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L. OILBRRT DUPL'CH, Editor jitJ Proprietor. OKKICK: rner Shirty g, Charlotte Sta Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas JD1TI 200. P. O. BOX MB, PUBLISHED DAILY RATES [ednesday and Friday— ITgle ropy J,| Jay, aiH Thursday -single copy id .Hturday-single copy ... ija. Weekly 5 ,l Monthly jgg s (,,) Quarterly 4 s. 6d HalfYcarly ^ s. Veaily 1 8s. h PAYABLE IN ADVANCK Advertising Rate*:—SI 1 pence per line for first insertion: three pence |>er line for second insertion ; and onepenny pa line for subsquent insertions. Advertisements under eight line4-.. Zbc Vrfbune Tl/t.SDAY. July 13.19IS. f+ PUBLISHED AT 6 P. M. M. C. P. OR M. L. A. WHICH? For a long time it has been a question in our mind, which was the proper or fitting de signation for tlie members of our House of Assembly M. L. A., or M. C. P. in fact we have used the latter and been told thai we were wrong. Now the Bahamas, the Barbadoes and the Bermudas have identical or very nearly so, forms of government and in the two latter colonies we find that the members of the House of Assembly are designated M. C. P., i. e. Members Colonial Parliament fitting, expressive and in keeping with the mother country where Members of the House of Commons as designated M. P., (Members of Parliament) and not M. H. C. (Member of House of Commons) — :o: — From The Barbadoes Standard, of June 12 we learn that that ancient Colony had sent off 12 recruits to England to enlist for the war to be followed by more. A recruiting Committee composed of Members of the I.egislativeCounciland of the House of Assembly has been appointed to select suitable recruits from those applying. The Mail Steamer "Havana" arrived from Yew York early this morning and after transferring the following passengers to the Tender "Co • Ionia" proceeded to Havana with 94 passengers for that city. Misses Lois Alexander, and Mary A. Eberte; Mesdames Julia Alexander, and Segrid Nielson; Messrs James T. Aberting, Bernan liirnhaum, Edward Bosch, Herbert E. Jelly, Emile Collins, Frank Criily, George A. Daly, Harry English, Eddie Gordon, Daniel E. Hanson, Fredine Herjog, John Jab) 1 John Kelly, Alfred H. Maurer, Fridholm C. Neilson, Emond J. Morris, John B. Simpson, Robert H. Sawyer, David H. Turner.and Harry B. Vokes. Mrs. Ella O. Bosfield, and Mr. Randolph C. Bosfield. Mrs. Withelmina Lewis, and Mr. Nathaniel Cambridge. The Majority of the passengers by this morning's steamer are connected with the Universal Moving Picture Film Company. —:o: — The Motor "Frances E." left Miami this morning with mails and ]o passengers. Foreign Mails tube despatched per "Frances E." via Miami Fla will be made up and closed on Friday the 16th. inst. at 8 a. m. Mr. George R.Evans, M.L. A. we regret to learn was stricken last night with a (fourth) stroke of Paralysis. Latest War News July 13th 1915. London 12th. Governor, Bahamas. Official News:—The French government reports unsuccessful enemy attacks at various point!. On the roth the British army repulsed German attacks which had at first secured a footing in some first line elements. North of Arras the enemy were dislodged from remaining trenches on line captured on the 8th July. Later—By an attack last night the Germans re-captured Souchez cemetery and some im mediately adjoining tienches. The Russian government reports the enemy retreating hastily after Russian counter attack near the village of Stryzea on the Lublin front. Satisfactory Italian progress continues. (Signed) BONAR LAW. Washington:—The situation with German} is serious and the American policy required de. liberate and lengthy consideration so as to have the firmness the circumstances require, so declare high officials. President Wilson and Secretary Lancing are preparing memoranda individually and will confer alter ideas mature. It is believed that the next note will include expressions of American intentions if its demands are not met. General comment is that Germany evad s the real issue and it is believed in some quarters that it may cause a seveiance of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Constantinople:— Naval bombardment of Turkish Gallipoli positions has been futile. London:—The Germans and Russians are apparently dead locked south of Lembeig' Petrograd is elated over t he success of the Russian army. The Austrians are reported to have lost an entire army corps in their recent attack against Lublin. Five billion dollers have been loaned to the British government within a period of three weeks for war purposes. The British press declares that the German reply is impudent and insulting and is a complete negation of everything asked for by the United States. Berlin claims the recapture of the cemetery at Souchez with l5jFrench prisoners and four machine guns. Paris newspaper despatches declare that the Sultan of Turkey is dead and that the Young Turks are fearful politically and are hiding the news. Washington:—Naval officials are awaiting a response from the British steamers Howthhead and Baron Napier to a warning sent by wireless last night telling the two ships to watch out for bombs in the holds of the vessels. July 13th 1915. The following was broadcasted from the United States Navy Radio stations at noon to-day. "All Ships:— The steamers Napier and Howthhead cleared July 8th. from New Orleans. They are reported to have explosives secreted in the holds. They have no wireless. Report any news of them." Washington:—The delay of a week in answering Germany is not to be interpreted as a back down by the United States. Strained relations make great care necessary as affairs between Germany and the United States are more critical than ever before. Secretary of State Lansing is preparing an opinion. It is considered that the next move of the United States will be to intimate to some extent its intentions. The Hague:— The Dutch Parliament is contemplating a law which would rail to the colours all men who during the last twenty years have been exempt from service for one reason or another. SKINS AND THINGS. 13II1 July lOLSThe Editor of The Tribune Sir, I've been thinking about the Mango skin grievance which is more than a grievance—its a danger. Sapodilla skins are bad, banana skins are worse, but mango skin are the worst. One may tread on a "saperdilly" skin, and grii*d it into nothingness, on a"bananer"skin with nearly a similar result, but the "manger" skin slips and slides and glides from under one's foot, and one's balance is lost which if recoverd is at the expense of. a wrench to one's side. Usually however r~ ^^i^mmmmmm



