
a drug store. With what glee
he enters the store, with what
confidence lie takes the near
patent medicine prescribed by
I the druggist No matter which
jit is, what he covets has been
granted; some sort of medicine
to put him in a happy frame of
mind again by alleviating the
general nervousness that obses
ses him. And in case lie is too
scientific to take what the drug
gist wishes to give him, and
resorls instead to his family
doctor, it is the latter more
chary of drugs ? No, indeed; the
usual formula is prescribed, the
patient is admonished not to
fail to return in a week or so,
and again is presented the de
lightful spectacle of credulity
magnifying the very ordinary
qualities of a drug into the
exaulted virtues of a Panacea
Editorial, Interstate Medical
Journal, February, 1915.
FOR SALE, CHEAP
One Motor Boat
Mali' gaiiy Finish.
12 h.p. LATHROP ENGINE
Heavy Duty, (New)
Easy Terms.
Apply,
A. C. CRAWFORD.
July 15, 10,15.
"The intense heat niak
them physically bad and the
general relaxation makes
them morally bad," says Fa-
ther Belford. "Rest and
change are good for every
one, but when they entail
dissipation and vice they be-
come real evils. When we
leave home let us bear in
mind that we do not leave
God. The Ten Command-
ments are not bounded by
jcity limits. Propriety and
I decorum are guardians of
virtue and nothing should
induce us to set them aside.
"A visit to the beaches is
quite enough to convince the
most broad-minded that
there prevails a degree of
immorality that is absolutely
inexcusable. No one will
dispute the fact that a cer
tain degree of undress is es
sential for bathing, but whei
that degree is used to spen
the day or a large part of i
on the sands where the scv
mingle with a degree of In
dom that would not be toler
ated on the street or even in
a ballroom it is time to cry
out in protest."
New York Herald.
LOST
Between Rawson Square
and Shirley St. along Parlia-
ment St. A Gold 3 Leaf
Clover Brooch, a Diamond
in the centre and a Sapphire,
on each side.
Return to
TRIBUNE OFFICE.
NOTICE TO FRENCH CITIZENS.
CONDEMNS BEACH CONDUCT.
Falher'Belford Snys Summer
Season Is tlio Worst Morally.
The Key. John I.. Belford
of the Roman Catholic
Church of 1 tie Nativity,
Brooklyn, in an article in
The Mentor, his parish pa-
per, yesterday expressed him- I
self as deeply shocked by the;
looseness of morals among!
pleasure seekersat the beach- i
es and in the public parkjs.
He said the .Summer season
was morally the worst of the
year.
Instructions have been re-
ceived summoning all French-
men born in Martinique,
Guadelope or French Guiana
belonging to the classes 1800
to 1909 (born from 1870 to
1889) lo present themselves
immediately at the Vice Con*
sulate of France at I'ort-of-
Spainor at any of the twi Ive
Consular Agencies of the Bri-
tish West Indies to pass a
medi< al examination,
h. f. armbrisu:r,
Consul u Aycil for Franco.
Nassau, N. P.,
2nd July, 1915.


1
THE AMERICAN BISON 4
is fast becoming extinct, hut this fact need not
trouble the housewife. Her interest is centred on
the fact that, thanks to Sunlight Soap, the terrors
of wash-day have become quite extinct. With
SUNLIGHT
SOAP
as a helper the wash is
quickly over. Labour is
reduced by its usetime
is saved and the clothes
are preserved.
Sunlight Soap does the
work. It is made for that
purpose.
TRY IT AND SAVE YOUR
*34i TIME AND MONKY.
been known that all was not
vrell at tlie British Headquar-
ters in France. That there
liave been serious dissensions
between Kield Marshal French
and his principal Generals is
apparent from the fact that
several of them, by way of ex
pressing their disapproval and
their unwillingness to serve un
tier him an> longer, have taken
the extreme step of asking to
be relieved of their commands,
and have returned home, most
notable among them all being
(ieneral Sir II irace Smith-
I inrrien, u h >, on the outbreak
of the war, wa placed at the
In ad of one of the two army
corps into which the British
foices under Sir John French
were divided.
Smith Dorrii n has always
been regarded as being one of
the ablest commanders and
cleverest stavj its of the British
Army, and stands particularly
high in the estimation of I lie
rank and file. But he h is the
disadvantage in French's eyes
of being one of the most inti
tiinate friends and trusted lieu-
tenai.ts of Kitchener, under
whom he served in Egypt, in
South Arftca and in India.
Moreover, he was associated
W ith Kitchener in that defeat
of Cionje, in the Moer war,
which was the point of depart-
ure of French's feud against the
conqueror of the Soudan and
the victor of Khartoum.