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i: the result is a tumble down involving perhaps severe injuries and a discharge of expletives more or less violent, but generally more. The aforesaid skins are thrown on the side walk and roadway by itinerant fruit eaters in the process of eating fleshy and drupaceous fruit. The practice is as old as the hills and is continued to-day without any thought as to the harmfuluess of it, on the part of those who indulge themselves at the expense of the pedestrian. Though it is the result of thoughtlessness and laziness, it is none the less harmful, and it has been made an offense to be dealt with by the police, and punishable by fine or imprisonment upon conviction. There are some cases, to wit repeated offences by the same offender which I think should be so dealt with but in the case of first offences which are seen by the police. I think a better procedure would be to instruct the police to compel the offender irrespective of his social position, to pick the skins up, and place them in the nearest drain where they would be harmless. To some this would be a humiliation which would have a good effect both on them and on observers also. I think if the police were instructed to adopt such a course, the evil would soon disappear. To many, thepayment of a fine which in a case would not be excessive would be an easy way of paying the piper, while to be marched up to the offending skins and compelled to perform the manual operation suggested would be a much greater punishment, especially to dandies. %  *yiA any rate, the exceedingly dangerous practice should be prevented,and the authorities should see to it, that the law is strictly enforced. Narrow escapes from falls are of hourly occurrence. Just one word more It seems to me, that too little heed, if any, is paid by the authorities to complaints which are made through the press, and where the organ is one of long established reputation that fact alone should entitle it to a fair amount of consideration. Inquiries should be made, and if substantiation follows, then the matter complained of should I be properly attended to, wrongs righted, and injuries redressed. It might be said that that were a Herculean task. Perhaps so, but Public Officials have incurred responsibilities of their own choosing, and they must live up to them -or quit, [might cite numerous instances of dissatisfaction with duties which were thoroughly understood as pertaining to an office when application for it was being made, but no sooner has the envied post been attained by the applicant, then their sky becomes clouded, lightning flashes, thunder roars, and a deluge descends, and every one is burdened with a tale of woe A down-trodden official, and mark you—this is not confined to the lower salaried officials, but increases with the arithmetrical progression of salaries. As it was in the beginning, and ever shall be—I suppose. Yours, QUI VIVE. LONDON SHIPPING BREAKS ALL RECORDS. But Increased Dockage Allows Vast Inflow of Fieight to be Handled Promptly. —o — London, June23, (Correspondence of The Associated Press.) —After nearly a year of almost unbelievable crowding and prassure in the Port of London, the shipping authorities have caught up with the sea traffic, and during the past week, for the first time since war began, not a single vessel had to be detained in lower Tames seating for a berth to be cleared in the docks. Immense new facilities have been rushed to completion during the past two months. More than 400,000 front feet of additional shed space, have been provided. The East India Import Dock, which will furnish %  which has found her way to the London docks, where she is discharging 1,500 tons of canned goods. That port statistics are n< eight new berths for large always an index to the a ocean-going ships, will be tual state of trade is evidenc opened in August, and the Jed by the fact that the reg early completion is also tered tonnage of shippt; promised of the new refrigerated meat wearhouse at the Royal Albert Dock, to contain, 500,000 carcases. There is very indication, however, that even these enlarged facilities will be pushed to their utmost capacity as the Autum comes on. The Auturn and Winter are normally the busiest seasons in all the ports of Northen Europe. The war situation will accentuate the position created by the ordinary increased flow of business. Moreover, several new lin>s are asking for berths in London. Government purchases of Indian wheat have begun to leave India for London, and large shipments of timber are promised from Norwegian ports. It is also stated that as soon as the numerous cargoes of supplies for Russia are out of the way at Archangel, that port will begin shipping heavily to London More sugar is expected shortly from Mauritius to replenish the stocks kept in storage along the London waterfront. The great rush of wool ships has ceased. Foodstuffs in store are abundant. The stocks of practically all classes of goods necessary for the support and comfort of the people are larger than entering the Port of L on do continues to show a marked decrease, as compared with twelve months ago. The explanation is That a ton of shipping today represents far more in cargo than it did before the war. For several years past the practice of most shipping companies lias been to discharge part of their cargoes here, then going on to Antwerp and Hamburg to finish discharge and partly load there, later coming hack here to finish loading This is not possible now, the Belgian and German ports being closed. Therefore a large amount of •hipping which counted as two entries before the war is now only counted once and the shipping figures suffer accordingly. Vet the cargoes manipulated and stored in London from each ship are double what they were. This is an instance of how deceptive statistics of shipping tonnage entering a port may be for purposes of comparison with other ports. The. number of men at present emphned on dock work by the Port of London authority is 7.500 as against 5,000 a year ago The figure of goods housed at the docks has risen to 285,000 tons, an increase cf d8 percent over last year. White Lime 1 AM offering FOR SALE my entiic slock of White Lime of about Soo bushels they were in June, 1914 I he a| Gi bushel. only important exception to) Orders left at Mr. Solomon is timber Kinlavson, Dcveaux St. substantial 01 Phone jjSor "The Tribune" Office. JoSIAII RAUMINIJune 30, 1915. this statement which shows a shrinkage owing to the demands of the army both at home and abroad. In the service of food transit some unusual types ofi T. M. Knowles ships are being employed, j 528 Bay Street. One of the recent arrivals is IS now prepared to supply the Kort, a small motor boat, I Rubber lires for Babies bringing a cargo of sugar Carriages, also to reset, and from Brazil. Another is ihe repair them, steamship Glenmavis, one of Satisfaction Guaranteed. the Canadian lake steamers, Mar 20th, 1915.



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—terms which will not involve the annihilation of the German Empire. *Flint is no good to us. Such iiifluences should have been exerted before hostilities commeiicnl. We are in it,and \vc mean to go through it—right theb>itter end. If we were >t convinced of that, we would jt travel another yard to get rruits —nor would we encour[6 men to join the colours. Serisra, and all that it stands must be abolished once and ever. The German Empire must become a thing of the past, and there must be no further menace to the peace of Europe, or the position of the British race, in our ti rne or that of our children, or our children's children. Will Lord Kitchener kindly say just n word or two, by way of a change, about the itnmedi ate outlook?— "JOHN HULL." ALCOHOL AND SOME OF ITS EFFECTS. T. D. Crothers M.D. Clinical observations of pa ticnts who come to hospitals • nd sana toriuins show dimin %  tied sensory, motor, and men tal activi ty, that can be measured and stated in exact terms. This condition is practically a palsy, wh icll increases with the continuous use of spirits. The conclusion was that alcohol, even insniiill doses, is an anesthetic, either for a longer or shorter period. Some illustra tions briDCOut this fact. A noted astronomer dtt lared that e*ery time he took a glass of wineor beer his work for a few hours sfter was full of errors and liad to be repeated. Me had to give up banquets and dinners in which wine was served,and announced that he had found from personal experience that all use of spirits was i njuri ous. In one of the large observatories in 11 lis country, there is a specific ru le that assistants and observers must abstain from spirits, coffee, tea, and tobacco. This is a recognition of the action of alcohol and its injurious effect onall work requiring accuracy of t hesenses and reason. In the musical world Sousa's band and other orchestras illustrate this same fact in their experience. \'c> member is permitted to drink spirits, or even wine or becjr, and all are required to abstain from tobacco and be abstemious in the use of cof fee and tea. The reason given is that these drugs impair hear ing and the accuracy of the sense of harmony and melody, as well as lower the muscular controlof the fingers and lips. Familiar examples are becoming more and more prominent in the management of railroads, and the increasing insistency that all officials and opciatois in the train service be total abstainers. Thus everywhere in practical life the ants thesia of alcohol is recognized, and becomes more and more apparent in tlie mistakes and errors that are traceable to its i se. Numerous degenerations constitute a more or less pro minent symptom in alcoholics. -'•Life and Health." H E R E'S AN OPPORTUNITY that you cannot afford to ose II You Want To— Economize. II You Want A First Class Light. If You Want To Be Recognized. Use The Best Light That Money Can Buy. I ho Safest and the Cheapest. -THE BEACON Good Morning! We Are Introducing American Silk American Cashmere American Cotton Lisle HOSIERY They have Mood the test, (live raa foot Comfort. No seam* t<> rip. Never become loose or baggyTlis slia|>e is knit in —not pressed in. GUARANTEED (or fineness, style, superiority of material aiul wutkrnaitsnip. VbtoloUly ttainleM Will wear 6 month* without holes, or new ones free. OUR. SPECIAL OFFER to every one sen line us $' W %  Currency or postal note, to cover advertising and shippingcbargO, we will send poll paid. with written guarantee, backed by a five million dollar cont| anv, either 3 Pairs of ovir 75c. value American Silk Hosiery, or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value An • in .in Cash mere Hosiery, or 4 P*irs ol our 50c. Value, American Cotton*Lisle Hosiery or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery. IJONT DELAY—Offer expircswhen dealer in your locality is selected. THE INTERNATIONAL HOISERY CO. P. O. Box 224 DAYTON, OHIO. U.S.A W. A. MATHER UNDERTAKER D ESIRES to inform Ins fi tends and the Public I ha I le iiai just received a complete outfit of facilities for t lie btlisnPM of an unilerlaker, which pl.irrs him ill B position to carry out Funerals that may be entrusted In Ins cure with system and despatch ; and respect fully solicits their patronage (i


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I Jl Nulling mid if ins |urare In verba mivulsirl. Being bound lo awenr to tho Dogma.* of no Master. VOL. XII. INASMU. N.P.. Bftlmmfti TUESDAY July. 13, 1915 NO. Q< Doi77 Try Us Too Much. THE NATIONAL WORMS ARE BEGINNING TO TURN. (Continued From Thursday's Issue.) THE DRINK HOG V. We say again, and we say it deliberately, tins Drink bogy is a mere device to shield Minis ters and others from responsibility for the present deadlock— if, indeed, deadlock there be— in the production of war munitions. It is the proverbial red herring In no serious sense— so far as the workmen are concerned—is there any drink trouble. The whole thing is a got up affair by the professional pumpuritans (who are artfully hiding in the back ground), and is a damnable libel upon the working classes. And the "Jov eminent is making us ridiculous and contemptible in the eyes of Germany,and what is worse, in the eyes of our Allies. When Mr. Lloyd George is taken to task for defaming the industrial community he says. "No, I spoke only of a small minority." Then why this panic legislation? And why that absurd declaration that Drink was a deadlier foe to dav than either Germany or Austria? At the time of writing, we do not know what the Cabinet intends to propose, but it is understood that the sale of whisky

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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00084249/02364
 Material Information
Title: The Tribune.