__ But the dissatisfaction with
French, and with Ins methods,
is unfotunat ly not restricted
to the British commanders w ho
have been serving uiidri him in
Flanders mul in France. It has
extended to the French mi Ha
ry authorities, and even to the
French Government, and the
frequent visits win. h have been
paid during the last three
months to France by Prime
Minister tsquitli, by Lord
Kitchener,and by Lloyd George
have ben for the purpose of
smotthing away dill, rei.ces I p-
tween the British < leneralissimo
and his Fren< ll 1 ollei pm s
Field Marshal French puts
forward an excuse foi h s fail
ure to advance, and f. r the im
mobilit) of his troops, the insuf
ficiency of ammunition and his
failure to receive proper supi ort
from the French Ami) But all
the reports of (iermaii prisoneis
and of the militaiv experts "f
the principal newspapers in
Germany lay Stress oil the pin
noini'iiaI amount of ainniunili' n
us- d by the Ei glish, which docs
not indicate any deficiency
therefore in that branch of war
supplies; while the Fn nch \< i v
justl) point out that, win 1
their lines extend from the
borders of Sw itzeiland north
ward for considerably over 400
miles, (he British lines are re
tricted to a bare tliiity miles,
to operate from which Kield has
Marshal French has under his
command the largest, best
equipped, and finest army that
tjreat Biitttin has ever put into
the field.
It is an armv which, according
to the most authoritative fig-
ures, numbers over 2,000.000!
m n. I'or troops have been pour |
ing iteadily across the Channel
from England into France, with
out a days interruption sine,* tie J
beginning of the war. The men '
are by common consent of a far
superior class to the former P.rit-
isll "Tommy" alike in physique
ioid intelligence, being drawn
fiom the educated and more or
less well-to do element of the
I population; men who, instead of
enlisting in the army as a last
resource, when they had failed
m everything else, had .... the
contrary givi n up lucrative em-
ployment, abandoned money
making professions, or mrren
,l''"'1 a life devoted to healthful
sport and adventure to' do ih< ir
bit" foi ()l.1 England,prompted
thereto by patriotism, and also,
1' must be admitted, by an in-
herent love of fighting.
Known as "Kitchener's men."
they have bi en trained to the
top notch of efficiency and en
durance. Their equipment and
the wonderful organization de
vised by Kitchener f..r ihcii be.
mg clothed and fed have arous-
ed the admiration and amaze
men! of military rxperU
throughout the world, even of
the Germans, and it may safelj
be uprated once more that
"' vet has a British General had
so fine an armv under his com-
mand as I'.ehl Marshal French.
RUMSEY'S PUMPS
CISTE RN Pumps, Well
Pumps, Windmill
I'umps, I>iaphragm jftbrnps,
House Pumps, pfrttimntic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Tumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
M.11 hinery, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fiie Lumps,
Air Compressors,Ship Lumps
Pressure Lumps, Boiler Feed
Lumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, etc.
Installed under the direct
supervision "f II. MePht^on
11 ml Jirnllier.
Priws mi Application.
II. J. THOMPSON,
Agent.
Position Wanted.
{to he continued )
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Oaahmera
Amarican Cott. n I.isle
HOSIERY
TIk-v have st,i u- teat Give rea
[""' c"'"f"'t No atamato rip. N< re.
-,riir lone ... bary. The >h..i.e is
knit in not 1 i.ssr.l m
GUARANTEED f.,r (inen.'ss, stvlo,
" ifity of malarial and workmanship.
Vb* li tefv st ijnlaai Will weai < month*
willi il hole*, "r TOW (Hies fie*
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
t" rKn: .ne -t 11 ling u -si iki in currency
"' noital 1. ite, to cttvm advertising and
sl"i'pi.-- <-i- 'I-1 .. ur will anid p -t paid,
with written gtihraiitee, backed by a five
million dollar cnni| any, either
5 Fivirs of our 75c. value
American Silk- Hnrierr,
or 4 1'n.irn of our 50c'. vn Hi*
American Caahmen Hosiery,
or 4 P%Jrof our 50c. Value.
Airerkan C. .It..11.Lisle Hi*iery
or 6 Ptvirs of CKildren'a Hosiery
I'ONT DBLAY-Offerespinewhcu
rtaalei in your locality is selected
The International Hoisery co
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON. OHIO. US.A
RY A YOUNG MAN'who, is will-
ing to work, has experience in
tlie (irorery business, can ride a
wheel, and drive u horse ; alao has
ability in office work and read) for
all kinds of work that is honour-
able.
I will be satisfied with a .sinuH
salary to begin with; give me a
trial arid if after a sjH,.ciiiod time I
do not suit, I will not expect to be
paid.
1 am a Bahamian by birth, a res-
ident in Miami for over a year and
can furnish best uf references.
Cable oh WiuTr -re
HERBERT E. MUNMNOg,
.r)l7 Avenue I.
Miami, 1'la.
(are W. E. FROST,
Manager.
.1. C McCRORY'S Sets, and 10ck
stme, 12th St. Miami, Fla.
Notice.
I"* 111 S is in in (or 111 my Patrons
.hmI the Public in General
il'ii I have opened my Public
Blnck Suiilli "^11 [>; and am now
ready i" .In finyihinx i" > e line ,>i
Cieuetal repair 01 iiew k Horse
S11 r * n, _ --in (i;illv. \|l work done
Mechanically
P. A. HUYLEB
ClIAS. C. LIGHT BObRN
ARMSTRONG ST.
Hawkine. Hill.
E* X PER ir. NCR I) Paper
* Hanger. Ceiling Work,
a specialty. Al! work- careful-
ly nnd Artistically performed.
Absolute s.'ilisf.irtion utjur.in
li'cd The v< 1 v besl 1 rl^k^u ,.
Terms moderate.
Williams' Shoes Are Better
\


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