Uniform Title: Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Alternate Title: Nassau tribune
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 58 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tribune
Publication Date: Tuesday, July 13, 1915
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Bahamas
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 09994850
oclc - 9994850
System ID: UF00084249:02364

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Full Text
I Jl
Nulling mid if ins |urare In verba mivulsirl.
Being bound lo awenr to tho Dogma.* of no Master.
VOL. XII.
INasmu. N.P.. Bftlmmfti TUESDAY July. 13, 1915
NO. Q<
Doi77 Try Us Too Much.
THE NATIONAL WORMS ARE BEGINNING
TO TURN.
(Continued From Thursday's Issue.)
THE DRINK HOGV.
We say again, and we say it
deliberately, tins Drink bogy is
a mere device to shield Minis
ters and others from responsibi-
lity for the present deadlock
if, indeed, deadlock there be
in the production of war muni-
tions. It is the proverbial red
herring In no serious sense
so far as the workmen are con-
cernedis there any drink
trouble. The whole thing is a
got up affair by the professional
pumpuritans (who are artfully
hiding in the back ground), and
is a damnable libel upon the
working classes. And the "Jov
eminent is making us ridiculous
and contemptible in the eyes of
Germany,and what is worse, in
the eyes of our Allies. When
Mr. Lloyd George is taken to
task for defaming the industrial
community he says. "No, I spoke
only of a small minority." Then
why this panic legislation? And
why that absurd declaration that
Drink was a deadlier foe to dav
than either Germany or Austria?
At the time of writing, we do
not know what the Cabinet in-
tends to propose, but it is un-
derstood that the sale of whisky
and scandalous insult to
Scotland and Ireland. And how
futile! When poor Marie Antoi
nette was told that the people
were clamouring for bread, and
that there was none, she iftoo
cently suggested "Why not give
them cake? And if whisky is pro-
hibited; brandy will take its
place. We are an adaptable
race, and shall soon get used to I
the change. Wiiat rot it all is! i
Will not somebody now suggest I
suspension of conjugal rights ?!
A much stronger case could be
made out for the proposal. Nero
fiddled whilst Home was burn
ing. And the historian of the
future is to write that the King!
of England was compelled to
drink ginger beci whilst his
mighty Empire was on its trial.
His Majesty has been shameful-
ly misled, and whilst acknow-
ledging the splendid sense of
duty which has prompted him
to set the example in alcoholic,
abstinence during the war, we I
at least ask that Hit-Government '
shall be guided by this Royal
hint that voluntary self denial,
and not State compulsion,
should decide our conduct.
GET ON WITH IT!
I
What the Government has to
do is to get on with the war.
The winter months arc gone ;
Spring is comingand it must
come in more senses than one,
W$ must springspring upon
the enemy, and, without further
ado,drive him across the Rhine.
1 Thin we may take a few weeks'j
rest, whilst getting ready toI
storm the forts and fortresses,
and make for Dei I in. We have j
plenty of men now. and plenty!
of ammunition for that purpose '
and we can keep the supply-
going all right. Leaving Italy
out altogetherif she will in
sist upon being left outthe
combined field forces of the Al-
lies arc at least equal to those
of Germany and Austria
whilst their navies are supreme.
Then why wait any longer?
We are becoming tired of wait-
ing. The other day we were
forcing the Dardanelles; how
are we getting on with that
job? Do let us know some-
thing definite. No, we are not
grumblingwe are simply ut-
tering, in a mild way, what the
Man in the street is swearing
about. We have lost in casu-
alties of one kind and another,
a hundred and fifty thousand
men, and we are prepared to
los half a million if necessary.
But do lei us get on with the job.
The Germans have been very
obliging by waiting in tin
trenches whilst we have been
getting ready. Now is the time
to strike. Kitchener's first Ar-
my is complete, and eager for
action. The enemy is disor-
ganised and barrassed, and is
busy preparing her Zeppelin
raid. Let us knock the Stuffing
out of her now. Of course, u e
do not pretend to be militai .
experts, and we have supreme
confidence in Lord Kitchener
and his generals. But we have
a kind of idea that they are not
being given a free handa
of notion that there are influen-
ces at work to bring about a
premature, patched-up peace
and it damps our recruiting ar-
dour. And we do not speak
altogether without our book.
We know that in high places a
desire exists to end the war on
(continued on fourth page)
To be had at all Grocer.:
C. L. LofthoUSe-Company's \gent
Coiner George and King Sts.
Wear Armbrister's
Shoes


L. OILBRRT DUPL'CH,
Editor jitJ Proprietor.
OKKICK:
rner Shirty g, Charlotte Sta
Nassau, .V. P., Bahamas
JD1TI 200. P. O. BOX MB,
PUBLISHED DAILY
RATES
[ednesday and Friday
ITgle ropy ......... J,|
Jay, aiH Thursday -single copy id
.Hturday-single copy ... ija.
Weekly ............ 5,l
Monthly .......jgg ,s. (,,)
Quarterly..........4s. 6d
HalfYcarly............^s.
Veaily ............18s.
h
PAYABLE IN ADVANCK
Advertising Rate*:SI 1 pence per line
for first insertion: three pence |>er line
for second insertion ; and onepenny pa
line for subsquent insertions.
Advertisements under eight line- 4-..
Zbc Vrfbune
Tl/t.SDAY. July 13.19IS.
f+ PUBLISHED AT 6 P. M.
----------- - -
M. C. P. OR M. L. A.
WHICH?
For a long time it has been
a question in our mind, which
was the proper or fitting de
signation for tlie members of
our House of Assembly M. L.
A., or M. C. P. in fact we
have used the latter and been
told thai we were wrong.
Now the Bahamas, the Bar-
badoes and the Bermudas
have identical or very nearly
so, forms of government and
in the two latter colonies we
find that the members of the
House of Assembly are desig-
nated M. C. P., i. e. Members
Colonial Parliament fitting,
expressive and in keeping
with the mother country
where Members of the House
of Commons as designated M.
P., (Members of Parliament)
and not M. H. C. (Member of
House of Commons)
:o:
From The Barbadoes Stan-
dard, of June 12 we learn that
that ancient Colony had sent
off 12 recruits to England to
enlist for the war to be fol-
lowed by more.
A recruiting Committee
composed of Members of the
I.egislativeCounciland of the
House of Assembly has been
appointed to select suitable
recruits from those applying.
The Mail Steamer "Hava-
na" arrived from Yew York
early this morning and after
transferring the following
passengers to the Tender "Co
Ionia" proceeded to Havana
with 94 passengers for that
city.
Misses Lois Alexander, and
Mary A. Eberte; Mesdames
Julia Alexander, and Segrid
Nielson; Messrs James T.
Aberting, Bernan liirnhaum,
Edward Bosch, Herbert E.
Jelly, Emile Collins, Frank
Criily, George A. Daly, Harry
English, Eddie Gordon, Dan-
iel E. Hanson, Fredine Her-
jog, John Jab)1, John Kelly,
Alfred H. Maurer, Fridholm
C. Neilson, Emond J. Morris,
John B. Simpson, Robert H.
Sawyer, David H. Turner.and
Harry B. Vokes.
Mrs. Ella O. Bosfield, and
Mr. Randolph C. Bosfield.
Mrs. Withelmina Lewis,
and Mr. Nathaniel Cam-
bridge.
The Majority of the pas-
sengers by this morning's
steamer are connected with
the Universal Moving Picture
Film Company.
:o:
The Motor "Frances E."
left Miami this morning with
mails and ]o passengers.
Foreign Mails tube despatch-
ed per "Frances E." via Miami
Fla will be made up and closed
on Friday the 16th. inst. at 8
a. m.
Mr. George R.Evans, M.L.
A. we regret to learn was
stricken last night with a
(fourth) stroke of Paralysis.
Latest War News
July 13th 1915.
London 12th.
Governor,
Bahamas.
Official News:The French
government reports unsuccessful
enemy attacks at various point!.
On the roth the British army
repulsed German attacks which
had at first secured a footing in
some first line elements.
North of Arras the enemy
were dislodged from remaining
trenches on line captured on the
8th July.
LaterBy an attack last
night the Germans re-captured
Souchez cemetery and some im
mediately adjoining tienches.
The Russian government re-
ports the enemy retreating
hastily after Russian counter at-
tack near the village of Stryzea
on the Lublin front.
Satisfactory Italian progress
continues.
(Signed)
BONAR LAW.
Washington:The situation
with German} is serious and the
American policy required de.
liberate and lengthy consider-
ation so as to have the firmness
the circumstances require, so
declare high officials.
President Wilson and Secre-
tary Lancing are preparing
memoranda individually and
will confer alter ideas mature.
It is believed that the next note
will include expressions of
American intentions if its de-
mands are not met.
General comment is that
Germany evad s the real issue
and it is believed in some
quarters that it may cause a
seveiance of diplomatic rela-
tions between the two countries.
Constantinople: Naval bom-
bardment of Turkish Gallipoli
positions has been futile.
London:The Germans and
Russians are apparently dead
locked south of Lembeig'
Petrograd is elated over t he
success of the Russian army.
The Austrians are reported to
have lost an entire army corps
in their recent attack against
Lublin.
Five billion dollers have
been loaned to the British
government within a period
of three weeks for war pur-
poses.
The British press declares
that the German reply is im-
pudent and insulting and is a
complete negation of every-
thing asked for by the United
States.
Berlin claims the recapture
of the cemetery at Souchez
with l5jFrench prisoners and
four machine guns.
Paris newspaper despatches
declare that the Sultan of
Turkey is dead and that the
Young Turks are fearful po-
litically and are hiding the
news.
Washington:Naval offi-
cials are awaiting a response
from the British steamers
Howthhead and Baron Napi-
er to a warning sent by wire-
less last night telling the two
ships to watch out for bombs
in the holds of the vessels.
July 13th 1915.
The following was broadcast-
ed from the United States Navy
Radio stations at noon to-day.
"All Ships:
The steamers Napier and
Howthhead cleared July 8th.
from New Orleans. They are
reported to have explosives se-
creted in the holds. They have
no wireless. Report any news
of them."
Washington:The delay of a
week in answering Germany is
not to be interpreted as a back
down by the United States.
Strained relations make great
care necessary as affairs between
Germany and the United States
are more critical than ever be-
fore.
Secretary of State Lansing is
preparing an opinion. It is con-
sidered that the next move of
the United States will be to in-
timate to some extent its inten-
tions.
The Hague: The Dutch
Parliament is contemplating a
law which would rail to the
colours all men who during the
last twenty years have been ex-
empt from service for one reason
or another.
SKINS AND THINGS.
13II1 July lOLS-
The Editor of The Tribune
Sir,
I've been thinking about
the Mango skin grievance
which is more than a griev-
anceits a danger. Sapodilla
skins are bad, banana skins
are worse, but mango skin
are the worst. One may
tread on a "saperdilly" skin,
and grii*d it into nothing-
ness, on a"bananer"skin with
nearly a similar result, but
the "manger" skin slips and
slides and glides from under
one's foot, and one's balance
is lost which if recoverd is at
the expense of. a wrench to
one's side. Usually however
r~
^^i^mmmmmm


i:
the result is a tumble down
involving perhaps severe in-
juries and a discharge of ex-
pletives more or less violent,
but generally more.
The aforesaid skins are
thrown on the side walk and
roadway by itinerant fruit
eaters in the process of eating
fleshy and drupaceous fruit.
The practice is as old as
the hills and is continued
to-day without any thought
as to the harmfuluess of it,
on the part of those who in-
dulge themselves at the ex-
pense of the pedestrian.
Though it is the result of
thoughtlessness and laziness,
it is none the less harmful,
and it has been made an of-
fense to be dealt with by the
police, and punishable by
fine or imprisonment upon
conviction.
There are some cases, to
wit repeated offences by the
same offender which I think
should be so dealt with but
in the case of first offences
which are seen by the police.
I think a better procedure
would be to instruct the po-
lice to compel the offender
irrespective of his social po-
sition, to pick the skins up,
and place them in the near-
est drain where they would
be harmless. To some this
would be a humiliation which
would have a good effect both
on them and on observers al-
so. I think if the police were
instructed to adopt such a
course, the evil would soon
disappear. To many, thepay-
ment of a fine which in a case
would not be excessive would
be an easy way of paying the
piper, while to be marched
up to the offending skins and
compelled to perform the
manual operation suggested
would be a much greater
punishment, especially to
dandies.
*yiA any rate, the exceeding-
ly dangerous practice should
be prevented,and the authori-
ties should see to it, that the
law is strictly enforced. Nar-
row escapes from falls are of
hourly occurrence.
Just one word more It
seems to me, that too little
heed, if any, is paid by the
authorities to complaints
which are made through the
press, and where the organ is
one of long established repu-
tation that fact alone should
entitle it to a fair amount of
consideration. Inquiries
should be made, and if sub-
stantiation follows, then the
matter complained of should
I be properly attended to,
wrongs righted, and injuries
redressed. It might be said
that that were a Herculean
task. Perhaps so, but Pub-
lic Officials have incurred
responsibilities of their own
choosing, and they must live
up to them -or quit, [might
cite numerous instances of
dissatisfaction with duties
which were thoroughly un-
derstood as pertaining to an
office when application for it
was being made, but no soon-
er has the envied post been
attained by the applicant,
then their sky becomes
clouded, lightning flashes,
thunder roars, and a deluge
descends, and every one is
burdened with a tale of woe
A down-trodden official, and
mark youthis is not confin-
ed to the lower salaried offi-
cials, but increases with the
arithmetrical progression of
salaries. As it was in the be-
ginning, and ever shall beI
suppose.
Yours,
QUI VIVE.
LONDON SHIPPING
BREAKS ALL RECORDS.
But Increased Dockage
Allows Vast Inflow of Fieight
to be Handled Promptly.
o
London, June- 23, (Corres-
pondence of The Associated
Press.) After nearly a year
of almost unbelievable
crowding and prassure in
the Port of London, the
shipping authorities have
caught up with the sea
traffic, and during the past
week, for the first time since
war began, not a single vessel
had to be detained in lower
Tames seating for a berth
to be cleared in the docks.
Immense new facilities
have been rushed to comple-
tion during the past two
months. More than 400,000
front feet of additional shed
space, have been provided.
The East India Import
Dock, which will furnish

which has found her way to
the London docks, where she
is discharging 1,500 tons of
canned goods.
That port statistics are n<
eight new berths for large always an index to the a
ocean-going ships, will be tual state of trade is evidenc
opened in August, and the Jed by the fact that the reg
early completion is also tered tonnage of shippt;
promised of the new refrig-
erated meat wearhouse at
the Royal Albert Dock, to
contain, 500,000 carcases.
There is very indication,
however, that even these en-
larged facilities will be push-
ed to their utmost capacity
as the Autum comes on. The
Auturn and Winter are nor-
mally the busiest seasons in
all the ports of Northen
Europe. The war situation
will accentuate the position
created by the ordinary in-
creased flow of business.
Moreover, several new lin>s
are asking for berths in
London.
Government purchases of
Indian wheat have begun to
leave India for London, and
large shipments of timber are
promised from Norwegian
ports. It is also stated that
as soon as the numerous car-
goes of supplies for Russia
are out of the way at Arch-
angel, that port will begin
shipping heavily to London
More sugar is expected
shortly from Mauritius to re-
plenish the stocks kept in
storage along the London
waterfront.
The great rush of wool
ships has ceased. Foodstuffs
in store are abundant. The
stocks of practically all
classes of goods necessary for
the support and comfort of
the people are larger than
entering the Port of L on do
continues to show a marked
decrease, as compared with
twelve months ago. The ex-
planation is That a ton of
shipping today represents far
more in cargo than it did
before the war. For several
years past the practice of most
shipping companies lias been
to discharge part of their car-
goes here, then going on to
Antwerp and Hamburg to fin-
ish discharge and partly load
there, later coming hack here
to finish loading This is not
possible now, the Belgian and
German ports being closed.
Therefore a large amount of
hipping which counted as two
entries before the war is now
only counted once and the
shipping figures suffer accord-
ingly. Vet the cargoes mani-
pulated and stored in London
from each ship are double what
they were. This is an instance
of how deceptive statistics of
shipping tonnage entering a
port may be for purposes of
comparison with other ports.
The. number of men at pre-
sent emphned on dock work by
the Port of London authority is
7.500 as against 5,000 a year
ago The figure of goods hous-
ed at the docks has risen to
285,000 tons, an increase cf d8
percent over last year.
White Lime
1
AM offering FOR SALE
my entiic slock of White
Lime of about Soo bushels
they were in June, 1914 I he a| Gi, bushel.
only important exception to) Orders left at Mr. Solomon
is timber Kinlavson, Dcveaux St.
substantial
01
Phone jjSor "The Tribune"
Office.
JoSIAII RaUMINi-
June 30, 1915.
this statement
which shows a
shrinkage owing to the de-
mands of the army both at
home and abroad.
In the service of food tran-
sit some unusual types ofi T. M. Knowles
ships are being employed, j 528 Bay Street.
One of the recent arrivals is IS now prepared to supply
the Kort, a small motor boat, I Rubber lires for Babies
bringing a cargo of sugar Carriages, also to reset, and
from Brazil. Another is ihe repair them,
steamship Glenmavis, one of Satisfaction Guaranteed.
the Canadian lake steamers, Mar 20th, 1915.


-
terms which will not involve
the annihilation of the German
Empire. *- Flint is no good to us.
Such iiifluences should have
been exerted before hostilities
commeiicnl. We are in it,and
\vc mean to go through itright
theb>itter end. If we were
>t convinced of that, we would
jt travel another yard to get
rruitsnor would we encour-
[6 men to join the colours.
Serisra, and all that it stands
must be abolished once and
ever. The German Empire
must become a thing of the past,
and there must be no further
menace to the peace of Europe,
or the position of the British
race, in our ti rne or that of our
children, or our children's child-
ren.
Will Lord Kitchener kindly
say just n word or two, by way
of a change, about the itnmedi
ate outlook?"John Hull."
ALCOHOL AND SOME
OF ITS EFFECTS.
T. D. Crothers M.D.
Clinical observations of pa
ticnts who come to hospitals
nd sana toriuins show dimin
tied sensory, motor, and men
tal activi ty, that can be mea-
sured and stated in exact terms.
This condition is practically a
palsy, wh icll increases with the
continuous use of spirits. The
conclusion was that alcohol,
even insniiill doses, is an anes-
thetic, either for a longer or
shorter period. Some illustra
tions briDCOut this fact.
A noted astronomer dtt lared
that e*ery time he took a glass
of wineor beer his work for a
few hours sfter was full of er-
rors and liad to be repeated.
Me had to give up banquets and
dinners in which wine was
served,and announced that he
had found from personal expe-
rience that all use of spirits
was i njuri ous.
In one of the large observa-
tories in 11 lis country, there is a
specific ru le that assistants and
observers must abstain from
spirits, coffee, tea, and tobacco.
This is a recognition of the ac-
tion of alcohol and its injurious
effect onall work requiring ac-
curacy of t hesenses and reason.
In the musical world Sousa's
band and other orchestras illus-
trate this same fact in their
experience. \'c> member is per-
mitted to drink spirits, or even
wine or becjr, and all are requir-
ed to abstain from tobacco and
be abstemious in the use of cof
fee and tea. The reason given
is that these drugs impair hear
ing and the accuracy of the
sense of harmony and melody,
as well as lower the muscular
controlof the fingers and lips.
Familiar examples are be-
coming more and more promi-
nent in the management of
railroads, and the increasing
insistency that all officials and
opciatois in the train service be
total abstainers. Thus every-
where in practical life the ants
thesia of alcohol is recognized,
and becomes more and more
apparent in tlie mistakes and
errors that are traceable to its
i se. Numerous degenerations
constitute a more or less pro
minent symptom in alcoholics.
-'Life and Health."
HE R E'S
AN OPPORTUNITY
that you cannot afford to ose
II You Want To
Economize.
II You Want A
First Class Light.
If You Want To Be
Recognized.
Use The Best Light That Money
Can Buy. I ho Safest and the
Cheapest.
-THE
BEACON
Good Morning!
We Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton Lisle
HOSIERY
They have Mood the test, (live raa
foot Comfort. No seam* t<> rip. Never
become loose or baggy- Tlis slia|>e is
knit in not pressed in.
GUARANTEED (or fineness, style,
superiority of material aiul wutkrnaitsnip.
VbtoloUly ttainleM Will wear 6 month*
without holes, or new ones free.
OUR. SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sen line us $' W " Currency
or postal note, to cover advertising and
shippingcbargO, we will send poll paid.
with written guarantee, backed by a five
million dollar cont| anv, either
3 Pairs of ovir 75c. value
American Silk Hosiery,
or 4 Pairs of our 50c. value
An in .in Cash mere Hosiery,
or 4 P*irs ol our 50c. Value,
American Cotton*Lisle Hosiery
or 6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery.
IJONT DELAYOffer expircswhen
dealer in your locality is selected.
The International Hoisery co.
P. O. Box 224
DAYTON, OHIO. U.S.A
W. A. MATHER
UNDERTAKER
DESIRES to inform Ins fi tends
and the Public I ha I le iiai
just received a complete outfit of
facilities for tlie btlisnPM of an un-
ilerlaker, which pl.irrs him ill B
position to carry out Funerals that
may be entrusted In Ins cure with
system and despatch ; and respect
fully solicits their patronage (i my Prices fust andpiovc thai these
are the veiy lowest for the fust ctflSI
work.
KEROSENE MANTLE
LAMPS and BURNERS
axo recognised a* the
standard Incandes-
cent oil lamps of the
world.
loo.ooo i.n.iie.i
urn. All drllsktrd.
Produces a power-
ful, brilliant white
llKht of 10O candle-
sower. Burns com-
mon coal-oil. nars
only ose erst for sis
soars.
Brighter than gas.
electricity or six or-
dinary lamps at one-
slxtk to onr-lrnih the
eoat.
Made entirely of
brass. For use In
homes, stores, halls
and churches. No
odor, no noise: safe,
simple and clean.
. There If only one
!l Beason. Insist o n
having It.
Home Supply Co.
KANSAS CITY, MO.
For Sale By
Thos. E Nabbie-
14 Christie St., Nassau, N.P.
Special Terms Riven if requested. Write
01 Ssi n t Bad know .;ll about this won-
derful Lamp,
RUMSEY'3 PUMPS
CIST E R N Pumps, Well
I1 ti 111 p s, \Y i 11 (I mill
rumps, Diaphragm Pumps,
House Pumps, Pneumatic
Systems, Spray Pumps, Hy-
draulic Rams, Mine Pumps,
Deep Well Pumps, Electric
Pumps, Cylinder and Valves,
Triplex Power Pumps, Cen-
trifugal Pumps, Waterworks
M,i. hinciy, Rotary Pumps,
Sump Pumps, Fire Pumps,
Air Compressors, Ship Pumps
Pressure Pumps, Boiler Peed
Pumps, Irrigation Pumps,
Hydrants, etc.
Installed under the direct
supervision of II. Mcl'herson
and Brother.
Prices on Application.
II. J. THOMPSON,
Agent.
(THE LJNEN STORE.;
and
J\Q B93) 0UWPQ8
Have Received
The Latest Spring Novelty
THE UEW' "LAVE" \NETS
Guaranteed Untarnishable,
and Washable.
Suitable for Waists, Yokes,
Dresses, Millinerv.
White and Black, White and
Silver, Black and Silver,
While .".nd Gold Ecru and
Gold, Heliotrope and Gold,
Saxe Blue and Gold. Gold
Silver and Crystal Tassels.
White, Cream, and Ecru Pre
tonne Nets, Shadow Nets,
Lace Nets, Overalls, Point
d'Esprit, Pleated Net Rueh
ings.
Washable Marquisettes.
Black and While, Sand and
White, Double Width.
Poplin.
Black Poplin, White Poplin,
double! width.
White Washing Silk.
Silk Crepe, Cotton Crepe.
May 1st, 1915.
FOR
SUMMER SUITS
Palm Beach Cloth
at 3s. yd.
\\M.
Phone 201.
HILTON.
For SALE
A 1.1. "f the buildings (to he
removed] situate on pro
perty in teveaux St. near Shir-
ley St., East. The buildings
ate now occupied by Mr. |og,
T. Dean, lor further par' it u
lais
Apply
L. GILBERT UUIHJCM.
Every Monday
SALE HERE FOR
Boots, Shoes, ^
Collars, Notions,
Don! niiss your chanc. Sold
for small value. Come and
SAVE MONEY.
J. K. AMOURT.
ilay Street.
Williams' Shoes Ape Better


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